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 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: 10-12-2007
Copyright Date: 2007
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
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System ID: UF00089928:00316

Full Text







Franklin





Chronicle


50o Fight


DEDICATED
TO PUBLIC INTEREST,
NOT PROFIT MARGIN


Volume 16, V\umber 21 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER Friday, October 12, 2007

I New Day


PHOTO BY RUSSELL ROBERTS

Is the sun more colorful than normal?
Well, no, the sun is the same old sun that's been rising over the bay off Eastpoint since time began. What's new is the splash
)f color in The Franklin Chronicle. That's one of several changes The Chronicle is announcing today: more color, a new size,
t new publication schedule, and new features. We get things started today, but be assured that the changes you'll find inside
:oday's paper are just the first in a series of improvements. There's more to come.. For an explanation of the changes, see
age 4.


New old faces take their places at

Carrabelle City Council session


Deja-vu new council
was almost seamless

3Y SKIP FRINK
'hronicle Correspondent
The two new faces at the
iarrabelle City Council meeting
ast week Mayor Curley Messer
Ld Commissioner Frank
lathes appeared right back in
he places they had occupied six
rears ago. New commissioner
and .ex-mayor) Jim Brown was
n the hospital, and was expected
iome by the weekend. The room
vas packed, partly due to the
!xtra people who were there for
he touchy Lanark Water and
;ewer issue. Both ex-commis-
ion members were in the audi-
.nce.
And except for some expres-
ive personalities who are well-
nown to be expressive, there
vas no major conflict. The meet-
ng on Thursday, Oct. 4, was rea-
onably brief and accomplished


most of the agenda goals. Only
Commissioner Tyre made any
mention of the behavior at the
swearing-in meeting just past,
and expressed his regrets that it
happened.
Under "Staff Reports" there
were more business items than


were listed on the business por-
tion of the program.
Administrator John McInnis
went through the list:
Keisha Smith, new city
office employee, received
Employee of the Quarter.
Pass Christian, Mississippi,


PHOTO BY SKIP FRINK
Project announcement sign at completed wharf/Waterfronts
office.


the devastated area where
Carrabelle directed its recovery
aid effort in 2005 after Hurricane
Katrina, sent a plaque with their
heartfelt thanks.
Land Development
Regulation work continues, and
the consultant's contract is up in
March 2008.
The commission voted to
approve a mutual aid agreement
with Lanark, which says that the
area worse hit by disaster will
receive aid from the other.
Prisoner work hours for the
month totaled 1,620 (at no
charge).
The lighthouse renovation is
due to be completed, and a repli-
ca lens lit, by the night of the
Boat Parade of Lights in
December. The New Orleans
Coast Guard, which is "preserv-
ing" the actual Fresnel lens, will
produce the replica. Also, it was
announced that a replica child-
safe, full-size pirate ship will be
Continued on Page 2


stops


Lanark


event

BY CHRONICLE WRITERS
Violence moments before
the Lanark Village Water and
Sewer District Board meeting
Monday night sent one man to
the hospital and forced cancella-
tion of the meeting.
Injured was Lanark resident
Billy Snyder, a frequent critic of
the Board.
Approximately 20 people
gathered at6 p.m. at Chillas Hall
for the meeting, which was to be
a budget workshop. At 6, Board
Chairperson Barbara Rohrs
announced that the meeting
would not begin until the arrival
of deputies from the Sheriff's
Office, who had been asked to be
present to help keep order during
the meeting. Recent meetings
have been raucous events.
The audience sat talking
amongst themselves until 6:20
p.m. At that time, shouting
erupted from the rear of the hall
where Snyder had set up his
video camera to tape the work-
shop. There are conflicting ver-
sions of exactly what happened
next, but everyone agrees there
was a confrontation between
Snyder and another audience
member, who objected to the
camera. The confrontation
began with verbal objections to
the camera, then quickly escalat-
ed into a physical confrontation.
Snyder said 1 uesday that a
member of. the audience
approached him and told him to
turn off the camera. Snyder, who
walks with a cane, shouted for
the man to get away from him as
he raised his cane. Snyder admits
that he pushed the man to get
him away, and the man then
punched Snyder, and Snyder
retaliated by hitting the man
with his cane. The man contin-
ued his attack until Snyder fell to
the floor bleeding. Several peo-
ple rushed in to break up the
fight, as chairs, coffee mugs and
other items were flung about.
Board attorney Brian
Armstrong was not at the meet-
ing, but he spoke to several peo-
ple who were. Armstrong said he
was told that Snyder stuck the
camera into the other man's face
and when the man objected,
Snyder hit the man on the head
and back with his cane. Snyder
denies that and said the camera
was not turned on until the other
man approached him.
Barbara Rohrs called 911
and shortly thereafter a group of
deputies arrived. An ambulance
was called and Snyder was taken
to the hospital, where he was
treated and released.
The audience sat stunned at
what they had witnessed, as
deputies collected statements
from the audience. Rohrs
declared that the workshop
would be postponed until a later
date.
Snyder said Tuesday he
believes the confrontation was
planned ahead of time. "He was
paid to beat me up," he said.

Continued on Page 2


I. / /g 1/ T4&4 e4 Poit4 W,4: Wi 2 P








Page 2 12 October 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


will be built on the lighthouse
site, in addition to a replica
"keeper" house. Lastly, there are
efforts underway to secure two
more contiguous building lots to
increase the size of the light-
house property.
Sewer Phase IV, the
Highway 98 beach run, is 30 per-
cent completed. The commission
voted to apply grant money to
lengthening the sewer run to the
lighthouse. When asked whether
or not residents along the line
would have to hook up to the
sewer, attorney Dan Cox
answered yes.
A conversation on the topic
of trash contract pickup and
mandatory citizen participation
ended with an agreement that
John McInnis and Dan Cox
would look into it.
The lengthy Lanark discus-
sion ended with the result that
Carrabelle would again entertain
the possibility of merging the
systems, but that Lanark would
have to clearly ask for what it
wants. Mayor Messer assigned
Jim Brown to handle the project.
The Wharf project's final
application for permit is at DEP.
ECT, consulting engineers, will
prepare a request for proposal to
get bids for the work.
Waterfronts Florida: the
old Coast Guard building is now
the newly finished Waterfronts
office. Waterfronts manager
Tamara Allen will pursue a
potential $50,000 grant, and Ray
Tyre volunteered to be the city
liaison with the 2-year project.
Three items were dropped
from the main business agenda,
and two added. First addition
was Gary McGee's request to
remodel his building now
propped up on Highway 98 just


past the Express Lane. Mayor
Messer first told him to tear it
down, which started a 15-minute
discussion about what could and
couldn't be done-and what
then could or couldn't be done
once that was done. (All were
confused at meeting.) The upshot
was that the request would be
tabled for one month, or until
some clarifications could be had.
The Boys and Girls Club
Area Director requested funding
for the next budget cycle, and
was awarded $4,000 of the
$6,700 that is the total city set-
aside fund, as a result of Richard
Sands' motion. Last year's budg-
et awarded the Club $7,500.
Attorney Cox agreed to
research and write a letter to the
DEP with his findings related to
Dell Schneider's request for
approval of a wetland crossing
mitigation.
Strangely, the heat of the
evening arose over golf cart and
4-wheeler traffic. Mayor Messer
and Commissioner Sands were
not totally in agreement over the
issue, and never resolved it.
Complicating factors: Highway
98 and 67 are not under city con-
trol; there is a high elderly popu-
lation of non-licensed drivers;
drivers have the right not to wear
a motorcycle helmet; and driver
licenses are not mandatory.
Finally Mayor Messer said he
would make it a police matter.
The city meeting place will
change back to the Senior
Center, effective next meeting.
The city voted to donate a sur-
plus lot near Sands Field to
Habitat for Humanity, and three
engineering firms were selected
to do future Carrabelle work:
Kemp, Dresser, McGee; ECT;
and Inovia Consulting.


Laser light at meeting

leads to arrest


A man has.been arrested
after it was alleged that he point-
ed a laser light into the eye of
another man during a meeting of
the Lanark Village Water and
Sewer District in August.
Arrested and charged with
battery was Paul Rohrs. He is the
husband of Barbara Rohrs,
chairperson of the Lanark
Village Water and Sewer District
Board. He was arrested on
Monday, Oct. 1, according to the
Franklin County Sheriff's Office.
According to court records,
William Snyder went to the
Sheriff's Office to report the inci-
dent. The report stated that
Snyder told officers that during a
Water Board meeting, "he was
speaking to the board members
... when he felt his right eye start
to burn and then noticed that
Paul Rohrs was shining a laser
light into his eye. Mr. Snyder
then went on to state that he then
proceeded towards Mr. Rohrs
and was telling him to stop shin-
ing the light in his eye, when Mr.


Lanark event from Page 1
Snyder confirmed that the
Sheriff's Office served him with
"no trespass" papers Tuesday,
ordering him to stay away from
Chillas Hall.
Ultimately, it will be up to
the legal system to sort out what
happened. The Sheriff's Office
confirmed that the incident is
under investigation, but declined
to release a preliminary report
since charges are pending. If
charges are filed, that informa-
tion would be made public.


Rohrs' wife, Barbara, who is on
the board, ordered him to stop
that he was being out of control.
"Later that night of the
20th, Mr. Snyder stated that he
could not sleep and his right eye
was hurting. The next day Mr.
Snyder went to his local doctor,
Dr. Dana Holton, and he pre-
scribed him some medicine and
also put a patch on his right eye."
Based on the statement
Snyder gave, an arrest warrant
was issued for Rohrs' arrest. The
arrest does not imply guilt; it
means that based on the state-
ment, there was enough informa-
tion to justify issuing an arrest
warrant.
Given the opportunity to
comment on the incident, Mr.
Rohrs declined, adding that The
Chronicle has a history of one-
sided reporting about- Water
District issues. In a letter to the
editor published in this issue in
The Chronicle, Board member
Sharon Thoman wrote that "Mr.
Snyder's claim is ridiculous."


Snyder has routinely video-
taped recent Board meetings and
has been a frequent critic of
District operations. In August,
he filed a complaint that his eye
was hurt when the husband of
Barbara Rohrs pointed a laser
light at him during a meeting.
The complaint led to Paul Rohrs'
arrest. (See story on page 2).
Also, Snyder is chairman of
Concerned Citizens of Lanark
Village, which is spearheading a
petition drive aimed at having
the Lanark Water District merg-


Carrabelle City from Page 1


ing with the Carrabelle public
utilities. The Concerned Citizens
of Lanark Village mailed letters
to Lanark property owners this
week about the issue, and bought
an advertisement in The Franklin
Chronicle outlining its position.
The letter says "Carrabelle
generously offers to work with
all of the people, regardless of
social status, to provide afford-
able water and sewer rates, good
quality water, protect our natural
resources, and preserve a healthy
environment for us to enjoy."


Fri Sat Sun
10/12 10/13 10/14


DEP begins

program to

protect

panhandle
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP)
has started the implementation
of expanded protection for water
resources in the Florida
Panhandle.
The Florida Legis-lature
passed House Bill 7163 in 2006,
creating an Environmental
Resource Permitting (ERP) pro-
gram in Northwest Florida for
the first time. DEP has worked
with area stakeholders since that
time to put effective rules and
practices for the ERP program in
place.
"This is an historic moment
for the people, the environment
and the economy of Northwest
Florida;" said DEP Secretary
Michael W Sole. "Including the
region in the statewide
Environmental Resource Permit-
ting program will improve
stormwater management and
flood control and better protect
some of the most pristine rivers,
estuaries and streams in the
state."
This inaugurates the first
phase of the program, updating
stormwater rules and practices to
protect water quality and reduce
flooding. Phase Two, to be
implemented after January 1,
2008, will enhance protection for
wetlands connected to other sur-
face waters as well as isolated
wetlands not previously protect-
ed by state law in Northwest
Florida. This program is being
implemented jointly by DEP and
the Northwest Florida Water
Management District.
The ERP program regulates
dredging of navigation channels,
filling wetlands, other urban and
residential development activi-
ties, highway construction, and
installation of docks and sea-
walls. Phase One of this pro-
gram requires stormwater man-
agement practices to reduce off-
site flooding and protect water
quality. The program includes a
strong mitigation component to
offset unavoidable impacts to
water resources and related habi-
tat. Rule development for Phase
Two wetland regulations is
underway and a public workshop
is anticipated before the end of
the year.
In addition to Florida's envi-
ronmental permitting programs,
the state is conserving wetlands
and wildlife habitat by acquiring
environmentally sensitive land.
More than two million acres of
natural land-including 191,000
acres in the Panhandle-have
been placed in public ownership
through Florida Forever and its
predecessor, Preservation 2000.
For more information, visit
http://www.dep.state.fl.us/wate
r/wetlands/erp/rules/draft_nw.
htm.


Sunrise:
7:39 AM
Sunset:
7:12 PM


tf"


81/61
Sunshine. Highs in
the low 80s and lows
in the low 60s.


Sunrise:
7:40 AM
Sunset:
7.11 PM


82/65
Sunshine. Highs in
the low 80s and lows
in the mid 60s.


Sunrise:
7:40 AM
Sunset:
71in PM


I


Florida At A Glance


Jacksonville
8-1463


80 59


81 59


Tampa
85.65


Area Cities
K^FTfA' rib IImm-EM,],-9


Clearwater 84
Crestview 79
Daytona Beach 83
Fort Lauderdale 87
Fort Myers 89
Gainesyille 83
Hollywood 88
Jacksonville 84
Key West 87
Lady Lake 84
Lake City 82
Madison 81
Melbourne 86
Miami 87
N Smyrna Beach 83


sunny
sunny
sunny
mst sunny
sunny
sunny
ptsunny
sunny
ptsunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
mstsunny
sunny


Ocala 86
Orlando 86
Panama City 80
Pensacola 80
Plant City 87
Pompano Beach 87
Port Charlotte 89
Saint Augustine 81
Saint Petersburg 83
Sarasota 86
Tallahassee 81
Tampa 85
Titusville 85
Venice 88
W Palm Beach 87


sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
mstsunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
mst sunny


National Cities
AL- ;Ii it]


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


sunny
rain
ptsunny
mst sunny
mstsunny
sunny
mst sunny
mst sunny


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


mst sunny
rain
sunny
rain
rain
sunny
pt sunny


Moon Phases






New First Full Last
Oct 11 Oct 19 Oct 26 Nov 1


UV Index
Fri Sat Sun
10/12 10/13 10/14
8 8 8
Very High Very High Very High


The UV Index is measured on a 0 11 number scale,
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.


