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 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: 10-19-2007
Copyright Date: 2007
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
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System ID: UF00089928:00317

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F anklin


Chronicle


50o


Sheriff's Office issues warning at Lanarl

Village Water & Sewer District meeting


PHOTO BY RUSSELL ROBE


Major Chester Creamer talks to the crowd in Lanark Village.


I


PHOTO BY CAROL NOBLE


- Workers install water lines
along C.C. Land Road in
k Eastpoint.

Here come
sewer and
water lines

in Eastpoint
BY CAROL NOBLE
.Chronicle Correspondent
When we moved to The
Escape Road, now known as
C.C. Land Road, in Eastpoint
nearly 30 years ago and we were
negotiating the cost of putting in
our septic system our biggest
concern was: If we spend all this
money for a septic tank system,
they won't be coming along with
a sewer next week and telling us
S that our septic has to go, will
they?
The man from the sewer
company said; "My friend, there
will be no sewer here on this
road in your lifetime."
Well, the man either under-
estimated our lifetime or the
speed of civilization because
here we are still alive and here
comes the sewer. Unfortunately,
it is much more than we and
RTS
Continued on Page 12


BY HARRIETT BEACH
Chronicle Correspondent
Major Chester Creamer of
the Franklin County Sheriff's
Office addressed the meeting of
the Lanark Village Water &
Sewer District on Monday,
telling the audience that he and
several deputies were present
and would not tolerate any more
of the violence and outbursts
that have occurred at previous
meetings.
His message apparently had
an impact. The meeting was
peaceful, although at times tense.
Major Creamer assured the
audience the deputies were there
only to protect the people attend-
ing the meeting.
The Water & Sewer District
monthly meeting was brought to
order by Chairman Barbara
Rohrs at 6:30 p.m. in Chillas
Hall, Lanark Village. The regular
meeting came after a budget
workshop, which had begun at
5:15 p.m. In addition to Rohrs,
present were Commissioners
Pauline Sullivan and Sharon


Thoman. Office Manager Carol
Reynolds and District Attorney
Brian Armstrong were also there.
Rohrs opened the regular
meeting by telling the audience
they could only speak at the end
of the agenda. Reynolds then
passed out a printed agenda. The
minutes were silently read and
approved.
Following are the agenda
highlights:
Field Report
The field report was present-
ed by Rohrs. Rohrs reported that
the planned outage to perform a
test of valve isolation took place
Oct. 8. All of the residents
affected were notified. A precau-
tionary boil-water notice was
issued Monday morning for the
small area and rescinded the
next day, after the water sample
results were cleared and results
were received from the laborato-
ry.
Repairs and Maintenance
A new water pump was pur-
chased and installed for the gen-


erator at the vacuum station. The
booster pump at the water plant
was repaired. The aerator at the
treatment plant was repaired.
Eight more sprinklers at the
spray field were repaired.
Fourteen valves were exercised.
Chairman's Report
Rohrs reported that she and
Armstrong had met with
Carrabelle representatives and
that they were notified that the
loan under which a
Lanark/Carrabelle Wat-er &
Sewer District merger could
occur would only be good until
March of 2008. Talks with
Carrabelle are on hold until Jim
Brown recovers from illness so
he can join the talks. The District
needs a new engineer by
November to obtain a permit for
the waste-water treatment plant
to continue to operate. Motion
was made and passed to accept
the chairman's report.
Treasurer's Report
'Thoman reported that there
was $87.82 in the checking


account and $280.64 in cash at
the end of September. In the
September profit & loss state-
ment, $16,846.25 was water
income and $13,696.11 was
sewer income plus fees, late fees
and interest for a total income of
$31,178.79. Expenses totaled
$31,544.28 for a net loss of
$365.49 for September. Sullivan
asked why attorney charges were
not listed on the profit & loss
statement as well as charge card.
amounts. She also questioned
bank charges of $83.80. Without
clarifying the questions, Rohrs
and Thoman-by flipping the
gavel back and forth-made, sec-
onded and passed the motion to
accept the financial report.
Sullivan opposed the motion as
she never received the billing
from Armstrong for legal fees as
she had previously requested.
Unfinished Business
Rohrs, Thoman and
Armstrong discussed the Draft

Continued on Page 2


Lucky fishermen rescued after capsize


BY LAUREL NEWMAN
Chronicle Correspondent
Selina Winchester knew
something was very wrong when
her husband, Dale, and his long-
time friend and fishing partner,
Sean Sullwood, were not home


by 6 a.m. Sunday. it was my birthday and we were
"They go out night fishing planning to go out."
all the time," she, said Monday, Robert "Dale" Winchester
"but they are always back by and Selina run Selina's Day Care
three or four in the morning, in Carrabelle, and he is known in
And I knew he wouldn't be late the community as a dedicated
yesterday," she added, "because family man.


After reporting Dale and
Sean missing, Selina and the
family gathered at C-Quarters
Marina to wait for news.
Meanwhile, the Coast Guard

Continued on Page 3


Chronicle

opens new

Web site
The Franklin Chronicle ann-
ounces today the opening of its
new Web site, www.Franklin
Chronicle.net.
Designed and hosted by a
Franklin County company, 2K
Web Group, the new Web site
will offer headlines from each
week's Chronicle. From time to
time, the Web site will allow the
Chronicle to post information that
is too lengthy to publish in the
newspaper.
The Web site will also allow
readers to contact The Chronicle
staff for information on subscrip-
tions and advertising, and will
give local merchants a new way
to publicize their business. This
may be especially helpful to local
businesses that might attract vis-
itors from across the world, such
as local motels. The site also
allows local organizations to
submit news releases for publica-
tion in The Chronicle.
In addition to rotating dis-
play ads, the website will list
links to local businesses and
attractions. For information on
how to get a link to your business
on The Chronicle site, call adver-
tising representative Guy Mark-
ham at 670-4377.


P~g T4 P~g 4 v Odok.w P.4 6 P 42








Page 2 October 19, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Lanark from Page 1
Action Plan for Lanark Village
Water & Sewer District as pre-
pared for. the Board by
Armstrong in July, 2007. The
plan is as follows:
Background
The Lanark Village Water
and Sewer District is interested
in strengthening its financial
position and potentially expand-
ing water service, and possibly
waste-water service, to areas
within its authorized service area
which are not served.
To strengthen its financial
position without raising the rates
of existing customers, the
District has initiated a Readiness
To Serve charge that is consistent
with charges charged by a num-
ber of other governmental water
and waste-water providers
throughout Florida. The revenue
from these charges has assisted
the District in meeting its rev-
enue requirements, however,
additional revenue is needed on
a going forward basis.
The District currently owns
surplus property, which the
District's engineer repeatedly has
indicated is not now and, based
on current expectations, would
not be needed in the future to
provide water and wastewater
service within the district. A past
board considered the sale of por-
tions of such property to raise
capital necessary to make
improvements to the systems
and to otherwise potentially cre-
ate a rate stabilization fund.
Once such property was
sold, the past Board considered
investigating methods available
to fund the capital cost of
extending water and, potentially,
waste-water lines into additional
areas within the District. In the
past, the District considered a
two-phase water-line extension
approach. The preliminary cost
estimate for each phase was
approximately $400,000 to
$500,000, including cost of
design and construction.
Existing Plant Capacity
The District's engineer has
indicated that the water and
waste-water plants possess the
capacity necessary to serve the
additional areas included within
the District. The District's Con-
sumptive Use Permit authorizes
the District to drill an additional
well, which has not yet been
drilled, that would ensure the
availability of water supply.
The wastewater system uses
sprayfield irrigation for disposal
purposes. The -sprayfield equip-
ment needs additional mainte-
nance and improvement, i.e.,
spray heads cleaned or replaced,
lines fixed, etc. However, the
District engineer has indicated
that there is sufficient acreage at
the spray field to accommodate
additional flows of treated
wastewater should the District
decide to extend wastewater
lines as well as water lines to the
additional areas.
Proposed Plan
The District may consider
the following steps toward main-
taining a strong utility operation:
1. Enforce collection of
Readiness To Serve charges from
all customers.
2. Secure assistance from
Florida Rural Water Association
for rate review analysis including
monthly service rates and con-
nection charges.
3. Pursue sale of surplus
property:
A. secure engineer certifica-
tion of surplus property.


B. prepare bid documents.
C. secure bids.
D. close sale.
4. Use proceeds of sale to
finance capital improvement for
water and waste-water systems
including improvement neces-
sary to comply with outstanding
consent order.
5. Use balance of proceeds
to create a rate stabilization
fund.
6. Pursue investigation of a
regional utility with interested
third parties: this is a govern-
mental utility entity subject to all
rights, privileges and obligations
of a local government.
7. Pursue investigation of
water sales to third parties on a
bulk basis.
8. Investigate impact on
District from expansion of water
and/or waste-water systems.
9. Pursue investigation of
grant/loan financing by federal
and state agencies.
10. If system expansion is
desired, secure engineer prelimi-
nary plans for expansion of
water system and potentially
wastewater system.
11. Consider alternatives for
financing expansion of systems
including sale of additional sur-
plus property, special assess-
ments against benefited property
and debt financing.
12. Initiate system expan-
sion if it is determined to be in
the long term best interest of the
District and its customers.
The Board tabled considera-
tion of Armstrong's plan for the
District until paragraph 4 is
reworded.
The Board discussed multi-
ple hookups as is the situation at
Ho Hum RV Park and Lanark
Plaza. Rohrs talked to Florida
Rural Water Association about
doing a rate study that will
address the multiple rate situa-
tion. Rohrs again announced the
next Budget Workshop will be
held Nov. 5 at 4:30 p.m. in
Chillas Hall. Armstrong said he
wants to draft a waste-water
agreement with Carrabelle.
Motion was made and passed for
a workshop with Carrabelle
about water/waste-water inter-
connections. The agreement is
contingent on engineer approval
and assurance that the intercon-
nections would not damage any
of the existing lines in either sys-
tem. It was suggested that
Armstrong make a draft of a pro-
posed agreement as soon as pos-
sible so that Lanark and
Carrabelle can work cooperative-
ly on a final agreement. Motion
was made and passed by Rohrs
and Thoman for Armstrong to
write a letter to Carrabelle with
his proposal. Sullivan abstained
from the vote as it was not clear
what Armstrong intended to pro-
pose to Carrabelle.
New Business
The Board discussed and a
motion was made and passed to
put a Request For Proposal out
for an engineer for the District.
This is urgent since one is need-
ed for the permitting of the
waste-water plant.
Attorney's Report
Armstrong reported that he
requested that the Readiness to
Serve Litigation be dismissed on
grounds that the suit has no
merit. His request was denied
and the litigation continues with
the completion of discovery
phase. Sullivan asked what were
the items in discovery that were
in question. Armstrong could
not answer her question except
to say that Sullivan did not give


him the information of uneven
application of the Readiness To
Serve fees within the District.
Armstrong challenged Sullivan
to give him more information on
the issue. Rohrs and Thoman
flipped the gavel and made and
passed an unclear motion con-
cerning the litigation.
Armstrong moved on to the
issue of Blue Water Bay water
and sewer line acceptance by the
District. The lines had never
been issued a compliance certifi-
cation. When a certificate of
compliance has been issued then
the District will accept the lines.
Armstrong informed Com-
missioner Sullivan that he is
making an Ethics Commission
complaint that Sullivan violated
the Sunshine Law based on an e-
mail message sent to at least 88
people including the other two
commissioners. The e-mail in
question is an open letter con-
cerning the urgent request that a
District customer's water be
turned on immediately for med-
ical reasons. Armstrong in the
complaint is charging Sullivan
with intended harm to the
District. He claimed to have
sworn affidavits that Sullivan
made statements that she would
harm the District. Rohrs and
Thoman, by flipping the gavel,
made and passed a motion to file
the complaint with the Ethics
Commission. Sullivan abstained.
Rohrs tried to close the
meeting without allowing audi-
ence questions but Barbara
Lasher insisted she had filed the
necessary request to speak at the
proper time. Rohrs gave her three
minutes. Lasher asked Arm-
strong about the incident in
which a laser was reportedly
used to injure an audience mem-
ber's eye during a meeting in
August. Paul Rohrs, Barbara
Rohrs' husband, has been arrest-
ed in connection with the inci-
dent.
Armstrong replied that the
allegation was ridiculous. She
next asked if all the system has
been flushed within the last year.
The answer was parts of the sys-
tem have been flushed. She then
asked about Armstrong's legal
bills to the District. Armstrong
replied the bills were on file
somewhere.
Betty Roberts expressed con-
cern that Lanark would not be
represented if it merged with
Carrabelle.
Jim Bove told the Board that
the District building was in disre-
pair and made the Village look
shabby.
David Adlerstein asked
Armstrong who made the sworn
affidavits and what were the
charges. Armstrong would not
answer the question.
Bob Benson asked if he
could see a balance sheet to date
for the District and pointed out
that the profit/loss statement
presented as the financial report
was not a balance sheet. Carol
Reynolds said she would provide
him with copies of the finances
of the year to date.
Lasher asked about a peti-
tion being circulated to dissolve
the District and a possible merg-
er with Carrabelle that was sent
to property owners in the
District by The Concerned
Citizens of Lanark Village.
Armstrong dismissed the peti-
tion ,and said only he and
LVW&SD Board members
could make any contact or hold
any talks with Carrabelle con-
cerning a merger. Rohrs
adjourned the meeting at 7 p.m.


*.Sl -


Fri
10/19




83/64
A few thun-
derstorms
possible.
Highs in the
loW 80s and
lows in the
mid 60s.

Sunrise:
7:44 AM
Sunset:
7:05 PM


Sat-
10/20




83/64
Abundant
sunshine.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
mid 60s.


Sunrise:
7:44 AM
Sunset:
7:04 PM


Sun
10/21


85/70
Mostly
sunny.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
low 70s.


