Title: Franklin chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00305
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: March 16, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00305
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text




RJ44U 41Ne R"Ak44 EV"L D~


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA, FL


Fr anklini


2320
;MIT #8


Chronicle

Volume 16, Number 6 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER March 16 29, 2007



Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Dept.


6th Annual Rib Cook-off


The Eastpoint VFD is Hot
on Ribs
BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
Once again the Eastpoint
Volunteer Fire Department is
going to tempt us with mouth-
watering barbequed ribs and
chicken. There has just got to be
something about North Florida
fire departments and good food!
St. George Island VFD just got
over its great 25th Annual
Charity Chili Cook-off and
Auction to benefit the SGI
Volunteer Fire Department and
First Responders. Now Eastpoint
is challenging our diets again
with impossible-to-resist bar-
beque. Or maybe it's the Franklin
County food culture showing
through again ... "Wherever two
or more Franklin Countians gath-
er, they eat!" I don't think there is
anywhere in this great country
that you will find so much good
food or food served up with so


much fun as right here in
Franklin County.
The revels start this Saturday,
March 17th, at 9:00 a.m. at the
Eastpoint Fire House on the cor-
ner of 6th Street and CC Land
Road in Eastpoint, Florida and
admission is free. Besides the
contest for the best ribs, there will
be a car show and contest, a silent
auction, and live entertainment
by Jive-eye. There will also be a
fun festival for kids, and don't for-
get..... lots of food; rib dinners,
hand-pulled pork dinners, chick-
en dinners, barbeque sandwiches,
pork rinds, apple dumpling, and
ice cream.
For more information on the
Eastpoint. Volunteer Fire
Department's 6th Annual Rib
Cook-off go to www.eastpointrib-
cookoff.com.
Leave your calorie charts to
home Saturday and follow me to
the great Rib Cook-off at


inn:
98!Ij


Ready for adventure. Starting at the Old Capitol.

To Hell And Back
140 Miles On Bicycles ... Tallahassee To Sumatra And
Back
BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
On Saturday and Sunday, Feb 17th and 18th, eleven intrepid cyclists set
off for a backcountry ride through Tate's Hell State Forest and the'
Apalachicola National Forest. They started at 7:00 a.m. from the Old
Capitol building in Tallahassee and rode the 70 miles to Sumatra where
they camped at Wright Lake campground before returning on Sunday
to All Saints Cafe on Railroad Ave. in Tallahassee for an "awards cere-
mony and de-leaching party". Unlike Cebe Tate, on his ill-fated trip
through the region now known as Tate's Hell, the cyclists had catered
food and coffee. Two vans followed the progress of the trip carrying
food and water for snacks along the way and dinner and breakfast at the
campsite. Entry fees and donations from the trip were donated to ben-
efit Fat of the Land branch of the Southern Off-road Bicycle Assn.
(SORBA), and the Capital City Youth Services shelter in Tallahassee.
Capital City Youth Services is dedicated to providing "three hots and a
cot" to runaway, homeless, truant and other at-risk youth and supply-
ing other basic needs to them and their families.
r "t ,
_ VIW I,-


Bill Oterson ... That's a bridge??
SORBA has been working with Franklin County forest and develop-
ment planners as well as at a national level. Many recent beneficial
changes in forest regulations have come about through the efforts of
SORBA and other advocates of sensible use of wild country. I asked
Scot Benton, President of Fat of the Land and organizer of the Hell
and Back tour, what the purpose of the bike club is and he said, "We
are a (trail) lobby and trail advocacy group. Our cause is to promote
sustainable trail practices, which will in turn facilitate healthy develop-
ment in communities, tie neighborhoods together and raise property
values." When asked to answer the common complaint that trails bring
in more people who might be a threat to residents or the environment,
Mr. Benton replied that trails promote "eyes on the land"; that is, the
more people there are moving around in an area, the more eyes there
are to watch out for undesirable or illegal activity. He says, "With prop-
er planning and design, there is a track record of proven results." He
< stressed "planning and design" as the key, not just laying out a trail
where the grass has been trampled by casual users of the area.
S Mr. Benton is leaving for Washington, D. C. next week as a representa-
tive of SORBA at the "Bicycle/Pedestrian Week" to meet with trail
advocates and lobby the trail cause with our senators.
I wish them well here and in Washington. Properly planned trails and
other facilities for travelers through our National and State Forests and
Parks are the best way to get people out where they can see for them-
selves the natural beauty that is so often threatened by greed and just
plain thoughtlessness.
To quote from Don Marquis' (1878 1937) Archy and Mehitabel, what
the ants are saying...(There are no capitals or punctuation because
archy was a cockroach and couldn't work the "shift" key)
"america was once a paradise of timberland and stream but it is dying
because of the greed and money lust of a thousand little kings who
slashed the timber all to hell and would not be controlled and changed
the climate and stole the rainfall from posterity"


Now are you sure that's enough food??


Eastpoint. Just go out 98 until
you see the sign that indicates the
turnoff to the fire department. It's
on the south side of the road.
Turn north on 6th Street and the


firehouse is on your right about
two blocks up. Can't miss it... just
open your window and follow the
smell of good ol' southern ribs
cooking.


Property Taxes?
BY RICHARD E. NOBLE
Marcia Johnson-Clerk of Courts
Marcia Johnson's announcement at this week's County Commission
Meeting was without doubt the feature story from the March 6th ses-
sion. As most of you all know the real estate bubble has burst-at least
temporarily. And, as has been the case in all recent speculative bubbles,
the more or less stable and staunch not so silent majority of taxpayers
have once again been left holding the bag.
This real estate bubble, I think one'could say.conservatively, was due to
hipper speculation-though in the particular case of Franklin County
it may be considered an overdue "adjustment". Some economists
would claim that what has happened is simply the normal ebbing and
flowing.of a vibrant free economy. Others of a more conspiratorial bent
might give the experience a more,sinister explanation. But whatever,
the stable, dependable, reliable, taxpayer has been left holding the bill
for what has been a very lucrative binge for many an investment broker,
money speculator, lucky home owner, realtor and State and County
governments who have inadvertently benefited from the mechanical
property value increases. This is all very reminiscent of the S&L and
Commercial Bank debacles and the now long forgotten Stock Market
Crash of a few years past-with the accumulated loses being picked up
by the American taxpayer of today and tomorrow.
The windfall profits that were gained'as this speculative real estate bub-
ble formed can not be recaptured. The people who made all the money,
made it fair and square by all the standards of our system-we can't put
people in jail for being good capitalist; not here in the United States
anyway. And nobody wants their own property to sell for any less than
the current market price.
All the other secondary and residual gainers are now gone or have
already spent or re-invested their profits. But whether or not a crime has
been committed-the bank has certainly been robbed. And now the
question is what do we-the citizens-do about it.
Here is what Marcia Johnson had to say to the County Commission
this past Tuesday.
"In light of proposed legislative actions on tax cuts; I must have specif-
ic instructions from you to be sent to the constitutional officers and
department heads regarding their upcoming budget requests. The leg-
islative proposals include a plan to roll back county property tax rates
to 2001 levels and cap them going forward which would affect budget
revenues and expenditures. Under the proposals, voters would addition-
ally be asked in a special election, possibly this fall, to consider a con-
stitutional amendment that would eliminate all property taxes on
homesteads and replace it with a higher sales tax. Under this concept,
homesteaders would be taken completely off the tax rolls, removing
millions from our state roll, and the drain to our county budget would
be replaced by raising the sales tax from 6 cents on every dollar spent
to 8.5 cents, the highest state sales tax in the country. Such a measure
would have to pass the Legislature by a three-fourths margin to go to
the voters and would also have to pass at the polls by a 60 percent mar-
gin. If passed, it could mean the County could reasonably expect to see
a 61% cut in tax dollars or approximately 9.4 million dollars in ad val-
orem taxes according to one of our representatives. You should know
the sales tax will only replace'a very small portion of ad valorem taxes
lost by adoption of the proposals. In our current budget year, we esti-
mated receiving only $586,000 from the 6 cent sales tax in place now,
and I have no idea now what would be generated from 8.5 cents, but it
probably won't be a significant amount. For the fiscal year October 1,
2001 through September 30, 2002, ad valorem taxes were
$5,260,125.00. The current year is $15,808,933.00.
"Anticipating that some type of property tax reform will be adopted by
the legislature, you must prepare to take a much closer look at budget
requests this year as far as separating budget items mandated by law
and required public services from other items. Some actions that can be
taken are to 1-rollback budgets to the 2001 level, 2-enforce your motion
on zero based budgets for all constitutional officers and department
heads whereby every budget line item must be justified and decreases
are encouraged, 3-provide direction on raises, 4-direct no new positions
be included in budgets, and 5- preclude all departments and constitu-
tional officers from including any large equipment purchases or large
capital outlay budgets.. Additionally, I suggest you direct that all spend-
ing be kept to a minimum for the remainder of this fiscal year and pos-
sibly freeze all current capital outlay projects and consider those.pre-
sented to you on a case by case basis. Do you have any suggestions on
the letters to be written to the non-governmental entities that have been
funded from ad valorem taxes?
I'd like to prepare a letter for your approval at the next meeting that will
include any direction you offer today."
"I think that we ought to roll it back to the 2001 levels if that is where
we are going to end up," suggested Mr. Crofton.
"It sounds like this (idea) is going to go," offered Ms. Sanders, "unless
something happens between now and the first Friday in May."
Marcia Johnson suggested that the County start taking action immedi-
ately because to delay will only mean more serious problems down the
line when County funding is drastically reduced.
Cheryl Sanders then suggested that the smaller counties like Franklin
will be hurt the most by this cutback because of the lower millage rate
that Franklin County has maintained which was made possible by the
gradual evolution of the escalating property tax revenue.
"For eighteen years you have been able to lower your millage rate and

Continued on Page 9


First in-First Place. Tera Moody, 26, of Boulder, Colorado.


SGI Charity Chili Cook-off

And Auction Is Once

More A Famous Success
Large crowds attend 25th Annual event
BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
Crowds gathered and chili simmered as the 25th Annual St. George
Island Regional Charity Chili Cook-off and Auction got underway last
Saturday, March 3rd with the running of the 5K Red Pepper Run. 78
runners from twelve states competed for prizes in categories divided by
age, sex, and residency. Tera Moody, 26, of Boulder, Colorado sur-
prised everybody by coming in a minute and 3 seconds ahead of every-
one else in 16:41. Congratulations, Tera! Iri second place was Charlie
Johnspn, 27, of Tallahassee, Florida,. to take 1st place for the men in
17:44. In first place for SGI men was John Crews, 26, flying by the fin-
ish line in 25:38. The first place woman from SGI was Megan Lamb,
24, in 28:30. The oldest member of the field was Philip Brachman of St
George Island still running at age 79 and finishing in a flat 51 minutes.
Way to go, Phil! SGI is proud of you. In all, five people age 70 or over
ran.in this year's marathon.
As an interesting sidelight of the race, when the trophies were awarded
they all had flying runners surmounting the fancy pedestals except the
first place male trophy for an SGI resident; it had a business man in a.
suit holding a briefcase instead of a runner. I don't think I even want to
try commenting on that.
Chili cooking contestants came from all over the United States, even
from as far away as Manitowoc, Wisconsin. The winners were; first
place--Doug Smith of Dead Serious Chili, second place-Paul Nunn
of Nunn Better Chili, and third went to erry Harrell of Big Shot Score
Chili.
Once again the Tallahassee Parrothead Club supplied a winner in the
Miss Chili Pepper-Mr. Hot Sauce contest. Last year's Mr. Hot Sauce
was Dave Gussak of the Tallahassee Club. This year "Captain" Penny
Weimer of Tallahassee took the honors as Miss Chili Pepper and the
golden crown for Mr. Hot Sauce went on the head of Mark Pierson
from the St. George Island Fireman's Auxiliary.
The .auction, led by auctioneers Harry Arnold and Wade Clark, went
on most of the day a.nd by the time the artworks, furniture, knick-
knacks, and even boats had been sold, it was estimated that over
$100,000.00 had been raised for the benefit of the St. George Island
Fire Department and First Responders by the auction alone.
It was a great day and we all had great fun. We're looking forward to
next year's cook-off. I'm starting to lay in a supply of Tums now so I'll
be ready. All kidding aside, the officers of the SGI Charity Cook-off are
very happy with the day ard want to thank everyone who helped make
it a success, from the volunteers, to the contestants, to.the guests whose
enjoyment made all the work worthwhile.


The pirate among us. Curley recently moved to St. George
Island with his wife who has opened a new custom frame
shop in Apalachicola.