"-- 11


81/60
Mainly sunny. Highs
in the low 80s and
lows in the low 60s.


I1!cityIi Lo ond


I it i oCod










The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


12 October 2007 Page 3


FWC moves to combat



boat-theft spike


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion's (FWC), Division of Law
Enforcement urges boat owners
to- protect their boats from theft
and to avoid boat title fraud
schemes.
More than 1,200 boats have
been reported stolen in Florida
this year. That reflects a 30-per-
cent increase com-
pared to the same
period last year.
Also, the FWC
said there is a
growing trend in
theft of "go-fast"
type boats.
"Go-fast boats,
26-39 feet long, are
being targeted with
greater frequency L
than in previous
years," said Lt.
John Humphreys
of FWC's Investigations Section.
"These boats are targeted by
criminals because of their high-
dollar value and for use in mar-
itime-based smuggling activi-
ties."
FWC officers possess a
tremendous amount of experi-
ence and knowledge relative to
the boating industry. This
resource is available to law
enforcement partners and private
industry through active partner-
ships with the Florida Marine
Intelligence Unit (FMIU) and
through several other marine
intelligence-sharing initiatives.
"FWC provides investigative
coordination and intelligence
analysis support to a myriad of
sheriff's offices and police
departments around the state.
We offer everything from assis-
tance with identifying boats and
suspects to predicting future theft
trends," Humphreys said.
Dade, Monroe and Broward
counties have the highest num-
ber of boat thefts; however, thefts
have been reported from every
county in the state.
"Investigations can quickly
become highly complex and
involve not only grand theft, but
also violations such as title fraud,
insurance fraud, larceny, alter-
ation of hull identification num-
bers and tax evasion,"
Humphreys said.
"Boat theft is big business


*


C


and a growing trend in Florida,"
said Capt. David Bullard of
FWC's Investigations Section.
"Frequently, boat thefts are
linked to larger issues, such as
organized crime, illegal immi-
gration and domestic security
threats. Because of this, it's
essential to work with federal
and local law enforcement agen-
cies to combat the


"Protecting
Florida's boaters
and waterways is
vital to FWC's mis-
sion," said FWC
Commis-sion
Chairman Rodney
Barreto. "It's -criti-
cally important
Fwe that Florida's vast
$4 boating communi-
ty take precautions
to avoid becoming
victims of these crimes."Readers
are reminded to contact their
local sheriff's office or police
department to report a stolen
boat or suspected boat title fraud.
Additional information and
tips for avoiding boat theft and
boat title fraud can be found at
MyFWC.com/Law and at the
Florida Marine Intelligence
Unit's Web site, www.FMIU.org.

Notice To Turkey Hunters

Hunters looking to do some
turkey hunting on most of
Florida's wildlife management
areas during the 2008 spring
turkey season need to apply for
quota hunt permits beginning 10
a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30.
Quota hunt permit work-
sheets will be available Oct. 15
on the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission's
(FWC) Web site at MyFWC.
com/hunting under "Quota
Hunts." Worksheets also are
available at county tax collec-
tors' offices and,at all FWC
regional offices.
Applicants must apply
through the FWC's Total
Licensing System (TLS).
Hunters may apply online at
www.wildlifelicense.com or turn'
in their completed worksheets to
any tax collector or license
agent.
All applicants, regardless of
when they apply, have the same


chance of being selected as long
as they submit their applications
within the application period.
Applicants must apply by 11:59
p.m., Thursday, Nov. 8, to be
included in one of two random
drawings.
Hunters, who were included
in the random drawing last year
but were not issued a quota hunt
permit, will be included in this
year's first drawing, known as
the "preference drawing."
"When you submit your
application, there is no need to
attach any rejection notice you
may have received last year. The
TLS knows who was rejected
and who is eligible," said FWC
quota hunt coordinator Eddie
White. "When you submit your
application, you will receive a
receipt showing the hunts you
have applied for and your prefer-
ence status. If you are eligible for
the preference drawing, your
receipt will indicate 'Preference:
Yes.' Those not eligible for the
preference drawing will be
included in the second drawing."
Hunters also may apply as a
"group." A group leader must
first apply to create the group.
The group's number will be
printed on the group leader's
receipt. Each person wishing to
join the group must submit his
own application using that
unique group number to join the
leader's group.
If chosen, applicants will
receive, by mail, a spring turkey
quota hunt permit before Phase
2 of the selection process begins
Dec. 5. Applicants not chosen
may re-apply during Phase 2 on
a first-come, first-served basis for
any hunts not filled and will be
eligible for the preference draw-
ing next year. Applicants may
check to see if they were success-
ful by clicking on "Check Permit
Availability and Drawing
Results" at MyFWC.com/hunt-
ing after Nov. 20.
For more information on
how to apply for spring turkey
quota hunt permits, visit
MyFWC.com/hunting.


Chc u

TheNeAF anki

Choice


The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of
$1,874,714.09 at their October 2, 2007 meeting. The bills are listed as
follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Office.


ACS ICV'T F-^:'"'Tr SYSTEM
o0/01/2007 1i cneck. Regist
BANK VENDOR
BANK GFNERAL AI S ACCOUNT


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NEFflDG' S


FAMNL0 N COUNTY
SLO40R-Vr6.74 PAGB I


CINICKI DATE

39906 10i,'oC'i,3
39907 10/'O/'7
39908 l /0':,'/
39909 10/02/07
3990 103/03107
3993?- 10,'02'0"/
3.9914 1,/0.0'0
39915 iO`'4O07
.IA91 i6 1O.' .'0I
1%917 16002/07
3591B l0/LlS/0"
3j919 10/02/07
139".1 '10/E2/07
3952"- 10/02/07
39933 /0/io 0/o
39924 10/02/07
39925 103/0./7
39927 i102/O'07
3793d 10/O-'/07
39929 t0/02/07
39930 10r02/0-'
399313 tO:02/P
39?3 10/02,'07
39i4? lo/i2/07
99gi6 tOi/0-u ,
'41337 il'D;O,0
_mc It ,/;,2 '01
g 9i i.i \ ai,'o0i
:ii$41 i i ,'n.-'.' 0
39942 LU/02/0"
1993 loiOl2/I07
3S994 10/0o,07
33.915 10/02/07

399o0 0o/00.'07
.Mfi6t. L3II0/07
39952 1a/01/07
3'"955 I lO/'.'.0"
399- 10/02/37
3 I49l 1ia/02,/'T
J995i' I0/01;0?
i0958a 10/2/07
39959 15/02/07
31960 10/02/07
39961 1J/02/07
39962 10/0:107
39963 InS/03.'.]
39964 ili/02/07
39965 13./02/07
_3996 1.1/' 12/C7
?3D9H' 1 "/02.07
30?6a I/"-'/2'C
39969 in102/0l7
39970 1JI/u;/,C-
39971 ir;.'p/07
39'72 10/7/0C7
i93'1_ lD/-2#'ri'
j351'4 1 0/D.I'O2
3'9974 10/'02/07
.9977 0/02.'07
319g7 3 1/1020,'
3197) )U/;.:/G7
3laiBO )3/0i/I7
928B2 11/0;/0'
.i 9- 10/102/0?
3le'E3 10l/0"/07
399874 10/02/07
35998 111/021.07
3'9e,3 10/02 '/07
39990 10,'02/1'-7
39991 1U02?'107
39992 Ir/02.'D7
39993 10/10.'07
S 999.1 iJ(j/0 / f
31995 10/03,'07
399ta, 10102, 07
39997 ]tU/392'l/ti1
30599 10/12/6i
40001 10/012/07

40002 1O'/0 2/' 7
40003 10.'02,0'O
40004 10/0 '01
40005 10/0,' /r'
40006 l/f0.:,'i
40007l J,02,'o"
40008 Io0r02'1)
40009 10 l 2/!n
40010 1/oi.0,'G7
40011 10,0/'-f
40012 i'j /a. '.'
400.13 1 0/0,OF-./
40014 li/02"'(J 7

4 11'.1! 10/0.'237
4r. I'j / ,, ',a c
*i."'.i l itL/ i2' i' '
4002 10 0'7,
40021 10/i/0'
46032 L^/oO V7

40026 is/;C. '0'
40027 1"/':0 .'
40028 l0"2( oII
40029 10/;'.' I


GENERAL BAMK ACCOUNT
FUND RECAP:
FUND DOSCRIPTIONI

001 GENERAL FUND
120 FT77C scm ]. ih
130 [r .,I I- 1 f .; r '. i i 'U ,.,
137 "T :.'' IJ *: r.P *-' .,F1
14U ROAD AND BRIDGE
142 MOSOU1TO CONTROL
170 AIRPORT T ND
180 AFFORD.HOUlSING ASSIST TRUS7
TOTAL Al.T, FUNDS


AMOUNT

15,086.oo
766.58
315,14
191.00
1,197.43
2,033.33
1,250.00
1,092.37
296.66
2,000.00
307.31
S,60.00
799.80
806.29
5,109.00
120.40
50,000.00
154,420.00
1].,519.43
194-60
124.18
89,123.52
69.32
3,400.00
472.79
2,476.2S
1,12,4.46
500.00
136.39
1,S5-.55
223,41
1,741.46
6,361.27
350.17
27,433.95
2.508.30
625.00
110,000.00
1,514.34
La.50
4.990,00
46.40
23-94
36.02
S,8:B .8fl
3,125.0iG
2,000.00
6S5,00
16 60
2.980.04
1,241.21
7. 33).37
1?9.157 00
116.61jG.0
400.01:
1.,35 30
4.560 9:
6.;50.P'0
74,416 00
.1,301.11
602 19
43, 06.00
5jj .21
S114. 1
j 7n2.76?
7,000.00
69,676,00
150.00
276 12
410.00
55'l.05
2@5.00
..a 74
!50.uu
,016.0,3.)
42.00
.678 .00
35 31
4.d00.00
429 2'' 00
5,023.11
458.66
4,633.00
8966.96
&0.25
14.68
62,38.00
155,546.00
1,398.00
19.00
132.83
225.25
10,785.46-
202.25
1,2S3.50
160,60
1,050.00
29,226.00
10,214.32
1,319.88
3,495.00
11a 7c
4,110.00
536.70
3r-. 'la
B iil; Hi
1:0 SO,
2,625.00
b5 85
284. O0i
2,697.49
802.32
1.810.00
624.68
4,747.30
306.34
1,232.94
309.04
27.90
1,174,714 .09


DSBOURSEMENTS

S1.125 538 00
1483, 486 .31
184.250.00
7, 167 0
62,897.67
3,276.40
29.58
8,068 50
1,874,714,09


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United Methodist Church


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Page 4 12 October 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Welcome to the new

Franklin Chronicle
Today, The Franklin Chronicle begins a new era in its history
with a new publication schedule and a complete redesign, the first
in its 16-year history.
Here are some of the changes you'll notice about The
Chronicle in upcoming weeks.
A New Easy-To-Read
Format: Have you ever sat outside
on a breezy day and tried to read the
newspaper? If so, chances are it was
a bit difficult to keep the wind from
blowing the pages apart. We
changed the size of the newspaper,
making the pages smaller so that it's
easier to read.
A Weekly Publication Cycle:
AT .J Since its inception, The Chronicle has
\4 E been published every other Friday.
By Russell Roer Beginning this week, we'll publish
By Russell Roberts weekly. It's a demanding schedule
for such a small staff, but we believe
readers will appreciate knowing The Chronicle will be published
each week.
An Editorial Page: Each week we'll have an editorial page
that presents opinion columns, editorial cartoons, guest columns
and letters to the editor. The Chronicle has always believed in live-
ly debate, and we will continue to publish your submissions.
Anyone who wants to write a letter to the editor or a guest col-
umn should submit their article by e-mail to
franklinchronicle@gtcom.net. If you don't have access to e-mail,
your letter can be mailed to Post Office Box 590, Eastpoint, Fl.,
32328.
A New Column by Richard E. Noble: Regular readers of
The Chronicle no doubt recognize Richard Noble's familiar byline.
A freelance writer who lives in Eastpoint, he has for many years
been a contributor to The Chronicle. We've asked him to write a
weekly column called "The Eastpointer," offering his unique spin
on local people, places and issues. You'll find it each week on the
editorial page.
A Weekly Weather Report: Our weather section will con-
tain a local five-day forecast, sunrise and sunset, area tempera-
tures, and UV index.
Weekly Crossword: While our mission is local news, many

Continued on Page 5



R a% The

I Franklin

TChronicle
POST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
Office: 850-670-4377
Fax: 877-423-4964
E-Mail: franklinchronicle@gtcom. net
Volume 16, Number 21 October 12, 2007
Publisher & Editor
Russell Roberts
Computer Graphic Designer
Diane Beauvais Dyal
Writers
Skip Frink, Richard E. Noble, Carol Noble, Tom Loughridge,
Laurel Newman, Harriett Beach
Circulation Associates
Jerry Weber, Tom Loughridge, Rick Lasher
Advertising Sales
Guy Markham
History
Tom W. Hoffer started the Franklin Chnnicle in 1991 in Tallahassee after
retiring from FSU as a communications professor. Editor Brian Goercke
worked with the Chrnicle for four years, then left to join the Peace Corps in
Africa. Computer Graphic DesignerDiane Dyal, joined the staff in 1996 and
then a short three years later her husband, Andy, became Circulation Director
(and later Director of Operations). Tom Hoffer movedThe Chronicle to
Eastpoint at the end of 2002. He built two duplexes on the propertyind local
writers joined the staff. On December 9, 2006 he passed away, but the
Chronicle still goes on with some new staff members.
Subscriptions
Changes in subscription addresses must be sent taThe Chronicle
in writing. In-county subscriptions are $22.00 a year; out-of-coun-
ty subscriptions are $29.00 a year
To Submit News and Ads
Submit news and ads to franklinchronicle@gtcom.net or to.B.
Box 590, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Deadline is Monday at noon for
that week's issue.
All contents Copyright 2007
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


"You ain't from around here, are ya?"