Sunrise:
7:45 AM
Sunset:


Mon
10/22




83/66
Times of
sun and
clouds.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
mid 60s.

Sunrise:
7:46 AM
Sunset:
7.-n3 Dha.


Tue
10/23

/* -
-A \

80/63
Isolated
thunder-
storms.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.

Sunrise:
7:46 AM
Sunset:
7-0n1 oM


Florida At A Glance


Jacksonville
85'70


Tampa
90 74


Area Cities
82 tTr~


Clearwater 89 74 t-storm
Crestview 83 54 t-storm
Daytona Beach 88 72 t-storm
Fort Lauderdale 88 81 t-storm
Fort Myers 90 75 t-storm
Gainesville 82 68 t-storm
Hollywood 89 78 t-storm
Jacksonville 85 70 t-storm
Key West 88 82 t-storm
Lady Lake 88 71 t-storm
Lake City 83 64 t-storm
Madison 82 62 t-storm
Melbourne 89 77 t-storm
Miami 88 78 t-storm
N Smyrna Beach 88 73 t-storm

National Cities


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


52 t-storm
62 rain
49 rain
58 sunny
44 sunny
59 sunny
59. ptsunny
78 t-storm


ucala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Plant City
Pompano Beachi
Port Charlotte
Saint Augustine
Saint Petersburg
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Venice
W Palm Beach


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


ct-sLCo


69 t-storm
73 t-storm
62 t-storm
61 t-storm
72 t-storm
78 t-storm
73 t-storm
70 t-storm
77 t-storm
75 t-storm
61 t-storm
74 t-storm
73 t-storm
74 t-storm
-77 t-storm


rain
rain
sunny
rain
rain
rain
t-storm


Moon Phases






New First Full Last
Oct 11 Oct 19 Oct 26 Nov 1


UV Index
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
10/19 10/20 10/21 10/22 10/23
6 1 7 7 6 .7.
High High High High High


The UV Index is measured on a 0 11 number scale, 0
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.


I


OU


I


I it H L Cnd


I cty i oCod


-~11











The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


October 19, 2007 Page 3


Roundup of FWC activity in Franklin /


Officers Travis Huckeba, Percy Cook and
Mike Slotin received a call from dispatch regard-
ing two commercial oyster vessels that sank on
Dry Bar in Apalachicola Bay on Oct. 2, late in the
afternoon. The officers were informed that four
persons were in knee-deep water and needed assis-
tance. The officers arrived on scene and safely
recovered the four stranded subjects. Officer Slotin
conducted a boating accident investigation and
determined that rough sea conditions and vessel
overloading contributed to the two vessels sinking.

Illegal net seized

On Oct. 2, Officers Travis Huckeba, Percy
Cook and Mike Slotin received information that
two subjects were fishing a monofilament gill net
near Yents Bayou in Apalachicola Bay. The offi-
cers set up a surveillance position in the area and
made two felony net limitation arrests and six mis-
demeanor arrests. Approximately 300 yards of ille-
gal monofilament net was seized along with
approximately 200 pounds of fish.


Fisherman from Page 1

station in Alabama was designat-
ed- to conduct the search,
because of the weather condi-
tions that had come up in the
night and the area where the
men were believed to have gone
fishing. Winchester and Sull-
wood had indeed gone fishing at
one of their usual places, near
"S" tower, about 10-12 miles
south of Dog Island, in about 75
feet of water.
"We were fishing as usual,"
Sullwood said later, "when the
wind came up, and started blow-
ing pretty hard. It must have
been about 11 p.m. when we
decided to head back in."
The two men, in a 20-foot
Cobia, found themselves in high
waves within minutes, estimated
by Winchester at between 7-8
feet.
"They kept getting worse,"
Sullwood said, "surrounding us
like walls of white water."
Later estimates say the
waves may have been as high as
10-12 feet.
The high water soon started
coming over the bow, gradually
filling the boat with water while
Sullwood bailed and Winchester
drove, attempting to make way
in the heavy seas. Finally,
Winchester said, "A big one
came over the bow, filling the
boat, and it started to go down.
The next one flipped it over, and
we were in the water."
Getting their life jackets on,
the men held onto the over-
turned boat, climbing on the hull
and holding on.
"The waves kept knocking
us off the boat," Sullwood said,


Boating accident

On Oct. 3, Officer Charlie Wood responded to
a vessel accident that
occurred the day
before inside the
Eastpoint breakwater.
The accident
involved a 10-foot
vessel striking a
moored 22-foot com-
mercial oyster vessel.
The operator of the
smaller vessel fled the

NkW4 ts FWQ scene after the acci-
dent. After the initial.
investigation, Officer
Wood identified and
located the operator of the smaller vessel and
secured a statement. The operator was issued cita-
tions for careless operation, failure to contact the
owner of an unoccupied vessel, and leaving the
scene of an accident with over $2,000 in damage.


"but we kept climbing on and
holding on with arms, legs, as
best we could."
The men were tempted to
try and swim for the tower, but
eventually decided to stay with
the boat to improve their chances
of being found. At some point in
the night, Winchester felt the'
direction of the boat shift, and
told Sullwood, "We're moving in
a different direction; I think the
current has shifted."
Later in the morning, they
began to see planes in the dis-
tance, so Sullwood dove under
the boat for the flare kit and
other items, which they began to
throw out in their wake. "Like a
trail of bread crumbs in the for-
est," he said.







AS, o44 #U **-





Otd 0"k.PO."

-Dale Winchester



At one point, a plane passed
by; "I think it was a jet, but it was
too far away to tell," Winchester
said. Another plane passed clos-
er, and they shot three flares,
hoping to be seen. After three or
four" hours passed, the men's
hopes for rescue were beginning
to fade when they saw another
plane that appeared to be cir-
cling. "We waited until it was
close," Sullwood said, "and fired


off the last two flares."
This time it was a Coast
Guard search plane, which
acknowledged the two men
clinging to the overturned boat
with a wave of its wings, and by
dropping an emergency pack
with water, first-aid supplies, and
a flotation device. The plane
remained in the area after relay-
ing their location, and they dis-
covered later that the plane's
crew had spotted a cooler the
two fishermen had ejected, and
adjusted the search area based
on the cooler's location. The
men were found about 70 miles
southwest of the original search
area.
At about 4:30 p.m. Sunday,
the Fish and Wildlife Commis-
sion's vessel JJ Brown reached
the location and picked up the
men. "I didn't know how weak I
really was until I got on that
deck," Sullwood said. "It felt
great to be safe."
Back at C-Quarters, where
family and friends were follow-
ing the search by radio, they
heard the happy news that both
men were safely on board and on
the way home. '
"That was such a feeling,"
Selina said. "I don't know how I
could have told my little boys
their daddy was lost at sea."
Later, Carrabelle Police
Officer C.J. Roberts escorted the
family to the Coast Guard dock
where the families we re-united.
"It's just such a good feeling
to be home again, safe with my
wonderful family and friends,"
Dale Winchester said, and his
friend agreed. Happy endings are
the best of all.


The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of
$650,222.21 at their October 16, 2007 meeting. The bills are listed as
follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Office.


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40045
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40049
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40052
10057
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GENERAL BAK ACCOUNT
FUND RRCAP:
FUND DSSCRIPFTION
---- ----- ---- ------ -------- -
001 GENERAL FUND
120 r,- r' i.' O-ORPEIT3RE
130 [1 'r'I"1 VOVELOPMEN7 PFUD
137 rpA,.L.'il '-0 PUBLIC LIBRARY
139 rAL F,'._'T TRUST FUND
140 ROAD .', BRIDGE
141 LOGT -: '. PAVING
142 MOSOUITO CONTROL
143 BOATING '-,0 '1V*i lT ?r..nlD
160 1. S. B .- -!F 1 .':. .
1G3 ENHANCED 911 FUNDI
170 AIRPORT FUND
150 APIO'D.HOUSING ASSIST TRUST
305 PRAKKLCIN CWONTY RECYCLING
TOTAi, ALL FUNDSS


.0/16/07
1.o/16/07
10/16/07
10/16/07
10/16/07
10/16/07
10/16/07
10/16/.07
10 Q6/07
10/16/07
7O016/o7
10/16/07
10/16/07
10/16/07
10/16/07
10/16/07
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10/16/07
10/16/07
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10/16i/07









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' s:,' 16."07
10] 161i7
tO/I,6's 1


FRANlBKIN COUmrrY
0L54R-V06. 74 PAGE 1


AMOUNT


500A00
9,728.00
38.19
100.55
5,454.74
235. 0
3,415.30
605.91
2,033.33
92.60
5,041.04
323.46
134.64
862.30
2,060.00
14,195.99
754.99
8,968.45
450.00
612.50
520-62
243.50
300.00
4,098 12
2. 1i5 1l
365,21
434.00
1,508.76
143,49
14.08
3,987-00
41',23.19
103..00
206.10
$1.50
3,044.35
23-94
292.50
1,059.36
298.00
10,000.00
830.32
S,989,62
1,307,71
1,273,39
-957.00
479.76
660,00
69.00
44.00
45,782.75
14,105.00
15,470.00
54.64
15,00



3 ?7.66
35.51

554. 00
450.00
5,022.00
5,235.00
54.00
..23? 64


2.291? 2:
295 58
33"' 20
375.00
420.00
1,188.00
497,63
166.00
5,707.90
3,420.00
25,898.17
5,514.10
295.75
351.88
223.08
79.20
3,390.19
35.00
260.00
5;000.00
60.597 6
567. 1
1, 126.55
17, i.i. 9
60.66
6.79
23.30
1,577.60
1.743.00
4,012.00
2i.53
29.06
550.00
-,825.27
650,222.21


rISBURIsME4TS

447;279.63
16,290.92
9.665.30
5,234-50
11,728.67
7,622.58
5,719.50
1,234.442
6.450.00
63, 114.19
3,126.67
659.88
6.498.49
65,597.46
650,222.21


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Page 4 October 19, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Two down and 50 to go
Welcome to the second edition of the new weekly Franklin
Chronicle.
It's a work in progress.
I was telling someone last week that the first redesigned Chronicle,
which we unveiled last week, is not an ending, but a beginning. I con-
sider this to be a 52-step process, and we plan to take a step forward
each week for the next year. Each week, we'll assess where we're at
and see what we can do better. Of course, with any newspaper, the
easy part is knowing what you want to
do; the hard part is finding the time,
staff and money to do it.
S Still, we're trying to do as much as
we can. If you have any thoughts about
features you'd like to see added to The
Chronicle, send me an e-mail at
news@franklinchronicle.net with your
suggestion. I can't promise to do every-
thing you want, but I do promise to con-
TIL sider it and do what's practical. Already,
your feedback is helping. Last week, I
By Russell Roberts heard from two readers who wanted to
see us add a weekly Sudoku to our line-
up. I'm aware that Sudoku is a popular
feature in many newspapers, but I've always felt skittish about pub-
lishing a feature that I can't even pronounce. But those two readers
helped me overcome my reluctance, and this week we've added
Sudoku.
You'll also notice a few other new columns: Be Jane, a feature on
home improvement projects; and Earth Talk, a primer on selected
environmental issues. More will be coming.
SAnother development in the evolution of The Chronicle comes not
on our pages, but on the Web. With the help of 2K Web Group of
Apalachicola, we've opened up www.FranklinChronicle.net, a Web
site where we'll post headlines each week. Frankly, I've never much
enjoyed reading news online. I like to hold my newspaper in my
hands. And many Web sites are too cluttered with blinking ads that
drive me crazy. But 2K Web Group has done a good job of develop-
ing a Web site that looks clean and uncluttered. We have space for
two ads and links, but I hope to keep the Web site's clean look.
Let me repeat.this week that if you have a knack for writing and
a~91attral' tii~ositaboiiut'ings, we'd love to have you join our list of
-citizn-j6itiialists. Theeis e'iit' tiuch money involved, but you could
have the satisfaction of knowing your work is making a difference in
the community. If you'd like to join us, e-mail me at
news@franklinchronicle.net.
So there you have it; week two of the new Franklin Chronicle. We
hope you like it.
N I


He called me 100% American


"So what nationality are you anyway?" I
asked my locally grown little helper over at Hobo's
Ice Cream Parlor-a little business over in
Carrabelle that I once owned.
"What do you mean?" he asked.
"I mean where
were your grandpar-
ents born?"
"They were born
in Carrabelle."
"Well then how


about your great
grandparents?"
"I don't know,
Carrabelle, I guess."
"No. What I'm
trying to find out is
what nationality you
are. You know, like
what country in


By Richard E. Noble


Europe your ancestors came from."
"None of my family has ever been to Europe
as far as I know."
"They had to come from someplace. Nobody
in America comes from America originally. Even
the Indians came from someplace else. You're
name sounds to me like it could be Irish or maybe
English."
"Listen," the boy said getting a little annoyed.
"I'm American, my mother and father are
Americans, my parents and great grandparents are
all American as far as I know. I don't even know
anybody who's Irish. I wouldn't know an "Irish" if
he walked in that door right now. I don't know
where the heck you come from but we're all
Americans here and that's it!"
I laughed, but it made me think about my old
neighborhood. In that neighborhood everybody
knew everybody else's nationality. Even today
when I talk to an old buddy invariably in our con-
versation one of us will ask; "Yeah Jack Greco,
was he Italian, Syrian, Greek or what?" Here in
this community a kid doesn't know an Irishman
from a German. Is that good or bad?
The very next day this old buck walks in the
door and starts chattering away. The first thing I
notice is that he has a foreign accent.
I ask him, "Where are you from?"
He says, "Carrabelle."
Oh no, not this again, I say to myself.
"No, you didn't get an accent like that from
being born in Carrabelle. I know what Carrabelle
sounds like and you ain't it."
The man laughed, "No originally I'm from
Poland."
"No kidding? I'm Polish too."
"Pardon me?"