Apalach Commissioners
Take On Sidewalks,

Firehouse
Commission Meeting, March 6, 2007 in ApalaGhicola
Community Center
BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
Opinions on some agenda items at the City Commissioners meeting
Tuesday evening at the Apalachicola Community Center often became
assertive and insistent when relating to two topics that seemed to trig-
ger emotional responses from audience members.
With the commission members James Elliott, John Bartley, Van
Johnson, and Valentina Webb as well as Mayor Boyd Howze, City
Attorney J. Patrick Floyd, City Administrator Betty Taylor-Webb, and
Planning and Grants Manager Cindi Giametta present, the meeting
started with presentations by citizens about a variety of concerns. Mrs.
Erin Rodriquez questioned whether signs for Dr. Humphries Street
could somehow be shortened to make a more efficient sign marker.
There followed some discussion on how far the named street was to
run. The thought was that to name just a short segment of a street is
confusing. At least for the present, the signs will remain as they are and
the street will remain its present length.
Dixie Partington requested clarification of her permission to use
Hendel's Field for her dog obedience school in light of the up-coming
softball season. Ms. Partington was concerned that there would be no
conflict between her program and the softball use. There doesn't seem
to be any problem at this time. If there is later conflict in use, the sports
teams will have priority and an alternate site for the dog classes might
have to be found.
Sherman Thomas expressed concern about the MLK street signs stop-
ping at 12th St. when they should go on to 14th St. More signs will be
added to designate the street for its full length. Mr. Thomas also
expressed concern about tinted windows in the police cars. He said the
windows should be clear so a person could see who was in the cars. He


Continued on Page 9


50


I -








Page 2 16 March 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs


March 6, 2007
BY RICHARD E. NOBLE

Mike Mock-Jail
.Overcrowding
"We need to take a look at the
overcrowding at the jail-some-
thing that I have been looking at
for over a year and a half. I have
mentioned it in the past. We do
have a tent in place. It does help
some. It houses about fifteen. The
problem you have with the tent is
.. (bad weather). The liability is
definitely a risk ... As we know it
takes money to solve this prob-
lem. We house 38 state inmates
currently. The revenue is around
$390,000 annually. What I looked
at there was to approach the
Board about not housing state
inmates. The other solution was
to put up a Quonset hut. It would
go outside the jail but would not
be attached. The problem with
that is that you would have to add
staff. The huts themselves would
have been a lot cheaper but you


Sheriff Mike Mock


would have to hire maybe five to
ten more correction officers. The
third solution that we looked at is
adding on to the jail itself. We did
have someone come in and look
at it ... he said $450,000 dollars
to say $500,000. That would be
approximately 40 more beds. We
are overcrowded. I can assure
you that for lack of a better word
we have some jailhouse lawyers
That let me know about that about
Every other day that being
inmates. It is a concern of mine. I
Shave talked to a representative
from DOC ... about housing
forty more inmates. I would like
to do this for only a year. That
would be pretty close to taking
:care of the add-on. We would
probably have to come out of
Pocket with some of it. We could
go two years. I don't think that is
- the solution. I would like to build
it and pay for it and put county
Inmates in it. But this is some-
Sthing that we could look at. The
'DOC said that (this idea) would
Sbe under review (not guaranteed).
So that is where. we are at. We
need to really look at this because
we are overcrowded."
"Right now the County just does-
n't have the money," offered Mr.
Crofton.
Mr. Pierce then brought up the
problem that even with the addi-
tional inmate and the resulting
Revenue, the County would still
be required to put the additional
money up front and then wait to
, be reimbursed.
S Mr. Putnal asked Sheriff Mock to
contact DOC and get a definite
answer on the forty temporary
additional inmates. Sheriff Mock
-said that he would have that
answer for the Board hopefully
by the next Commission meeting.
"Could I make a couple of com-
ments?" interjected Marcia
Johnson. "Have you actually
done any research or a study to
show the benefit of us housing all
those state inmates? I mean how
much does it cost us? Even if you
take on more, the county still
must pay the cost of housing, the
food, the bedding, the utilities."
"Marcia, that is a very good point
and that is the first thing that I
looked at. I will be honest with
you because that is what I would
love to do. That would solve the
problem and we wouldn't have to
do this. There are some numbers
but it is not even close to what we
get from the state."
"I think that before we make any
decision, we need to know that
benefit. And, being involved as a
Court Clerk also, I think maybe
you need to talk to the judge and
the state attorney and see why we
are not moving these cases along
quicker. We've got to get these
inmates out of that jail quicker.
Those cases are being continued
and continued and continued."
"You are absolutely right. In my
opinion that jail is not for sen-
tencing-we need to do some
sentencing-(your last idea)
would not only cut down on how
* many we have in the jail, it would
cut down on the inmate medical
as well. We have addressed that.
SWe talk quite a bit to the State
SAttorney. And I have tried to talk
to the circuit judge. We have a
new circuit judge coming in June
and that will help. But that is a


good point. But I can get that
number on what it costs us (com-
pared to state revenue received)."
"What is the condition of the jail
at present?" asked Mr. Lockley.
"Is it in pretty good condition?"
"I think that it is," responded the
Sheriff. "I was concerned with
this black mold or whatever
because we had a leak. I have
never seen a flat roof that didn't
leak ... But we have addressed
that ... I got an expert to come in
(and look at the mold) about a
month or two ago. He went
through the jail and it turned out
good (the black was not a mold).
I was very relieved. We were hav-
ing a lot of employees that were
sick and it seemed like some-
thing. But overall the jail is in
pretty good shape."
The Sheriff was asked to find the
answers to the questions that
were asked and return with an
update. It was generally agreed
that there was a problem.
At a later point in the meeting a
gentleman came forward from
the audience and expressed his
views that we should be changing
our direction with regards to
crime in this community and in
the country. He expressed the tra-
ditional liberal view that crime
was more a matter of education,
job opportunity, the eradication
of poverty, and improved social
conditions in opposition to the
traditional conservative approach
that has been the U.S. policy for a
number of decades. The conser-
vative answer to crime has been
traditionally more prisons, longer
and more severe penalties, hasher
living conditions for inmates, and
more readily enforcement of the
death penalty.
The tendency in the U.S. still
leans. to the conservative
approach. Many are suggesting
that this does not seem to be
working-including the gentle-
man at this commission meeting.
There have been several recent
national controversies over the
death penalty and the justice of
mandatory sentencing. Prisons
are now considered by many crit-
ics to be a growth industry in the
U.S. and we can't seem to build
them fast enough. Prison jobs pay.
well but most people still don't
want to do them. We now have
over six million incarcerated-
this is the equivalent of a few
Central American countries. The
United States now has more peo-
ple in its prisons than any other
industrialized nation in the
world-including Russia and
China.
'Mr. Lbckley agreed with the gen-
tleman from the audience on his
point regarding education but
suggested that steps.were being
taken to increase job'.opportuni-
ties in Franklin County-most
recently with the representative of
Opportunity Florida being direct-
ed to our local high schools. Mr.
Crofton agreed but added that
parental responsibility was also a
factor in the production and pro-
motion of crime and criminal
behavior.
Unfortunately no one had any
suggestions in dealing with the
now 50% divorce rate, the ram-
pant child abuse and neglect in
the U.S. or how to promote better
parenting even among those who
have learned to tolerate one
another and their own children
for longer periods of time.
Neither instruction on how to
keep a marriage together nor how
to be a good parent are a part of
the national education process
and unfortunately this does not
seem to come in humans via
genetics nor natural inheritance
as it does with monkeys, ele-
phants and orangutans.

Wesley Tise-Health
Department Director
"What I want to do today is
introduce to the Board ... our
new Health Manager. We have
been without a health manager
for the past twelve months. We
are fortunate to get Jason
Flowers. Despite his youthful-
ness, he has been with Gulf
County Health Department as
their environmental manager for
the past six years. So he has a
wealth of experience and knowl-
edge. And we are fortunate to
have him here to help us out."
Mr. Tise then introduced Jason
Flowers to the Board.


Butch Baker-Emergency
Management Director
"There are a few things that ~
have to bring up today, and it is
this National Incidence
Management System (NIMS)
thing that the Federal
Government has come up with-
all counties must be NIMS com-
pliant ... to continue our pre-
paredness assistance funding we
need to become NIMS compli-
ant." Mr. Baker then explained
the requirement that all elected
officials must be NIMS compli-
ant along with other related and
civically responsible people. "We
are providing training ... at the
DOC both this month and next
month. We will have computers
available to go on line to do the
course,,or the test. A lot of folks
are not familiar with computers
... if you need assistance we can
walk you through that." Mr.
Baker was then appointed to be
the single point of contact for all
NIMS compliant requirements-
a position which he reluctantly
agreed to assume. "The single
point of contact will be the per-
son who works with all the other
departments heads; works with
the other elected officials and
brings all those necessary folks
together to insure that all depart-
menets within the county-be it
the road department or solid
waste, the clerk of courts office or
whoever it may be-are all NIMS
compliant ... so that we don't take
the chance of loosing our federal
funding."

Frederick Minot
Mr. Minot, an insurance agent,
presented his company's plan for
County employees and elected
official. The Board did not show
a great interest but agreed to look
into his recommendations.

William Hobson Sr.
Mr. Hobson is from Carrabelle
and lives' next to the rest
area/public beach. He provided
the Board and the audience with
a good deal of entertainment-at
least for a county commission
meeting. He told jokes and gave
anecdotes from his life experi-
ences but his main concern was
with people from the "public
beach" in Carrabelle trespassing
onto his shoreline property. Mr.
Hobson lives on Highway 98 east
of the Carrabelle beach and has a
small spot across the road on the
beach that is deeded to him via
his lot north of the highway. The
beach property of Mr. Hobson is
not buildable but is his property
regardless. Mr. Hobson wanted a
sign put in place by the County
prohibiting people from lighting
on his beach. There was some
problem with his willingness to
grant a right of passage but not
the right of "stoppage"-he
would like the folks to walk
through his beach property and
keep on going.
The Board told Mr. Hobson that
they would have Van Johnson of
Parks and Recreation look into it;
they also discussed the possibility
of buying Mr. Hobson's beach as
a public access if Mr. Hobson
was so inclined.

Hospital Board Advisory
Committee Update
A representative of the Hospital
Advisory Committee gave a posi-
tive report on the current stand-
ing of the Weem's Hospital.
Blackhawk and affiliates are
being phased out. It was
announced that the hospital staff
as of April 1 will have a competi-
tive health insurance program.
The hospital will pay 75% of the
cost to cover the employee and
family coverage will be made
available at the employee's discre-
tion. The hospital was given a
grant of over $100,000 which will
help in the purchasing of new
and necessary equipment. The
community is getting involved
and volunteerism was said to be
high. A property next to the hos-
pital was asked to be put under
consideration for purchase. A
motion was passed to get an
appraisal of the property in ques-
tion, so that a possible purchase
might be considered Mr. Colvert
was also offered the responsibility
of being the hospital's CFO
(Chief Financial Officer) in addi-
tion to his present CEO (Chief
Executive Officer) position. Mr.
Colvert, the Board was informed,
has previous experience at both
of these positions. Mr. Colvert
agreed to take on the added
responsibility at half the cost of
hiring an additional CFO.


PALACE DAY SPA
S.', =European Pedicure with
Accupressure Nails
na Spray Tanning and p
Large Tanning Bed

CONNIE ROEHR
407 Highway 98, Eastpoint
850-670-3777




S* Ard's Service

407 Highway 98

(850) 670-8463


New and Used Tires and Rims
Gasoline and Diesel


Alligator Point Update
Camille Tharpe was once again
on hand to help explain and clar-
ify the alternatives being offered
to the residents of the Alligator
Point area with regards to a possi-
ble beach renourshment pro-
gram. It seems that if the citizens
of Alligator Point want their
beach renourished they are going
to have to pay for it. The choices
being made to these citizens on
this occasion were of two types-
MSTU and an MSBU. The
MSTU deals with Proposed
Millage rates and the MSBU
deals with Proposed Assessment
Rates. This issue will have to go
before the Alligator Point
Citizens via a public hearing. Mr.
Ken Osborne a representative of
the Alligator Point community
was asked by the Board to speak
to this issue.


that very many if any people
from Alligator Point ever see any
use of-just because of the fact
that people there can be in
Tallahassee as quick or quicker
than they can be at Weems. So
that issue of the million dollars
disappearing and never coming
back and the issue that there is no
County contribution. This gets to
be a very confused issue. There is
no (County) contribution. I don't
know where we stand on this
stuff or what our situation is
going to be. I question (the Clerk
of Court's estimate of future
property tax losses) you know
between five million and fifteen
million? That puts a zero value
on anything that has been built
since 2001 ... This beach (at
Alligator Point) is used by people
from all over this County. So let's
try to keep that in mind as we go
along forward. We would really


Ken Osborne with map.


"We have had two votes ... and
the majority at both of those
votes were in favor of the MSBU
... One of the things that is going
to come up now (at a public hear-
ing) is that Hidden Harbor is not
included. Now Hidden Harbor
was sold ... (with the understand-
ing) that they would have beach
access ... that has to be in there.
The other issue that is going to
come up that I keep getting
phone calls on-you know we're
looking at 8.9 million dollars here
and we're talking about a 3.4
local so some people have done a
really good job and I'll have to
give Alan (Pierce) credit for that
and other people who have
worked on the legislative side.
But the one thing that is missing
is; what is the contribution from
the County? We have Federal
money here; and we have State
money here; and we have local
money here ... One of the things
that caused a great deal of unhap-
piness at Alligator Point was that
after Dennis we were promised a
million dollars to help us with the
repair of the roads and things -
that million dollars went to the
'hospital. That is not something


like to have a workshop; is there
any chance that the workshop
could be at the church over on
Alligator Point?"
Camille Tharpe suggested that
the property owners out on
Alligator Point be sent before-
hand a written estimate of what
they might be required in actual
dollars and cents under either the.
MSBU or the MSTU. So when
they arrived at the public meeting
they would have an actual idea of
their individual proposed costs.
She said that they already had
such estimates prepared and
ready to go. She just needed a
date and an approval from those
in authority. A motion was made
and approved to have a meeting
on April 3 at 5 p.m. at the church
on Alligator Point and' the Board
also approved the mailing of the
estimates by Camille Tharpe.