I suppose there are a few people out there who
might incorrectly assume that because a person has
lived in Eastpoint for 30 years or so, he could right-
fully call himself an "Eastpointer." I am not so
naive. I would never, even in my wildest dream tell
anyone that I was an Eastpointer. I could no more
be an Eastpointer
than if captured by a
Seminole as a child
and held on a reserva-
tion .for 30 years
would I be an Indian.
But when intro-
ducing myself to peo-
ple from far off and
distant places like
"Tallahassee" for T. 9
example, I can refer
to myself as an By Richard E. Noble
" Eastp o-inter"
because what the
heck would they know, anyway. They probably
wouldn't know an oysterman from a fisherman, a
crabber from a picker, a shucker from a culler or a
dealer from a deckhand.
Often here in this neighborhood people refer to
me as a "Yankee" sometimes even as a "damn
Yankee." I was informed the very first night that I
arrived here in Eastpoint of the difference between
the two definitions.
The wife and I were at the old Charlie's Bar
when a rather large fellow with a mud stained T-
shirt, a baseball cap and a pair of ragged looking
stained white rubber boots came up to the bar next
to where we were sitting. He looked me up and
down rather curiously, and then said, "You ain't
from around here, are ya?"
My first thought was how did this guy come to
the conclusion that I wasn't from around here? I
mean it wasn't like I was Chinese or something. I
wasn't dressed in a tuxedo or sporting a Gene
Autry cowboy shirt and 10-gallon, wild west hat. I
mean before landing here in Eastpoint, I had been
from one corner of this country to another. My
wife and I had traveled from Oregon and
Washington State to Fort Lauderdale and Key
West, from Baja and San Diego, to Portland,
Maine and Boston, Mass., from the upper peninsu-
la of Michigan to Port Isabel, Texas. Like the song
said, "We had been everywhere man." And in trav-
eling to all these different places no one ever looked
at us and said "You ain't from around here, are
ya?" That was weird.
"No I ain't," I said.
"I didn't think so. Where are you from any-
way?"
"Well, before we arrived here we were working
in Orlando."
"You ain't from Orlando."


"You mean where was I born and raised?"
"Yeah, that's what I mean."
"Well, originally I'm from New England -
Massachusetts in particular."
"That is just what I thought! You're a Yankee."
Now I thought that was rather peculiar. All the
many years that I had lived in New England
nobody had ever called me a Yankee. I was raised
in a town up there that was called the "Immigrant
City." We had somewhere around 40 to 60 different
nationalities who had settled there over the genera-
tions. I had been called a "Polack" and I had been
called a "Harp" and I had sometimes been called a
"Limey" depending on which :of my immediate
ancestors my accuser was familiar with. But no one
had ever called me a Yankee.
"What the heck is a Yankee anyway?" I asked.
"Well there's two kinds," he said. "Let me ask
you a question. Are you just passing through or are
you looking' to buy a place and settle here?"
"At the moment we ain't planning on settling
anywhere," I said. "We plan on staying any place
that we can find work."
"Well, we got plenty of that around here. But
if you ain't thinking of settling here and you're just
planning on passing through that would make you
just a plan old Yankee."
"And if I was planning on settling in?"
"Well, in that case you would be one of them
damn Yankees."
Everybody around the bar laughed. When the
big gentleman walked away the bartender said,
"Don't mind him. He don't mean nothing' by it. He
can't help himself ... he's an Eastpointer."
At this point I still don't know if being known
as an Eastpointer is a good thing or a bad thing.
When my wife and I began our careers as "oyster
people" we were working for this fellow who
owned a little campground down by the water's
edge. We were standing on the "hill" one morning
warming our hands over a small fire when I asked
the old "salt" if he was originally from Eastpoint.
He immediately began laughing and slapping his
thighs and elbowing everyone standing around
him. "He thinks I'm an Eastpointer," the man said
laughing and sputtering. "Can you believe that?"
Well after the laughing and sputtering died
down, I followed up and said, "Well where are you
from anyway?" I was sure that he was going to tell
me that he was from Georgia or Alabama, or
Louisiana or some place like that, but instead he
proclaimed, "Why I'm from Carrabelle originally. I
don't have no relation to none of these folks over
this a way."
So there you go.
My conclusion was that if Carrabelle was a
separate entity to this "Eastpointer" then maybe
being a Yankee wasn't all that distant either.
Continued on Page 5







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


12 October 2007 Page 5


The EastpointerfromPage4 Letter.To The Editor


Richard E. Noble has been an
"Eastpointer" for around 30 years
now. He has authored two books: 'A
Summer with Charlie, "which is cur-
rently listed on Amazon.cor, and
"Hobo-ing America" which should
be listed on Amazon in the not too
distant future. Most recently he com-
pleted his first novel, "Honor Thy
Father and Thy Mother," which will
be published and on sale soon.

The Editor fom Page 4

readers enjoy having the weekly
diversion of a crossword puzzle,
one of the traditional features
found in most newspapers.
In upcoming weeks, more
changes are planned, such as
obituaries, sports news, fishing
reports, and features about local
businesses and the entertainment
scene. Very soon, The Chronicle
will open a new Web site to post
headlines and to give our adver-
tisers another avenue. Also, in
January, your Chronicle will
include American Profile maga-
zine, a national "Sunday supple-
ment" type of magazine geared
toward celebrating traditional
American values.
Yes, many things have
changed about The Chronicle.
Based on my three decades of
experience in the newspaper
business, I know some of you
will be unhappy. Anytime a
newspaper makes a change, it
upsets some of its readers. Please
understand that all the changes
we'll be making are designed for
one purpose, which is to make
The Chronicle a more complete
community newspaper. If you
have any suggestions or com-
plaints, I'll be happy to read
them if you e-mail them to
franklinchronicle@gtcom.net.
The Chronicle was found-
ed some 16 years ago by Thomas
Hoffer, who decided to start a
newspaper in his adopted
Franklin County. He was not by
training or experience a journal-
ist, but he loved the press and he
loved Franklin County. Way
before the Internet gave birth to
citizen journalism, he practiced
citizen journalism in The
Chronicle. Tom Hoffer published
the paper for 16 years until he
died in 2006. Many of the citi-
zen-correspondents who con-
tributed to The Chronicle in the
past will stay with us as we
undertake this new adventure.
We appreciate their devotion to
journalism, because they certain-
ly aren't doing it for the money,
of which there is very little. If
you have a knack for writing,
don't be shy about offering your
services to The Chronicle. We can
always use another citizen jour-
nalist.





C HRO IC LIS




PUBL{ICIlTEREST
iANDi NOT A r~


Reaction from water commissioner
Dear Editor:
I am one of three commissioners serving the Lanark Village
Water and Sewer District. The commissioners and employees of the
Lanark District have remained virtually silent until now as a few indi-
viduals have made false accusations and spread fear and misinforma-
tion repeatedly throughout our community. At the District's last
meeting, an expert from the Florida Rural Water Association present-
ed a rate study which suggests that at the worst case, water and sewer
rates charged to District residents could double. The District made
clear that there would be a workshop and a hearing before rates can
increase and that there are a number of reasons why rates will not go
up by nearly that much.
I am sure that the beginning of this rate review will result once
again in one of the District commissioners, Pauline Sullivan, and her
.few followers attacking the District. In fact, District office employees
have already responded to customer calls informing us that Frank
Rush, who did not attend the board meeting, was misinforming peo-
ple the day after the meeting that the Board voted to double the rates
and that this rate increase is retroactive. Nothing could incite cus-
tomers more and nothing could be further from the truth.
I am writing to inform the public that the descriptions made by
Pauline Sullivan and Harriett Beach, who does not sign her reports in
The Franklin Chronicle, about District meetings have been biased and
inaccurate. Any disturbances that have occurred at our meetings have
been created by Ms. Sullivan, Bill Snyder or one of their small group.
To prove the point, the District videotaped the last District meeting.
The District will be glad to show it to anyone who is interested.
Ms. Sullivan, even before the meeting began, objected to some-
thing as ridiculous as how the tables and chairs were arranged. Many
times during the meeting, Ms. Sullivan could not control herself and
stood up until the District chair and finally a sheriff's deputy had to
instruct her to sit down. Ms. Sullivan freely insulted the other com-
missioners, rolled her eyes, and even took the side of Mr. William
Snyder who claims that he was "attacked" by a laser pointer used for
Power Point presentations at the last District meeting and that his eye
was damaged as a result. Ms. Sullivan stated that she has a doctor's
statement from Mr. Snyder, but she has refused to provide it to the
District. Putting aside the fact that Mr. Snyder's claim is ridiculous,
Ms. Sullivan's duty is to give the District a copy of Mr. Snyder's doc-
tor statement, if it exists, so that it can be provided to the District's
insurance company.
Ms. Sullivan's behavior is not surprising. She has been in the
District office when an intoxicated man threatened two of the
District's female employees and all she did was watch as Bill Snyder
filmed the women being abused. The women called the sheriff and
the man was told to stay away from the office.
Ms. Sullivan and her friends have entered the District office with
coins to pay a bill and demanded that one of our female employees
count the-coins in front of them before they would let our employee
do any of her other work. Of course, she was intimidated by the pres-
ence of three men and a commissioner, Pauline Sullivan, demanding
her to do what they said. Our employee was alone in the office, she
was intimidated and so she did what Ms. Sullivan and the men
demanded, she counted their pennies and coins.
Is this proper behavior for adult men and women, especially a
commissioner? We commissioners have been advised that our most
important obligation to Village residents is to see that safe and suffi-
cient water and wastewater service is provided. All District's commis-
sioners should also know without having to be told that they owe it
to District employees and the public to keep the office where employ-
ees must work safe and free of intimidating activities like the forced
counting of the coins.
Despite this obligation, on many Fridays, Ms. Sullivan and Bill
Snyder appear in the District office, and sometimes on other days as
well, with a video camera to film every move of District employees
and commissioners, follow us around the office, and attempt to make
us miserable. Commissioner Sullivan and Mr. Snyder know when the
office closes, so we expect them to arrive shortly before closing time
so that they can force at least one of the two women employees to
remain in the office past closing time. They make it very clear that
their intent is to provoke us. These actions of Commissioner Sullivan
and Mr. Snyder got so bad that the District Board had to pass a poli-
cy prohibiting video cameras in the office so the ladies will not be
harassed this way.
Ms. Sullivan at least twice has told one office employee that she
was "fired" because our employee would not do things that Ms.
Sullivan wanted done despite the fact that the Board had not author-
ized them to be done. She has had letters published in a local paper
which are mean and spiteful and she refuses to help us at the District.
She only looks for ways to hurt us or attempt to intimidate us. Why?
District Commissioners and office employees are only trying to
do our jobs. District employees working in the field are only trying to
do their jobs working at times in 90 and 100 degree heat in trenches
in the ground. Ask them who sticks video cameras in their faces as
they try to work? Who refuses to obey the barricades placed around
the trenches so that they can film the workers? Who taunts our
employees and tries to make the workers lose their tempers, probably
hoping that they will create another action to spread false stories
about? Who? Bill Snyder, Commissioner Sullivan and a couple of
their friends.
Pauline Sullivan tells the Board of County Commissioners and


suggested at the September District board meeting that she is afraid
for her safety at the District office and District meetings (as an excuse
for why Mr. Snyder trails her around with a video camera), but she
writes a letter to The Franklin Chronicle stating that District meetings
are fun entertainment like the World Wrestling Federation and
encourages the public to attend for such entertainment value. Of
course, we want the public to attend our meetings, but we do not
appreciate Commissioner Sullivan's obvious efforts at each meeting
to make it a circus. We will say it again, we are not perfect. We make
mistakes. But our only desire is to do our jobs as best we can to make
sure that Village residents are safe and have the service they need. We
believe that a new opportunity to work cooperatively with the City of
Carrabelle had opened, and we will do everything that we can to
develop that opportunity as we believe it is in the best interest of res-
idents of Carabelle and our Village that we do so.
Pauline Sullivan does not tell the elected officials, representatives
of the Governor's Office, the public or the news media about the
actions I have described inthis letter, but I think you should know
about them.
Ms. Sharon Thoman
sthoman@gtcom.net


Letter To The Editor

Reaction to Carvel article
I had to laugh at the article written by Richard Noble in regards
to James Carvel who is as Democrat as it gets and his wife, Mary
Madalin who is a Republican.
I am one of 17 children born to two Democrats. It is a joke with-
in our family of how can parents of 17 children be Democrats. You
see, 16 of us are Republicans and one is registered as an Independent.
There isn't one single Democratic child.
I must add that my husband is one of 11 children whose parents
were both Democrats, also. I would have to say that half of his sib-
lings are Democrats and the other half are Republicans.
So do you still think it is all genetics?
Debra Dahlin
Marietta, GA



Letter To The Editor

Comments on Clergy Appreciation Month
Dear Editor:
October is Clergy Appreciation Month. On behalf of Big Bend
Hospice, I extend our special thanks to our spiritual leaders, both
employees of our organization and those in the communities we
serve. Spiritual leaders are essential partners in helping Hospice ful-
fill our mission of providing compassionate care to those who are
dying. Each year, Big Bend Hospice provides more than 110,000
days of care to patients and families facing the end of life. The won-
derful men and women of faith greatly enhance and support compas-
sionate physical care by dealing with the spiritual issues that can
cause pain or bring peace at life's end. A family's clergy is often the
first person they turn to when facing a terminal diagnosis. I'thank our
religious leaders for opening the difficult discussions that so many
families need to have about end of life care.
Each quarter our spiritual care department sponsors "Breaking
Bread" luncheons so that area clergy can come together to discuss
issues surrounding end of life ministry, and to develop a network of
spiritual support. These luncheons are open to all clergy in our eight-
county service area. Big Bend Hospice has a dynamic team of chap-
lains serving each of our counties and ministering to the needs of our
patients. We are fortunate to have numerous volunteer clergy who
join our chaplains in providing a supportive presence to help our
patients find peace and closure.
Ministering to the needs of those facing the end of their time on
earth, helping heal spiritual wounds, and preparing for death is a dif-
ficult calling. I salute our spiritual leaders and extend my prayers of
support.
Carla Braveman, RN, M.Ed, CHCE
Big Bend Hospice
President and CEO
cbraveman@bigbendhospice.org

Local volunteer part of panel
Linda Miniciello, director of the Camp Gordon Johnston
Museum in Carrabelle, has accepted an invitationto participate in a
special tribute to World War II veterans.
On Nov. 4th, WFSU in Tallahassee will host a tribute to WW II
Veterans from 2-4 p.m. at the Museum of Florida History. Veterans
from the area are invited to attend. Veterans will be ushered into the
auditorium and welcomed by the Florida Secretary of State, followed
by a viewing of "The Florida War Diaries." Afterwards, there will be
a panel discussion to talk about resources available to veterans, dur-
ing which Linda Miniciello will participate. The event will bring
more attention to the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum, a special
treasure in downtown Carrabelle.