"Well, I've never been to Poland but my
grandmother on my mother's side was from
Poland and her husband was too."
The man stood there staring at me for a long
while. Then he smiled and said.
"Let me tell you something. I was born and
raised in Poland. I lived there for 40 years. Finally
I was lucky enough to be allowed to come over
here to this country. I know Poland and I know
Polish people. You are not Polish."
"I'm not? Well when my grandmother finds
this out she is going to be very disappointed."
"I doubt that very much," added the old man.
"If I know anything about your grandmother and
I think I do, she came over here to become an
American. Her children were born here and that
makes them Americans. You were born here of
American parents and that makes you a double
American. Son, take my word on this, you are 100
percent American. If you leave Carrabelle and
travel to any country in the world as soon as you
open your mouth those people will know that you
are American. You have got American in your
blood; it is written all over your face. It is in the
way you walk, the way you talk, the way you act,
the things you believe. It is your attitude, your
style, your manner, your custom-it is everything
about you. I know Polish and I know American,
believe me you are American. You can not be any-
thing else--even if you want to be. You are
SAmerican through and through."
After the old man left I began thinking. It was
kind of peculiar. I was born and raised in this
country but in all of my life living here, no one had
ever before called me an American. I have been
called a lot of other things but never an
American-and certainly never has anyone ever
said that I was a one hundred percent American.
And when finally someone does call me an
American it is a guy with a foreign accent from
Poland.
And in addition to all that, unless I was read-
ing this guy wrong, he thought that my being a
"100 percent American" was a good thing and riot
a bad one.
I don't know which of those two revelations is
the more shocking-that I am a "100 percent
American" or that someone in this world today
thinks that being an American is actually "a good
thing."
Richard E. Noble has been an "Eastpointer"for around
30 years now. He has authored two books: 'A Summer
with Charlie, which is currently listed on Amazon. corn,
and "Hobo-ing America," which should be listed on
Amazon in the not too distant future. Most recently he
completed his first novel "Honor Thy Father and Thy
Mother," which will be published soon.


POST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
Office: 850-670-4377
Fax: 877-423-4964
E-Mail: info@franklinchronicle.net
Volume 16, Number 22 October 19, 2007
Publisher & Editor
Russell Roberts
Computer Graphic Designer
Diane Beauvais Dyal
Writers
Skip Frink, Richard E. Noble, Carol Noble, Tom Loughridge,
Laurel Newman, Harriett Beach
Circulation Associates
Jerry Weber, Tom Loughridge, Rick Lasher
Advertising Sales
Guy Markham
History
Tom W. Hoffer started the Franklin Chronicle in 1991 in Tallahassee after
retiring from FSU as a communications professor. Editor Brian Goercke
worked with the Chronicle for four years, then left to join the Peace Corps in
Africa. Computer Graphic Designer, Diane Dyal, joined the staff in 1996 and
then a short three years later her husband, Andy, became Circulation Director
(and later Director of Operations). Tom Hoffer moved The Chronicle to
Eastpoint at the end of 2002. He built two duplexes on the property. And local
writers joined the staff. On December 9, 2006 he passed away, but the
Chronicle still goes on with some new staff members.
Subscriptions
Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to The Chronicle
in writing. In-county subscriptions are $22.00 a year; out-of-
county subscriptions are $29.00 a year.
To Submit News and Ads
Submit news and ads to info@franklinchronicle.net or to P.O. Box
590, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Deadline is Monday at noon for that
.week's issue.
All contents Copyright 2007
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


October 19, 2007 Page 5


Boyd Report

Congressman Allen Boyd reflects on trip to Iraq


BY ALLEN BOYD
Recently, I had the opportu-
nity to lead a bipartisan congres-
sional delegation (CODEL) to
Iraq to meet with our troops and
get a firsthand look at our mili-
tary operations and Iraqi securi-
ty, political, and economic con-
ditions.
As someone who has worn
the uniform in Vietnam, I
thought it was important for me
to get on the ground and talk
with our soldiers, our generals,
and the Iraqi leaders about the
obstacles and opportunities con-
fronting our men and women in
uniform and the Iraqi govern-
ment. I had many reflections fol-
lowing the CODEL to the
Middle East, and while I am
more convinced than ever that
our troops are performing at the
top of their game, this trip also
confirmed my belief that we
must require the Iraqi govern-
ment to step up and provide
security for their own country.
Flying into theatre on a C-
130 with American soldiers
going into combat brought back
many memories for me of my
experience in Vietnam almost.40
years ago. I was buoyed by the
enthusiasm of these young men
and women, and seeing the out-
standing work they are doing
under very difficult circum-
stances brought me face-to-face
with why America is the greatest
country in the world. I was
encouraged to find that the
morale amongst our troops is
very high, and the developments
we have made in Iraq are due to
the strength and the dedication


." . . ...;.
Polk.


-- ';.




I .


Rep. Allen Boyd listens to General David Petraeus talk about the mission.


of our military.
This trip reinforced my
belief that our problems in Iraq
do not lie with our military; they
lie with our policy and with the
Iraqis themselves. This was evi-
dent while I was touring a mar-
ket place in the Rashid district of
southern Baghdad, an area that
is still known to be very danger-
ous and violent. Our soldiers, in
many cases, are out on the front-
lines literally policing the streets
of Baghdad and refereeing a civil
war in Iraq. Our troops are per-
forming a function that is typi-
cally left up to local police and is
not a standard military role, and






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it is certainly not a sustainable
long term role for our military.
After the market place tour,
the CODEL met with General
David Petraeus and Ambassador
to Iraq Ryan Crocker. I could not
have been more impressed with
these two men, and there is no
doubt that they are the best and
the brightest. General Petraeus
candidly addressed my concerns
that our military is acting as a
police force in Iraq. General
Petraeus explained that while we
have had some success in train-
ing individual Iraqi security
forces, the Iraqi government has
been unable to develop the infra-
structure and logistical support
necessary to manage and organ-
ize these forces. Iraqi Prime
Minister Nouri Al-Maliki reiter-
ated this concern and admitted
to our group that the Iraqi gov-
ernment is having a very difficult
time organizing a functional gov-
ernment due to the conflicts
between the political sects and
the inherent tribal nature of the


Iraqi people. These assessments
and my own observations have
reinforced for me that it is not
possible for our country to solve
Iraq's internal and sectarian dif-
ferences-differences that have
plagued their people for over a
thousand years and differences
that they seem no. closer to
resolving.
The most troubling reports
from this trip are the strain that
our continuing conflict in Iraq
has had on our military readi-
ness. General Petraeus acknowl-
edged his concerns that our mili-
tary forces have been stretched
thin by current operations in Iraq
and that currently we would be
unable to respond to another
serious conflict if we needed to
do so.
This disturbing fact was con-
firmed at every stop I made and
echoed by every soldier I met.
Our country is making a
major investment in Iraq, not
only in U.S. casualties and
injuries, but also in taxpayer dol-


lars to the tune of $2:5 billion a
week. The Administration must
rethink how we are using our
resources,and our assets so that
we can fight terror more effec-
tively, and we must require the
Iraqi people to provide their own
security on the ground. Also, this
Administration must recognize
that our conflict in Iraq has
extended our military in a way
that could be seriously detrimen-
tal to our country's national
security interests.
Additionally, this Adminis-
tration has not put enough
emphasis on the diplomacy and
political persuasion necessary to
achieve stability in Iraq. The U.S.
State Department must engage
in robust diplomacy with Iraq's
neighbors in the Middle East to
address the Iraq conflict. Iraq's
neighbors have a substantial
stake in Iraq's future, and by
engaging these countries and
opening up avenues of diploma-
cy, we can lead a collective effort
to bring stability to the region.
There are no perfect solu-
tions in Iraq, but we can address
the challenges we face if we do
so together as Americans, not as
Democrats or Republicans. For
this reason, our CODEL includ-
ed Democratic and Republican
members of Congress so that we
can. foster a biprtisan dialogue
,to deal with our ips,t: difficult
and pressing foreign policy issue.
We all agree that bipartisan-
ship equals progress, and we will
only be able to resolve the situa-
tion in Iraq if we find areas of
common ground and work
together. It is my sincere hope
that this bipartisan CODEL and
similar efforts to promote bipar-
tisanship in Washington will
begin a new era in which
Congress can join together to put
pressure on this Administration
to turn control of Iraq to the
Iraqis, bring our troops home,
and develop a long term strategy
that is in the best interests of our
country.


Franklin County hosts Oyster School


Buyers from the nation's
major oyster retailers were in
Franklin County this week to
attend a first-of-its kind work-
shop aimed at increasing the
quality of fresh Gulf oysters.
The inaugural University of
Florida "Oyster School" pro-
vides key retailers in the U.S.
seafood industry with compre-
hensive and practical training for
marketing raw oysters from har-
vest to table.
The workshop was
Wednesday and Thursday, Oct.
17-18. The school was very
much a hands-on experience for
buyers to learn about the har-
vesting and processing of fresh
oysters, according to organizer
Steve Otwell, a professor with
UF's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS).
Some 20 participants were
scheduled for a demonstration
run aboard a working vessel, a
tour of dockside processing facil-
ities, and classroom time learn-
ing techniques- to evaluate the


taste, texture and appearance of
fresh oysters.
One session focused on post-
harvest processing methods for
fresh oysters that have virtually
eliminated the kinds of bacterial
contaminants responsible for ill-
nesses and deaths formerly asso-
ciated with oyster consumption
by at-risk segments of the public.
"The idea is to teach whole-
sale and retail buyers in the
seafood industry about advance-
ments we've made in methods
that make eating raw oysters
safer," Otwell said.
The school was developed in
cooperation with shellfish
processors in Franklin County,
state and federal regulators,
Florida Sea Grant, a NOAA-
funded program of coastal
research and education affiliated
with UF and IFAS.
"It is one step in our ongo-
ing partnership to improve both
the sustainability of Florida's
oyster fishery and the safety of
the fresh oyster supply," Otwell


said.
In 2004, with the assistance
of 2nd District Congressman
Allen Boyd and the Apalachicola
Bay Oyster Dealers Association,
UF presented another first-of-its-
kind when it opened the nation's
first oyster industry lab in
Apalachicola to certify oyster
products free from bacteria
before entering the marketplace.
The oyster school's novel
curriculum is patterned after
another UF seafood and aqua-
culture food technology pro-
gram, the annual Shrimp School.
Since its creation, Shrimp School
has become the leading academ-
ically based domestic and inter-
national training program for
processors and regulators world-
wide.
Otwell says the Oyster
School will grow in popularity.
"We want to increase the aware-
ness among buyers of how safe it
is to eat Gulf oysters. The more
they buy, the more our state's
oyster industry can expand."


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU













850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.










_ Flu vaccines offered


October 18- 25, 2007
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18
* 4:30 p.m.: Carrabelle Planning and Zoning meeting, 4:30 p.m.
* 5:30 to 8 p.m.: Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce and Gulf Coast Workforce
Board is hosting a Regional After-hours Networking Event at Pirates Tiki Hut
on Timber Island. Organizations from Wakulla, Gulf, Franklin and Leon coin-
ties have been invited.
* 6:30 p.m.: Red Cross training in the Carrabelle Library
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19
* 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Oct. 12 through Saturday, Oct. 20, public radio WKGC
radio annual on-air fundraiser.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20
* 9 a.m..: Red Cross training in the Carrabelle library.
* 1 p.m.: Red Cross training in the Carrabelle library.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21
* 4 p.m.: Dawn Radford will read from her new book Oyster Flats, Trinity
Episcopal Church Benedict Hall.
To list your organization's upcoming meeting in Community Calendar, e-mail
your information to info@FranklinChronicle net. We will also list upcoming
birthdays and anniversaries here free of charge.


Franklin County School Board Chairman Jimmy Gander (middle) and
Wayne Blanton (right) of the Florida School Boards Association presents
Rep. Will Kendrick with the award.

Rep. Kendrick receives Florida
School Board Association award


Wayne Blanton, Executive Director
of the Florida School Boards Associa-
tion, was on hand at the regular Franklin
County School Board meeting on
Thursday, Oct. 4th, to present Rep. Will
Kendrick (R-Carrabelle) with the
Association's Legislator of the Year
Award.
The award was presented to Rep.
Kendrick for his continued support of
educational issues and taking a stance on
providing school districts with the tools
needed to offer every child the best possi-
ble education.
"This award goes to the heart of the
future of this state, our children. I am
pleased to receive this recognition," said
Rep. Kendrick.
In the 2007 Legislative Session,
Kendrick was successful in passing HB
511, School District Flexibility, legisla-
tion that will provide school districts with
flexibility in using the 2-mill levy in local
property taxes to offset the rising costs of
property and casualty insurance.
This legislation is a victory for school
districts across the state and is especially
important to the rural counties that Rep.
Kendrick serves. Dollars that would typi-
cally be used for insurance costs will be
available for educational purposes and


benefit all children.
In addition, Kendrick led the charge
in career education legislation that allows
students to go for certification in a job
skill while in high school as opposed to
attaining higher academic levels.
"We are pleased to present Repre-
sentative Kendrick with this Legislator of
the Year Award because of his hard work
representing School Board members,
teachers, and most importantly students
throughout the state of Florida," Blanton
said.
In his fourth and final term in the
Florida House of Representatives, Rep.
Kendrick serves on the Committee on K-
12 and continues to work to maintain
educational dollars to meet the growing
needs of school districts and to provide
teachers with materials and resources
that best reach every child's potential and
achieve paramount academic perform-
ance.
"There is no greater resource than
our children. In order to produce future
leaders of our state, to sustain a viable
economy, and to preserve the environ-
ment as we know it, it is necessary that
we provide the best possible educational
experience that we can," Kendrick said.