Clerk's Report March 6,
2007
1 I need approval of three.reso-
lutions on unanticipated rev-
enues. These resolutions must be
approved by you in order to com-


ply with FS 129.06(2)(d) which
says receipts not anticipated in
the budget and received for a par-
ticular purpose may, by resolu-
tion of the board, be appropriated
and expended for that purpose
and the budget may be amended.
The first resolution deals with
$7,500 received from the Florida
Counties Foundation for Small
County Technical Assistance
Grant/Alligator Point Beach
Renourishment Funding Study.
We put the money in Professional
Services in the Bald Point Trust
Fund. The second resolution
deals with $336,050.56 FEMA
money from the State of Florida
from Hurricane Ivan and we put
the money for the Paving Project
for the Alligator Point Road into
the LOGT Road Paving Fund.
The last resolution deals with
$110,454.14 FEMA money from
the. State of Florida from
Hurricane Dennis and we also
put that money for the Paving
Project for the Alligator Point
Road into the LOGT Road
Paving Fund. These requests
were approved.

Alan Pierce
Report to the Board of County
Commissioners, March 6, 2007
1 The Board has received notice
from the Tourist Development
Council (TDC) that the applica-
tion for infrastructure grants is
approaching. The TDC is expect-
ing there to be approximately
$350,000 available for infrastruc-
ture grants. In keeping with the
Board's direction from last year,
the TDC plans to make some of
the infrastructure grants available
as operational funds for non-prof-
its, like Camp Gordon Johnson
Museum.
The following items are what I
recommend the Board submit for
infrastructure grant funding:
$100,000 for land acquisition for
a waterfront park
$50,000 for Lights at D.W.
Wilson Park
$50,000 for continued improve-
ments at Kendrick Park
$30,000 for a visitor center
(Lighthouse) on St. George
Island
This will then leave approximate-
ly $120,000 to fund the opera-
tional requests of non-profits,
and to provide for some infra-
structure grants to other groups.
The Board approved unanimous-
ly.
2 Inform Board that Mr. Steve
Fling has called to say that he has
his Notice to Proceed from DEP
for South Shoal so the residents
continued on age
Contnuedon Page 3,


Saturday March 17th 2007





-- X
.-


F-X











|1 : CO i S |








X X





^ lThis ijear will Le Letter than ever!

SThe Biest Ever Rib Competition *

*Silent Auction and Car Show -

SLive Entertainment and Rides For the Kids*

AND DID WE MENTION RIBS!!!

BBQ Dinners served at 11:00


BBQ Ribs, Pulled Pork and more! -
Come join the Fire Dempartment for a claim of food and luii at the'

EASTPOINT FIRE DEPARTMENT

LOCATED AT VROOM1AN PARK

T he coruerof 6t [ Street and, CC Land Road, Eastpoint, Florida

Contact us at 670-9000 or on our web site at www.eastpointribcookoff.com
Ai ~All proceeds benefit the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department.
, -
0! ,

... ". .. --0
.. ., ..'0_ / ,'








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 March 2007 Page 3


Franklin Briefs from Page 2

should see more road construc-
tion shortly. The county is finish-
ing the design on the last section
of Alligator Point Road so hope-
fully by the time South Shoal has
finished their road work the
county will be ready for our last
section.
3 Board action to authorize
Preble-Rish to finish the design
on the Sawyer St. drainage proj-
ect that was started before the
County Engineer was hired. The
project is 60% complete. The con-
struction costs on Sawyer St. are
funded through a grant from the
Northwest Florida Water
Management District.
Mr. Pierce recommended that
this project be completed. This
recommendation was approved.
4 Board action to correct a
Scrivener's error on land being
purchased by Mr. Steve Rash.
The land use map, which is the
controlling document, shows the
land as Industrial, which is what
Mr. Rash wants, but the zoning
map shows it as Residential.
Board action to recognize that
the land use map prevails and
that the land is Industrial. This
clarification was approved.
5 Board action to create a
Franklin County Housing
Authority and to appoint five
members to serve a two year term
to get it started. The recommend-
ed members are all willing to
serve: Tommy Luster, Robert
Davis, Cliff Butler, Skip Frink,
and John Sink. These members
will serve as an advisory board to
the county commission on hous-
ing issue. Ms. Laurie Switzer,
SHIP Coordinator, will be the
staff to the Authority. The
Authority will be the advisory
board for any proposed changes
to the SHIP program, as well as
provide leadership on other hous-
ing issues the County wants to
pursue. These recommendations
were approved.
6 Inform Board that Preble-Rish
and C.W.Roberts are still negoti-
ating the price for the CR 67 proj-
ect.
7 Provide Board with copy of
letter from Carrabelle regarding
Lanark Village merger.
"Let's just say it like this-and
I'm going to put it plain to you-
on March 20th be prepared to do
whatever we've got to do to start
proceeding on the County's
behalf," warned Ms. Sanders.
"The City of Carrabelle voted up,
unanimously, to go into that (the
merger) and they have sent a let-
ter to Lanark Village and Sewer
Water District. The Concerned
Citizens are aware that it takes
ten percent of the property own-
ers on a petition to dissolve this
District. The next meeting for the
LWSB is on March 19th. I will be
there at that meeting and if I
don't feel a good comfortable,
cozy feeling from them, I'm
ready to start it on March 20. I'm
getting prepared ahead."
"I am all prepared," responded
Attorney Shuler. "I am just wait-
ing for marching orders from the
Board."
"What really concerned me,"
added Ms. Sanders, "is the meet-


ing before Mayor Kelly says we
will be wanting a report on this to
Mr. McInnis, the City
Administrator, the two older
commissioners (Lanark Water
District Rohrs and Thoman)
knew this but they did not show
up at the meeting. The one newly
elected commissioner (Pauline
Sullivan) did. This sends out a
bad message to me-somebody
who has been fooling with this
thing since 1998. We need to get
this in there; we need to do what
we've got to do to help the peo-
ple. So whatever we have got to
do; we need to do."

Seafood Taskforce
Alan Pierce then spoke to a sug-
gestion that was made at the last
meeting. "I just want to give you
an update on the Seafood
Taskforce. At the last meeting
you asked us to go and discuss
with the Taskforce the possibility
of them becoming involved on a
regular basis for reviewing devel-
opments that would affect the
bay. At the discussion with the
Taskforce last night they decided
that they have enough to do with
their own schedule and they did
not want to get into a larger role
on a regular basis."

Bill Mahan-Franklin
County Extension Director
Gulf of Mexico Fishery
Management Council Update:
The next GMFMC meeting is
scheduled for March 26- 28, 2007
at Destin-Mirarar Beach. Topics
for discussion include: revising
the list of allowable by-catch
reduction devices, the National
Marine Fisheries Service final
Interim Rule for Red Snapper,
formation of an Ad Hoc
Recreational Red Snapper
Advisory Panel for developing
new ideas to manage recreational
and for-hire red snapper fisheries
(Partially Closed Session), rec-
ommendations on completing a
red drum stock assessment, and a
discussion paper on an amend-
ment to require trip tickets for
recreational-for-hire sector.
FSU Sea Grant Statements of
Interest: At least two Statements
of Interest have been submitted
to FL Sea Grant by FSU
researchers for funding to con-
duct research on area marine fish-
eries. 1. 'Elucidating the effects
of reduced freshwater flow on
Apalachicola Bay Oysters;"
Principle Investigator-Dr. Felica
Coleman; Co-Principle Investiga-
tors-Dr. Laura Petes, & Dr.
PChris Koenig. The proposed proj-
ect will help determine how
changes in freshwater input in the
Apalachicola watershed will
affect oyster populations. 2.
"Ecosystem level trophic linkages
between northeastern Gulf of
Mexico estuaries and offshore
reef fish communities;" P.1.-Dr.
Jeff Chanton Co-RI.-James
Nelson. The proposed project
would measure the nature and
magnitude of the transfer of
energy derived from near-shore
primary production to offshore
secondary fishery production.
4-H Community ATV Safety
Grants: I'm exploring the feasibil-
ity of applying for a 4-H
Community ATV Safety Grant to
teach youth and adults about
ATV safety. The program is done
in partnership with the Specialty


POST OFFICE BOX 590
r EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
a l Facsimile 850-670-1685
S ~e-mail: hoffer531 @gtcom.net

THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vehicle Institute of America and Th lf
ATV Safety Institute. The Clerk Of
>^I^HEHH9Bw^^^^^^^B ^PTi. Cl_. Of


Hubert Chipman-Franklin
County Road Department
Report to Board of County
Commissioners
We would like to inform the
board that we have filled our
vacant inmate supervisor/equip-
ment operator position.
Work Summary
Stocked pile approximately 350
tons of lime rock, 165 tons of
sand and 470 tons of black dirt.
Repaired the parking lot at the
Baptist Church in Carrabelle.
Graded county roads in Alligator
Point, Apalachicola, Carrabelle,
Eastpoint and St George Island.
Repaired potholes in Apalach-
icola.
Repaired shoulders of roads in
Apalachicola, Eastpoint, Lanark
and St. George Island.
Litter control in Apalachicola,
Carrabelle and Eastpoint.
Pulled and cleaned out ditches in
Apalachicola and Carrabelle.
Installed culverts, cleaned up
around and put sand bags around
culverts in Apalachicola.
Sign Maintenance in Alligator
Point, Apalachicola, Carrabelle,
Eastpointand St. George Island.

Dan Rothwell-County
Engineer
"The Apalachicola Airport proj-
ect is winding down. It is 95 per-
cent- complete." There were
repairs necessary and the run-
ways still to be finished, Mr.
Rothwell informed the Board.
"The surveys have been complet-
ed for the maintenance shop and
the drainage ditch." There was
then a discussion with regards to
a road or roads at the new school
site. Mr. Lockley then brought up
the road paving issue. He recom-
mended that there be a "work-
shop" to discuss how to get the
roads paved in the county. A
workshop was tentatively sched-
uled for Tuesday, March 27th at 5
p.m. to be combined with anoth-
er workshop to discuss the
Feasibility Study at a location to
be announced.

Commissioner's Comments
"Progress' Enrergy is :urnmng a
new line from" St. Joe to
Apalach," Mr. Crofton stated.
"The Airport committee was
concerned about the height of the
towers that were going to come
around the Airport and Progress
Energy has a meeting on March 7
from 4-7 over at the Armory. The
Airport Committee wanted me to
sign a letter that they would pass
along to Progress Energy asking
them to be aware of the require-
ment not to have large towers
around the Airport."
It was suggested that Progress
,Energy be asked to put the line in
question. under ground. This
request was approved by the
Board.
Mr. Lockley then brought up the
closing of the Progress Energy
Pay Station in Apalachicola. Mr.
Lockley suggested that it was a
burden for many of the older cit-
izens to travel over to St. Joe in
order to get their bill paid before
the deadline. Commissioner
Parrish explained the problem in
more detail and supported Mr.
Lockley's suggestion. A motion
was then made by Ms. Sanders to
request that Progress Energy re-
open their office in Apalachicola.


i ne Court
Your Public Trustee
BY MARCIA JOHNSON
Q. I received a speeding ticket recently
went to pay the ticket at the Clerk's Offic
am curious. Where does the traffic: tic
money end up?
MARCIA JOHNSON A. The money from traffic infraction
used in a variety of ways. The majority of
dollars and cents stays in the city or county where the ticket is writ
The money is spent on court operations and facilities, law enforce
training, and law enforcement radio communications. The rest of
fine money is distributed to the State for general revenue and a var
of State Trust Funds and programs, such as: Emergency Med
Services, Brain and Spinal Cord Rehabilitation, Florida Endowm
Child Welfare Training, Juvenile Justice, Nongame Wildlife stu
and state criminal justice programs. The percentage of money rece:
from traffic tickets to be applied to each of the various funds is es
lished by the Legislature, and it is the statutory responsibility of
Clerk of Court to see that the monies are properly distributed. U
receipt of a civil. traffic ticket for any violation where points may
assessed, you have (30) thirty days from the date of issuance of the t
et to exercise any one of three options: 1-pay the ticket, 2-go to drive
improvement school, and 3-contest the ticket in court. Contact
Clerk's office for more information on those options. You may pay t
fic tickets online at MyFloridaCounty.com.
If you have any questions or comments about this column, please
ward them to: Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market St.,
203, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 or by email
mmjohnson@franklinclerk.com. Visit the Clerk's website
Swww.franklinclerk.com.



Library Happenings
BY DANY RAY
In last week's issue of the Chronicle we forgot to mention Don McLc
one of our most faithful, long term-volunteers., Stop by the Carrab
Branch on Saturdays to find him busy shelving and helping patron
The Carrabelle branch has new hours: Tuesday: 11:00 a.m.-7:00 p
Wednesday and Thursday: 8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Friday: 9:00 a.m.-:
p.m., and Saturday: 10:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
The FROG Family learning program is "hopping" in Carrabelle.
by the Library to find out about all the great activities-from art
computer classes, to a weight loss discussion group followed by a \
around the city. For information, call Anne Birchwell at 697-2091
The FROG Program in Apalachicola and Eastpoint is gearing for sc
great activities, too. Call Jhaki Davis at 670-4423 for information.
Don't forget about the upcoming Genealogy Workshop, at
Eastpoint Library, Tuesday, March 20, from 5:00 p.m.-7:00
Participants will learn how to use the Heritage and Ancestry Plus
bases. The workshop space is limited, but still available. Call
Eastpoint Library at 670-8151 or 670-8165 to reserve a seat.
Spring at the Carrabelle Branch is celebrating with a performance
the Atlantic Coast Theatre for Youth, whose production "Rockin"
Riding Hood will take you through a history of Rock n Roll songs.
performance is Saturday, March 24, 2007 and begins at 2:30 p.m.
The Franklin County Public Library's programs-FROG-WITH
And BEST are offered at no cost to participants. Registration how
is required. For information about the-libraryand-any of its program
call 670-8151, 697-2366, or 653-2784. .