The Franklit Chronicle


Page 6 12 October 2007 A LOcALLYOWNED NEWSPAPER


October 11 18, 2007


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11
5:30-7:30 p.m.: Apalachicola Chamber of Commerce Business.
After Hours, Apalachicola State Bank in Eastpoint.
6:30 p.m.: Red Cross training in the Carrabelle Library.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12
6 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Oct. 12 through Saturday, Oct. 20, public radio
WKGC annual on-air fundraiser.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13
9 a.m..: Red Cross training in the Carrabelle Library.
1 p.m.: Red Cross training in the Carrabelle Library.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16
5 p.m.: Franklin County Commission meeting.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18
4:30 p.m.: Carrabelle Planning and Zoning meeting.
6:30 p.m.: Red Cross training in the Carrabelle Library.
If you want your organization's upcoming meeting listed in the
Community Calendar, e-mail your information to
FranklinChronicle(@gtcom.net. We will also list upcoming birth-
days and anniversaries here.




Red Cross holds classes in

Carrabelle Library
A series of Red Cross classes for people who would like to be disaster services vol-
unteers will be held at the library in Carrabelle. Volunteers are encouraged to take as
many classes as possible, but there are no prerequisites, so not being able to attend one
class does not prevent anyone from taking other classes. Here is the schedule:
Thursday, October 11, 6:30 p.m.: Fulfilling Our Mission: Translating Your
Compassion into Community Action
Saturday, October 13, 9 a.m.: Logistics
Saturday, October 13, 1 p.m.: Shelter Operations
Thursday,. October 18, 6:30 p.m.: Damage Assessment
Saturday, October 27, 9 a.m.: Client Casework-Providing Emergency Assistance.
You may register in one of three methods: Fax your name, phone number, course,
and date of course to (850) 838-1102; or phone (850) 584-6663 and leave your name,
phone number course and date of course; or online.at redcross.tallytown.com/training-
ds.html.


Clergy invited to Hospice luncheon
Big Bend Hospice invites area clergy to attend a special luncheon on Thursday,
October 18, 2007, at noon. The luncheon will be held in conference room C of the Big
Bend Hospice Elaine Bartelt Center located at 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee.
"We have planned a very special time for our clergy to gather, fellowship and to dis-
cuss issues that impact them in ministering to those who are dying," said Rev. Candace
McKibben, Big Bend Hospice Pastoral Care Coordinator. "At this quarterly meeting
we will be discussing Hospice and Your Congregation and our featured speaker will be
Big Bend Hospice President & CEO, Carla Braveman."
Strong and Jones Funeral Home is the luncheon sponsor for this quarterly meeting.
The meeting is open to all clergy in Leon, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Wakulla,
Franklin, Liberty and Gadsden counties. To make reservations for the luncheon, con-
tact Rev. Candace McKibben at Big Bend Hospice by October 16th. Her email address
is candace@hbigbendhospice.org or you may call her at (850) 878-5310 ext. 250 or toll
free at (800) 772-5862.







*, If,


The Clerk Of The Court

Your Public Trustee
Q. Is there a way to access your official records online?
A. At the Clerk's office, we make every effort possible to ensure the public has
access to our official records. Official records are defined as those instruments required
or authorized to be recorded in one general series called
"Official Records" at the county level. Instruments such
as deeds, mortgages, and judgments are among those
recorded here. You may go online at www.myfloridacoun-
Sty.com. Under Online Services, click on "Order Official
Records." Another screen will appear and click on "Non-
S Subscriber Search." You can then complete whatever
information you have available to you and click on "Begin
Search." There is different criteria for your search and you
can also search statewide instead of just for Franklin
Sl A County. Your search results will appear and you can select
SA fan instrument arid click on "View Image," and that instru-
ment's image will appear on screen. Franklin County's
By Marcia Johnson Clerk's Office allows you to print a copy of the images
without a charge.
Please remember; however, that this service does not provide criminal court
records. There are also benefits to becoming a subscriber versus a non-subscriber such
as discounted fees, monthly billing, and detailed financial reports that businesses may
prefer. Click on "Become a MyFlorida County.com Subscriber and enjoy the benefits."
If you have any questions or comments about this column, please forward them to:
Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market Street, Ste. 203, Apalachicola,
Florida, 32320, or by email to: nimjohnson@franklinclerk.com




CARRABELLE REALTY, INC.
P.O. Drawer 708 Carrabelle, FL

1 (850) 697-2181 1 (800) 530-1473

Ruby J. Litton, Broker 850-528-1 101
Dale Millender, Realtor Associate 850-519-7048






- . ..




This home has 6.5 acres that can be Golf Course: Prestigious lot on the 9th
divided, 3BR/2BA, fireplace, wood & tile tee, corner lot, reduced to $299,000
floors, enclosed garage, separate large owner/agent.
workshop. MAKE OFFER! Asking
$345,000, appraised at $395,000-
$50,000 equity. A great investment to
have a home and sell off some
acreage!
NEW LISTINGS:
Beach lot in private area, 50'x100', $895,000.
One acre on Harbor Rd., high & dry, $89,900.
*44 acre parcels in Pine Coast Plantation, $225,000.
1.97 acre homesite, cleared, Baywood Estates, $98,900.
*10 acres in Riverbend Plantation, $225,000.
2.53 acres with large pond, Baywood Estates, $164,900.
*8 acres Riverbend Plantation, approximately 500' Crooked
River, $349,000.
*2.2 acres Creekfront, Victorian Village, shared dock,
$395,500.
*1-1/2 city lot s with riverview, $225,000.
*Bayfront, 50x162, $324,500.
Riverview, 2BR/1BA, TWO LOTS, fenced front yard, needs
a little TLC, $165,000.
Great Weekend Retreat, close to water, 2BR/1BA Cottage,
$118,200.00.
Two Lots, near bay on Carolina Street, has old MH on it (AS
IS), asking $160,000.

OWNER FINANCING WITH 10% DOWN AND 7% INTEREST.


A LOCALLY' OWNED NEWSPAPER


Page 6 12 October 2007







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


12 October 2007 Page 7


County agrees to new hotel rules


Franklin County
finally has a new
definition of exactly
what constitutes a
motel
At the County Commission
meeting on Oct. 2, commission-
ers voted 4 to 1 to approve the
definition. It's an issue that has
taken some two years to resolve.
In 2005, the County
Commission passed a moratori-
um prohibiting the development
of motels until a new ordinance
could be approved. This month's
vote sets up passage of an official
hotel/motel ordinance, which
would then clear the way for
development of motels to
resume.
One of the issues that sur-
faced iin 2005 is that county offi-
cials wanted to make sure that
motel owners weren't using their
motel as their residence, essen-
tiallj creating residential proper-
ty in a commercial zone. This
especially could happen in a
motel in which each unit is
owned by an individual, similar
to a condominium.
Some of the highlights of
the new ordinance are:
Motels must pay the coun-
ty tourist tax;
Motels must have 1.5 park-
ing spaces for each sleeping
room;
No unit owner is allowed
to occupy a unit owned by them
for more than 30 days per year;
Guests are limited to six-
month stays;
There must be a 24-hour


Following is the report pre-
sented to the Franklin County
Comrmssion on Oct. 2 from Bill
Mahan, county extension diiec-
tor.
NOAA Fisheries Update:
NO.LA Fisheries has extended
the interim red snapper and com-
mercial shrimp regulations for
up to an additional 180-days to
allow for additional comments
on the currently proposed regula-
tions. The original interim rules
expired on September 29th.
Fish & Wildlife
Commission Update: The next
FWC meeting is scheduled for
December 5th & 6th, 2007 in
Key Largo. On October 1st, the
price of all recreational hunting
and fishing licenses was
increased. The annual freshwater
and saltwater licenses increased
from $13.50 to $17.00.
Red Tide Status: Currently
the red tide organism Karina bre-
vis is being reported in the fol-
lowing areas-East Coast-
Nassau, Duval and St. Johns
counties in concentrations rang-
ing from background to high.
Southwest Coast: southern Lee
County-low levels and off
Collier County-very low levels.

lobby on site.
There must be a single
metered utility service for the
entire parcel.
The units can not qualify
for homestead exemption.
The entire property must
be connected to a cental water
and sewer.


Northwest Coast: Medium levels
were found 2 19 miles west of
the mouth of St. Andrews Bay.
In addition, background to very
low concenrranons of K brevis
were reported in St. Joseph Bay.
Zebra Mussel Update:
Zebra mussels were first discov-
ered in the U.S. (Great Lakes) in
1988. Today they are found in
the Great Lakes, Mississippi,
Ohio, Tennessee and Arkansas
River systems. Dunng the past
few years, it has expanded its
range very little. However, with-
in its current range it has invest-
ed many new locations along the
rivers and is now found in many
small lakes, not connected to any
rivers or the Great Lakes.
Redtail Catfish found in St.
Andrews Bay: An 18-inch, 5-
pound, South Amencan redtail
catfish was found dead in St.
Andrews Bay. This fish, in the
wild, can reach a length of 5-feet
and weigh 110 pounds, is
believed to have been released,
when it outgrew its fish tank.
UF-IFAS Turkey/Deer
Short Course: As a reminder,
the UF-IFAS Deer & Turkey
Short Course (seminars, field
tours, demonstrations & trade

A handful of business own-
ers spoke about the ordinance,
most of them suggesting one
change or another.
While there wasn't universal
agreement among commission-
ets, in the end they voted 4 to 1
to approve the ordinance.
Commissioner Noah Lockley


show) will be held October 4-5,
2007 at our North Florida
Research & Educaton Center in
Quincy. The program is for
landowners, managers, hunters
and others interested in deer &
turkey habitat management and
best herd/flock management
techniques. There is a registra-
tion fee of $100 for the course.
FSU Marine Lab Seminar:
Attached for your information is
a flier for the upcoming lecture
'Has anyone seen my date? The
consequences of being rare in
the sea.' by Dr. Don Levitan.
The program is scheduled for
Thursday, October 1lth at FSU
Marine Lab, Turkey Point, from
7-9 p.m.
Oyster School Update: As
of yesterday (Oct. 1), 20 people
have registered representing 15
companies. Currently some of
the better known companies
sending representatives are:
Publix Super Markets, Winn-
Dixie, Outback, Sysco Foods
and Disney. In addition we are
trying to target buyers a few
more Tallahassee restaurant
chains. The Oyster School will
be held October 17th 18th.


voted against it based on his
objection to limiting the property
owner to 30 days.
Here is a summary of other
county commisison action.
Road work results from sewer
expansion
A project to extend city


SBill Mahan's report


St. Joe announces restructuring


The St. Joe Company has
announced it is restructuring the
company in an effort to increase
its financial flexibility and
strengthen its balance sheet.
To improve its financial per-
formance the company intends
to:
Significantly reduce capital
expenditures;
Meaningfully decrease sell-
ing, general and administrative
expenses;
Divest non-core assets;
Aggressively lower compa-
ny debt; and
Eliminate the current divi-
dend and over time return value
to shareholders through JOE's
share repurchase program.
"Going forward, a restruc-
tured JOE will enable us to
accelerate the transition of our
land to higher and better uses,"
said Peter S. Rummell, chairman
and CEO of St. Joe. "At the
same time, we will limit our cap-
ital investments by shifting more
development to a range of best-
of-class strategic business part-
ners that include branded
builders, project developers, ven-
ture partners, alliances and key
long-term customers. Capital
investment for horizontal devel-


opments will be limited to our
most strategic and valuable
places. We believe this approach
will accelerate our land sales and
development.
"By better managing our
fixed overhead costs, we will be
able to preserve the low basis in
our land, which is fundamental
to our ability to use price as a
competitive advantage, to put
time back on our side and to cre-
ate significant value over the
long term.
"We are dramatically chang-
ing the company to become
more efficient," said Rummell.
"Through our restructuring
process, we will significantly
reduce capital expenditure
requirements and operate with a
leaner infrastructure. We believe
JOE will benefit from a stronger
balance sheet and, over time, a
meaningful increase in our finan-
cial flexibility."
The company intends to har-
vest value from its land assets
that are no longer fit its plan. St.
Joe intends to divest, over a rea-
sonable time period given cur-
rent market conditions, assets
that include: Sunshine State
Cypress Mill, selected non-con-
tiguous parcels with commercial


entitlements, and approximately
100,000 acres of long-term rural
lands.
Also priced to sell are
approximately 1,200 developed
home sites and approximately
190 homes.
The restructuring plan calls
for a major reduction in capital
expenditures and tighter focus
on high-growth assets. Currently
located primarily in Walton, Bay
and Gulf Counties, these high-
growth assets are the primary
targets for future new business,
partners and ventures. Examples
of these growth assets include:
-The 75,000-acre WestBay
Sector to be anchored by the
relocated Panama City-Bay
County International Airport.
After nearly 10 years of study,
analysis and permitting, the local
airport authority is nearing the
start of construction of the air-
port.
The resorts at WaterSound
and WindMark Beach. In
Walton and'Gulf counties, the
company's resorts are existing
keys to future value creation.
The. Town of WaterSound is
designed to drive value inland,
across U.S. 98 all the way to the


Intracoastal Waterway. The
thousands of acres within this
development zone are capable of
supporting dozens of land uses.
A hundred miles to the east
of WaterSound, St. Joe is seek-
ing additional strategic partners
to accelerate growth at
WindMark Beach and for Port
St. Joe's planned waterfront
town center.
To accomplish these objec-
tives will require a realigned
company. To that end, the com-
pany is creating a streamlined
corporate and regional staff to
support the new structure,
instead of an organization
designed to support full-scale
development; partnering with
nationally recognized leisure,
hospitality and lifestyle brands to
operate our hospitality, recre-
ational and golf assets; and seek-
ing relationships with strategic
partners to leverage existing
investment and expertise.
The new company will con-
sist of a lean corporate center
focused on regional planning,
land-use entitlements, and busi-
ness-to-business relationships
with strategic partners and cus-
tomers. St. Joe will increase its


efforts to stimulate regional eco-
nomic development and to iden-
tify and manage key regional
inducers.
Before the end of the year,
the company intends to transfer
the day-to-day operations of its
hospitality, recreational and golf
assets to recognized leisure, hos-
pitality and lifestyle companies.
For many of the approximately
500 employees in these units, this
change will provide significant
new professional opportunities.
The company will continue to
own the assets to keep the rev-
enue stream and ensure they
continue to be managed in a way
that increases the value of the
surrounding land.
Approximately 260 addi-
tional positions company-wide,
particularly in project develop-
ment and related support staff,
.will be either eliminated or trans-
ferred to strategic partners and
customers between now and the
end of 2008.
St. Joe's restructuring is
expected to generate annual sav-
ings of approximately $10 mil-
lion in 2008, approximately $18
million in 2009 and approxi-
mately $20 million in later years.