The Franklin County
Health Department has
received its shipment of flu
vaccine and is offering it at
various locations.
In Carrabelle, vaccines
are offered Monday
through Thursday, 8 a.m.
to noon at the Health
Depart-ment. In
Apalachicola, vaccines are
offered Monday through
Friday from 8 a.m. to noon
at the Health Department.
They will be offered until
the supply is gone, which
may be about a month.
Other times and loca-
tions are:


Franklin County
Senior Citizen Center in
Carrabelle, 10 a.m. to 1
p.m., Oct. 18;
St. George Island
Methodist Church, 1 to 4
p.m., Oct. 26;
Chillas Hall in
Lanark Village, 8:30 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m., Nov. 9.
Medicare will cover
the cost of the flu and
pneumonia vaccine, which
is payable at time of serv-
ice. The cost is $25 for the
flu and $45 for pneumonia
vaccine. Vaccinations are
recommended for the eld-
erly, those with long-term


health problems, weak-
ened immune systems,
muscle or nerve disorders,
pregnant women, on long-
term aspirin therapy, resi-
dents of nursing homes or
other chronic-care facili-
ties, health-care workers
and care givers.
Also, vaccinations are
recommended for all chil-
dren 6 months to 5 years.
The flu vaccine for chil-
dren has arrived and is
available either through
your private medical
provider or the Health
Department.


CARRABELLE REALTY, INC.
P.O. Drawer 708 Carrabelle, FL

1 (850) 697-2181 1 (800) 530-1473

Ruby J. Litton, Broker 850-528-1101
Dale Millender, Realtor Associate 850-519-7048












This home has 6.5 acres that can be Golf Course: Prestigious lot on the 9th
divided, 3BR/2BA, fireplace, wood & tile tee, corner lot, reduced to $299,000
floors, enclosed garage, separate large owner/agent.
workshop. MAKE OFFER! Asking
$345,000, appraised at $395,000-
$50,000 equity. A great investment to
have a home and sell off some.
acreage!

NEW LISTINGS:
Beach lot in private area, 50'x100', $895,000.
One acre on Harbor Rd., high & dry, $89,900.
*44 acre parcels in Pine Coast Plantation, $225,000.
1.97 acre homesite, cleared, Baywood Estates, $98,900.
0 *10 acres in Riverbend Plantation, $225,000.
2.53 acres with large pond, Baywood Estates, $164,900.
*8 acres Riverbend Plantation, approximately'00' Crooked
River, $349,000.
*2.2 acres Creekfront, Victorian Village, shared dock,
$395,500.
*1-1/2 city lots with riverview, $225,000.
*Bayfront, 50x162, $324,500.
Riverview, 2BR/1BA, TWO LOTS, fenced front yard, needs
a little TLC, $165,000.
Great Weekend Retreat, close to water, 2BR/1BA Cottage,
$118,200.00.
Two Lots, near bay on Carolina Street, has old MH on it (AS
IS), asking $160,000.

OWNER FINANCING WITH 10% DOWN AND 7% INTEREST.




The Fraklin Chonicle s9
now* availbeI nside' akistIi't,

^^Kickstone & Newman Books at

86 Tallahassee t. in Carrabell


Page 6 October 19, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


October 19, 2007 Page-7


Franklin TDC embarks on national

marketing program for tourism


The Franklin County Tour-
ist Development Council has
announced that Geiger &
Associates Public Relations,
Inc., a Tallahassee-based public
relations and destination market-
ing firm, has been selected to
implement a national media
marketing initiative for the coun-
ty.
The firm will promote
Franklin County and attract visi-
tors who will appreciate our nat-
ural and cultural resources, said


Paul Parker, chairman of the
Franklin County TDC. The
Franklin County marketing ini-
tiative will highlight the area's
vast natural resources and rare
bio-diversity; the seafood and
charter fishing industries; local
parks, museums, historic sites,
shops, galleries and outdoor
recreation options. A strong
emphasis also will be placed on
the county's year-round appeal
for visitors and relocation
prospects.


Geiger & Associates has spe-
cialized solely within the tourism
"industry since 1985. Currently,
the firm represents some 50 trav-
el industry clients nationwide,
including the states of Michigan,
Oklahoma, Arkansas, Virginia,
New Jersey and Tennessee; as
well as single-county destina-
tions including San Antonio,
Phoenix, Albuquerque, Nash-
ville, Chattanooga, Mobile and
many others.


Now as ow as Pime -1
On a Home Equity Lne of Credit
(currently 6.75% AP)*


Current monthly payment:
Credit Card: $217
Credit Card 2: $188
Credit Card 3: $157
Auto Loan: $364


Total:


$926


One new single payment:
Credit Card: 0
Credit Card 2: 0
Credit Card 3: 0
Auto Loan: 0
Home Equity Payment: $525


[This example is based on an equity line of $35,000 with an APR of 6.75% and a monthly payment of 1.5% of the
outstanding balance.]


If you want to put more money into your pocket every month, now's the time to get
a Superior Home Equity Line. You can consolidate bills, renovate your home, or take
a vacation anything you want. Best of all, we make it easy with no closing costs**,
no application fees and the interest may be tax deductible. Simply.call or visit one
of our friendly offices today.


SUPERIOR BANK
Local. Friendly. Superior.


Altha / 25463 North Main St / 850-762-3417
Apalachicola / 58 4th Street/ 850-653-9828
Blountstown / 20455 West Central Ave. / 850-674-5900
Bristol /10956 NW State Road 20 / 850-643-2221
Carrabelle / 912 Northwest Avenue A / 850-697-5626
Mexico Beach /1202 Highway 98 / 850-648-5060
Panama City / 400 West 23rd Street / 850-763-8500
Port St. Joe / 418 Cecil G. Costin Blvd. / 850-227-1416


www.superiorbank.com I Member FDIC


'The Vall Street Journal Prime Rale s the base rate on corporate loas posed by at east 75% of the nation s 30 larges! banks The WVal Street Journal Prime Rate is subject to change
APR stands for Annual Percentage Rate "Superor BanK pays customary closing costs uo 1to 500 inclutng credit report, flood certification. collateral vluaticn, property report. signing
and recording services To be eligible for $500 waver of closing costs, you must take an inital drawof S10,000 or 100% of the i ne of credit Customary closing costs do not include are
fees, tite insurance premiums, or appraisal fees, if applicable You must pay any difference between actual closing costs and costs paid by Supeior Bank Typical osing costs on an
Equity ine of Credit range between $0 and $1 500 You also pay state taxes if apphcao!e Offer limited to cwner-occuoed, primaP y residences in Alabama. Flonda, and Tennessee
(mobile and manufactured homes are ineligible) vaih combined ioan-to value (including the amount of your new line) of up to 90% based on property inspection or apraisal satsfactory
o Superior Bank Superi Bank must have a first or second en position n your primary single-family residence ai closing. Superior Bank may reauire a title and f td insurance po!:cy
and you must provide eSidence of hazard insurance coverage in an amount aceotable to Superor Bank which is ao least equal to the lesser of loot o the fe0lacemrent uara teed
coverage or the amount of this line plus any other outstanding lines cr loans on the property Consult a tax advisor to determine tax-deducdbdlty of interest


PHOTO BY RUSSELL ROBERTS
Members of the Apalachicola Bay Area Chamber of Commerce
meet on Thursday, Oct. 11, at Apalachicola State Bank in
Eastpoint for a "Business After Hours." The informal gathering
gives an opportunity for Chamber members to meet one another
and enjoy good food and drink away from their offices.

Carrabelle Chamber hosts

regional mixer after-hours


The Carrabelle Chamber of
Commerce and Gulf Coast
Workforce Board are hosting a
Regional After-hours Network-
ing Event on Thursday, October
18th, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at
Pirates Tiki Hut on Timber
Island.
There will be food, enter-
tainment and giveaways.
Organizations from Wak-
ulla, Gulf, Franklin and Leon
counties have been invited to
attend. The Gulf Coast Work-
force Board will have informa-


tion on free classes/training:
CPR, Safe Staff, Supervisory,
Customer Service (a class will be
developed to concentrate on cus-
tomer service for Franklin
County), and Computer Classes
.(Microsoft Word, Excel, Power-
point, Publisher.) Call Sheila
Hauser at 850-251-0445' if you
have questions on the classes.
Chamber officials say this
will be a "great networking
opportunity. for organizations,
businesses and Chamber mem-
bers."


State announces food
safety partnership with UF


Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services Commis-
sioner Charles H. Bronson has
announced that the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services will -work
with the University of Florida,
Institute of .Food and Agricul-
tural Science (IFAS), to develop
and deliver statewide food safety
educational materials and train-
ing for agricultural producers
and workers.
The food .safety partnership
program will enhance the safety
and competitiveness of Florida
specialty crops. The program is
funded by the USDA Specialty
Crop Block Grant in the amount
of $253,000 and will be a multi-
year program. The block grants,
which are funded by Congress
and administered by USDA, can
be used for programs that
enhance .the competitiveness of
specialty crops.
"It is critical to develop and
provide materials, training and
outreach activities, so that pro-
ducers and production personnel
adopt and adhere to good food
safety practices to protect the
public," Bronson said.
The training and materials,
which will be printed in both
English and Spanish, will be pro-
vided statewide by Florida exten-
sion professionals to producers,
field workers, packers and
repackers of fresh fruits and veg-


tables. Currently few materials
exist to' train fai-m.workers in
food safety practices. Food safe-
ty requirements must be clearly
communicated at all levels of
production and handling, Bron-
son said.
To keep Florida specialty
crops competitive, and to ensure
safe consumption, a series of
practices.. must be followed to
prevent and reduce microbial or
chemical contamination. .
The Food Safety Partnership
program will target crops at the
greatest level of production in
Florida-tomatoes, leafy greens,
melons and berries. Florida. is.
the number two producer of
fruits and vegetables in the
nation. Cash receipts for agricul-
ture production in Florida for
2005 were $7.759 billion.
According to USDA data, more
than 45 percent of this amount
was derived from specialty crop
production of fresh fruits and
vegetables.
Bronson said the food safety
training.and educational materi-
als will address safe handling,
production and packing of fruits
and vegetables.
"While this issue is impor-
tant for our growers to remain
competitive in the global market-
place, it is critically important for
the safety of the consuming pub-
lic," Bronson said.


Boyd staff holds hours in

Carrabelle, Apalachicola
A member of Rep. Allen Boyd's (D-North Florida) staff will
be visiting Carrabelle and Apalachicola on the fourth Wednesday of
every month so the people of Franklin County have the opportunity
to discuss issues concerning them.
Congressman Boyd's staff is trained to assist constituents
with a variety of issues relating to various federal agencies.
The hours will be Wednesday, October 24, 9:30 a.m. 11
a.m., Carrabelle City Hall; and 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m. in the Franklin
County Courthouse Commission Room in Apalachicola.


[I -I


,, / / Igf^^Mi^^^^ ^^H^


--I


,,
E'SNDSSS







Page 8 October 19, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Attention Lanark Village Property Owners
Hi, I'm Bill Snyder and I'm the chairman of the Concerned Citizens of Lanark Village. Once again we are asking the Land owners of the Lanark Village Water and Sewer
District to Sign a petition to dissolve the District. We need to dissolve the district in order to merge our system with the city of Carrabelle's. As most of you remember we
were working on this a few months ago and a large number of you signed petitions to dissolve. Our attempt to dissolve our district and merge the two systems failed at that
time. We withdrew our support on that attempt at the last minute because we felt the deal we were being offered was not in the people of Lanark's best interest. At that time
the officials of the city of Carrabelle did not understand how important some of the issues were to our Village, thus we were unable to endorse the deal that Carrabelle pro-
posed in the end. Since then, we have talked to them a great deal, and we all agree that a merger is the only thing that makes sense for both towns.
We have worked out our differences. Carrabelle's officials have proposed, at their last meeting, to work together and make a merger happen. They told the people of Lanark
that if we merge we would be a part of their system. We would be treated the same as their citizens. They said that we would be charged the same as anyone that is outside
of their city limits. They also assured us that we would not lose a few of the key pieces of land that are needed in the Village. They say they will be happy to give us at least
a hundred year lease at a dollar a year for the property that the association uses for boat and RV storage. They will offer the same deal for the two lots that the office trail-
er is situated on. They also agreed that the fire department will.need more land for future expansion and room for training exercises. We have asked that they get three acres
with the same lease agreement. We were told that this would not be a problem.
Please read the petition carefully and if you agree with it, sign it and get it back to us as soon as possible. Everyone whose name appears on a property deed within the
Lanark district can sign.
If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to call 850-697-3189. You can get more information and updates at the following website:
http://www.freewebs.com/lvwsdsaga/. You can e-mail us at lanarkyayhoos@yahoo.com The Concerned Citizens of Lanark Village, 2332 Enabob St., Lanark Village, FL.
32323.


A Carrbelle Merger Makes the Most Cents for the LVWSD Rate Payers
Carrabelle generously offers to work with all of the people, regardless of social status, to provide affordable water and sewer rates, good quality water, protect our natural
resources, and preserve a healthy environment for us to enjoy.
Carrabelle listens to LVWSD concerns and has re-opened communication between the Lanark district and its residents in regards to merging the two water and sewer sys-
tems.
At the most recent Carrabelle city meeting, the Carrabelle board proposed working together to make a merger that would benefit both towns.
LVWSD would be a part of Carrabelle's system and our residents would be treated the same as their citizens. This ensures that the LVWSD rates will remain competi-
tive with neighboring communities.
Carrabelle wants ALL residents to be able to afford water and sewer services, not just the rich.
Carrabelle can refinance the LVWSD debt at a much lower interest rate (perhaps 2.3%) and the state has offered some money to help make this merger work.
Duplicated costs, such as for the trihalomethane problem, will-be eliminated.
LVWSD rate payers would be charged the same as anyone that lives outside of the Carrabelle city limits.
The ready-to-serve fees that many Lanark landowners are being forced to pay, even though they don't have a connection, will stop.
LVWSD can keep the key pieces of land that they need, such as the boat and RV storage area that the Lanark Village Association uses, and the two lots that the office
trailer is situated on. This can be done through at least a hundred year lease at a dollar a year.
Carrabelle also agreed that the fire department will need land for future expansion and training exercises. We have been assured that they will get what they need. Three
additional acres are under negotiation with the same lease agreement.
Over time, new sewer lines will decrease the need for costly septic tanks. This promotes a healthier environment for our treasured and irreplaceable Apalachicola Bay
ecosystem.
Franklin County water will remain the property of the people, and not large law firms and international bond buyers.
In sumn,Carrabelle has generously offered to work with all the people, regardless of their social status, to provide affordable water and sewer rates, good quality water,
protect our natural resources, and preserve a healthy environment for us to enjoy.