Lifeguard Training

Classes At GCCC
The Wellness and Athletics Division of Gulf Coast Commu
College will offer a series of Lifeguard Training classes to be
March 8-19 and April 12-23. Classes meet from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m
the Natatorium.
Students must be fifteen years old on or before the last day of the c
enrolled. The prerequisite swim ability is to be capable of swim
300 yards continuously and showing stroke proficiency in the follow
order: 100 yards front crawl using rhythmic breathing and a stabili2
kick; 100 yards breaststroke, 100 yards either front crawl or breaststr
or a mix of these strokes. It is also necessary to be able to swing
yards using front crawl or breaststroke, surface dive to a depth of
feet, retrieve a 10 lb. object and return 20 yards to the starting p
under a timed run.
The cost of the course is $100. Prospective students are request
register in the Admissions and Records office. Students are require
bring a swimsuit the first day of class. Books required for the coi
may be obtained at the American Red Cross, 430 East 15th Str
Panama City, Florida.
Classes are limited sizes of 25 students per class. Upon successful c
pletion of the course, students will receive an American Red C
Lifeguard Certification Identification Card.
For additional information, call 769-1551, or Carl Kleinschmidt,
3832.


March 16, 2007


Founder ............. ...... ,Tom W. Hoffer
Director of Operations .......... And) Dyal
Contributors ................ Skip Frink
Carol Noble
Richard Noble
Dawn'Radford
Sue Cronkite
Tom Loughridge
Photographer ................. Diane Beauvais Dyal
Advertising Design and
Production Artist ...............Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate ...........Jerry Weber

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein ............... Alligator Point,
Karen Cox-Dennis ............... Apalachicola,
Skip Frink ................. ....Carrabelle
David Butler .....................Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung .......... Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins ...... .Eastpoint
Barbara Revell .................. Lanark Village
Richard Harper ........ ....... .. St. George Island

Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue
would cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the
Chronicle for price quotes if you seek several different
or similar issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96
including tax. Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26
including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2007
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


St. George Island
United Methodist Church

You ARE INVITED To
SUNDAY WORSHIP 9:30A.M.


201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org Pastor: Ray Hughes


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU














850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836

SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


9i t SJaptist CAwic

St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor

Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!

Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 7:00 p.m.
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


Boyd Fights For Farmers
Congressman Allen Boyd (D-North Florida), a meinber of the
Agriculture Subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee,
today hosted an Agriculture Summit to discuss the drafting of the 2007
Farm Bill and the needs of farmers in North Florida. Congressman
Boyd was joined by the Chairman of the U.S. House Agriculture
Committee and chief architect of the 2007 Farm Bill, Collin Peterson
(D-MN). Congressman Boyd and Chairman Peterson heard from
farm families and farm groups on ways to improve our nation's farm
policy and ensure that Florida's farmers have the tools and resources
they need.
"This year, passing the Farm Bill must be and will be a top priority for
Congress," said Congressman Boyd. "Today's Agriculture Summit
allowed me to discuss Florida's agriculture priorities with representa-
tives from Florida's major crops and specialty crops. I will take back
to Washington what I heard here today so that farmers in Florida will
have a voice in our nation's agriculture policy."
"I appreciate this opportunity to hear from farmers and ranchers in
North Florida about how the 2002 Farm Bill is working for them and
what they would like to see-in the Farm Bill that we will write in
Congress this year," said Chairman Peterson. "I look forward to work-
ing with Congressman Boyd and Members of Congress from agricul-
tural areas nationwide to pass a bill that meets the needs of all our agri-
culture producers and consumers."
Florida Agriculture Commissioner Charles Bronson, Florida Farm
Bureau President John Hoblick, and University of Florida's Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) Vice President Dr. Joe Joyce
also participated in the meeting.
Congressman Boyd believes that a core mission of the Farm Bill should
continue to be promoting profitability and income potential in agricul-
ture and a degree of stability in our nation's food and agriculture sys-
tem. The 2007 Farm Bill also needs to look to the future and support
farm-based renewable energy as a way to move our country closer
toward energy independence.
"The rewrite of the Farm Bill presents huge promise and potential for
the agriculture industry," Boyd stated. "In this bill, we have the oppor-
tunity to develop more effective disaster assistance, better access to agri-
cultural credit, and more programs to encourage agricultural research,
development, and conservation. As a fifth generation farmer and one
of a handful of active farmers in Congress, I look forward to working
with Chairman Peterson and my other colleagues in Congress to write
a farm bill that allows our farmers to continue to provide us with the
highest quality, safest, and most affordable food supply."


Vol. 16, No. 6


Bully

A Review
BY RICHARD E. NOBLE
Bully is a one man play that was
written by Jerome Alden. It
and appeared this past week at the
e. I Dixie Theatre and starred David
cket Poirier as Teddy Roosevelt.
David is the full-time stage man-
s is ager at the Dixie Theatre and also
the a very talented actor. Mr. Poirier
ten. did a wonderful job of portraying
lent the eccentric Teddy Roosevelt.
Sthe
iety To say that Teddy Roosevelt was
lical an eccentric is an understate-
ent, ment. Teddy ranges even in the
dies annals of historians anywhere
ived from a flamboyant hero to a com-
tab- plete crackpot. As usual the truth
the is probably somewhere in-
pon between.
y be
tick- But whether you consider Teddy
,ves a crackpot or a hero, you will def-
the initely enjoy seeing Mr. Poirier's
traf- re-enactment of the famous ex-
President. That gallant hero who
stormed up San Juan Hill in his
for- very expensive Brooks Brothers
Ste suit; won the Nobel Peace Prize
to: while disclaiming peace as
at unmanly; became famous for the
"Teddy Bear", one of the few
cute little animals that he didn't
shoot; the man who won election
to office by bad-mouthing the
"tyranny of wealth" and the
"criminal rich' while in his sec-
ond run for president was never-
theless able to gain the backing of
Morgan, .Harriman, Rockefeller,
ean, Frick and Gould; the man who
belle bought the first airplane from the
s. Wright brothers to start the U.S.
Air Force and sent the entire U.S.
.m. Navy on a tour around the world;
5:00 dug the Panama Canal which he
admitted to have "stolen fair and
Stop square"; the man who put thou-
an sands of acres aside for National
alk Parks and monuments and who
. invited a "negro" to eat at the
White House, Booker T.
ome Washington.
Teddy like his cousin Franklin
the was considered a disgrace to his
.m. class-that class being the upper
data class. Teddy, as with some of our
the modern day presidential hope-
fuls, couldn't figure out what side
of the tracks he belonged on.
e by
Red Senator Thomas Platt, one of the
The big money boys in New York at
that time is quoted as saying; "I
want to get rid of that bas...d. I
-IT! don't want him raising hell in my
ever state any longer." And Markus
ams, Hanna, .wealthy backer and
prime advisor to President
McKinley. cried after ,'the
McKinley assassination; "Now
look, that damn cowboy is
President of the United States."
Then on the heroic side once
again, while Teddy was about to
give a speech in Milwaukee a
nity would be assassin ran up to him
held and put a bullet into his chest.
i. in The bullet went through his writ-
ten speech which he had in his
pocket; then through his metal
lass eyeglass case; and then sunk four
ning inches into his chest. He coughed
ing into his hand to see if there was
zing blood in his lung, and then went
-oke on to speak before the crowd for
i 20 fifty minutes. This is the same
7-10 man who Gore Vidal claimed
point was a "mama's boy" who spent
his life trying to prove he was a
d to real man. Well, whatever his pol-
d to itics this event stands as proof
nurse enough for me.
reet, The more one reads about Teddy
Roosevelt the more difficult it
becomes to draw the line between
om- madman and genius. But there is
rOSS no line that has to be drawn when
it comes to either the writing of
872-
Continued on Page 9








Page 4 16 March 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


EAmoo ;(4


Carrabelle City Council Meeting March 1, 2007


Saltwater Classic

Dilemma Resolved

Mayor Has To Break Tie Vote
BY SKIP FRINK
Item number one under Unfinished Business' was The Big Bend
Saltwater Classic fishing tournament. Following last month's unprece-
dented "no second" motion which did not require open discussion or
action, the tournament managers asked for another chance to present
their request for a temporary beer license.
Michelle Clark, tournament manager, reviewed the improved services
planned for this June's event: off-duty police officers on site, pedestrian
crosswalk, no on-street parking, 3 satellite parking lots, "construction"
high-wattage floodlighting and professionally supervised and trained
beverage servers handling beer sales. She asked for consideration of
their request and public comment.



Si


'Richard Sands again made the motion to approve. This time, Gathana
Parmenas seconded, but in her words "only to start discussion". Mr.
Sands then observed that his actions to approve the request are "pro-
moting Carrabelle, not alcohol".
'Ray Tyre had a different slant-he went to great length to explain that
during his campaign, he didn't campaign. He didn't knock on doors, or
send mailings, or carry out any typical campaign actions. He main-
tained that the people who asked him to run did so because of his rep-
utation for integrity. His logic then tied his non-campaign and his
integrity to his current decision to vote No on this issue. He did not
'refer to the effects that the major tournament might have on the eco-
nomic development of the town, nor to the planned "containment" of
alcohol consumption. Grumblings from the overflow audience (char-
acterized by the mayor as pro-motion) suggested that Tyre may not be
sufficiently concerned with our future as a city.
Commissioner Parmenas said that her vote would be "no" to avoid a
"bad precedent". Sands and Rankin Yes, Tyre and Parmenas No.
Mayor Kelly cast the tie-breaking Yes vote without explanation, and
-angrily gaveled for silence at the outbreak of applause from the room.
Post-meeting speculation by informed sources indicated that the city
had received counsel from local agencies in and out of government to
-vote in this positive manner on the tournament, for the benefit of the
whole area.
In earlier commission action, -Raymond.Williams, Jimmie Crowder
and Lillian Smith received'Mayor's Special Awards for their contribu-
tions to community improvement. Raymond cleaned up and land-
,scaped his property on Highway 67, Jimmie refurbished the outside of
the red caboose at C-Quarters, and Miss Lillian was commended for
sharing her wealth of historical Carrabelle information for posterity.
'City Administrator John McInnis informed the room that the architec-
1tural agreement for lighthouse renovation was signed, and the work
was going out to bid. Also, Franklin County requested water and sewer
to serve a new 90-bed nursing home. In police report action, the good
-news this month is that the confiscated cash amount from drug busts
was $4500. 1000 ctibic yards of debris was removed from Carrabelle in
February (citizens can call for free pickup). Our fire station is now heat-
ed, and freshly painted.
In an update regarding the Hexaport factory plans: Franklin County
has allowed some needed easements, and the CDBG grant application
is looking good. All Carrabelle water and sewer project work is on
schedule, with no major problems.
P&Z reported the CDBG (Hexaport) grant progress, and that they are
starting work on planning new city sidewalks.
Richard Sands discussed the Veteran's Park Wall of Honor plans. The
350-name starting capacity can grow to 700 with the current design. He
noted that all uniformed defense service veterans who had ever lived in
Carrabelle would be candidates for inclusion.
The commission approved Tamara Allen's report on the Carrabelle
Cares management plan for the Waterfronts Florida Partnership
Community application. The city will receive $50,000 over 2 years, as
long as we contribute significant volunteer work.


the action, all budgets, accounting, billing, etc. would be kept separate
from Carrabelle's. Approved. Cheryl Sanders, of the county commis-
sion, was invited by the mayor to come forward and bless the proceed-
ing,. which she did.
Suzanne Zimmerman, representing' the Carrabelle Area Chamber of
Commerce, requested the usual Marine Street road closings for the
April Riverfront Festival, which were approved. Lake McKissack Phase
II project received final plat approval.
Mr. McInnis related that we have applied to extend the grant to increase
our final water and sewer,work phase (the Carrabelle Beach run) to go
as far as the lighthouse, since it will have public restrooms.
As the witching hour approached, final plat approval for the long-
fought Long Pointe Phase II canie up for discussion. Knut Rittweger,
property owner across the river, introduced much documentation
against the approval but was not allowed to read it all. Commissioner
Parmenas conducted an exhaustive discussion of the 20% impervious
surface regulations, and could not come to an agreement with several
project representatives on hand. Developer attorney Michael
Donaldson finally expressed that their hope had been that this final
attempt, which reduced the number of homesites to 35, would be a
solution "without litigation". The commission then voted, had another
2-2 tie, and the mayor broke this one as well with her "no".