/
I I
I
/ /'
I I I I
I


sewer from Carrabelle toward
the west will make it necessary
to cut Gulf Beach Drive near
Two Al's restaurant in upcoming
weeks while sewer lines are
installed. Residents will still be
able to get to and from their
homes while the work is ongo-
ing.
Beach Advisories
County Commissioner
Smokey Parrish wants an expla-
nation regarding what is causing
contaminated beaches in.
Franklin County this year. The
state Health Department sam-
ples the water weekly for bacte-
ria, but state officials do not
identify what the source of the
bacteria is. After Commissioner
Parrish raised the issue, county
commissioners agreed to send a
letter to health officials asking
for more detailed information.

Sea Turtle Report
A report from Bruce Drye,
who monitors sea turtle nests on
St. George Island, indicated that
only 66 loggerhead nests were
identified this year. That com-
pares to over 100 nests five years
ago. Of those 66 nests, only 48
hatched out, and at least 10 of
those baby turtles were attracted
by outdoor lighting away from
the Gulf. Although outdoor
lighting is a common problem,
another problem is that many
beachgoers leave items on the
beach, such as blankets, coolers
and beach paraphernalia. This
causes many female turtles to go
back into the water before laying
eggs in search of another loca-
tion, he said.







Page 8 12 October 2007 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER The Franklin Chronicle





Attention Lanark Village Property Owners
Hi, I'm Bill Snyder and I'm the chairman of the Concerned Citizens of Lanark Village. Once again we are asking the Land owners of the Lanark Village Water andSewe
District to Sign a petition to dissolve the District We need to dissolve the district in order to merge our system with the city of Carrabelle's. As most of you remember we
were working on this a few months ago and a large number ofyou signed petitions to dissolve. Our attempt to dissolve our district and merge the two systems failed at that
time. We withdrew our support on that attempt at the last minute because we felt the deal we were being offered was not in the people of Lanark's best interest. At that time
the officials of the city of Carrabelle did not understand how important some of the issues were to our Village, thus we were unable to indorse the deal that Carrabelle pro-
posed in the end Since then, we have talked to them a great deal, and we all agree that a merger is the only thing that makes sense for both towns.
We have worked out our differences. Carrabelle's officials have proposed, at their last meeting, to work together and make a merger happen. They told the people ofLanark
that if we merge we would be apart of their system. We would be treated the same as their citizens. They said that we would be charged the same as anyone that is outside
of their city limits. They also assured us that we would not lose afew of the key pieces of land that are needed in the Village. They say they will be happy to give us at least
a hundredyear lease at a dollar a year for the property that the association uses for boat and RVstorage. They will offer the same deal for the two lots that the office trail-
er is situated on. They also agreed that the fire department will need more land for future expansion and room for training exercises. We have asked that they get three acre
with the same lease agreement. We were told that this would not be a problem.
Please read the petition carefully and if you agree with it, sign it and get it back to us as soon as possible. Everyone whose name appears on a property deed within the
Lanark district can sign.
If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to call 850-697-3189. You can get more information and updates at the following website:
http://www.freewebs.com/lvwsdsaga/ You can email us at lanarkyayhoos@yahoo.com. The concerned citizens of Lanark Village, 2332 Enabob St., Lanark Village, FL
32323.


A CaQrabelle Merger Makes the Most Cents for the LVWSD Rate Payers
Carrabelle generously offers to work with all of the people, regardless of social status, to provide affordable water and sewer rates, good quality water, protect our natural
resources, and preserve a healthy environment for us to enjoy.
Carrabelle listens to LVWSD concerns and has re-opened communication between the Lanark district and it's residents in regards to merging the two water and sewer sys-
tems.
*At the most recent Carrabelle city meeting, the Carrabelle boardproposed working together to make a merger that would benefit both towns.
LVWSD would be a part of Carrabelle's system and our residents would be treated the same as their citizens. This insures that the LVWSD rates will remain competitive
with neighboring communities.
Carrab'elle wants ALL residents to be able to afford water and sewer services, not just the rich.
Carrabelle can refinance the LVWSD debt at a much lower interest rate (perhaps 2.3%) and the state has offered some money to help make this merger work.
Duplicated costs, such as for the trihalomethane problem. will be.eliminated
LVWSD rate payers would be charged the same as anyone that lives outside of the Carrabelle city limits.
The ready-to-serve fees that many Lanark landowners are being forced to pay, even though they don't have a connection, will stop.
LVWSD can keep the key pieces of land that they need, such as the boat and RV storage area that the Lanark Village Association uses, and the two lots that the office
trailer is situated on. This can be done through at least a hundred year lease at a dollar a year.
Carrabelle also agreed that the fire department will need land for future expansion and training exerciMs. have been assured that they will get what they needThree
additional acres are under negotiation with the same lease agreement.
Over time, new sewer lines will decrease the need for costly septic tanks. This promotes a healthier environment for our treasured and irreplaceablpalachicola Bay
ecosystem.
Franklin County water will remain the property of the people, and not Ar law firms and international bond buyers.
In sum, Carrabelle has generously offered to work with all the people, regardless of their social status, to provide affordable water and sewer rates, good quality water,
protect our natural resources, and preserve a healthy environment for us to enjoy.

Current LVWSD Ratepayer Concerns
LVWSD's 2006-2007 report from Florida Rural Water Association shows an annual shortfall of $65,787 and a debt of about $900,000.
The Concerned Citizens of Lanark Village, 2332 Enabob St., Lanark Village, FL 32323.

Let's Merge Our System with Carrabelle's System.

It is the Only Thing That Makes Cents!
Many unnecessary expenses were incurred during 2006-07. These include over $30Kfor attorney fees and over $5000for insurance for one of our district commission-
ers.
LVWSD's old system needs a major upgrade and is under a DEP consent order to fix a problem with trihalomethane levels that are considered too high.
Since last year there have been many pipe breaks including at least one that the LVWSD workers could not fix without the assistance of volunteer Carrabelle manage-
ment.
Money and expertise to redo or upgrade the LVWSD is lacking; the LVWSD Chairperson wants to undertake a $12.87 million improvement plan for future growth. The
rate payers will be expected to foot the bill
Florida Rural Water Association predicts a 20 year increase in demand, based on Franklin County historicalfigures and a South Florida growth rate. They forgot the ave
age age in IVWSD is significantly greater, approximately 61, than other areas, making normal growth estimates, including births, invalid.
Growth and current expenses will cost the Lanark residents approximately $855,301.76 nextyear. This includes about $84,000for a LVSWD manager and another $30K
in legal fees, in addition to our previous debt.
LVWSD's proposed FY2007-08 budget by Florida Rural Water Association is $855,301.76 (over 100% from FY2006-2007 revenue of $381,981). LVWSD residents will
be asked to pay a combination of significantly higher water and sewer service chges and or ad valorem property taxes, to support the budget.
The current LVWSD board is inefficient in managing the budget and no checks and balances are in place to insure that the expenses are appropriate.
The current LVWSD chair has lost touch with the majority of the people she represents. For example, discussion of anything she does not want to hear is gaveled out and
residents now have no voice.
We do not have Democracy in regards to the Lanark Water and Sewer District. Two LVWSD commissioners and the office secretary have effectively prevented the third
commissioner from participating in governance of the district.
In sum, LVWSD still has an old failing system; it still meets conditions as set forth in Section 218.503 for a unit of local government in a state offinancial emergency;
and its management is getting worse.

Petition To Dissolve The Lanark Village Water And Sewer District
By signing this petition we agree that we own property within the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District and we wish to dissolve the Lanark Village Water and Sewer
District We believe that the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District located in Franklin County Florida does not serve the needs of the people, and thus should be dis-
solved.
Signature: Lanark Village Property Address: Print:

Signature: Lanark Village Property Address: Print:

Signature: Lanark Village Property Address: Print:______
if you agree with this petition, please sign it and return it to:
The Concerned Citizens of Lanark Village; P.O. Box 442; Lanark Village, Florida 32323
PAID AD VER TISEMENT BY THE CONCERNED CITIZENS OF LANARK VILLAGE









The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


12 October 2007 Page 9


A Lanark/Carrabelle Merger Makes The Most Cents For Lanark

Village Water And Sewer District Land Owners And Rate Payers

If the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District remains a stand alone special district, and does not merge with Carrabelle, Lanark's
water and sewer rates will increase dramatically, and all of us will likely be forced to pay ad valorem taxes as high as 2 mils. Below is a
comparison that shows what the rate increases will be under different scenarios as prepared by the Lanark districts engineers. No mat-
ter which plan the Lanark district Commissioners choose, we are all going to have to pay a significantly higher water and sewer bill.
LVWSD's proposed budget will go up over 100% and the residents and property owners will be expected to pay the bill!
THE CONCERNED CITIZENS OF LANARK VILLAGE, 2332 ENABOB ST., LANARK VILLAGE, FL 32323


Florida Rural Water Association Date; -Sep-07
Member Lanark Village Water & Sewer District County Franklin
Project Rate & Connection Fee Report WS 4 1190414

PROPOSED 2008 RATES
with Improvements 0% Grant & 100% Loan
Est Revenues
WATER $581,144.45
$48.63 Base Rate Charged to All Customers


Residential
$2.50
$2.55
$2.60
$2.65
$58.68


WASTEWATER
$40 50
Residential
$250
$255
$2.60
$2.65
$50.55


FY 2007-08 Budget


FY 2006-07 Revenue $381,'

FY 2006-07 Shortfall (5526,46

CURRENT CONNECTION FEES


Commercial Monthly Usage Charges
$2 50 0 to 3,000 gallons
$3.05 3,001 to 6000 gal
$3 60 6,001 to 9,000 gal
$4.15 9,001 + gallons Residential
Average Residential Water Bill


Base Rate Charged to All Customers
Commercial Monthly Usage Charges
$2 50 0 to 3,000 gallons
$3,05 3,001 to 6000 gal
$3 60 6,001 to 9,000 gal
$4.15 9.001 + gallons Residential
Average Residential Wastewater Bill


$908,451.57 -


$327,339.23







$908483.68

100.0%


'81 67 Actual

r9.90) 238% Min. Increase Needed


WATER


Capacity Charges
(Treatment & Piping)
Connection Fees
ICost to set Meter or Sewer Collection De
Security Deposit

Total Utility Connections

Total Water & SeWer Connections


$1,500

$350


$1,850


WASTEWATER
Gravity Vacuum
$2,000 $2 000


$1,500

$50


$3,550

$5,400


$3,500

$50


55,550

$7,400


Florida Rural Water Association Date: 17-SepO7
Member Lanark Village Water & Sewer District County Franklin
Project: Rate & Connection Fee Report PWS: 1190414

PROPOSED 2008 RATES
with Improvements 20% Grant & 80% Loan
Est Revenues
WATER $558,751.49
$46 45 Base Rate Charged to All Customers
Residential Commercial Monthly Usage Charges


$2 50
$2.55
$2.60
$265
$58.50


WASTEWATER
$35,00
Residential
$2.50
$2.55
$2.60
$265
$45.05


FY 2007-08 Budget

FY2006-07 Revenue

FY 2006-07 Shortfall


$2.50 0 to 3,000 gallons
$3.05 3,001 to 6000 gal
$3 60 6,001 to 9,000 gal
$4.15 9,001 + gallons Residential
Average Residential Water Bill


$296,913.23
Base Rate Cnarged to All Customers
Commercial Monthly Usage Charges
$2.50 Oto 3,000 gallons
$3,05 3,001 to 6000 gal
$3.60 6,001 to 9.000 gal
$4 15 9 001 + gallons Residential
Average Residential Wastewater Bill
$855,664.72

5855,282.43 100.0%

$331.981.67 Actual

($473,300.76) 224% Min. Increase Needed


CURRENT CONNECTION FEES


Capacity Charges
(Treatment & Piping)
Connection Fees
(Cost to set Mete r .,r Sewer Collection Del
Security Deposit

Total Utility Connections

Total Water & Sewer Connections


WATER


$1,500

$350


$1,850


WASTEWATER
Gravity Vacuum
$2,000 $2,000

$1,500 $3,500


$3,550 $5,550


$5,400


$7,400


PAID ADVERTISEMENT BY THE CONCERNED CITIZENS OF LANARK VILLAGE


Florida Rural Water Association Date: 17.Sep-D7
Member. Lanark Village Water & Sewer District County: Frankln
Project Rate & Connection Fee Report PWS: 1190414