.Current LVWSD Ratepayer Concerns
LVWSD's 2006-2007 report from Florida Rural Water Association shows an annual short fall of $65,787 and a debt of about $900,000.
The Concerned Citizens of Lanark Village, 2332 Enabob St., Lanark Village, FL 32323.

Let's Merge Our System with Carrabelle's System.

It is the Only Thing That Makes Cents!
* Many unnecessary expenses were incurred during 2006-07. These include over $30K for attorney fees and over $5000 for insurance for one of our district commission-
ers.
* LVWSD's old system needs a major upgrade and is under a DEP consent order to fix a problem with trihalomethane levels that are considered too high.
* Since last year there have been many pipe breaks including at least one that the LVWSD workers could not fix without the assistance of volunteer Carrabelle manage-
ment.
* Money and expertise to redo or upgrade the LVWSD is lacking; the LVWSD Chairperson wants to undertake a $12.87 million improvement plan for future growth. The
rate payers will be expected to foot the bill
* Florida Rural Water Association predicts a 20 year increase in demand, based on Franklin County historical figures and a South Florida growth rate. They forgot the aver-
age age in LVWSD is significantly greater, approximately 61, than other areas, making normal growth estimates, including births, invalid.
* Growth and current expenses will cost the Lanark residents approximately $855,301.76 next year. This includes about $84,000 for a LVSWD manager and another $30K
in legal fees, in addition to our previous debt.
* LVWSD's proposed FY2007-08 budget by Florida Rural Water Association is $855,301.76 (over 100% from FY2006 2007 revenue of $381,981). LVWSD residents
will be asked to pay a combination of significantly higher water and sewer service charges and or ad valorem property taxes, to support the budget.
* The current LVWSD board is inefficient in managing the budget and no checks and balances are in place to ensure that the expenses are appropriate.
* The current LVWSD chair has lost touch with the majority of the people she represents. For example, discussion of anything she does not want to hear is gaveled out and
residents now have no voice.
* We do not have Democracy in regards to the Lanark Water and Sewer District. Two LVWSD commissioners and the office secretary have effectively prevented the third
commissioner from participating in governance of the district.
* In sum, LVWSD still has an old failing system; it still meets conditions as set forth in Section 218.503 for a unit of local government in a state of financial emergency;
and its management is getting worse.

Petition To Dissolve The Lanark Village Water And Sewer District
By signing this petition we agree that we own property within the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District and we wish to dissolve the Lanark Village Water and Sewer
District. We believe that the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District located in Franklin County Florida does not serve the needs of the people, and thus should be dis-
solved.
Signature:_ Lanark Village Property Address: Print:

Signature: Lanark Village Property Address: Print:

Signature: Lanark Village Property Xddress: Print:

if you agree with this petition, please sign it and return it to:
The Concerned Citizens of Lanark Village; P.O. Box 442; Lanark Village, Florida 32323
PAID ADVERTISEMENT BY THE CONCERNED CITIZENS OF LANARK VILLAGE









The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


October 19, 2007 Page 9


A Lanark/Carrabelle Merger Makes The Most Cents For Lanark

Village Water And Sewer District Land Owners And Rate Payers

If the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District remains a stand alone special district, and does not merge with Carrabelle, Lanark's water and
sewer rates will increase dramatically, and all of us will likely be forced to pay ad valorem taxes as high as 2 mills. Below is a comparison that
shows what the rate increases will be under different scenarios as prepared by the Lanark districts engineers. No matter which plan the Lanark
district Commissioners choose, we are all going to have to pay a significantly higher water and sewer bill. LVWSD's proposed budget will go
up over 100% and the residents and property owners will be expected to pay the bill!
THE CONCERNED CITIZENS OF LANARK VILLAGE, 2332 ENABOB ST., LANARK VILLAGE, FL 32323


Florida Rural Water Association
Member Lanark Village Water & Sewer District
Project Rate & Connection Fee Report


Date:
County
PWS:


17-Sep.07
Franklin
4490414


PROPOSED 2008 RATES
with Improvements 0% Grant & 100% Loan


WATER
$48:83
Residential
$2.50
$2.55
$260
$265
$58.68

WASTEWATER
$40 50
Residential
$250
$2.55
$2,60
32.65
$50.55


FY 2007-08 Budget

FY 2006-07 Revenue

FY 2006-07 Shortfall


Base Rate Charged to All Customers
Commercial Monthly Usage Charges
$2 50 0 to 3,000 gallons
$3.05 3,001 to 6000 gal
$3 6 6,001 to 9,000 gal
$4 15 9.001 + gallons Residential
Average Residential Water Bill


Base Rate Chargea to All Customters
Commercial Monthly Usage Charges
$2.50 0 to 3,000 gallons
$3.05 3,001 to 6000 gal
$3 60 6.001 to 9.000 gal
$4 15 9.001 + gallons Resliential
Average Residential Wastewater Bill


$908,451.57


Est. Revenues
$581,144;45








$327.339.23







$908,483.68

100 0%i


$381,981.67 Actual

($526,469.90) 238% Mfir Increase Needed


CURRENT CONNECTION FEES
WATER

Capacity Charges $1,500
(Treatment & Piping)
Connection Fees $350
(Cost to set Meter o Sewer Collection Devices)
Security Deposit

Total Utility Connections $1,850


Total Water & Sewer Connections


WASTEWATER
Gravity Vacu
$2 000 $


um
2,000


$1 500 $3,500


$3,550 $5,550


$5,400


$7,400


Florida Rural Water Association
Member: Lanark Village Water & Sewer District
Project: Rate & Connection Fee Report


Date: 17-Sep07
County: Franklin
PWS: ', 1190414


PROPOSED 2008 RATES
with Improvements 20% Grant & 80% Loan

WATER


te Charged to All Customers
ercial Monthly Usage Charges
50 0 to 3,000 gallons
15 3.001 to 6000 gal
60 6,001 to 9.000 gal
15 9,001 + gallons Residential
Residential Water Bill


te Charged to All Customers
ircial Monthly Usage Charges
5 0 to 3.000 gallons
15 3,001 to 6000 gal
0 6.001 to 9,000 gal
5 9,001 + gallons Residential
Residential Wastewater Bill


282.43


$46.45 Base Ra
Residential Commi
$2.50. $2.5
$2.55 $3.C
$2.60 $3 6
$2.65 $4.1
$58.50 Average

WASTEWATER
$35.00 Base Ra
Residential Comme
$2.50 $2.5
$2.55 $3.C
$2.60 $3 6
$2.65 $4 1
$45.05 Average


FY 2007-08 Budget $855,2

FY2006-07 Revenue $381,f

FY 2006-07 Shortfall (5473,3(

CURRENT CONNECTION FEES


WATER

Capacity Charges $;,5(
(Treatment & Piping)
Connection Fees $3i
(Cost to set Meter or Sewer Collection Devices)
Security Deposit

Total Utility Connections $1,85

Total Water & Sewer Connections


Est. Revenues
$558,751.49








$296,913.23







5855,564.72

100.0%


WASTEWATER
Gravity Vacuum
30,. 1: $,000 $2:000


50


$1,500 $3,500


50 $3,550 $5,550

$5,400 $7.400


Florida Rural Water Association
Member: Lanark Village Water & Sewer District
Project Rate & Connection Fee Report


WASTEWATER
Gravity Vacuum
00 $2,000 $2,000


50


$1.500 $3,500


50 $3,550 $5,550

$5,400 $7,400


Dale
County
PWS


17-Sep.07
Franklin
4180414


PROPOSED 2008 RATES
with Improvements 45% Grant & 55% Loan


WATER
$42 50
Residential
$250
$2.55
$2.60
$2.65
$52.55

WASTEWATER
$33.00
Residential
$250
$2.55
$2 60
$2.65
$43.05


FY 2007-08 Budget


FY 2006-07 Revenue 381

FY 2006-07 Shortfall ($420.21

CURRENT CONNECTION FEES


WATER

Capacity Charges $1,50
(Treatment & Piping)
Connection Fees $35
(Cost to set Meter or Sewer Collection Devices)
Security Deposit

Total Utility Connections $1,8i

Total Water & Sewer Connections


PAID ADVERTISEMENT BY THE CONCERNED CITIZENS OF LANARK VILLAGE


Base Rate Charged to All Customers
Commercial Monthly USage Charges
$2 50 0 to 3,000 gallons
$3 05 3,001 to 6000 gal
53 60 6,001 to 9,000 gal
$4 15 9.001 + gallons Residential
Average Residential Water Bill


Base Rate Charged to All Customers
Commercial Monthly Usage Charges
$2,50 0 to 3,000 gallons
$3.05 3,001 to 6000 gaf
$3 60 6,001 to 9,000 gal
S$4 15 9001 + gallons Residential
Average Residential Wastewater Bill


$802,184.13


EsL Revenues
$518,177.09








$285,849.23







$804,026.32

100.2%'


181.67 Actual

00.76) 224% Min. Increase Needed


Flonda Rural Water Association
MtDlr a Lnarki Village Waeir & Ssew Oldtrl Coon: Ffranin
Project: Ral i Connection Fee Repor PWS: 190414

COMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVES
Average Average
Proposed 2008 Rates Budget Revenue Residential Res ial Total Estimated
WaterBsIII Wate tr Average Bill Intcrease
Bllf
Current Rates & 2008 1,67) 4. 24.0B.00
Budget $24 $48.
Balanced Budget 2008 79 4 27 55
Rates $447.7900 $447,79161 27.30 $2.26 $ 5 9.
Balances Budget wl
Recommended $618,175,17 $619,520,32 $37.55 537 55 S:5'10 56%
Reserves
Proposed Water & SeWer Improvements with 0% Grant &100% Loan
Rates Supporting
Imes rienls eo08,451.57 $908,483,68 $58.68 $50.55 $109.23 128%

I MIL ad valorem ts $908,464.64 $908,53490 $46.30 $40.05 s8.35 80%

2 MIL ..a orems sa $908,452.4s5 908,498.28 $34,45 S28.55 $63,00 31%

Proposed Water & Sewer improvements with 20% Grant & 80% Loan

RI s Suppotng $865,282.43 $856,664.72 $56.50 $45.05 $10 .5S 112%

1 MIL ad valorem tax $855,301.78 $855,986.0 $42.80 $37.05 $79.86 68%

2 MIL ad valorm ta $855 34932 856.779.48 $31,30 525.05 $58.35 17%

Proposed Water & Sewer Improvements vith d5% Grant & 55% Loan
esSupponing $802,184.13 $804,026.32 $52.55 $43.05 $95.60 99%
lmprovments
1 MILad valorem tak $802,084886 $802,36850 $41.35 $30,05 $71.40 49%

2 MIL ad valorem tax $802,208.32 $804.429.48 527.55 $22.55 $50.10 4%


981 67 Actual

02.46) 210% MIn. Increase Needed


I








Page 10 October 19, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle
%


Following is a list of Octo-
ber 9, 2007 dispositions of cases
in Second Circuit Court, Judge
James C. Hankinson presiding:
BANKS, CLAUDE JR:
Charged January 3, 2006 with
sale of substance in lieu of
cocaine. Defendant admitted
being in violation, was found in
violation of probation and adju-
dicated guilty. The defendant
was sentenced to 15 months in
prison with 91 days credit for
time served. Probation revoked
and terminated.
BARRACK, HARVEY S.:
Charged April 9, 2005 with sale
of controlled substance; posses-
sion of controlled substance;
Charged May 21, 2007 with less-
er charge battery of a child; 2
counts contribute to delinquency
of minor. Defendant entered a
plea of no contest and admitted
being in violation of probation.
Defendant was adjudicated
guilty. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 24 months in prison
with credit for time served.
BRAY, JAMES EDWARD:
Charged June 21, 2007 with pos-
session of controlled substance
cocaine; possession of cannabis;
possession drug paraphernalia.
Defendant entered a plea of no
contest. Adjudication withheld
counts 1 & 2; Adjudicated guilty
count 3. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 2 days in jail with 2
days credit for time served; 24
months probation; substance
abuse evaluation and treatment;
no drugs or" alcohol, random
testing; $470 costs.
BROWN, RODNEY:
Charged September 13, 2007
with sale of cocaine. The defen-
dant entered a plea of no con-
test. Adjudication withheld. The
defendant was sentenced to 45
days in jail with 26 days credit
for time served; substance abuse
evaluation and treatment; no
drugs or alcohol, random test-
ing; 24 months probation; $510
costs.
c CAIN, VICTOR WAYNE:
Charged March 3, 2007 with
resisting officer with violence;
driving while license suspended
or revoked; attach improper
license plate. Defendant entered
a plea of no contest. Adjudi-
cation withheld count 1;
Adjudicated guilty counts 2 & 3.
Defendant was sentenced to 2
days in jail with 2 days credit for
time served; 18 months proba-
tion; $410 costs.
COCHMAN, ERVIN JR:
Charged with sale of cocaine
within 1,000 feet of a church.
The defendant entered a plea of
no' contest and was adjudicated
guilty. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 48 months in prison
with 100 days credit for time
served.
CORLEY, ZACKARY
BUCK: Charged September 5,
2007 with possession of con-
trolled substance without pre-
scription. The defendant entered
a plea of no contest.
Adjudication withheld. The
defendant was sentenced to 2
days in jail with 2 days credit for
time served; 24 months proba-
tion; substance abuse evaluation
and treatment; no drugs or alco-
hol, random testing; $560 costs.
COX, STACEY: Charged
August 13, 2007 with aggravated
battery with deadly weapon.
Defendant entered a plea of no