Gentle Footsteps In The

Sands of Time
BY SUE CRONKITE
We are fascinated with history, with how this area was settled, who
lived here and who inhabited the land where we walk and talk and live
today. Old homes are exotic to us. We revere their history-who built
them, who lived in the unusual-looking buildings. We admire greatly a
church brought by ship and reconstructed in Apalachicola, maybe one
of the first modular buildings.
We display pictures and write accolades of many who came before
us-the man who invented air conditioning, a botanist who grafted a
pecan tree onto hickory roots. St. George Island has become a magnet
to sun seekers. And we are reconstructing a lighthouse which washed
into the Gulf on the south side of Little St. George, cut loose from its
mother barrier island to make it easier for boats to go from
Apalachicola Bay to their fishing destinations in the Gulf of Mexico.
Out from Two-Mile we point to St. Vincent Island and brag to visitors
about Dr. Ray V Pierce (b 1840-d 1914) who brought Sambar deer from
Asia to the island. His son V. Mott Pierce, who inherited the island was
77 when he died in 1942. A national lottery is held each year for
hunters to go on the island and hunt the fabled deer.
Eunice Hogan Dykes, born Oct. 19, 1936, and died Feb. 28, 2007,
remembered a little girl named Margaret, probably a granddaughter to
Mott Pierce. A boat would take Eunice from her home at 11-Mile to the
island to play with Margaret.
St. Vincent was sold after Mott Pierce died, to Alfred and Henry
Loomis, who put many exotic animals on the island. In 1968, the island
was sold to the U. S. government. We wonder what happened to. the
descendants of the St. Vincent foxes when one swims to the mainland,
and speculate on how many other exotic animals have escaped to mix
with others still here.
Every place has layers and layers of history. Even the dirt is made up of
tiny particles of the lives of those who were here before, shards of skin,.
hair, bits of toenails, rubbed down shells, broketi buttons made from the
insides of oyster shells, rubber shoe heels, sharks teeth, chicken bones,
egg shells. Analyze a spoonful of soil from your yard and you'd be
amazed at what's there. Every step you take has underneath it the his-
tory of its existence.
As time goes on, we lose the real people connections to those who went
before, the humans whose lives were touched by those written about
and revered. The people who spoke with, laughed, and possibly cried
with those who were here when the history of Apalachicora began to
be written down.
One of those who remembered was Eunice Hogan Dykes. Her foot-
prints are still in the sand where she walked around her home on the
north side of Highway 98 at Two-mile in Apalachicola. A hard rain
and time will erase the footsteps that can be seen now. But even time
can't wipe out the history of herself, the real person who walked into
the church, grocery store, the homes of family members and friends.
The lilt of Eunice's mouth when she smiled will remain in the memo-
ries of -those who knew her. Just as her memory of the little girl who
lived on the island where they played with their dolls remained with
Eunice. She looked forward to seeing her playmate as the boat bobbed
across the bay from the mainland to St. Vincent Island.
After she grew up and married Josh Dykes, how happy she was when
she cooked fish caught by him, their children, and grandchildren, and
shared it with her family and friends. Nobody wrote it down before, but
those who came in contact with her, from the little girl, other friends of
her youth, her family and friends know that Eunice was a great moth-
er, grandmother, and friend. Those memories will last as long as those
whose lives she touched continue. Just as she kept the fact of the little
girl alive when she told about being taken over to the island to play.
Somebody picked Eunice. Maybe the little girl's mother, or her father,
or just an employee around the house built on the island. Pictures show
a little-girl Eunice with laughing eyes, hair blowing around a friendly
face.
She remembered that the house was big, that the furnishings looked
rich, that sandwiches were served to her and the little girl as they played
with their dolls. She didn't remember what was in the sandwiches, just
that they were different. Eunice's. family ate mostly fish, oysters,
shrimp, potatoes, peas, tomatoes and other vegetables from the garden.
"I loved my doll and she loved hers. There were other dolls, but we each
had our favorite which we played with most of the time. We usually
played in her room, or on the big, wide porch, swinging in a swing, or
rocking. Sometimes we went out in the yard. There were peacocks.
They were really beautiful. I wanted a peacock feather, but nobody
offered me one that I remember."
When it was time for the little girl to take her nap, Eunice was taken by
boat back to her home at 11-Mile. She never knew when she would get
to visit the little girl on St. Vincent again. "My mama would help me
bathe and put on a clean dress. I looked forward to playing with
Margaret."'
Eunice didn't think being taken on a boat to play with a little girl on an
island was all that unusual. "I felt sorry for her," said Eunice. "There
were lots of kids to play with where I lived. She only had me."


The little girl had her place in the colorful history of Apalachicola Bay
by being a descendant of Dr. Ray V. Pierce, who sold patent medicines
over the country. His remedies were widely known and appreciated.
Eunice Hogan Dykes fit into the history of her time and place of exis-
tence, by being herself. The person of Eunice is at the core of all histo-
ry. She made her mark by being a quiet, gentle one who tried to be the
best person she could be, every day. She breathed the air, dreamed the
dreams, loved, and lived to bless the lives of those around her. She
made the world a better place where the rest of us still live.



Optimism And Truth
Editorial and Commentary
BY RICHARD E. NOBLE
"Listen you; go back inside that bedroom and when you come back
out, I want to see a smile on your face."
I have a friend who was told this by an adopting uncle of his when he
was still a young boy. To my friend-who is no longer a young boy this
story is of major significance. For my friend this was a life changing
moment. It seems that this little incident turned my buddy from a per-
petual sad sack into Norman Vincent Peele. From that day forward, in
sickness and in health, for richer or poorer, my friend has been a tower
of "positive thinking"-sometimes a slightly leaning tower, but never-
theless a tower.
Then there was "John the Chicken Man". John the Chicken Man
worked at the meat packinghouse where I was employed for my first
full-time job in life. As you may have guessed John was the guy in
charge of the chicken department. Whenever there was a problem that
related to chickens all my co-workers would say; Go talk to John the
Chicken Man.
John the Chicken Man was also a part-time philosopher. He always had
long, involved, often penetrating answers to any question. I liked John.
And one day he told me, "Happy people are people who think about
happy things or things that make them happy. Unhappy people are peo-
ple who think about sad things or things that make them unhappy. If
you are an unhappy person you have got to stop thinking about unhap-
py things and start remembering good things, not bad things.
I liked that idea. And whenever I find that I am unhappy I force myself
to think about things that once made me happy. And then pretty soon,
I am happy once again.
In opposition to my old friends there are others of equal wisdom, for
example, Clarence Darrow. Clarence wrote an essay on the advantages
of pessimism. He considered optimists to be delusional and unable to
cope with reality. He said that optimists were like drug addicts. The
only way that they can stay happy is to escape from the "truth" or real-
ity and continually inject themselves with "happy-thought" drugs.
And then there was the poet Robert Service who wrote a poem entitled
"Compensation Bill". Compensation Bill was the kind of a guy who if
he lost one foot, rejoiced because a pair of socks now lasted twice as
long.
And then we have Voltaire and his "Candide". Candide was Voltaire's
cynical answer to all those who promoted the idea that this is "the best
of all possible worlds" more specifically a guy by the name of Leibniz.
Then there is that notion about "truth" setting you free. If we accept
"truth" as what is; or as what really is, then the truth isn't always happy;
it often isn't even positive.
So then who is right on this issue-my old friend and John the Chicken
Man with their Compensation Bill mentality or Clarence Darrow,
Voltaire, Robert Service and the entire chorus of Greek Stoic
Philosophers?
I know that Voltaire and that crowd are closer to the truth--but my old
buddy and John the Chicken Man always seem to bring me out of the
dumps much more often than facing the truth or reading Epictetus or
even Marcus Aurelius-even though I know that I'm lying to myself.
So I guess that the answer is to face the truth but only when it is
absolutely impossible to make up a better story.



Panhandle Players Meet
BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
The Panhandle Players Annual Meeting Thursday night, March 1, was
presided over by Liz Sisung, president. Nineteen players were present
to vote on the next year's officers, hear about the success of the past
year activities and plan for another year of providing entertainment for
the Franklin County community. The slate of officers elected by accla-
mation consisted of: President- Liz Sisung; Vice President- Pam Vest;
Secretary- Joe Shields; Treasurer- Gayle Dodds; and members-at-large-
Tom Adams, Linda Elsea, Jeff Ilardi, Megan Lamb, Margy Oehlert,
Royce Rolstad, and Cathy Watts.
Treasurer Gayle Dodds reported on the income during the last season
and president Sisung noted that expenses were rising, making it neces-
sary to increase th ticket prices slightly. There will also be a new "stu-
dent" ticket available. The prices for the coming season will be: adults
- $12.00 ea., students $10.00 ea. and children 12 and under $5.00 ea.
President Sisung said, however, "Not always does our box office
income cover the expenses; royalties, rentals, costuming, etc. We also
need the income advertising provides."
Cathy Watts described the levels of membership available in Panhandle
Players. Active members pay dues of $15.00 per year, an Associate
membership is $25.00, a Patron pays $100.00, and $250.00 creates a
Sponsoring Angel.
Pam Vest introduced the cast for the production of Harvey, which will
be, performed at the Dixie Theatre on April 19th, 20th, 21st, and 22nd.
Harvey is a comedy about a man named Elwood P. Dowd, whose con-
stant companion is a six-foot tall white rabbit. When Elwood P. Dowd's
sister tries to get him committed to an asylum, the fun begins. Elwood
P. Dowd is played by Hank Kozlowsky, his sister by Margy Oehlert,
and the rest of the characters will be played by (in order of appearance)
Stephaney Provenzano, Jan Sheddon, Janyce Loughridge, Megan
Lamb, Jeff Ilardi, Joe Shields, Tom Loughridge, Elaine Kozlowsky,
Patrick Leach, and Royce Rolstad,.III.
Mr. Rolstad then gave the members a preview of the play he plans' to
direct next November. He has found a stage version of Charles
Dickens' A Christmas Carol that will be a nice introduction to the hol-


Continued on Page 9


Pauline Sullivan, new Lanark Commissioner.


Recently-elected Lanark Village water and sewer commissioner Pauline
Sullivan introduced herself. Then after some minutes of back-and-forth
"he said, she said" which has become the hallmark of the utility asso-
ciation, John McInnis explained the current status. Carrabelle has met
with Lanark, we can afford the acquisition and can pay off the debt at
half the current interest rate, and that if the commission would approve


I IHC O
PUB IC NEES* N
NOTAPOFT ARIN


Whether you're looking for the perfect place to unwind for a weekend or a lifetime,
our associates can help find your place.



m, p


Ron Bloodworth Ben Bloodworth Kay Barnett Sam Gilbert BJ Neshat Billie Grey Jan Grey
Realtor, Realtor. Realtor, Realtor, Realtor, Rental Manager Reservations Agent
Sales Associate Sales Associate Sales Associate Business Manager Sales Associate


Call or stop by our offices at
224 Franklin Boulevard, St. George Island
800-341-2021 850-927-2282
www.uncommonflorida.com


rnii


You too can have an investment
in paradise with

MORE BEST LOANS

ON THE PLANET
from Bank of America
For details about all Home and Lot Loans, NO FEE Home Equity
Lines of Credit and Construction Terms, please contact:
Chollet Ramsey, Vice President
850.927.4812
chollet.ramsey@bankofamerica.com
BankofAmerica. .







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 March 2007 Page 5


Second Circuit

Court Report
February 13, 2007
Judge William L. Gary
BY CAROL NOBLE
All persons listed below are innocent
until proven otherwise in a court of law.


PRE-TRIAL CONFERENCE
BAUCHAM, ROBERT T: Charged November 8, 2005 with battery on
law enforcement officer; resist officer without violence. Bond was
$500.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Robert
Culpepper II. Trial set for February 14, 2007.
CARGILL, STEPHON EUGENE JR: Charged September 2, 2005
with driving while license suspended (felony); resisting officer without
violence; refusal to sign summons; Charged January 7, 2006 with driv-
ing while license suspended (felony). Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Case Management continued to April 10, 2007.
CARGILL, STEPHON EUGENE JR: Charged December 20, 2005
with driving while license suspefided (felony); Charged January 20,
2006 with sale of controlled substance; charged January 21, 2006 with
2 counts sale/possession of controlled substance with intent to sell
within 1,000 feet of a church; possession of cannabis with intent to sell
within 1,000 feet of a church; possession of ecstasy. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was 'represented in court by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to April 10,
2007.
ELLIOTT, ALYSSA J: Charged March 6, 2006 with possession con-
trolled substance with intent to deliver; delivery of controlled sub-
stance. Defendant on conditional release. The defendant was present in
court with Attorney Robert Culpepper II and entered a plea of no con-
test. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentenced to 30
months probation (concurrent); 2 days in jail with 2 days credit for time
served; no alcohol or drugs, random testing; $470.00 costs and fees.
MONROY, DIANE: Charged April 23, 2006 with battery on law
enforcement officer. Bond was $1,000.00. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin-Steiger and entered a plea of no con-
test to the lesser charge of resisting without violence. Adjudication
withheld. The defendant was sentenced to 2 days in jail with 2 days
credit for time served; 12 months county probation; $335.00 costs and
fees.
ONEAL, MICHAEL JEROD;. Charged 6 times September 14, 2006
with sale or possession controlled substance with intent to sell within
1,000 feet of a school or park. Bond was $25,000.00 each charge. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney Robert Culpepper II,
entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty each charge.
The defendant was sentenced to 4 years in prison (suspended); 4 years
probation; 62 days in jail with 62.days-credit for time served; $470.00
costs and fees; each charge. All cases concurrent.
PORCHE, EDWARD: Charged December 23, 2005 with grand theft
3rd degree. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Pre-trial Conference continued to
March 13, 2007.
ARRAIGNMENT
APONTE, CARLOS E: Charged November 17, 2006 with driving
while license suspended or revoked. Bond was $1,000.00. The defen-
dant was present in court and entered a plea of not guilty. A public
defender -was appointed. Case Management continued to April 10,
2007.
BARBER, AMMIE L: Charged December 22, 2006 with fraudulent
use of credit card more than $100 :property in 6 months; petit theft
value greater than $100. Bond was $3,000.00. The defendant was pres-
ent in court with Attorney Ethanl Andrew Way and entered a plea of no
contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentenced to 2 days
in jail with 2 days credit for time served; 24 months probation; restitu-
tion to victims; $410.00 CO.Ls and fees.