PROPOSED 2008 RATES
with Improvements 45% Grant & 55% Loan
Est. Revenues
WATER $518,177.09
$42.50 Base Rate Charged to All Customers
Reside4tial Commercial Monthly Usage Charges
2 50 $2 50 0 0o 3 000 gallons
$2.55 $3.95 3,001 to 6000 gal
$2.60 $3,60 6,001 to 9,000 gal
$2.65 $4.15 9,001 + gallons Residential
$52.55 Average Residential Water Bill

WASTEWATER 5285,849.23
$33.00 Base Rate Crarged to All Customers
Residential Commercial Monthly Usage Charges
$2.50 $2.50 0 to 3,000 gallons
$2.55 $3.05 3,001 to 8000 gal
$2.60 $3.60 8,001 to 9 000 gal
$2.65 $4.15 9 001 + gallons Residential
$43.05 Average Residential Wastewater Bill
$804,026.32

FY20078 Budget $802.184.13 100 2%

FY 2006-07 Revenue $381,981 67 Actual

FY 2006-07 Shortfall ($420,202.46) 210% MIn. Increase Needed

CURRENT CONNECTION FEES
WATER WASTEWATER
Gravity Vacuum
Capacity Charges $1,500 $2,000 $2,000
Treatment & Piping)
Connection Fees $350 $1,500 $3.500
(Cost to set Meter or Sewer Collection Devices)
Security Deposit 50 $50

Total Utility Connections $1,850 $3,550 $5,550

Total Water & Sewer Connections $5,400 $7,400


Florida Rural Water Association
hM&rTir Lanrl Village Water & Sewer Oirric Coutty Frankld
Priject Rate & Connectlon Fee Report Ps; 190414

COMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVES
Average Average
Residential Total Estimated
Proposed 2008 Rates Budget Revenue Residentl a Residential Total Estimate
Water atil Wastewater Average BiIl increase
BIll
currtrnt Rates & -i
CurntRates 208 $447,769.00 ($381,981.67) $24.00 $24.00 S48.00
Budget
Balanced Budget 2008
aaced Budg $447,769,00 $447.791,61 $27.30 $25.26 $S5255 9%
Rates
Balances Budget w
Recommended $618.175,17 5619.520.32 $37.55 $37.55 $75.10 56%
Reserves .
Proposed Water & Sewer Improvements with 0% Grant &100% Loan
Rates Supporting $08,451.57 $908,483.68 $58.88 $50. 5 $109.23 128%
Improvements
1 MIL ad valorem tax 908.454.64 $908,534.90 $46.30 $40.05 586,35 80%

2 MIL ad valorem tax $908,452.45 S908.498.28 $34.45 S28.5S .83,00 31%

Proposed Water & Sewer Improvements with 20% Grant & 80% Loan

Rates Su$855,282.43 $855,664.72 .58.50 $45.05 $10155 1I2%
Improvments
1 MIL ad valorem tax $865.301,76 8855,9868.0 42.80 $37.05 $79.85 88%

2 MIL ad valorem tax $855,349.32 $856,779.48 $31,30 $25,08 $56.35 17%

Proposed Water & Sewer Improvements with 45% Grant & 55% Lon
Rates Supporting
ars avrnents $802,184.13 s804.21z 32 $52.S5 $43.05 95.0 99%

I MIL ad valoremtak $802,084.86 $802,368 0 $41.35 30.05 S71.40 49%

2 MIL ad valoremtax $802,208.32 S804.429.48 $27.55 $22.55 $50 10 4%







FPimW teal W knrA gooBatos l eAm dA te RAtt 0w0


~"- ~"I"' `







Page 10 12 October 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Oyster Spat
race results
Here are the results of the
2nd Annual Oyster Spat Festival
5K (3.1 mile) Run, along with
any special recognition. It was
sponsored by Angela and Larry
Troy at Island Oufitters, 235
Gulf Beach Drive, St. George
Island.
1 Vince Molasky, 1st Male; 2
Ryan Puckett; 3 Hobson Fulmer;
4 Barry Pugh; 5 Mike Motes; 6
Thomas Michael Shuler; 7
James Mann; 8 Bryon Sandier; 9
Cole Green, 1st 15 & Under; 10
Clayson Miles; 11 J. Gordon
Shuler; 12 Nick Yonclas; 13
Dwight Moss; 14 Chris Reber;
15 Dillon Bruckman; 16 Larry
Miller; 17 Marcus Dalton; 18
Bill Rembold; 19 Rod Key; 20
Don Nicholson; 21 Derek
McKeithen; 22 Dena Daugherty,
1st Female; 23 Deidre Fuerst; 24
Aimee Capps; 25 Audrey
Wiggins-House; 26 Becca
Daugherty; 27 Barbara Yonclas;
28 Colton Key; 29 Ben Cantrell;
30 Wendy Davis; 31 Nathan
Landrum; 32 Charles Everett; 33
William Kamard; 34 Dusty
Turner; 35 Robert Mccloskey; 36
Chonnie Baker; 37 John
Culbertson; 38 Elizabeth
Campagne; 39 Calyn Reber; 40
Kathy Jansen; 41 Tom Ahr; 43
Sue Crowe; 44 Dave Watt; 45
Cthy Ahr; 46 Megan Lamb; 47
Christine Corzine; 48 Russ
Petruka; 49 Alan Pierce; 50
Amber Powell; 51 Cody Klink;
52 Chris Corzine; 53 Tari
Minter; 54 Paige Covington; 55
Neil O'Boyle; 56 Cindy
Bielecky; 57 Paula O'Boyle; 58
Ellen Katz; 59 Lisa Underwood;
60 Janice Bequette; 61 Amy
Sims; 62 Paul Formby; 63 Colby
Allen; 64 Jensen Pugh; 65
Barbara Butler-Moore; 66 Seth
Harrell; 67 Barbara Gurr; 68 Jim
Upshaw; 69 Dakota Humble; 70
Jackie Mossburg 1st 71 and Over
73; Dan Katz; 74 William Crine;
75 Barbara Sanders; 76 Sonia
Wiggins; 77 Peyton Bennett; 78
Miranda Banks; 79 Isabel
Patentsas; 80 Dominique
Bennett; 81 April Still; 82 Austin
Wiggins; 83 Dyson Barksdale;
84 Dallas Wiggins; 85 Allen
Wiggins; 86 Addison Linn; 87
Barbara Winn; 88 Anita Moss;
89 Carolyn Upshaw; 90 Daniell
Sandler.


Want to

own a

home?
Habitat for Humanity of
Franklin County has two donat-
ed lots in Carrabelle, and is ready
to select the families. Anyone
interested can call the Habitat
office at 850-653-3113 and leave
a message, or pick up an applica-
tion at any Franklin County
branch library. Information is
also available about volunteering
your time, talents or money.





TE N LI
CHONCL I


Fun on St. George Island
The second annual Oyster Spat Festival turned out to be a
popular event on St. George Island last weekend, with hun-
dreds of visitors enjoying great seafood, beautiful weather,
local music and attractions. The event was hosted by the St.
George Island Business Association, with help from the
Franklin County Tourist Development Council and corpo-
rate sponsors.

Progress Energy to give

students $5,000


For students attending
GCCC Gulf/Franklin
Center in Port St. Joe
Larry Watson, community
relations manager for Progress
Energy, made a $5,000 check
presentation on October 3 at the
Gulf/Franklin Center in Port St.
Joe.
The gift will provide five
scholarship opportunities to stu-
dents who reside and attend
classes at the Gulf/Franklin
Center.
Each awarded student will
receive $500 per semester for the


2007-2008 academic year, pro-
vided the student's GPA and
enrollment status is maintained.
Dr. Jim Kerley, GCCC Presi-
dent, and the Gulf and Franklin
County District Board of
Trustees members were present
for the ceremony.
"Our mission is one of
opportunity and access, and this
donation will change the lives of
these students in so many posi-
tive ways," said-Kerley. "We are
so thankful for our friends, like
Progress Energy, who see the
advantages of how a post-sec-
ondary education can benefit the
entire community."


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Marine Construction Utility W ork-Public &
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MARKS INSURANCE

AGENCY, Ic.




WRITING:
Home, Auto, Life, Business, Marine, Bonds
and Other Lines of Insurance
See us for-your insurance needs at:
61 Avenue E
Apalachicola, Florida 32320
850-653-2161 800-586-1415


State park system developed
management plan


DEP readies 161st
state park for
recreational use
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
(DEP) Florida Park Service is
welcoming visitors to the 161st
state park, St. Marks River State
Park.
Located in Jefferson and
Leon counties, the 2,589-acre
property lies only 20 miles out-
side of Tallahassee. The state
park aids in buffering the St.
Marks River from development
and preserves its water quality
while also protecting the natural
communities in the floodplain.
"The division will hold pub-
lic workshops for interested com-
munity members to help develop
the unit management plan for
the park," said Florida. Park
Service Director Mike Bullock.
"We anticipate adding a parking
area, accessible restroom facili-
ties, a picnic facility and a kiosk
with brochures and information
about the park in the upcoming
months." "
Rich in cultural and natural
resources, St. Marks River State
Park houses dirt road systems
dating back to the mid-1800s.


State park archaeologists and
resource managers are studying
these road systems as well as
sinkholes and other cultural sites
to develop a historical under-
standing of the area. Currently,
visitors can explore the proper-
ty's wildlife by hiking or biking
on the park's existing road sys-
tem while the Florida Park
Service develops the manage-
ment plan and necessary infra-
structure for the park.
St. Marks River State Park is
home to a variety of native
wildlife for visitors to experience,
including the threatened black
bear, bobcats, fox, deer, turkeys
and fox squirrels. Birding enthu-
siasts can spot an array of hawks,
owls and ducks wading and fly-
ing within the park. The plush
river land provides a scenic
assortment of plant communities
including a floodplain forest,
xeric hammock, flatwoods, sand-
hill and bay heads.
The first two-time Gold
Medal winner honoring the
nation's best state park service,
Florida's state park system is one
of the largest in the country with
161 parks spanning almost
700,000 acres and 100 miles of
sandy white beach.


C1,zFunk
The Name
as It All '.
Nanci Kerr &
Clarice Powell
88 Market St. i .-
Apalachicola H
850-653-3885






Full-time Chaplain for Wakulla/Franklin Counties
Master's degree in divinity required. CPE preferred.
Must have skills in communication, cooperation and
compassion with patients and families, with the team
and with local clergy and congregations. Prefer can-
didates to live in Wakulla/Franklin County.

Big Bend Hospice, Human Resources Dept., 1723
Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308, (850)
701-1374.


V I I








The ranlin hroicl A LCALY ONED EWSAPE 12 O~tber2007 Pae 1


r~nrsnr A~n~Y~/


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& DAY SPA
European Pedicure Sp o European Facials
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Phone: .850-670-5220
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347 Highway 98 MANICURES,
P.O. Box 977 PEDICURES &
Eastpoint, FL 32328 ACRYLICS


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU










J'nitif

850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
SEST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30A.M.


Swap Meet


9bot 9Japtijt Chfu~tcw
St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!
Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 7:00 p.m.
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


ACROSS
1. Birdbath slime
6. Profs' degs.
10, White Monopoly
bills
14. "I swear!"
15. Muddy up
16. Flat fish
17, Merchant ship's
path
19. Bat the breeze
20. Helpful contacts
21. Sharer's word
22. Writes, modern-
style
24, Winter melons
27. In pieces
28. Cashless
exchange of
goods
32. Silvery fish
35. Aussie hoppers
36. Victorian
37. Patriot Nathan
38 Bozo or Krusty
40, Prudish sort
41. Source of iron
42. Frame of mind
43. Some wines
44. Number of yen to
the dollar, e.g.
48, Tries out
49 Gold or silver
53. Add fizz to
55: Philosopher Lao-

56. Stadium cheer
57, Blood flow
stoppage
58. Sudden reversal
62. It may ebb
63. Hefty volume
64. Tabloid duos
65. Tea leaves
reader
66. Lawn starter
67. Hawkins Day

DOWN
1, Bit of hijinks


070909


46. Took a break
47. Actor Guinness
50. Made a boo-boo
51. Watts of "King
Kong"
52." were the
days!
53. "Hamlet" has five
of them
54. Nobelist Wiesel
55, Umpire's call
59. Doomsayer's cry
60. Masters
Voice
61. JFK guesstimate


Crossword Puzzle Answers on Page 12


Stup n4 7oo p cl

MolEt
Njt7m o


-" SM
BAR-B-Q
Hickory-smoked the old-fashioned
way with all the fixns prepared from
our own recipes.
Now serving some of the
best seafood on the coast!
LUNCH BUFFET
Sunday-Friday
HOBO'S ICE CREAM
1593 West Highway 98-Carrabelle
697-2776
"Worth Driving 100 Miles For."
OPEN
Sun.-Thurs. 11.00 a.m. 8:00 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 11:00 9:00 p.m.
Closed Tuesday


000000000000000000000000000000
TWO CRACKED POTS PLANT NURSERY

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MIKE'S MARINE SUPPLY
P.O. BOX 429 HWY. 98 PANACEA, FL 32346
PHONE: (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693 FAX: (850) 984-5698
www.mikesmarine-panacea.com
HOURS: MON., TUES., THURS., FRI: 8:00 6:00
WED.: 8:00 1:00 SAT.: 8:00 5:00
PRO-LINE GHEENOE BOSTON WHALER
PONTOON BOATS -SEA PRO G-3 CENTURY


Air-Con of Wakulla, LLC
HEATING AND COOLING
850-926-5592
Installation
Service
Repair
Gary Limbaugh, owner Lic # CAC1814304
Serving Franklin and Wakulla Counties since 1988


. Amwerica Pralle Honet wn Conent
2. Doone"
3. Tiffany art
medium
4. Lend a hand to
5. Shoebox letters
6. "Swann's Way"
novelist Marcel
7. Lecture duration.
perhaps
8. Morse bit
9. Considers
overnight
10. Prized statuettes
11. Nolan Ryan's
seven
12, Flier to Ben-
Gurion
13. Gets firm
18, Ocean sound
23, Giants great Willie


25. Up to the task
26. Vampire in flight
27. "... pretty maids
all in "
29. Wear away
30. Toledo's lake
31. Periodicals,
briefly
32. Clog or pump
33. Groucho of
comedy
34. Current
conductor
38. Spelling bees,
e.g.
39. Cabin makeup
40. Limerick, for one
42. Sail supporter
43. Numbered rd.
45. Furnace, for one


A LOCA'LL Y OWNED NEWSPAPER


12'October 2007 Page 11


The Franklin Chronicle








Page 12 12 October 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


RnYrAStatewide


According to the State Library and Archives of Florida, this photo shows the first Carrabelle
High School football team. The exact year is unknown. The Archives say the publication
date was 19-. If you have an old photo of a scene from yesteryear in Franklin County that
you'd like to share with readers, please e-mail it to franklinchronicle@gtcom.net, or mail it
to The Franklin Chronicle, Attn: Yesteryear, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, Fl. 32328. Include as
much information as you have to explain the photo, and include your telephone number and
a self-addressed stamped envelop for return of the picture.