contest to lesser charge disorder-
ly conduct. Adjudication with-
held. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 1 day in jail with 1 day
credit for time served; 6 months
probation; no .contact with vic-
tim; pay restitution; $215 costs.
ESTES, FREDRICK:
Charged September 13, 2007 and
October. 2, 2007 with 3 counts
sale of controlled substance. The
defendant entered a plea of no
contest. Adjudication withheld.
Defendant was sentenced to 45
days in jail with 26 days credit
for time served; substance abuse
evaluation and treatment; no
drugs or alcohol, random test-
ing; 42 months probation; $560
costs. All counts concurrent.
FENN, JAMES A.:
Charged August 14, 2006 with
lewd and lascivious act on a
child; false imprisonment. The
defendant entered a plea of no
contest and Was adjudicated
guilty. Defendant was sentenced
to 447 days in jail with 447 days
credit for time served; 60 months
sex offender probation (concur-
rent); substance abuse evalua-
tion; no alcohol or drugs, ran-
dom testing; GPS monitor; no
contact with victims; $410 costs.
FENN, JAMES A.:
Charged August 14, 2006 with
lewd or lascivious conduct. The
defendant entered a plea of no
contest to the lesser charge of
felony battery. Defendant was
sentenced to 447 days in jail with
447 days credit for time served;
60 months probation (concur-
rent); substance abuse evaluation
and treatment; no drugs or alco-
hol, random testing; no contact
with victims; $410 costs.
FENN, JAMES A.:
Charged June 23, 2006 with bur-
glary of dwelling; criminal mis-
chief $200 to $1,000. The defen-
dant entered a plea of no contest
to lesser charge of trespass and
criminal mischief and was adju-
dicated guilty. Defendant was
sentenced to 11 months, 29 days
in jail with 11 months, 29 days
credit for time served.
FORD, TOMEIKA D.:
Charged July 16, 2006 with
aggravated battery with deadly


weapon; August 26, 2006 with
possession of controlled sub-
stance cocaine. The defendant
admitted being in violation and
was found in violation of proba-
tion. Probation revoked.
Defendant was sentenced to 24
months community control. Any
conditions not met, re-imposed.
Cases concurrent.
FRANKLIN, ANTHONY
CHRISTOPHER: Charged
August 12, 2007 with resisting
officer with violence. The defen-
dant entered a plea of no contest
to lesser charge of resisting offi-
cer without violence. Adjudi-
cation withheld. Defendant was
sentenced to 2 days in jail with 2
days credit for time served; 1
year probation; no alcohol or
drugs, random testing; letters of
apology to officers; 250 hours
community service; $335 costs.
GORDON, VERNON D:
Charged 2 times September 13,
2007 with sale of controlled sub-
stance within 1,000 feet of a
church; Charged with sale of
cocaine. Defendant entered a
plea of no contest and was adju-
dicated guilty. The defendant
was sentenced to 24 months in
prison (all cases concurrent).
HALL, PIERRE JONTUE:
Charged December 4, 2006 with
attempted trafficking in .con-
trolled substance cocaine; sale of.
cocaine. The defendant entered a
plea of no contest and was adju-
dicated guilty. Defendant was
sentenced to 36 months in prison
with 338 days credit for time
served.
HARRINGTON, KIM-
BERLY DIANN: Charged June
21, 2007 with possession of con-
trolled substance cocaine; pos-
session of cannabis; possession
of paraphernalia. The defendant
entered a plea of no contest.
Adjudication withheld count 1 &
2; Adjudicated guilty count 3.
Defendant was sentenced to 2
days in jail with 2 days credit for
time served; 24 months proba-
tion; substance abuse evaluation
and treatment; no drugs or alco-
hol, random testing; $470 costs.
KING, VERNON EARL:


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Charged May 18, 2007 lewd or
lascivious molestation. The
defendant entered a plea of no
contest to lesser charge of
attempted lewd or lascivious
molestation and was adjudicated
guilty. Defendant was sentenced
to 12 years in prison with 144
days credit for time served; deter-
mined to be a sexual predator.
MARTIN, KELVIN A.:
Charged 2 times December 13,
2003 with sale/possession of
controlled substance with intent
to sell within 1,000 feet of a
church; Charged November 1,
2005 with sale of controlled sub-
stance; Charged November 15,
2006 with resisting officer with
violence. The defendant admit-
ted being in violation, was found
in violation of probation and
adjudicated guilty. Defendant
was sentenced to 72 months in
prison with credit for time
served. All cases and counts con-
current. -
MESSER, CAWANNA
MICHELLE: Charged Septem-
ber 14, 2007 with sale of cocaine.
Defendant entered a plea of no
contest. Adjudication withheld.
The defendant was sentenced to
45 days in jail with 26 days cred-
it for time served; 24 months pro-
bation; no drugs or alcohol, ran-
dom testing; substance abuse
evaluation and treatment; $510
costs.
SMOORE, DANIEL E.:
Charged 2 times May 14, 2007
with sexual battery on child
under 12 years of age by defen-
dant under 18 years of age. The
defendant entered a plea of no
contest and was adjudicated
guilty. Defendant was sentenced
to 120 days in jail with 120 days


credit for time served; 60 months
sex offender probation; sex
offender evaluation and treat-
ment; no contact with victim; no
alcohol or drugs, random testing;
curfew 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.; cannot
be around children unsuper-
vised; $510 costs.
PAGE, DONALD DE-
WAYNE: Charged March 22,
2007 with sale of cocaine. The
defendant entered a plea of no
contest and was adjudicated
guilty. Defendant was sentenced
to 60 days in jail with 5 days
credit for time served; 24 months
probation; substance abuse eval-
uation and treatment; no drugs
or alcohol, random testing; $510
costs.
POLK, ANDREW: Char-
ged January 11, 2007 with sale of
controlled substance. The defen-
dant admitted being in violation
and was found in violation of
probation. Defendant was sen-
tenced to 180 days in jail with 62
days credit for time served.
Probation revoked and terminat-
ed.
PORTER, ELIZABETH
BARBER: Charged August 23,
2007 with burglary of a struc-
ture. The defendant entered, a
plea of no contest to the lesser
charge of trespass of structure
and was adjudicated guilty.
Defendant was sentenced to 48
days in jail with 48 days credit
for time served; $335 costs.
PROVENZANO, MICH-
ELE D.: Charged November 15,
2005 with sale of controlled sub-
stance. Defendant entered a plea
of no contest. Adjudication


Continued on Page 13


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


October 19, 2007 Page 11


How to winterize your windows


Dear Jane,
What steps can I take
myself to prep my windows for
the winter and save on my heat-
ing bills?
Thanks, Frannie P.
Dear Frannie,
With the winter about to
blow in, don't spend another
year throwing money out the
window. By sealing your win-
dows before the season hits
you'll keep warmer during those
long winter months and cut
your heating bills
by more than 30%!
Taping and
sealing your win-
dows are inexpen-
sive basics that will
keep you cozy but if
your windows are
especially old you
may want to consid-
er more drastic
measures, such as f
replacing them.
Read on to get the
low down on
whether you should
caulk, seal or look into buying
new windows altogether.
Where to Start
How to winterize your win-
dows depends on what kind of
windows you have. If you live in
an older home, chances are the
windows have not been updat-
ed. You could be living with
100-year old windows, which
may need a bit more extensive
work.
Storm windows are com-
mon in parts of the country with
major winter weather. Replace
your screens with the storm win-
dows when it starts to get chilly,
around October. If your home
doesn't currently have storm
windows, this is an option to
consider especially if you are
not in the market to replace your
windows all together.
Know Your Window
Assess what kind of win-
dows you have. Are they long
and narrow or short and wide?
Do they. open from the top and
the bottom or just the bottom? If
your window opens in two
places it is called a double-hung
window. Because these types of
windows provide the most venti-
lation, they also have the most
significant problems with drafts
and leaks. Windows that open
solely from the bottom are
called single hung. Other types
include swing out windows, hor-
izontal sliding door windows,
slat-piece and pane windows
(windows that don't open). All
are certainly prone to leaks and
drafts, but depending on their
age and condition, the problems
may not be as severe.
If you have to turn a crank
to open your window, you have
a casement window and you are
in luck as these are one of the
most energy-efficient models
around! Wind blowing at the
window only makes it seal to the
frame tighter. However, case-
ment Windows do have disad-
vantages. They are harder to
clean than your run-of-the-mill
window and depending on their
size they can be difficult to
escape' from in the event of a
fire. Consider installing case-
ment windows in rooms where
you spend a lot of time; though
carefully research your building
codes first. Their size and
weight dictates how wide these
windows can be.
The Frame Game
Advances in technology
have dramatically increased
window efficiency within the
last 20 years so it may just be
time to update. The frame of the
window is actually the biggest
culprit in wasting your heated
air, not the glass! If you live in a
cold environment do not install


4


aluminum frames. In fact, you
may want to consider replacing
your existing ones. Many
builders choose aluminum
frames because they're cheap,
but aluminum should be
reserved for warmer climates
only. Fiberglass, wood and vinyl
are better options for colder cli-
mates.
Caulk it Up
Protecting your home from
the bitter winter cold begins
with mending any cracks
around your win-
dow frames and
doors on the both
inside and outside
of your home. If
you discover that
some of your
r. ''"' cracks are already
treated with caulk,
check it carefully.
It may need to be
replaced, which
4, requires that you
remove it with a
scraping tool.
Once it has been
removed, liberally apply remov-
able caulk around fissures sur-
rounding your window and
door frames, wiping away any
excess. Work on a dry day when
the temperature is hovering
above 45 degrees Fahrenheit. If
moisture gets into the caulk it
won't work properly. Use wood
filler to fill in any larger gaps
between the wood siding and
the window frames. For extra
protection, consider painting
over the wood filler with a
weather proof primer and exte-
rior paint.
Weather Stripping
Weather stripping your win-
dows and doors is critical for
keeping your home insulated in
the winter. You can either pick
up weather stripping as a kit at a
local home improvement store,
or buy the materials individual-
ly. What you buy will depend on
your climate and how intensely
you feel like weather stripping.
Vinyl, bronze, aluminum
and felt are just among some of
the many materials used in
weather stripping; it all depends
on your climate and how much
money you have to spend. Ask
your home improvement retailer
what materials they recommend
for your particular climate.
Cover your Windows
If the drafts are strong and
you can't seem to solve the issue,
another extra precaution worth
investigating is covering win-
dows with plastic and shrink
wrapping them by heating the
plastic with a hair dryer. Again,
you can buy a kit to shrink wrap
your windows or do it yourself
with a few basic materials. To do
it yourself, line your window
and frame with heavy-duty dou-
ble sided tape. Stick shrink wrap
(rolls of which can usually be
found in most moving stores) or
plastic wrap (the kind you wrap
leftovers in) and gently warm
the plastic with a hair dryer until
it becomes smooth. (Because it's
going to shrink, make sure to rip
off a little excess.) Move the
dryer back and forth as not to
overheat one portion. You don't
want the plastic to start melting.
Stay Warm
Preparing your windows for
the upcoming season shouldn't
take more than a few hours. The
time you'll spend doing so will
pay for itself many times over in
both your comfort level through-
out the winter as well savings to
your energy bill. So get started
sealing up that drafty home of
yours. That warm feeling won't
be just the heater; it'll be the sat-
isfaction of knowing you are
saving money and energy!
For more information, visit
www.BeJane.com.