r


BAXLEY, PAUL C: Charged December 10, 2006 with driving while
license permanently revoked. Bond was $500.00. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea
of not guilty. Case Management continued to April 10, 2007.
BROWN, ARTHUR CHARLES: Charged January 11, 2007 with sale
of cocaine. Defendant released on own recognizance. The defendant
was present in court and entered a plea of not guilty. A public defend-
er was appointed. Case Management continued to April 10, 2007.
BROWN, BRIAN J: Charged January 16, 2007 with sale of cocaine.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way who entered a written plea of not
guilty dated February 5, 2007. Case Management continued to April
10, 2007.
BUNYON, VEDELL M: Charged January 11, 2007 with sale of
cocaine. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was present in court and
entered a plea of not guilty. A public defender was appointed. Case
Management continued to May 15, 2007.
BUZBEE, CHRISTOPHER: Charged December 14, 2006 with home
invasion robbery with weapon; aggravated assault with deadly weapon,
victim over 65. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was repre-
sented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of
not guilty. Case Management continued to April 10, 2007.
CHAPMAN, HOMER JEFFERSON: Charged December 3, 2006
with burglary of dwelling while armed; Charged January 17, 2007 with
grand theft of a firearm; grand theft. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger
who entered a plea of not guilty. Case Management continued to
March 13, 2007.
CROWELL, GLENN J: Charged January 11, 2007 with sale of
cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way and entered a plea of no con-
test. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentenced to 33 days in
jail with 33 days credit for time served; 24 months probation; no drugs
or alcohol, random testing; substance abuse evaluation and treatment;
$510.00 costs and fees.
DALTON, MANDI SMITH: Charged 4 times December 12, 2006
with sale of cocaine. Defendant Was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way and entered a plea
of no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentenced to
120 days in jail with 63 days credit for time served; 36 months proba-
tion; substance abuse evaluation and treatment; no alcohol or drugs,
random testing; each charge; $510.00 costs and fees; forfeiture of
money seized.
DAVIS, JAMES H: Charged January 13, 2007 with sale of cocaine.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not guilty. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
DOMINGUES, ESMERALDA: Charged January 11, 2007 with sale
of cocaine. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan
Andrew Way and entered a plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld.
The defendant was sentenced to 33 days in jail with 33 days credit for
time served; 24 months probation; substance abuse evaluation and
treatment; no drugs or alcohol, random testing; $510.00 costs and fees..
FENDLEY, MARSHALL: Charged December 19, 2006 with obtain
or attempt to obtain controlled substance by fraud. Bond was
$2,500.00. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender
Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of not guilty. Case Management con-,
tinued to April 10, 2007.
GRAHAM, ANTHONY J: Charged December 22, 2006 with sale of
cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way and entered a plea of no con-
test. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentenced to 53 days in
jail with 53 days credit for time served; 24 months probation; substance
abuse evaluation and treatment; no drugs or alcohol, random testing;
$510.00 costs and fees.
GRIGGS, ETTA:' Charged October 21, 2006 with burglary of occu-
pied dwelling; Charged January 23, 2007 with felony petit theft.
Defendant released on own recognizance. A written plea of not guilty
entered on December 13, 2006. Case Management continued to May
15, 2007.
HALL, PIERRE JONTUE: Charged December 4, 2006 with traffick-
ing in controlled substance; Charged December 4, 2006 with sale of


CARRABELLE REALTY, INC.
P.O.Drawer 708 Carrabelle, FL


1 (850) 697-2181


* 1 (800) 530-1473


Ruby J. Litton, Broker 850-528-1101
Dale Millender, Realtor Associate 850-519-7048


House 002: Country home.in a private set-
ting, 3BR/2BA; enclosed garage, separate
workshop, fireplace, on 6.5 acres. Come
take a look and make an offer $349,000.

NEW LISTINGS


* Beach lot in private area,
50'x100', $895,000.
*50'x150' MH lot, Lanark,
$165,000. Reduced to $150,000.
* (2) Five-acre tracts on Hwy. 67,
$195,000 each.
* One acre-on Harbor Rd., high &
dry, $89,900.
* Weekend Retreat, 2$R Mobile
Home on Corner Lot. $103,500.


Golf Course: Prestigious lot on the 9th tee,
corner lot, reduced to $299,000
owner/agent.


2003: 32'x64' double-wide on 1.96 acres on
Harbor Rd., 3BR/2BA, large pond, beautiful
property $249,500.


* 44 acre parcels in'Pine Coast Plantation, $225,000.
* 1.97 acre Homesite, cleared, Baywood Estates, $98,900.
* 10 acres in Riverbend Plantation, $225,000.
* 2.53 acres with large pond, Baywdod Estates, $164,900.
* 8 acres Riverbend Plantation,' approximately 500' Crooked River,
$349,000.
* 2.2 acres Creekfront, Victorian Village, shared dock, $439,000.
* 1-1/2 city lots with riverview, $225,000.
* Bayfront, 50x162, $324,500.


Tyndall Eye
2007 Gulf Coast Salute to
America's Heroes
Tyndall will host the 2007 Gulf
Coast Salute air show and open
house Saturday, March 24.
Gates open at 9 a.m. Parking and
admission are free.
The U.S. Navy's premier aerial'
demonstration team, the Navy
Blue Angels, will headline the
show with breath-taking high-
speed passes and impressive aeri-
al maneuvers.
Come see the F-22 Raptor, the
most advanced fighter jet in the
world, perform the first F-22


demonstration flight ever per-
formed for a public audience.
The joint-service, one-day air;
show will feature aerial perform-
ances and exhibits from the Air/
Force, Army, Navy and Marine
Corps.
U.S. and foreignimilitary demon-
stration teams,' including Russian
MiG-23 aircraft, will fill the skies
over Tyndall Air Force Base with
excitement.
Civilian aerobatic performers,
including Patty Wagstaff, the
Trojan Phlyers and the Vortex
Aerobatic Team will roll and
tumble through airspace over
Tyndall.


'r "i p r
I an G & yyrnti

Mexic1A^ 9rilt nj aCt t-nti I

I Buy 1 Dinner at Regular Price, I
I Get Second Dinner I
I 50% OFF I
I One coupon per person, per visit. Offer good in Apalachicola onty.
I 75 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8555 I



L ot-t
1.-.,- --- --- ------






4- 8 250-926-681 ~
|?r PERFORMANCE SPRAY-ON BED LINERS
WREC CKTM FULL LINE OF
AUTO ACCESSORIES
WWW.MIKESPAINTANDBODY.COM 3140 COASTAL HWY.
VISIT US AT WAKULLA.COM CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327



MARKS INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.





WRITING:
Home, Auto, Life, Business, Marine, Bonds
and Other Lines of Insurance
See us for your insurance needs at:
61 Avenue E
Apalachicola, Florida 32320
850-653-2161 800-586-1415


The famous Jet Truck will also
appear at the 2007 Gulf Coast
Salute to America's Heroes air
show. The 12,000 horsepower
flame-throwing Jet Truck will be
put to the test as it races a low-fly-
ing airplane at full speed.
The show will feature numerous
aerial teams, more than 50 differ-
ent aircraft on display, a classic
car show and more!
As the family event of the spring,
the 2007 Gulf Coast Salute air
show will have activities for chil-
dren including peddle planes,
inflatables, games and crafts.
Visit www.tyndall.af.mil for a
schedule of events, directions,
photos, security information and
more.
Military ID Card Processing
The Tyndall AFB Military
Personnel Flight Customer
Service will not process Active
Duty/Dependent identification
cards due to a server conversion
upgrade March 21 and 22. If you
need an identification card creat-
ed on March 21 or 22, you must
report to the Naval Coastal
SSystem Station in Panama City
Beach or to Eglin AFB, in Fort
Walton Beach.
Special Duty Assignment
Team
The Air Education and Training
Command Special Duty
Assignment Team will conduct a
briefing offering active duty
enlisted personnel the opportuni-
'ty to pursue assignments as mili-
. tary training instructors,
recruiters, or other AETC special
duties. The briefing will be held
March 23 at 8:45 a.m. in the
Weapons Evaluation Group
Auditorium on Tyndall AFB. If
you are interested in learning
more about the challenges and
rewards of being an Air Force
recruiter, training instructor, or
other special duties specialist,
attend the briefing or call MSgt
Travis Fritts at 283-2222 for more
Information.


large. Call ClarenceP

Villgafimliiwi0^U


-Sffi~fUi~H^^


( L ~ __


I I I a


--- "- I


~ r_~ _ __


cocaine. A written plea of not guilty entered on January 19, 2007 and
December 15, 2006. Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
LE, HUNG VAN: Charged November 11, 2006 with flagrant violation
of net law; trawling with more-than two trawls; trawling with net over
66 feet circumference. Bond was $2,500.00. A written plea of not guilty
entered on February 9, 2007. Case Management continued to March
13, 2007.
LEE, CARMIA: Charged December 12, 2006-with sale of controlled
substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was present in court.
A written plea of not guilty was entered dated February 5, 2007. Case
Management continued to April 10, 2007.
LOWERY, PAULA S: Charged December 22, 2006 with fraudulent
use of credit card more than $100 in 6 months; petit theft value greater
than $100. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest
and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 53 days in
jail with 53 days credit for time served; 30 months probation; restitution
to victims; $410.00 costs and fees.
NELSON, DANIEL TREVOR: Charged January 5, 2007 with posses-
sion contraband at county detention facility; delivery of controlled sub-
stance; possession of controlled substance without prescription. Bond
was $4,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of not guilty. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
NICHOLS, BOB NELSON: Charged October 16, 2006 with flagrant
violation of net law; net fishing no'gill or entangling net; carriage of net
across state waters; Charged January 19, 2007 with pompano net shall
not be less than 400 yard length; pompano net shall be at least 70 mesh-
es deep; net unmarked and unnumbered. Bond was $1,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and
entered a plea of not guilty. Case Management continued to April 10,
2007.
POWELL, JANET LYNN: Charged January 4, 2007 with possession
of controlled substance cocaine;, resisting officer without violence.
Bond was $1,000:00. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of not guilty. Case
Management continued to April,10, 2007.
RICHARDS, CONNIE J: Charged 3 times January 12, 2007 with sale
of cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represent-
'ed in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not
guilty; Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
SHIRLEY, WILLIAM J: Charged January 5, 2007 with possession of
controlled substance without prescription. Bond was $1,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way and
entered a written plea of not guilty dated February 5, 2007. Case
Management continued to April 10; 2007.
SMYTH, MARC S: Charged May 10, 2006 with grand theft. Bond was
$6,000.00. Attorney J. Gordon Shtiler entered a written plea of not
guilty dated February 9, 2007. Case Management continued to April
10, 2007.
STANLEY, KRISTOPHER.JERRAN: Charged January 8, 2007 with
- battery. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not
guilty. Case Management continued to April 10, 2007
TAYLOR, JOHN JR: Charged October 16, 2006 with flagrant viola-
tion of net law; net fishing no gill or entangling net; carriage of net
across state waters; Charged January 19, 2007 with pompano net shall
not be less than 400 yard length; pompano net shall be at least 70 mesh-
es deep; net unmarked and unnumbered. Bond was $1,000.00. The
defendant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way
who entered a written plea of not guilty. Case Management continued
to April 10, 2007.
THOMPSON, VERNON- Charged December 29, 2006 with posses-
sion of controlled substance without prescription; possession of
cannabis; possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond was $3,500.00. The
defendant was present in court alnd entered a written plea of not guilty.
Case Management continued to April 10, 2007.
TOPHAM, JIMMY: Charged October 28, 2006 with driving while
license suspended felony. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was pres-

SContinued on Page 6








Page 6 16 March 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Second Circuit Court Report from Page 5

ent in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of
not guilty. Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
TRUMBULL, JOHN ELWEN JR: Charged October 16, 2006 with
flagrant violation of net law; net fishing no gill or entangling net; car-
riage of net across state waters; Charged January 19, 2007 with-pom-
pano net shall not be less than 400 yard length; pompano net shall be
at least 70 meshes deep; net unmarked and unnumbered. Bond was
$1,000.00. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney
Gregory Cummings who entered a written plea of not guilty. Case
Management continued to April 10, 2007.
WHITE, NATHANIEL III: Charged November 28, 2006 with 2
counts sale or possession of controlled substance with intent to sell
within 1,000 feet of a school; Charged 2 times on November 28, 2006
with sale of cocaine. Total bond was $75,000.00. The defendant was
present in court and entered a written plea qf not guilty. Case
Management continued to April 10, 2007.
WILSON, PAUL DENNIS: Charged December 7, 2006 with posses-
sion of controlled substance cocaine; possession of controlled sub-
stance without prescription; possession drug paraphernalia; Charged
December 8, 2006 with delivery of controlled substance. Defendant
was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney
J. Gordon Shuler who entered a written plea of not guilty. Case
Management continued to April 10, 2007.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION ARRAIGNMENT
BROWN, ARTHUR CHARLES: Charged December 6, 2003 with
sale of controlled substance; Charged April 11, 2004 with sale of con-
trolled substance. Defendant released on own recognizance. The defen-
dant was present in court and entered a plea of denial. Case
Management continued to April 10, 2007.
BROWN, BRANDON NEEL: Charged February 20, 2005 with resist-
ing officer with violence; battery on law enforcement officer; criminal
mischief; Charged March 3, 2005 with criminal mischief; Charged
August 2, 2006 with burglary of a dwelling. Defendant was incarcerat-
ed. The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin
Steiger who entered a plea of denial. Case Management continued to
March 13, 2007.
BROWN, BRIAN J: Charged June 9, 2005 with possession with intent
to sell cannabis. A written plea of denial was entered by Attorney
Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management continued to April 10, 2007.
BUFFKIN, ROBERT CHARLES: Charged March 12, 2006 with pos-
session of controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
admitted being in violation and was found in violation of probation.
Probation revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 60 days in jail with
35 days credit for time served; probation reinstated. Any conditions not
met, re-imposed.
CAIN, GEORGE D: Charged July 19, 2005 with driving while license
permanently revoked. Defendant released on own recognizance. The
defendant was present in court. Probation terminated. Costs reduced to
civil judgment.
COGBURN, JOSEPH C: Charged June 28, 2003 and August 6, 2003
with burglary of a dwelling; 2 counts dealing in stolen property.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and was
found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defendant was
sentenced to 48 months in prison with credit for time served (stipulat-
ed time); counts and cases concurrent,
CRAUSWELL, DARYL ALVIN: Charged August 19, 2004 with
attempted sexual battery; false imprisonment. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin
Steiger who entered a plea of denial. Case Management continued to
March 13, 2007.
ESTES, FREDERICK JR: Charged March 21, 2005 with burglary of
a dwelling; grand theft; Charged November 5, 2006 with batter on
inmate; Charged November 9, 2006 with 2 counts uttering. Defendant
was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public'
Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and was found in
violation of probation. The defendant was sentenced to 48 months in.
prison with credit for time served. All cases and counts concurrent, all
financial amounts reduced to civil judgment. :- 2 .'o
2d.