Man arrested on drug charges


On October 4, the Franklin
County Drug Unit received
information that a white male-
was entering Franklin County
from Georgia bringing in his
possession a large amount of
prescription medication, accord-
ing to a press release from the
Franklin County Sheriff's Office.
The white male was identi-
fied as James Davis, also known
as Sonny. The Drug Unit .had
been investigating Davis for sev-
eral weeks. The Drug Unit was
informed that Davis would be


coming into Eastpoint on Oct.
4th at noon and would be driving
a blue Ford truck.
At approximately 10:45 a.m.
the Drug Unit was notified that
Davis was in town. The Drug
Unit set up an undercover opera-
tion and made contact with
Davis. He was questioned in ref-
erence to selling prescription
medications in the county and
then Davis was placed under
arrest and transported to the
Franklin County Jail. During a
search of Davis, officers found


marked police drug buy money
in Davis's pocket and an empty
hydrocodone bottle under the
front driver's seat. Also found in
the truck was a 44mag pistol in
the center console and numerous
bottles of prescription medica-
tion for a total of approximately
323 pills:
The medication taken from
Davis were: Darvocet, Oxyco-
done, Alprazolam, Parovetine,
Vicodin, and Hydrocodone. _All
was seized for further investiga-
tion.


Port security a priority, Bronson says


Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson has called on Congress
to ensure that U.S. borders are
protected from plant and ani-
mal pests and diseases that have
ravaged Florida's agricultural
industry.
In testimony before a sub-
committee of the U.S. House
Agricultural Committee,
Bronson asserted that plant pests
alone, many of which come
from overseas, cost the nation's
agricultural industry an estimat-
ed $137 billion a year. And
Florida, with 28 airports or sea-
ports, nearly 50 million visitors a
year, some 6 million tons of per-
ishable cargo entering the state
each year and its mild semi-trop-
ical climate is perhaps the most
vulnerable state in the country to
this problem.
"In fact, historically, we dis-
cover one new foreign plant or
animal pest or disease a month
in Florida," Bronson said. "It is a


battle we fight on a daily basis."
Examples of the damage
such foreign introductions have
caused in Florida include citrus
canker, a bacterial disease which
has resulted in the loss of mil-
lions of citrus trees in recent
years, and citrus greening, an
insect-driven disease that has
currently spread to 27 counties in
the state.
The legislation that Bronson
is testifying in support of would
return the Agriculture
Quarantine Inspection (AQI)
program to the U.S. Department
of Agriculture. That is the pro-
gram where inspectors working
at international airports and sea-
ports monitor and inspect pas-
sengers and cargo to make sure
they are not introducing any for-
eign pests or diseases that could
harm U.S. agriculture.
In the wake of the terrorist
attacks on 9/11, the federal gov-
ernment has absorbed the AQI
into the Department of
Homeland Security, and some


critics say it has suffered as a
result.
Bronson emphasized during
his testimony that protecting the
country from terrorist attacks
must be the federal government's
top priority and commended
Homeland Security officials for
doing a "phenomenal job of that
mission." But the emphasis on
that mission may be inadvertent-
ly minimizing the attention that
needs to be paid to protecting the
nation's borders from agricultur-
al pests and diseases.
"Bombs and bullets are not
the only way to wreak havoc on
the United States," Bronson said.
"Damage inflicted on our econo-
my can have equal, and in some
cases longer term, impacts that
are much more difficult to recov-
er from. Unfortunately, Florida
knows all too well the economic
impacts a foreign pest or disease
can have on both an agricultural
sector and a state's economy."


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Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


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Rechoer4MilinRedrsbyclln
TheFrakln Croncl at85067-4377 _


f 012O ALL

Topper for small pickup: $75.00
Fax machine: $10.00
Assortment of bookcases: $10.00 to $50.00
File cabinets: $10.00
Desktop copy machine: $25.00
Call 670-4377 or 653-6390




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Au.i 1C w m


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


12 October 2007 Page 13


Fifth annual Leukemia Foundation raises $130,000


BY LAUREL NEWMAN
Chronicle Correspondent -
For the fifth year in a row,
Jimmie Crowder and his C-
Quarters Marina volunteers have
successfully sponsored one of
the fastest-growing, most popu-
lar fishing tournaments in the
area.
Emcee Jon Hill; known for
keeping the audience entertained
between weigh-ins at the Big
Bend- Saltwater Classic until
recently, remembered the first
Leukemia Foundation
Tournament, in 2003.
"It really started off with a
bang," he said. Jimmie had
recently lost his. daughter Lisa
Crowder Jackson to the disease,
at the age of 34, and he deter-
mined to establish a tournament
as a memorial to her, to raise
funds for leukemia research.
That first year the goal was to
raise $30,000 through sponsor-
ships, and guaranteed a pot of
$25,000.
."Well it surpassed expecta-
tions since that very first one,
which ended up with $61,200
going to the Leukemia
Foundation, and it has contin-
ued to grow," Hill said.
Over the intervening years,
the tournament has grown to a
two-day event, special awards
have been added to the pot, and
women and young anglers have
their own divisions.
"We have fishermen coming


in from all over," said Millard
Collins, the C-Quarters Marina
event organizer. "From Georgia,
all over Florida, even some from
Alabama and Mississippi."
On Saturday, September
29th, the day dawned cool and
calm, with a flat bay awaiting the
anglers as they set out at 7:30
a.m. from the mouth of the
Carrabelle River. Although
rougher weather was expected
before the end of the day,
prompting some of the regis-
tered fishermen to stay home
Saturday, hoping for better
weather Sunday, it didn't turn
out that way.
While stay-at-dockers and
onlookers enjoyed Jimmie's
famous barbecue ribs and chick-
en dinners, shopped for t-shirts,
and lounged around the shady
C-Quarters deck, enjoying the
cool river breezes, the anglers
were hard at work in the Gulf,
trying to wrest that big king from
increasing seas.
John Wilkes, fishing on
"Hunter's Pursuit," said, after
weighing in a 9.65-pound fish,
"It was not a hard decision to
come in."
More anglers began appear-
ing right at the 3 p.m. official
weigh-in time, almost all com-
plaining about the rough weath-
er. "Some of those boys were
downright green in the face
when they brought their fish to
the stage," weighmaster Jim
Davis observed, "and most of


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them are experienced fisher-
men."
At least the queasy anglers
did not have to tote the fish from
boat to the weigh station, as a
corps of young volunteer "dock-
masters" were standing by, eager
to grasp fish almost as long as
they are tall, and haul them to
the hook.
Austin Kyle Hathcock,
Elijah Cole Wheeler, Ryan
Williams and Hunter Lee vied
with each other for the dubious
honors, and appeared to be hav-
ing a grand time, judging by the
scaled, slimed and otherwise
begrimed state of their clothing
by close of weigh-in.
"I've been doing this for a
long time," one of the youngsters
declared. "So I know what I'm
doing."
As the weigh-in was coming.
to an end at 6 p.m., chief organ-
izer Millard Collins announced
that he would check the weather
report at 4 a.m. Sunday, and if a
small craft advisory were issued,
then fishing would be canceled,
and Saturday's standings would
become final.
This news was met with
mixed reactions; those in the big
money hoped for more bad
weather, all the fishermen who
came in lower on the board, not
at all, or who didn't venture, out
hoped for conditions to improve.
Tom Stephens who had the
leader of the day, a 26.95 fish,
was asked, "You ready to go out
tomorrow, Tom?" to which he
replied, "Just let it blow."
Sunday dawned fair and
breezy on land, but worse condi-
tions prevailed at sea, and the
advisory was called that kept
everyone ashore. The word
spread quickly, and the awards
ceremony began promptly at 2
p.m.


sible are dedicated to research.
Keep coming back for more fish-
ing for a good cause."
Emcee Hill added, "We
know that Lisa is smiling down
on us and she's proud of what is
being accomplished in her
name."
The checks were handed
out, the Calcutta results were
announced, and not only did
Tom Stephens of Panama City
go home with the $10,000 first-
place award, he took the top
Calcutta pay-out of $800. Since
no kingfish broke the standing
record of 35.95 pounds, estab-
lished in the tournament's first


year, and no wahoo at all were
weighed in, those awards (total-
ing $2,750) were added to the
Leukemia Foundation's dona-
tion.
Later, Jimmie Crowder
delivered a check for $130,000 to
Leukemia Research Foundation
Rob Grabemann and Amy
D'Arco.
"We appreciate everything
this tournament has done, and
what this means to research," he
had said Saturday. "In the last
five years, survival rates for cer-
tain types of cancer have gone
from five to eight percent. In a
war like this, that's significant."


Before handing out the prize
checks, Jimmie Crowder took ..,
the stage and thanked all the
anglers and sponsors for helping
to make the tournament a grow-
ing success. "This is a great trib- PHOTO BY LAUREL NEWMAN
ute to Lisa (Crowder Jackson) Tom Stephens, of Panama City carries his own winning fish
and the donations you make pos- to the weigh station.


PHOTO BY LAUREL NEWMAN
James Hayman, of Carrabelle, stands with the eighth-place
fish.


Fishing
Tournament
Final Standings

1st: Tom Stephens,
26.95, Renegade,
$10,000. 2nd: Buddy
Kadel, 23.95, "On the
Edge, $5,000. 3rd:
Steve Gilders and Dave
Walker, 21.70 "Hey
Daddy", $2,500. 4th:
Doug Fisher and Scott
Avery, 20.75, "Island
Time, $1,000. 5th: Paul
Paulk, 20.00,
"Weathermaker",
$900. 6th: Matthew
Gooch, 17.95, $800.
7th: Scott Whitaker,
"Double Trouble",
17.70, $700. 8th: James
Hayman, 16.95, $550.
9th: Matthew
Bradshaw, 16.80, $450.
10th: Donnie Causey,
15.65, $350.


'`~'"~':~ ~'"--`~~~""~"~'""~""""~"I'~~""" "'








Page 14 12 October 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Florida Classified


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The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper with the
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Announcements
GET COVERED....Run your ad
STATEWIDE! You can run
your classified ad in over 100
Florida newspapers for $475.
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www.florida-classifieds.com.
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Employment Services
2007 POST OFFICE JOBS
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REF #FLPB.
Notice: Post Office Positions
Now Available. Avg. Pay
$20/hour or $57K annually
including Federal Benefits and
OT. Get your exam guide materi-
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Fee Req.
Help Wanted
DRIVERS-MORE MONEY!
Sign-On Bonus 36-43
cpm/$1.20pm $0 Lease/Teams
Needed Class A + 3 months
recent OTR required (800) 635-
8669.
Driver-BYNUM TRANS-
PORT-needs qualified drivers
for Central Florida- Local &
National OTR positions. Food
grade tanker, no hazmat, no
pumps, great benefits, competi-
tive pay & new equipment. (866)
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experience.
BODYGUARDS: STATESIDE
& Overseas. Earning Potential:
$350/$750 per day. No Exper-
ience Needed. Free Training.
(866) 271-7779 www.bodyguard-
sunlimited.net http://body-
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Driver: DON'T JUST START
YOUR CAREER, START .IT
RIGHT! Company Sponsored
CDL training in 3 weeks. Must
be 21. Have CDL? Tuition reim-
bursement! CRST. (866) 917-
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We're raising pay for Florida
regional drivers! Home every
weekend! Home during the
week! Solid weekly miles! 95%
no touch! Preplanned freight!
$.43 per mile, hometime, money
& more! Heartland Express
(800) 441-4953 www.heartland-
express.com.
MECHANICS: Up to $20,000
bonus. Keep the Army National
Guard Rolling. Fix Humvees,
Strykers, etc. Expand your skills
through career training. Be a


Soldier. 1-800-GO-GUARD.
com/mechanic.
Homes For Sale
Palm Harbor Factory Prices!!!
Modulars, Mobiles, Stilt Homes.
Call (800) 622-2832.
Daniel Boone Log Home
Auction Sat. Oct. 20th-
Jacksonville, FL 26 New Log
Home Packages to be auctioned.
Take delivery up to one year.
Package includes sub-floor, logs,
windows, doors, rafters, roofing,
etc. Call (800) 766-9474.
Miscellaneous
DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS
children, etc. Only one signature
required! *Excludes govt. fees!
Call weekdays (800) 462-2000,
ext.600. (8 a.m. 6 p.m.) Alta
Divorce, LLC. Established 1977.
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from home. Medical, business,
paralegal, computers, criminal
justice. Job placement assistance.
Financial aid and computer pro-
vided if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121, www.OnlineTidewater
Tech.com.
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-
Train for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid
if qualified Job placement assis-
tance. CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance (888) 349-5387.
NOW AVAILABLE! 2007
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Motorcycle for Sale
Hondas From $500! Police
Impounds and Repos for Sale!
Many Makes and Models
Available! For listings call (800)
366-9813 x9275.
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or www.maprealtyboone.com.
1ST TIME OFFERED Color-
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ACRES-$49,900. Priced for
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Terms. (866) 353-4807.