I I,
ii


ACROSS
1. Pitcher's miscue
5. "Lemon Tree"
singer Lopez
10. Dirtbags
14. Ready for
business
15. Pine exudation
16. Twistable snack
17. Marked by self-
indulgence
19. Tijuana's locale,
for short
20. Means of escape
21. Place to get
oysters or clams
23. Like some grins
24. Have a bug
25. Marathoner's rate
26. Arborist's skill
31. Satellite's job,
briefly
34. Part of an
interstate
35. Old French coin
36. Cheese in a ball
37. Sunday assents
39. Gives a boost to
40. Cackleberry
41. Light bulb, in
comics
42. Map close-up
43. Doctors
sometimes
engage in it
47. "The doctor "
48. Offbeat
49. "That's all
wrote"
52. Rub elbows
55. Free from
.imperfections
57. Bad way to run
58. Insect
domestication
60. Greedy one's cry
61. Overthrow,
maybe
62. _Nicole Smith
63. Critic's bestowal
64. Bit attachments


American Profile Hometovn Content

65. Oenophile's
concern

DOWN
1. Box office
biggies
2. Boston Marathon
month
3. Smelling a rat
4. "Trick" joint
5. Mrs. Ed Norton
6. Attack verbally
7. any
wonder?"
8. Diarist Anais
9. Fixes indelibly
10. Sign of disuse
11. Native Saudi
12. "It was vu all
over again"
13. Eagles do it
18. Soak up


22. Wile E. Coyote's
.supplier
25. Think ahead
26. Rock's Petty
27. Traction aid
28. Horned goddess
29. Intersection point
30. Sudden burst
31. Cause of
grounding
32. Upper hand
33. Tamer's
workplace
37. Off-the-cuff
comic, e.g.
38. Chow
39. Director Lee
41. _facto
42. The movie
"Wordplay" is one
44. Tricky pitch


071014


45. Accepted, as a
job
46. Thumb twiddlers
49. Perform superbly
50. Reddish brown
dye
51. Award named for
Poe
52. Some Easter
dinners
53. Leave off
54. fide
55. Gilpin of "Frasier"
5. 6: FiP tin ,a5e .si
59. Poetic preposition


Crossword Puzzle Answers on Page 12


Stm aa rot iEd
F dtA
Nojb o malo


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LUNCH BUFFET
Sunday Friday
HOBO'S ICE CREAM
1593 West Highway 98-Carrabelle
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OPEN
Sun. Thurs. 11:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m
Friday & Saturday 11:00 9:00 p.m.
Closed Tuesday


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Page ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ u 12YOcoeo1,207ALCAL WNDNWSAE SthtewFakihoicle


2x2 Rates
Statewide $1200
Regional or National
Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


This photo, date unknown, is identified as "bathing houses on the grounds of the Lanark
Hotel, Lanark Village." The information below the photo states, "The Hotel at Lanark is
lighted with gas, and each room is connected with the office by electric bell. It is also pro-
vided with spring beds, hair mattresses and all modern conveniences. A porch 200 feet in
length and 13 feet wide affords an elegant promenade, and a broad platform 300 feet long
connects the hotel with a spacious dancing pavilion on the beach, and with a pier, at the end
of which is located two large bath houses for ladies and gentlemen respectively, each being
fitted with private dressing rooms for the bathers. A fine fleet of pleasure boats is provided
for the hotel guests and fishing of Lanark cannot be surpassed on the coast. A natural spring
of water within 200 feet of the hotel furnishes a daily supply sufficient for 3,000 people, and
the water after careful examination by the State Chemist and two of the leading physicians
of Tallahassee, has been endorsed by them as being extraordinarily pure, and strongly recom-
mended because of that fact. The cool breezes of the Gulf and the refreshing shade of the
trees make Lanark a very satisfying summer resort, while its equable climate and tempera-
ture render it a very attractive home for the winter. The hotel is open through the year."


Sewer lines from Page 1
many of our neighbors can
afford but here it comes anyway.
Hank Garrett of the East-
point Water-and Sewer said that
if'y6u live'&bY'SC. 'Eand Road in
Eastpoint, you'can "hook up" at
your own expense to either the
water or the sewer. The water
will cost you a $1,900 tap fee;
and the expense for the sewer is
approximately $4,000 to $5,000
because a lift station on your
property is necessary. Hooking
up is optional. The owner is also
responsible for connecting the
water and possibly the sewer
from the home to the road. As
far as he knows there are no
grants or special programs avail-
able at this time or in the imme-
diate future to help defray the
cost.
The contractor for this proj-
ect is Jimmy Crowder. He is lay-
ing nearly 11,000 feet, or approx-
imately two miles, of pipe.
The actual purpose of the
new pipe is to service the new
consolidated Franklin County
School that is under construction
on Highway 98 east of Highway
65.
You can see the school as it
is being built, by tuning in to the
new local TV station. Forgotten
Coast TV is doing a series about
the construction of the new
school on Channel 3.




"Ee-sy"
BALK fR IN CADS
SPEND RES N ORI E
FREE L IVIG BAJA
FI REEX T RAWBAR
SLY A L PACE
TREECL MBING
RECON LANE SOU
EDAM AMENS A I D S

IS N ODD SHE
HOBNOB POL SHED
A M O K B.E:E KE EP N G
MINE ERROR ANNA
STAR REINS YEAR


Stacy's Hair Design

850-670-1772
Hours: Tues-Fri 10-5, after 5 by apt. Sat. 10-until


Stacy Williams,
Stylist
347 Highway 98
P.O. Box 977
Eastpoint, FL 32328


TAKING CARE OF
ALL YOUR HAIR
CARE,
MANICURES,
PEDICURES &
ACRYLICS


850-926-6181
W'Mi M PERFORMANCE SPRAY-ON BED LINERS
WRECK IEcKTM FULL LINE OF
WRC AUTO ACCESSORIES
WWW.MIKESPAINTANDBODY.COM 3140 COASTAL HWY.
VISIT US AT WAKULLA.COM CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327



SCISSOR'S PALACE

& DAY SPA
European Pedicure Spa European Facials
Body Wraps & Waxing Hair Gel Nails
Phone: 850-670-5220
338 Highway 98, Eastpoint, FL 32328
WALK-INS WELCOME o OWNER: ANGELA CREAMER



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S?.C-3 l U. a T


2x4 Rates
Statewide $2400
Regional Placement
also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


F[O 5ALE

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Sudoku Puzzle #80

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9 2 6 1 8 4.

5 7 1

8 64 3

6 5 1 9

7 8


The Franklin Chronicle


Page 12 October 19, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER









The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


October 19, 2007 Page 13


Second Circuit Court Report
from Page 10
withheld. The defendant was
sentenced to 17 days in jail with
17 days credit for time served; 24
months probation; Substance
abuse evaluation and treatment;
no alcohol or drugs, random test-
ing; $510 costs.
RAFFIELD, ASHLEY
RONALD: Charged July 19,
2007 with dealing stolen proper-
ty; burglary of structure; grand
theft (3rd degree). The defendant
entered a plea of no contest.
Adjudication withheld. Defend-
ant was sentenced to 45 days in
jail with 2 days credit for time
served; 36 months probation;
substance abuse evaluation and
treatment; no drugs or alcohol,
random testing; no contact with
victim; pay restitution; $410
costs.
RAPACK, MICAH A:
Charged August 26, 2005 with
burglary of conveyance while
armed; 3 counts grand theft of a
firearm; grand theft 3rd degree;


Charged August 26, 2005 with
burglary of conveyance; grand
theft 3rd degree; Charged
August 26, 2005 with burglary of
conveyance; Charged August 26,
2005 with 2 counts burglary of
conveyance; 2 counts grand theft
3rd degree; Charged November
8, 2005 with burglary of con-
veyance; grand theft; criminal
mischief. The defendant admit-
ted being in violation, was found
in violation of probation and
adjudicated guilty. Defendant
was sentenced to 90 days in jail
with 56 days credit for time
served; probation reinstated
modified.
SRHODES, ANDY: Charg-
ed March 20, 2006 with dealing
stolen property. The defendant
entered a plea of no contest and
was adjudicated guilty.
Defendant was sentenced to 18
months in prison with 217 days
credit for time served (concur-
rent with another case).
RICHARDSON, BIAN-
CA: Charged May 20, 2007 with
grand theft. The defendant


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admitted being in violation, was
found in violation of probation
and adjudicated guilty. Defen-
dant was sentenced to 83 days in
jail with 67 days credit for time
served; $270 costs. Probation
reinstated. Any conditions not
met, re* imposed.
SANDERS, JOEY E.:
Charged July 3, 2006 with bur-
glary of a dwelling. Defendant
admitted being in violation, was
found in violation of probation
and was adjudicated guilty. The
defendant was sentenced to 24
months in prison with 156 days
credit for time served. Probation
revoked and terminated.
SEGREE, CRYSTAL:
Charged May 20, 2005 with
accessory to sale of controlled
substance. Defendant- admitted
being in violation, was found in
violation of probation and adju-
dicated guilty. The defendant
was sentenced to 60 days in jail
with 29 days credit for time
served. Probation revoked and
terminated.
STARKEY, GREG L.:
Charged August 25, 2005 and
November 15, 2005 with pur-
chase controlled substance
cocaine. Defendant admitted
being in violation, was found in
violation of probation and was
adjudicated guilty. The defen-
dant was sentenced to 18 months
in prison (cases concurrent).
Probation revoked and terminat-
ed.
STEELE, JENNIFER
CHRISTINE: Charged August
11, 2007 with possession contra-
band at county detention facility;
possession of cannabis not more
than 20 grams; possession of
paraphernalia; DUI. The defen-
dant entered a plea-of no con--
test. Adjudication withheld
count 1; Adjudicated guilty
counts 2, 3, and 4. Defendant
was sentenced to 18 months pro-
bation; 50 hours community
service work; 6 month license
suspension; DUI school; sub-
stance abuse evaluation and
treatment; no alcohol or drugs,
random testing; 10 day vehicle
impound; $1,180 costs.
STEPHENS, CRAIG L.:
Charged September 13, 2007
with sale of controlled substance
cannabis. Defendant entered a
plea of no contest and was adju-
dicated guilty. The defendant
was sentenced to 45 days in jail
with 27 days credit for time
served; 24 months probation;
substance abuse evaluation and
treatment; no alcohol or drugs;
$370 costs.
STRATTON, JONA-
THAN SHANE: Charged
August 13, 2007 with burglary of
dwelling; grand theft of a
firearm; grand theft. The defen-
dant entered a plea of no con-
test. Adjudication withheld.
Defendant was sentenced to 24
months probation; no contact
with victims; substance abuse
evaluation and treatment; no
drugs or alcohol, random test-
ing; pay restitution; $410 costs.
TATUM, ERIC ALLEN:
Charged August 23, 2007 with
burglary of structure. The defen-
dant entered a plea of no contest
to the lesser charge of trespass
and was adjudicated guilty.
Defendant was sentenced to 47
days in jail with 47 days credit
for time served; $215 costs.
TAYLOR, BOBBY RAY:
Charged September 20, 2006
with sale of controlled substance
cannabis. Defendant entered a
plea of no contest. Adjudication
withheld. The defendant was
sentenced to 60 days in jail with
credit for time served; substance


abuse evaluation and treatment;
no drugs or alcohol, random
testing; $510 costs.
THOMPSON, ROBERT
ZACK: Charged July 22, 2006
with battery. Probation reinstat-
ed modified to include 30 days in
jail with 8 days credit for time
served. Probation will terminate
upon completion of jail time.'
TOWNSEND, RUFUS E.
JR: Charged 2 times August 30,
2004 with sale of controlled sub-
stance. The defendant admitted
being in violation and was found
in violation of probation.
Defendant was sentenced to 63
days in jail with 63 days credit
for time served; Probation rein-
stated, modified.
VONIER, CYNTHIA
LYNN: Charged August 1, 2007
with grand theft. The defendant
entered a plea of no contest.
Adjudication withheld. Defend-
ant was sentenced to 18 months
probation; return all property
and pay restitution (amount
reserved on for 60 days); $410
costs.
WALLACE, ALFRED
OLIVER: Charged 5 times
August 19, 2005 with burglary of
conveyance; 5 times grand theft
(3rd degree); 3 times grand theft
of a firearm; burglary of con-
veyance while armed. The defen-
dant admitted being in violation,
was found in violation of proba-
tion and adjudicated guilty.
Defendant was sentenced to 60
months in prison with 470 days
credit for time served.
WHIDDON, KRISTA
RENEA: Charged 2 times Sept-
ember 15, 2007 with sale of
cocaine. Defendant entered a
plea of no contest. Adjudication
-withheld. The defe adant was
sentenced to 55 days in jail with
24 days credit for time served; 30
months probation; $510 costs.
Cases concurrent.
WILLIAMS, REGINALD
LERON: Charged February 23,
2007 with possession of contra-
band at county detention facility.
The defendant entered a plea of
no contest to the lesser charge of
possession of cannabis and was
adjudicated guilty. The defen-
dant was fined $500.
WRIGHT, KORTNEY K.:
Charged 2 times September 12,
2007 with possession with intent
to sell cannabis; Charged with
sale of controlled substance
MDMA; Charged with sale of
cocaine. Defendant entered a
plea of no contest. Adjudication
withheld. The defendant was
sentenced to 90 days in jail with
27 days credit for time served; 36
months probation; substance
abuse evaluation and treatment;
no drugs or alcohol, random
testing; $510 costs. All cases and
counts concurrent.
YANCEY, JAMES
ROBERT: Charged February
22, 2006 with lewd or lascivious
exhibition. The defendant
entered a plea of no contest to
the lesser charge of indecent
exposure and was adjudicated
guilty. Defendant was sentenced
to 24 days in jail with 24 days
credit for time served; 12 months
probation; mental health evalua-
tion and treatment; no contact
with victim; immediate family or
residence; $255 costs.


EARTH


TALKi)
Questions & Answers
About Our Environment

From the Editors of
E/ The Environmental
Magazine
Dear EarthTalk:
Is it true that some ingredi-
ents in common air fresheners
can cause health problems?
-Mike Jaworski, Seattle, WA

Air fresheners are a $1.72
billion industry in the United
States. An estimated 75 percent
of homes use them regularly.
According to a September 2007
report released by the Natural
Resources Defense Council
(NRDC), most common house-
hold air fresheners contain
potentially noxious chemicals
that degrade the quality of
indoor air and may even affect
hormones and reproductive
development, particularly in
babies.
As part of its "Clearing the
Air" study, NRDC researchers
tested 14 brands of common
household air fresheners and
found that 12 contained chemi-
cals known as phthalates. Only
two, Febreze Air Effects and
Renuzit Subtle Effects, contained
no detectable levels of phtha-
lates. Products testing positive
included ones. mnarketed'as ai4j
narura I"' sa "uns enae.d,'' 09O
of the brands tested listed phtha-
lates on their labels.
Phthalates are "hormone-
disrupting" chemicals that can
be particularly dangerous for
young children and unborn
babies. Like some other man-
made chemicals, phthalates can
affect normal hormonal process-
es-those that control brain,
nervous and immune system
development, reproduction, men-
tal processing and metabolism-
by blocking them altogether,
throwing off the timing or
"mimicking" natural hormones
and interacting with cells them-
selves, with very unhealthy con-
sequences. The State of Cali-for-
nia notes that five types of phtha-
lates-including one commonly
used in air freshener products-
are "known to cause birth
defects or reproductive harm."
Despite these issues, the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) does not regulate the use
of phthalates or require the label-
ing of phthalate content on prod-
ucts. Other governments take the
phthalate threat more seriously.
The European Union forbids the
most harmful phthalates in cos-
metics or toys, and California
Governor Arnold Schwarzen-
egger is expected to soon sign
similar legislation for his state.
NRDC bemoans the fact
that the U.S. government does
not test air fresheners for safety
or require manufacturers to meet
specific health standards. "More
than anything, our research
highlights cracks in our safety
system," says Dr. Gina Solo-
mon, a senior NRCD scientist.
"Consumers have a right to
know what is put into air fresh-
eners and other everyday prod-
ucts they bring into their
homes," she says, adding that the
Continued on Page 14


I


-i


I I









- Page 14 October 19, 2007 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER The Franklin Chronicle


FCAN Florida Classified

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The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper with the
FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-4377, fax: 877-423-4964, e-mail: info@franklinchronicle.net


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Kendrick,

Mock file

for primary
The primary election is near-
ly a year away, but already two
candidates have filed for the
Franklin County primary elec-
tion on Aug. 26, 2008.
According to the Supervisor
of Elections office, the two can-
didates are:
Sheriff Mike Mock, who
has filed for re-election as a
Democrat. Mock filed on Oct. 1.
Rep. Will Kendrick, who
has filed for election for
Superintendent of Schools as a
Republican. Kendrick, who is
term limited out of the
Legislature after this term, filed
on Jan. 25.