GILLEY, SHARON LESLIE: Charged December 8, 2005 with unau-
thorized possession of driver license; 11 counts forgery; 11 counts utter-
ing (passing worthless document); grand theft (3rd degree). Defendant
released on own recognizance. The defendant was present in court and
entered a plea of denial. A public defender was appointed. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
GRAY, CHARLES DENUM: Charged February 21, 2006 with bur-
glary of conveyance while armed. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler.
Violation of Probation Hearing set for March 13, 2007.
GREEN, ROBERT CORBETT: Charged July 23, 2005 with driving
while license permanently revoked. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
admitted being in violation and was found in violation of probation.
Probation revoked. Probation was reinstated with 38 days credit for
time served.
JORDEN, CARL W: Charged January 22, 2006 with worthless check
over 150 dollars. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was pres-
ent in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in vio-
lation and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The
defendant was sentenced to 24 months probation; $300.00 costs; any
conditions not met, re-imposed.
LATTIMORE, ROBERT C. JR: The defendant was present in court
with Attorney Glazer, admitted being in violation and was found in
violation of probation. The defendant was sentenced to 5 years in
prison with 5 days credit for time served.
LOWERY, PAULA S: Charged July 9, 2005 with sale or possession of
controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a school.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and was
found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defendant was
sentenced to 30 months probation with 74 days credit for time served
(concurrent); any conditions not met, re-imposed.
MARTIN, ROBERT STEVEN: Charged October 4, 2004 with posses-
sion of controlled substance; October 1, 2004 with possession of
cannabis more than 20 grams. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-'
dant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who
entered a plea of denial. Case Management continued to March 13,
2007.
MORROW, SHANNON LEE: Charged July 21, 2005 with sale or pos-
session of controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a
school. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial.
Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
MURRAY, RUBY ALINE: Charged August 7, 2006 with aggravated
battery with deadly weapon. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted
being in violation and was found in violation of probation. Probation
revoked and re-instated with 24 days credit for time served. The defen-
dant was sentenced to substance abuse evaluation and treatment;
$615.00 costs, a result of another case.
NELSON, ADRIENNE JOYNER: Charged March 13, 2006 with
grand theft motor vehicle. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted
being in violation and was found in violation of probation. Probation
revoked and terminated. The defendant was sentenced to 1 year and 1
day in prison with 94 days credit f6r time served. Costs reduced to civil
judgment.
PILOTTI, JAMES EDWARD: Charged March 31, 2005 with burgla-
ry of a conveyance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in
violation and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked
and terminated. The defendant was sentenced to 1 year and 1 day in
prison with 78 days credit for time served. Costs reduced to civil judg-
ment.
RAY, DEDRA L: Charged April 28, 2005 with 4 counts uttering (pass-
ing worthless document). Defendant released on own recognizance.
The defendant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler.
Probation modified and extended 12 months. Any conditions not met,
re-imposed.
RICHARDSON, MICHAEL ANTHONY: Charged June 29, 1998
with possession of cocaine with intent to sell; possession with intent to
sell cannabis. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present


in court with Attorney Alphonso Hagans Jr. Affidavit withdrawn and
probation terminated.
SIMMONS, MATHEW R: Charged 3 times November 21, 2005 with
possession of controlled substance. Defendant released on own recog-
nizance. The defendant was present in court and entered a plea of
denial. A public defender was appointed. Case Management continued
to April 10, 2007.
THOMPSON, JAY L: Charged July 19, 2005 with grand theft of
motor vehicle; charged with purchase of controlled substance.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
WARD, TIMOTHY SHAWN: Charged March 11, 2004 with throw-
ing deadly missile; Charged May 8, 2006 with 4 counts battery.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and was
found in violation of probation. Probation revoked and terminated.
The defendant was sentenced to 28 months in prison with 260 days
credit for time served (stipulated). Costs reduced to civil judgment.
WHITE, NATHANIEL JR: Charged January 21, 2005 with grand
theft;, Charged May 29, 2005 with aggravated battery great bodily
harm. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of denial. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
WILSON, PAUL DENNIS: Charged July 28, 2005 with possession of
controlled substance cocaine. Defendant incarcerated. A written plea of
denial was entered by Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. Case Management
continued to April 10, 2007.
BOWERS, WALTER F: Charged January 23, 2005 with sale/posses-
sion of controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a
store. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and
was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked and reinstated
with 6 days credit for time served. Any condition not met, re-imposed.
CREAMER, BOBBY GENE: Charged May 20, 2005 with driving
while license suspended (felony). Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler who
entered a written plea of denial. Case Management continued to April
10, 2007.
DAVIS, JAMES H: Charged March 27, 2006 with sale/possession of
controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a church.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to March
13, 2007.
SAND, CRYSTAL AMANDA: Charged November 28, 2005 with
grand theft (3rd degree). Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted
being in violation and was found in violation of probation. Probation
revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 18 months in prison (sus-
pended); probation reinstated with 35 days credit for time served; any
condition not met, re-imposed.
SANDERS, JOEY E: Charged July 3, 2006 with burglary of a
dwelling. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant, was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Probation modified to
include 45 days in jail with 45 days credit for time served; $40.00 costs.
Any conditions not met, re-imposed.
YON, JAMES C: Charged April 18, 2006 with uttering (passing worth-
less document). Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was pres-
ent in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in vio-
lation and was found in violation of probation. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 1 year, 1 day in prison with 146 days credit for time served.
Costs reduced to civil judgment.
YOUNG, FREDERICK J: Charged November 3, 2005 with posses-
sion of controlled substance; driving while license suspended (felony).
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin 'Steiger, admitted being in violation and was
found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defendant was
sentenced to 30 days in jail with 9 days credit for time served; 100 hours
community service work; probation re-instated. Any condition not met,
re-imposed.

Continued onPage 7 .


COUNTY WIDE VOTING: THE TIME HAS COME

THE ISSUE:
County wide voting was approved by 69% of Franklin County voters during a non-binding referendum at the last general election. Yet, the County Commission chose to
ignore voters and refused to make county wide voting a fact.

THERE'S MORE:
And, through some convoluted double-think, the county attorney said the 69% of the voters in the election didn't make up a majority. And, 'that the federal judge who set
aside the requirement for county wide voting didn't mean what he said. And, that if anyone wanted to find out the truth, it was up to them to pay for the review process. You
can't make this stuff up.

WE'RE FOR IT:
Concerned Citizens of Franklin County think voters should be listened to, not ignored. And that county officials should do their jobs, not foist the work and expense on the
public. We are for county wide voting because:
County wide voting will make County Commissioners more sensitive to taxing.and spending, not just focused on special favors for their own districts, and CCFC sup-
ports lower taxes.
County wide voting favors the needs of the entire county, not just a single district. Commissioners can be responsive to the needs of their constituents, yet stay
attuned to the needs of the entire county.
County wide voting reduces the effect of special interest groups or a single powerful constituent in decisions made by the County Commission. By reflecting the diver-
sity of needs and opinions throughout the county, all citizens are better served.
County wide voting could increase voter turnout by making voters alert to county-wide issues and events, and have a means of speaking across district lines.
County wide voting is not a return to past, bad days. According to numbers supplied by the County, no district in the county has an African American majority of regis-
tered voters. Good candidates get elected, as they have in recent elections.

WHAT TO DO:
Contact your Commissioner and demand that the county research legal issues involved with county wide voting. While you're at it, tell them to lower taxes and spending.
Contact: Chairman Russell Crofton: 927-4143, e-mail: gcrofton(hotmail.com
Commissioner Bevin Putnal: 697-3719
Commissioner Noah Lockley: 653-5481
Commissioner Smokey Parrish: 653-8790, e-mail: wardshrimphouse@yahoo.com
Commissioner Cheryl Sanders: 697-2534, e-mail: csanders(gtcom.net
Or; 92733 Market St. Suite 305, Apalachicola, Fl. 32329
Or: votefranklin.com/countyelectedofficials.htm

AND, JOIN US:
Join CCFC. We are for open, affordable, responsive and responsible government. Fill out the form below, and join us. Together, we can make a difference. And, join us for
an open meeting at 7 p.m. March 22 at the Eastpoint Firehouse. Bring a friend.

CONCERNED CITIZENS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, P.O. BOX 990, EASTPOINT, FL. 32328

Please accept my contribution to help create more affordable, efficient, effective and responsive government in Franklin County.

Name:

Address:

Phone: Work: Home: Cell:
Yes/No:
I would like my membership and contribution to remain confidential.
I would like to become a member of CCFC.
I would like to volunteer time for CCFC. My special skill is:
Please make your check payable to:
Concerned Citizens of Franklin County, Inc., P.O. Box 990, Eastpoint, FL 32328

THANK YOU. TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE!


M60








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 March 2007 Page 7 :


Second Circuit Court Report from Page 6

DISPOSITION
BARRACK, HARVEY S: Charged April 9, 2005 with sale of con-
trolled substance; possession of controlled substance. The defendant
was present with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Adjudication with-
held. The defendant was sentenced to 33 days in jail with 33 days cred-
it for time served; 12 months probation; no drugs or alcohol, random
tests; $510.00 costs and fees.
SANDERS, DELANTA LIONEL: Charged August 10, 2000 with
burglary of structure while armed; Charged 3 times October 1, 2004
with sale/possession of controlled substance with intent to sell within
1,000 feet of a store; felony fleeing or attempting to elude officer.
Disposition continued to April 10, 2007.
WESTMORELAND, PEARLIE B: Charged June 29, 2005 with
exploitation of elderly; money laundering; aggravated white collar
crime. Defendant was found guilty by trial on January 5, 2006. The
defendant was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to 9 years, 3 months in
prison each count (concurrent); fines; restitution to victims; no contact
with victims; $40,000.00 bond, forfeited. Notice of appeal entered
February 13, 2007.

CASE MANAGEMENT
BARFIELD, MICHAEL WADE: Charged October 25, 2006 with
driving while license suspended (felony). The defendant was represent-
ed in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management contin-
ued to March 13, 2007.
BARTON, TRACY ANN: Charged January 8, 2003 with grand theft.
Defendant released on own recognizance. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Probation modified to
include restitution payments to be paid at $150.00 per month. Any con-
ditions not met, re-imposed.
BROWN, ROOSEVELT III:* Charged August 7, 2006 with 2 counts
sexual act with child under sixteen years of age. Defendant was incar-
cerated. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney Robert
Culpepper II. Case Management continued to April 10, 2007.
BROWN, THOMAS LEE: Charged October 8, 2006 with aggravated
battery with deadly weapon; resisting officer without violence.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to
March 13, 2007.
CAMPBELL, ERIE LEO: Charged November 26, 2005 with attempt-
ed burglary of dwelling; Charged November 29, 2006 with sale of con-
trolled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was rep-
resented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management
continued to March 13, 2007.
CARGILL, GEORGE FREDERICK: Charged March 2, 2005 with 3:
counts possession of controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver;
possession of firearm by convicted felon (State Attorney's Office
dropped this charge); Charged May 21, 2005 with driving while license
suspended (felony); Charged January 21, 2006 with 2 counts sale /pos-
session of controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a
church; possession of cannabis with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a
church or business; possession of ecstasy. Defendant was incarcerated.
The defendant was present in court with Attorney Gregory Cummings,
entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant
was sentenced to 36 months in prison with 411 days credit for time
served; all counts and cases concurrent.
CREAMER, JAMES A: Charged October 11, 2006 with sale of con-
trolled substance cannabis. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was
present in court and a public defender was appointed. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
CROOM, KENDRAH W: Charged November 10, 2006 with traffick-
ing in controlled substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management
continued to April 10, 2007.
DIXON, DANIEL L: Charged July 10, 2006 with sexual battery
involving serious physical force. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was represented in court by Attorney Gregory Cummings.
Case Management continued to May 15, 2007.
FENN, JAMES A: Charged August 14, 2006 'ith lewd or lascivious
conduct; solicitation sexual activity by custodial/familial; August 31,
2006 with 2 counts lewd or lascivious conduct; Charged August 14,
2006 with lewd and lascivious assault or act; false imprisonment;
Charged August 22, 2006 with tampering with witness. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to April 10,
2007.
FULLER, SAMUEL EUGENE: Charged November 13, 2004 with
premeditated murder (1st degree). Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was represented in court by Attorney Rachel Chesnut. Pre-
trial Conference set for March 13, 2007.
GOLDEN, RICHIE DONALD: Charged April 19, 2006 with burgla-
ry of a structure. Bond was $7,500.00. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management contin-
ued to March 13, 2007.