GORGEOUS N.C. MOUN-
TAIN HOMESITES 3-7 Acres
from just $79,900 MINUTES
TO ASHEVILLE N.C. Enjoy
sweeping mountain views, A
mile of river frontage and walk-
ing trails. Amenities include
gated entrance, community
lodge & Riverside BBQ area.
Excellent Financing Available.
GRAND OPENING Saturday,
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LIMITED TIME OFFER 100%
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SAVANNAH HIGHLANDS
NEW HOME $164,900: New
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1 1C -80 3 -2 )








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


12 October 2007 Page 15


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle pages is an efficient way to promote your business to the public and save money
at the same time. These ads are strictly business cards magnified to 2 columns by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two
insertions. Send your business card or copy to: Franklin Chronicle, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL 32328 or fax 877-423-4964 or e-mail:


franklinchronicle@gtcom.net.


Your check for $15.00 will guarantee position in the next issue.


SMOKING

ILLNESS ALERT

The Corea Firm, P.L.L.C.is representing Florida
residents. and their survivors, who sulfered medical
conditions caused by tobacco products.

You may be entitled to compensation for
smoking related illnesses.

Call The Corea Firm, P.L.L.C. toll-free for a free consultation


1-888-335-2962

Tfie hiring ~ .l I.n L er ..in inmI .rl.ni dI ,1 cl that should u tnu be tiled ole' Utxmn
aIdvrtisemell ts. BeOlr e \,u dcjc. jr. a.r uh I-, In, ,, ifr> v.n111 j, i r .ni iil.iri,nI.i n l.i oIrl jh'll Etr
qualificalii ns and expcrience- Florida Attorney Jeremy R. Wilson, pi:...in lU in DUIiW ..
T.. sa............... i ... ....l ...... ......1...l .. .. .n. .r..







PIEDRA SPRINGS RANCH
Sellm, n to h Hehc.- Bidder Above $4 9 ,M11hln Prci .oui L r. d t Sqr -,i 11at
242 acres of recreational paradise Adjoin-,Sa n Juan hantonal
Forest Frontage on Piedra River, Yellor Jack et Creelk ard US- Go
8 a acre lake Water, oil & mineral rights Abundant %ildlife
[ Trudavdo October 7o uf -ol Pf (AMT)]

----- ------ ----- -- - - ------ -

Dan^^^B^iel lBoone Log HomuDesMU


Jacksonville,
26 New Log Home
Packages to be auctioned,
Take delivery up 1o one year
Package incudes ub-floor, ogs.
windows doors, rafers, rooing, etc
Daniel Boone Log Homes


4


I Mor-e-o C l 1. ,9


.. ...... ....... ....


867 ACRES 418 ACRES SELLING ABSOLUTE
(Pnme Tiri. r Ir.iinr,. Lonl in Websfer Counfy, Georiaol
Area rich in wildlife andt game* Most of he acreage covered with pine ready Lor
harvst in approximately years Excellent network ofroads throughout the prop-
erty for easy vehicle access Ideal for leasing to hunting clubs or for development
[ Saturday, N'ovember 3 at 11:00 AM (ET)I


FREE 4-NIGHT VACATION!
Donate Car Boat RV Motorcycle
1-800-227-2643
www.boatangel.com


(Forgotten Coast Lighting, Inc.

LINDA BLACKWELL
P.O. BOX 1026 171 HIGHWAY 98, UNITA
EASTPOINT, FL 32328
PHONE: 850-670-4900
CELL: 859-393-9020
FAX: 850-670-4901
FORGOTTENCOASTLTG@GTCOM.NET 10-1210o






73: Acr, 21 Year Old Loblol Pine
,5t Acres Ha damoods
SExcdtlent Sl I fypeL
-86 Acres Cropland Fe'dv or Inrgalion
'Excllent Hunting. PIenltful Turkey & Der
4 Bedroom. 3 Bth Bn.ri Couniry Horre on 6 r Secluded Ac
C,.-a, duna ALf.ti'nCoorjt ', r ,ForCotlpleo r De t ails Cf
Rowell Auctions Inc. 800-323-838
I.lhS 10O. fitv:'! FPTrrm,uRr l.LL Ll CAUClTI




U.S. MARSHALS AUCTION


O Santa Rosa Beach, FL 8
4 BR/4.5 BA SFH
3,739 sq t
Bid Online
10/22-10/24
bid4assets.corm/SRB


Sportsman's Lodge
White agle


seafood steaks salads
cocktails sandwiches
waterfront dining .
Hours: 11 am-9 pm Tues.-Thurs.
11 am-10 pm Fri., Sat., Sun.
99 North Bayshore Dr Eastpoint 670-1111


Local children become

fighter pilots for a day
Three local children who have been diagnosed with seri(
nesses suited up and jumped into the cockpit of an F-15 fighi
craft recently as they experienced a day in the life of an Air
fighter pilot.
The 95th Fighter Squadron hosted the children and their
lies during the "Pilot for a Day" event at Tyndall Air Force Ba
"Some of the highlights of the day are taking the kids on
around real F-15s, letting them suit up at Life Support with
gear, and they'll then fly the same simulator as real pilots," s
Col. Kevin Huyck, 95th Fighter Squadron commander.
The "Pilot for a Day" program originated at Randolph
Texas in December 1994. The goal of the program is to offer cl
with serious illnesses a chance to experience a day as a United
Air Force pilot and for a time, forget about the challenges o
everyday lives and develop new friendships with some of Ty
finest fliers.
"This is one way for the Boneheads (the 95th Fighter Squ
to show how good we really are," Colonel Huyck said. "We cc
ourselves the premier fighter pilot training squadron in the wor
this gives us a chance to train some of the youngest pilots." "W
this to be an extraordinary day for these extraordinary kids. W
to show them what we can really do," Colonel Huyck said.
The 95th Fighter Squadron has partnered with the An
Heart Association and the Make A Wish Foundation to coo
the one-day event.


Restaurar


Experts

review a

selection of

fine wines
BY TOM MARQUARDT
AND PATRICK DARR
South African wines are
-19 once more becoming available in
world markets after the anti-
apartheid reforms of the early
'90s. Enjoying a Mediterranean
climate, South African wineries
have made a quantum leap in
quality in the past decade, rapid-
ly gaining respect and market
share in the global wine markets.
Several wines that we have sam-
pled recently are making us
believers, in the potential for
South African wines.
A recent visit by David
8 Finlayson, winemaker and man-
aging director for Glen Carlou
located in the Paarl Valley, fur-
thered our impressions of the
S positive direction of these wines.
At age 35, the youthful David is
the second generation to run
Glen Carlou-he took the reins
from his father who founded the
winery in 1985.
He shared with us a story of
his first vivid memory at the win-
ery, when as a child he opened a
valve to a 15,000-liter tank of
pinot noir and was knocked over
by the onrushing torrent. He also
FL shared his initial wine epiphany,
which was in 1991 when a friend
opened and shared a 1982
Chateau Margaux. That experi-
ence inspired David to join in
working the harvest at the
Chateau Margaux in 1995, as
it part of his winemaking educa-
d tion.
Mr. Finlayson described the
wines of South Africa some-
where between, old world and
new world in style-ripe fruit of
the new world but some old
world restraint, complexity and
aging ability. Furthermore, he
said that the neighboring
Stellenbosch region is analogous
to the Napa Valley with it's more
famous wineries and the Paarl
Valley is similar to Sonoma with
less glitz and glamour, but with
good solid wines.
ous ill- We were impressed by two
ter air- of the wines that he shared with
Force us. The Glen Carlou Chardon-
nay Paarl 2004 ($18) was a real
r fami- nice wine, with a pear, apple and
ise. lemon notes. Medium bodied
a tour and round in the mouth from the
Flight partial malolactic fermentation,
aid Lt. it had a nice touch of mostly
French oak aging. Good acidity
SAFB, to match well with food and a lot
children of complexity and.pleasure for
SStates the price.
if their The Glen Carlou Grand
'ndall's Classique Meritage Paarl 2003
($22) was an amazing wine-
adron) 50% cabernet sauvignon, 35%
consider merlot, 8% malbec, 5% cabernet
Id, and franc and 2% petit verdot. This
e want wine exhibited a sophisticated
Te want cassis nose with a hint of mint.
Cassis and berry flavors with
nerican some complex earthy elements
rdinate that combined for a balanced
and pleasurable drink.


Pace. FL SFH
4BR/3 B A
1.994 sq ft
Bid Online
10/22- 10/24
www.bid4assets/Pl


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Page 16 12 October 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


DEP celebrates Disability Awareness in October


The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
(DEP) Florida State Parks are
celebrating Disability Awareness
throughout the month of
October.
The Division of Recreation
and Parks has committed to
ensure its facilities, programs
and services are accessible to and
usable by all people, including
those with disabilities. Access for
All, the Division's commitment
to providing resource-based
recreation to everyone, is the
theme for October's state park
celebration.
"The Division's goal is to
provide equal access to all facili-
ties and programs within the
state park system," said Florida
State Parks Director Mike
Bullock. "Accessibility aware-
ness training for staff members,
nature trail assessments and park
facility evaluations are part of
the Division's efforts toward
access for all."
Nearby, St. Andrews State


Park and The Friends of St.
Andrews State Park are hosting a
fall festival welcoming persons
with disabilities Saturday and
Sunday, October 27 and 28, 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Park admission is
free with donations accepted.
Nature's Gallery is a celebration
of the environment and the arts
in the natural setting of the park.
Visitors can enjoy living history
exhibits, music, children's activi-
ties, educational displays, an
Artist's Market and a wide vari-
ety of food vendors.
St. Andrews has accessible
campsites, beach wheelchairs
and one fully accessible beach
use area, located adjacent to the
jetties. Popular park features,
such as the Jetties Beach Area
and "Kiddie Pool," offer accessi-
ble parking, bathrooms and cov-
ered picnic pavilions. For more
information, call (850) 233-5140
or.(850) 233-5117.
On National Disability
Mentoring Day, Wednesday,
October 17, DEP's Florida State


Parks are partnering with the
Florida Statewide Disability
Mentoring Day Planning
Committee which includes The
Able Trust, the Florida Agency
for Persons with Disabilities, the
Division of Vocational Rehab-
ilitation, the Florida Commis-
sion for Transportation Disad-
vantaged and Volunteer Florida
for a job shadowing opportunity
to mentor individuals with a dis-
ability.
"During the -month of
October, I challenge Floridians
to become more aware of dis-
ability in their community:
whether by hiring a person with
a disability, getting to know
someone with a disability more
closely, or simply researching a
particular disability to learn
more about it," said Jane
Johnson, Director of the Agency
for Persons with Disabilities.
"Your life will be enriched by the
experience."
National Disability Mentor-
ing Day, sponsored by the


American Association of People
with Disabilities (AAPD), began
in 1999 to increase the profile of
National Disability Employment
Awareness Month, celebrated
every October. A national part-
nership between the AAPD and
the U.S. Department of Labor
Office of Disability Employment
Policy, Disability Mentoring
Day provides employers with
opportunities to. help mentees
with disabilities build confidence
about their own- employability,
share firsthand job experiences,
develop lasting relationships and
gain access to a pool of new
emerging talent.
The Agency for Persons
with Disabilities currently serves
about 35,000 Floridians with
developmental disabilities of
mental retardation, autism, cere-
bral palsy, spina bifida, and
Prader-Willi syndrome. For
more information on the agency,
call 1-866-APD-CARES or visit
www.apd.myflorida.com.
The first two-time Gold


Medal winner honoring the
nation's best state park service,
Florida's state park system is one
of the largest in the country with
161 parks spanning 700,000
acres and 100 miles of sandy
white beach. From swimming
and diving in Florida's rivers and
springs to birding and fishing or
hiking and riding on natural sce-
nic trails, Florida's state parks
offer year-round outdoor activi-
ties for all ages. Battle reenact-
ments and Native American fes-
tivals celebrate Florida's unique
history, while art shows, muse-
ums and lighthouses offer a win-
dow into Florida's cultural her-
itage


Harry A's Restaurant & Bar


The Freshst Local Seafood Steas, Sandwiches, Salads & Kids Menu

The Family Friendliest Place Live Entertainment Nightly

Large Parties Welcome OPEN FO1 BRPEAFAST AT 8:00 A.M.


First Right Over The Bridge, On Your Left
BAP HiOU.RS: Sunday thru Thursday S:00 a.m. to Midnight
and Friday & Saturday S:oo a.m. to 2:oo a.m.
KITC.HN HOUgRS: Everydajy :00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m.

COMING SOON!

DirecTV with ESPN & NFL Game Dal Packages


PHONE: S50 -9 2-3400


DAILY SPECIALS
Lunch from 1 1:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Dinner from 4:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
MONDAY
Lunch: Sandwich BasKet with Coleslaw $4.15/
Pinner: I Dozen Wings $5.95
TUESDPAY
Lunch: Hamburger SteaK with Mashed Potatoes
and Veggie of the Dal $5.15/Dinner:
Hamburger SteaK Dinner with Mashed Potatoes,
Veggie of the Dal, Garlic Toast and Side Salad
$7.95

Lunch: 3 Hard or Soft Shell Tacos with BlacK
SBeans and Rice $3.15/Pinner: 3 Hard or Soft
hell Tacos with BlacK Beans and Rice $3.95
THUSPDAY
Lunch: Spaghetti with 6iarlic Toast $4.95/
Dinner: All You Can eat Spaghetti with Garlic
Toast and Side Salad $7.15
FRIDAY
Lunch: Catch of the Dal Fish Sandwich with
Coleslaw $4.q5/Dinner: All You Can Cat Peel &
Eat Shrimp with Coleslaw and New Potatoes

SATUPPAY
Lunch: 'teaK (V oz. ibeye) Sandwich with
Coleslaw $6.15/Dinner: Surf i& Turf (I shrimp
Skweer r 12 oz.. ibeye) with garlic Toast, New
Potatoes and Side Salad $14.15
'SUNDYAW
Lunch: Countrj Dinner (All Dal) Meat.
Potatoes, Veggie of the PDa, 6iarlic Toast and
Side Salad $8.95/
Pinner: Country Dinner (All Da) Meat,
Potatoes, Veggie of the Day, G6arlic Toast and
Side Salad $8.95

No Substitutions/O% M ^ded to
P41 "To 6o" Orders


C I II C.' L CC- C~bq~l ~1 ICII~ I


~Ct, ~~ IDR~ 4




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