New meeting
place for
Carrabelle
City Council
.If you're planning on going
to the next meeting of the
Carrabelle City Council, be sure
to remember that the meeting
place will change.. Beginning
with the next meeting, the city
meeting'place will change back
to the Senior Center.

Earth Talk from Page 13


sites located in central (eorgia. FOUR SEASONS REALTY government should keep a
Great weather. Starting at $3900 .your home'town- specialists, watchful eye on potentially dan-
per acre. Financing Available. (877)BUY-MTNS or www.buv gerous.prbducts.
(706) 364-4200. mts.com. In conjunction with the
VIRGINIA MQUNTAINS 5 .Steel Bldigs study, NRDC-along with the
acres riverfront on Big Reed Steel Buildings Sierra Club, the Alliance for
Island Creek near New River Steel' Buildings: Before -Price:. Healthy Homes and the
State Park, fishing, view, private, increase-sale: 30x40 to 1.00x100 : National Center for Healthy
good access $89,500 (866) 789- Serious. Buyers Only- Liniited Hiiising-is petitioning federal
8535. (772) 595-9002. agencies to start assessing the
risk air fresheners pose to con-
AFFORDABLE LAKE PROP- Travel sumers by testing all products
ERTIES On pristine 34,000 acre GOINGTO ALASKA? Check now on the market. And NRDC
Norris Lake Over 800 miles of Out Th Alaskas has already begun working
First! www.alaskaoffers.com or
wooded shoreline Four Seasons- u T directly with some manufactur-
Call (888) 291-5253 Or visit First! www.as o ers to find ways to eliminate
Lakeside Realty wwwlakesidere-Call (800) 922-9000. phthalates from these products.
alty-tn.com. NRDC recommends that
consumers be selective and pur-
Ral Est a Fedral& Smlf ol gation chase only air fresheners that
PeimaIhave the least amount of phtha-
SBal vSpOpZ iB H SaBnavpt&,a lates. Better yet, the group sug-
yOU F BtF tL E St PO ES FMLF WSUE OC FNCS gets consumers first try to
L A W 0 F F I C E 0 F reduce household odors by tend-
M ui mL A. KAUFMN PD ing to their root causes or
IV. improving ventilation rather
1601 FORUM PLACE. SUITE Ji4 WEST PALM BEACH, FL 33401 than masking them. "The best
-61.4 478.2878 way to avoid the problem is to
AcrnmEo N N YOR, FLOR.A AND WAShNGTON DC simply open a window instead of
EVENING & WEEKEND APPOINTMENT AVAILABLE reaching for one of these cans,"
WrE, t4a,'-- .Fv7-p.r concludes Solomon.
S:, o ,, a ce CONTACTS: Natural Re-
sources- Defense Council,
www.nrdc.org/health/home/air
No ExperienceP No Problem. fresheners.asp.
GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL
Company-provided CDL training for QUESTION? Send it to:
qualified candidates EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environ-
S N mental Magazine, -P.O. Box
New higher pay packages 5098, Westport, CT 06881; sub-
Nearly 2/3 of Schneider drivers get mit it at: www.emagazine.com/
home daily or weekly earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-mail:
earthtalk@emagazine.com.
schnoirohbs.Com i Read past columns at: www.
hneier om SCER. emagazine.com/earthtalk/archi
1-O4PRIE1-800-44M7-M33 AI i ves.php.


Page 14 October 19, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


October 19, 2007 Page 15


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle pages is an efficient way to promote your business to the public and save money
at the same time. These ads are strictly business cards magnified to 2 columns by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two
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il t The donation is tax deductible
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PIEDRA SPRINGS RANCH
Sellnr lJ the Higher BiJJer Aor4b. Si q \ .lla..n Prir,.ml, Li ted at 59 3 Arlli.,in
2'21 acres of re reauonal paradise Adloins Sanua an Naional
Iuresi Frontage on Piedra Riaer, \ello.[acrke Creek and VS-I6o
8 acre lake Water, oil & mineral right *Abundant wildlife
.. [ Tu s d i 0 '. t,i r ? ,c1 r ia I PM ( ifT) 1
1) KI N 8 0.55 8.46
... ..... __ W W JP KI NG, 0S


Roo


On The Apalachicola East Bay

Phone: 850* 670* 1111

Fax: 850* 670* 8316


DAIR LmNCH SP OAS

LUNCH .....................$5915
With French Fries and ColeSlaw
Mulet
catfish
SteaK Wrap
ChicKen Wrap


NIGHTLY SPEUALS
NIGHTLY MEALS ............ $8. 5
Country Fried SteaK
Alfredo ChicKen or Shrimp


W666NDP MSALS


Surf f


BREAST MENU
BlEAKFAST SANDWICH ........... $2.25
White Bread or Biscuit/Choice of Sausage or Bacon
USASAE CAGAVY G BISCUIT ...... .$2.oo
PANC'AKES with Choice of Meat ...... .$.50
FRENCH TOAST with Choice of Meat .... $3.?.
WOP-EP'S B-REAKFAST .............. 4.51
3 Eggs, Grits, Home Fries, Toast and Bacon
BOB'S BREAKFAST .............. ..$1.50
SEggs, Girits, Toast, and Bacon
OMLeTTES
Ham and Cheese with Grits and Toast . .$3.99
Western (onion, tomato, ham, cheese) .$4.50
with Grits and Toast
off ...........IN... .. .
Coffee ..................... .. .$I.OO


STurf M ilK .......................... $1.50
Orange Tuice ..................... $1.20
Hours: 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Mon. to Thurs./6:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Sat. & Sun.
Ask your server for Special Oilers
We cater weddings, office parties, etc.


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October is
Greenways
and Trails
Month
Emphasizing a commitment
to a healthier lifestyle for all
Floridians, Gov. Charlie Crist
and the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP)
are recognizing October as
Florida Greenways and Trails
Month.
With more than 5,000 miles
of trails and 80,000 acres of
greenway, Florida provides resi-
dents and visitors of all ages and
abilities with year-round access
to a wide variety of free health
and fitness activities. Greenways
and trails provide recreational
opportunities, protect Florida's
natural resources, preserve his-
torical and cultural sites and con-
nect communities.
"Florida Greenways and
Trails Month offers Floridians a
chance to come together and cel-
ebrate our natural resources,"
said Jena Brooks, Director
DEP's Office of Greenways &
Trails. "Greenways and trails
provide nature-based recreation-
al opportunities as well as
encourage use of alternative,
energy-saving forms of trans-
portation."
More than 100 events are
taking place in more than 59
counties around the state to cele-
brate Florida Greenways and
Trails Month, including the 13th
Annual Rails to Trails Bike Ride
on the Withlacoochee State
Trail, the Calusa Blueway
Paddling Festival and an
Apalachicola Canoe Trip. Events
will highlight the natural beauty
of Florida's trails with equestri-
an rides, educational hikes and
birding festivals as well as pad-
dling excursions, running and
mountain biking events.
DEP's Office of Greenways
& Trails manages eight state
trails, in addition to the Marjorie
Harris Carr Cross Florida
Greenway, Florida's longest
green corridor stretching 110
miles from the St. Johns River
near Palatka to the Gulf of
Mexico near Inglis.' Of the eight
state trails, six are rail-trails,
which are railroad corridors con-
verted to recreational trails for
hiking, biking, skating and
equestrian activities. Through
Florida Forever, the state's pre-
mier land acquisition program,
$4.5 million is allocated annually
to purchase and preserve land for
Florida's greenways and trails.

Reading
A reading/book signing for
Dawn Radford's new book Oyster
Flats, will be held Sun., Oct. 21,
4 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal
Church's Benedict Hall. Refresh-
ments will be served as Dawn
shares the story with the locale
in a "serene, isolated fishing
community on the Gulf of
Mexico in the FL Panhandle,"
which is far from serene.


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Page 16 19 October 2007 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER The Franklin Chronicle


The Wine Guys talk about fine wine
Cyril Brun was on his way to the United States to pro- destined to continue their ascent. Veuve Clicquot raises its reasonable for this kind of quality. Good crisp flavc
mote his company's champagne when he happened to prices 3 to 5 percent a year. Let's hope for expansion. Veuve Clicquot 1999 ($75). The grapes wei
catch a glimpse of a familiar label on two in-flight movies. With this kind of sales, it may be easy for champagne mature when harvested this year, so the wine has
First was the animated Shrek when a character threw a bot- makers to get people to drink champagne on days other ously aged but flavorful profile with a silky text
tie of Veuve Clicquot across the floor. Then came than celebrations. good weight on the palate. Peach and honey notes
Spiderman II. What are the odds two movies would feature "It's frustrating," confesses Mr. Brun. "When cham- hint of almonds. We loved this wine.
his wine? pagne is served at a table, people at nearby tables wonder Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame 1996 ($150
The odds are getting better, he says, as champagne whose birthday is it?" only in great vintages, this wine was born with the 1
labels become Hollywood icons. We all know that James It may not be anyone's tage as a tribute to the Widow ("veuve") Clicqt
Bond, for instance, liked Bollinger. birthday. It could be that managed the property in the early 19th century at
The ubiquitous Veuve Clicauot. like most champagne, I someone just likes cham- after her husband of just two years died. Her maiden


is enjoying growing popularity nowadays. The trend does
not seem like a bubble ready to burst soon. In fact,
Champagne's success presents a bit of dilemma-demand
is outstripping availability.
By law, Champagne's growers cannot simply plant
more vines to fill the need. The land is there, but it takes a
new law that won't come easy, says Mr. Brun. The appro-
priate land is owned by a limited number of people who
will profit handsomely from expansion and therein lies a
political dispute.
Then there is global warming, a phenomenon that is
impacting wine growing regions around the country.
Champagne is so far north that grapes struggle to ripen
before the first frost. You would think that a warming trend
would make grape growing easier, but Mr. Brun says there
is another side to riper grapes: a loss in acidity. He noticed
his 1999 vintage champagne has riper flavors as a result of
riper grapes. The chalky soil can add acidity, but tradition-
al wine-making methods have to be reevaluated. He pre-
dicts that global warming will lead to more vintage cham-
pagnes-they are made in only the best years-and that
champagne's flavor profile will be more opulent. What's the
complaint with that?
Without more champagne on the market, prices are


pagne or the celebration is
merely being alive.
Although there are signs
that champagne is selling
year-round, sales will spike
i sharply in the coming
S months. Champagne is a fix-
ture at New Year's Eve bash-
and even Thanksgiving.
We sometimes drink
champagne on a leisurely
Sunday afternoon when it's
cold outside and you need something to lift the spirits.
Even with their steep prices, you can find real champagne
for $30 a bottle. The luxurious cuvees, though, can easily
pass the $100 mark.
Veuve Clicquot favors pinot noir in its blend and that
gives the champagne more weight and flavor.
Mr. Brun recently shared some his excellent wine with
us during a visit. Here are our favorites:
Veuve Clicquot Yellow Label ($55). This non-vintage
champagne accounts dominates Veuve Clicquot sales. It is
one of the most well recognized labels and the price is still


ors.
re more
an obvi-
ure and
s with a
). Made
962 vin-
lot who
t age 27
en name


"Ponsardin," was added to the label in 1810, but most peo-
ple just shorten the name to Veuve Clicquot.
It also replicates the wine of her day by using the same
blend and the grapes from the same vineyards but adding
new technology that makes the wine less oxidized today.
The 1996 has a mature personality but with good acidity,
particularly on the finish. Citrus and toast notes. About 64
percent of it is pinot noir, which is pretty.consistent with
previous vintages.
Veuve Clicquot Vintage Rose 2000 ($85). This proper-
ty has 20 winemakers divided into teams of four who con-
centrate on each of the wines. Mr. Brun's specialty is the
vintage rose-good choice, if it was his. to make. He stuck
his neck out when he argued for a rose in the year 2000, a
mediocre growing season at best. The only other time
Veuve Clicquot made only a rose as its vintage wine was in
1997. This wine had a floral bouquet, pink grapefruit fla-
vors and a touch of spice. good balance and fresh acidity.
Tom Marquardt and Patrick Darr have been writing a wine col-
umn for 20 years and have traveled to the WJest Coast and Europe
to meet countless wine luminaries. "Wine Guys" will guide read-
ers through the maze of intimidating jargon, introduce them to
winemakers, and offer suggestions for dinner or their wine cellars.


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THUPRDAY
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I


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Page 16 19 October 2007


The Franklin Chronicle




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