CAROL ANN WILLIAMS
Lic. Real Estate Broker/Owner
Cell Phone: (850) 899-0664


d~aG


GRIGGS, DEMAR L: Charged July 9, 2004 with sale of controlled
substance; Charged June 4, 2005 with grand theft; charged October 4,
2006 with sale of cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was represented in court by Public Deferider Kevin Steiger, admitted
being in violation, and was found in violation of probation. The defen-
dant entered a plea of no contest to sale of cocaine and was adjudicat-
ed guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 36 months in prison with
credit for time already served (stipulated). All counts and cases concur-
rent..
HARRELL, ROBERT C: Charged September 26, 2006 with posses-
sion of firearm by convicted felon; possession legend drug without pre-
scription. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender
Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty.
The defendant was sentenced to 24 months probation; no drugs, ran-
dom testing; 2 days in jail with 2 dayscredit for time served; $410.00
costs and fees.
HARRIS, SAMUEL SMITH: Charged April 10, 2004 with battery on
child. Defendant was incarcerated.iThe defendant was present in court
with Attorney Sean T. Desmond, admitted being in violation, and was
found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defendant was
sentenced to 36 months in prison (suspended); 24 months probation; 12
months community control; 158 days in jail with 158 days credit for
time served; any conditions not met, re-imposed.
JONES, BOBBY C. JR: Charged November 15, 2006 with sale of
ecstasy; sale of cocaine. Total bondwas $15,000.00. The defendant was
present in court. CaseManagement Hearing set for March 13, 2007.
JONES, DENNIS DALLAS: Charged August 11, 2006 with lewd or
lascivious conduct. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management contin-
ued to May 15, 2007.
KEIGANS, TIMOTHY D: Charged August 24, 2006 with sale of con-
trolled substance. Defendant released on own recognizance. The defen-
dant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case
Management continued to April 10, 2007.
KEITH, TINA N: Charged October 16, 2006 with burglary of
dwelling; Charged October 27, 2006 with petit theft value greater than
$100. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to March
13, 2007.
KELLIHER, BELINDA F: Charged October 12, 2006 with sale of
controlled substance cannabis. Bond was $10,000.00. The defendant
was present in court with Public, Defender Kevin Steiger. Case
Management continued to May 15,.2007.
KORNEGAY, ALBERT: Charged August 25, 2005 with grand theft
(3rddegree). The defendant was represented in court by Attorney Mel
C. Magidson Jr. Pre-trial Conference set for April 10, 2007.
LATTIMORE, CORLINDA: Charged November 15, 2005 with sale
of controlled substance; Charged 3 times September 14, 2006 with sale
or possession of controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000
feet of a school. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was pres-
ent in court with Attorney Steven P. Glazer, entered a plea of no con-
test and admitted being in violation of probation. Disposition set for
April 10, 2007.
LEE; RONALD WAYNE: Charged March 14, 2006 with possession
of controlled substance cocaine; possession drug paraphernalia. Bond
was $10,000.00. The defendant was represented in court by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to March 13,
2007.
MCANALLY, ROBERT T: Charged November 16, 2006 with sale of
cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented
in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management contin-
ued to March 13, 2007.
MCDANIEL, ROGER: Charged December 22, 2006 with worthless
check over 150 dollars. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management
continued to February 14, 2007.
MENDEZ, JORGE: Charged 3 times April 27, 2006 with sale/posses-
sion of controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a
church; Charged 2 times April 27, 2006 with trafficking in controlled
substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented
in court by Anrorrne Adam Ruiz Pe-trial Conference set for April 10,
2007 .
MISSLER, ANDREW SCOTT: Charged May 13, 2006 with lewd las-
civious act in presence of child under 16. Bond was $2,500.00. Case
Management continued to March 1.1, 2007 by court order.
MOORE, KATIE NICOLE: Charged March 2, 2005 with 3 counts
possession of controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver. Bond
was $2,500.00. The defendant whs present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. The State Attorney's Office dropped charges.
NELSON, DANIEL TREVOR: Charged October 5, 2006 with posses-
sion of controlled substance cocaine; possession of controlled sub-
stance without prescription. Bond was $10,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management
continued to March 13, 2007.


MAIN OFFICE: P.O. Box E
84 Tallahassee Street
Carrabelle, FL 32322
Phone: (850) 697-9604
Fax: (850) 697-9605
BRANCH OFFICE:
3295 Crawfordville Road
Suites 2 and 3
Crawfordville, FL 32327
Phone: (850) 926-1340
Fax: (850) 926-8640


PRICE REDUCED!

Fenced, Landscaped, Mulched, Paved and Everything You Need. This warm,
comfortable home, lined in Cedar, with 2 porches and 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, is
complimented with new vinyl siding and new metal roof. Around the corner from
the house is a aeriated pond, full of catfish, with a pier and a gazebo, a 30 x 60
barn, a game room, a picnic area, 2 shops, an RV parking port and a carport for
a luxury car, with a storage house or Kid'playhouse. Security lighting and cam-
eras over all of property. All for only $499-O. Telogia, FL. MLS#200345.
Reduced Price: $359,000.




ffixie Theatre presents... The 2007 Season
I Ni- XT- or-Pmrfit Theatre


PUBIC IINTERESTII
I 'I I' l

-N K-TA ROI


F' SM
BAR-B-Q
Hickory-smoked the old-fashioned
way with all the fixns prepared from
our own recipes.
Now serving some of the
best seafood on the coast!
LUNCH BUFFET
Sunday-Friday
HOBO'S ICE CREAM
1593 West Highway 98-Carrabelle
697-2776
"Worth Driving 100 Miles For."
OPEN
Sun.-Thurs. 11:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 11:00 9:00 p.m.
Closed Tuesday


ORDONIA, NICK: Charged September 6, 2006 with grand theft
motor vehicle; criminal mischief (3rd degree felony). Bond was
$10,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Martin
P. McDonnell and entered a plea of no contest. Disposition set for
April 10, 2007.
PARRAMORE, FLOYD B: Charged July 18, 2005 with felony bat-
tery. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Violation of Probation
Hearing set for April 10, 2007.
PARRAMORE, FLOYD B: Charged April 29, 2006 with battery. The
State Attorney's Office dropped charge.
PROVENZANO, MICHELE D: Charged 2 times September 29, 2005
with aggravated child abuse with deadly weapon; Charged November
15, 2005 with sale of controlled substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Case Management continued to May 15; 2007.
PUTNAL, JOSEPH GLEN: Charged October 2, 2006 with aggravat-
ed battery with deadly weapon. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Case Management continued to April 10, 2007.
RANDOLPH, MANUEL JR: Charged January 13, 2005 with grand
theft. Bond was $7,125.00. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to March
13, 2007.
RAY, LAWRENCE WILLIAM: Charged December 28, 2004 with
sale of controlled substance; Charged 3 times October 11, 2006 with
sale of cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was pres-
ent in court with Attorney Gregory Cummings, admitted being in vio-
lation of probation, entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated
guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 24 months in prison with cred-
it for time served; $1,230.00 costs and fees.
RICHARDS, JOSEPH D: Charged January 5, 2005 with grand theft.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and was
found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defendant was
sentenced to 24 months in prison (suspended); 24 months probation
with 168 days credit for time served. Any conditions not met, re-
imposed.
RICHARDS, JOSEPH D: Charged August 29, 2006 with grand theft;
criminal mischief (3rd degree felony). Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant
was sentenced to 24 months in prison (suspended); 24 months proba-
tion (concurrent) with 67 days credit for time served; restitution to vic-
tim; $410.00 costs and fees.
RUE, CHARLES A: Charged August 13, 2006 with possession with
intent to sell cannabis; no valid driver license (charge dropped);
Charged with sale of cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Attorney Gregory Cummings, entered a
plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 18 months in prison with 35 days credit for time served;
$410:00 costs and fees each case; counts and cases concurrent.
SHERIDAN, JOHN W: Charged August 18, 2006 with sale of con-
trolled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a church;
Charged August 18, 2006 with sale of controlled substance within
1,000 feet of a church; Charged August 18, 2006 with possession of
controlled substance morphine with intent to sell or deliver; possession
of controlled substance methadone with intent to sell; 5 counts posses-
sion of controlled substance without prescription. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to April 10,
2007.
SIMMONS, BERNARD F II: Charged October 12, 2006 with sale of
controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
STEPHENS, MELVIN BERNARD: Charged November 15, 2005
with sale of crack cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Violation of
Probation Hearing set for March 13, 2007.
TURRELL, JRVIS B:: Charged April 4, 2006 with sale of controlled
substance. Bond was $25,000,00., The defendant was present mn court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Pre-trial Conference set for April
10, 2007.
WEBB, CURTIS B: Charged October 2, 2006 with possession of con-
trolled substance cocaine; possession of cannabis; possession of drug
paraphernalia; indecent exposure. Bond was $5,500.00. The defendant *
was represented in court by Attorney Frederick M. Conrad. Case
Management continued to April 10, 2007.
WESTMORELAND, MARK W: Charged August 28, 2006 with pos- ,
session of controlled substance marijuana over 20 grams. Bond was s,
$25,000.00.. The defendant was present in court with Attorney J.
Gordon Shuler. Case Management continued to April 10, 2007. ,
WILLIAMS, JOHNNY A. JR: Charged May 14, 2006 with premedi-
tated murder (1st degree); Charged August 2, 2006 with shooting into ,
occupied vehicle (charge to be dropped); charged May 15, 2006 with
sale/possession of controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 r,
feet of a church. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was pres-
ent in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, entered a plea of no 0,
contest to the lesser charge of aggravated assault with deadly weapon
(stipulated, no firearm) and to the other charge and was adjudicated ,
guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 48 months in prison (suspend- .
ed); 36 months probation; 275 days in jail with 275 days credit for time *"
served; $410.00 costs and fees, each charge; cases concurrent.
YON, CORA BETH: Charged November 29, 2006 with possession
with intent to sell cannabis; possession of controlled substance cocaine
(charge to be dropped). Bond was $15,000.00. The defendant was pres-
ent in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of
no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentence to 30
months probation; substance abuse evaluation and treatment; no alco-
hol or drugs, random testing; $510.00 costs and fees.
ZACKERY, REGINOLD T: Charged November 3, 2005 with felony
fleeing or attempting to elude officer, property damage; Charged
January 30, 2006 with driving while license suspended (felony). Bond
was $1,500.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney
Gregory Cummings, entered a plea of no contest to the lesser charge of
resisting law enforcement officer without violence (count 1), property
damage, count 2 and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 1 year probation; restitution to victim; 4 days in jail with 4
days credit for time served; $540.00 costs and fees.

HEARINGS
BUZBEE, CHRISTOPHER: Motion for pre-trial or reasonable bail.
Motion granted, bond $10,000.00.
DANIELS, LOREAL L: Motion to civil judgment costs. Motion
denied, to pay restitution.
HATFIELD, LARRY D: Restitution review. Restitution Hearing set
for March 13, 2007.
HORVATH, STEFANE J: Motion for pre-trial or reasonable bail.
Motion denied.
RICHARDSON, TEELIAH: No restitution.


Continued on Page 9


The Queen of Bingo

March 16, 17, 18 23, 24, 25


Friday & Saturday 8:00 PM Sunday 3:00 PM


Call 850/653-3200
www.dixietheatre.com


Schedule sulbject to clrnge

IXIE
THEATRE
APALACICIIOLA, VA,
"Where, Quality is Paramount"


fCZlhI3


* Did you earn 13% on your investments
last year?
* Did you pay taxes on your gains?
* Have you ever lost money on your
investments?

Contact David Hill & the Sundance Group now, and ask
how we can help do a better job of protecting your assets.

SUNDANCE GROUP
office: (850) 386-5119
Sundance6843@earthlink.net
SundanceGroup.RetireRX.com

Life Annuities Long Term Care


I








Page 8 16 March 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Boyd Works To Improve 1000 Friends of Florida* The Nature Conservancy Fourth Quarter 2006 MLS
Audubon of Florida Florida Wildlife Federation
Water Quality In North Defenders of Wildlife Analysis


Florida : The Honorable Charlie Crist
SOffice of the Governor
Congressman Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) today supported legisla-.- The Capitol
tion to improve water quality in North Florida by adequately funding: Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0001
the Clean Water State Revolving Fund, a program that helps state and
local governments address critical water infrastructure needs. The February 20, 2007
Water Quality Financing Act (HR 720) authorizes a total of $14 billion RE: Florida Department of Transportation Future Corridors Action
for the Clean Water State Revolving Loan Fund over the next four Fla
years.
The Clean Water State Revolving-Fund is used to enhance water qual- Dear Governor Crist
ity by helping local communities improve drinking water and sewage In December 2006, the Florida Department of Transportation (DOT)
treatment facilities. Many counties in North Florida, including Leon, adopted a Future Corridors Action Plan describing the potential devel-
Jefferson, Taylor, Jackson, and Bay Counties, have utilized this pro-..opment of nine major new transportation projects within the state. Itis
gram in the past.. the concerted opinion of our respective organizations that this decision.
"Throughout North Florida, there is significant demand for water ad. occurred with haste, absent appropriate consideration for the signifi-
wastewater treatment expanisionand modernization," said cant environmental and growth management consequences of trans-
Congressman 'Boyd. "The Clean Water State Revolving Fund will portation planning.
help to raise the quality of life for many North Florida residents as well The fundamental flaw with the Department's Action Plan is that it
as promote greater economic development. This legislation is an positions DOT in the role of driving, rather than implementing land
example of how federal resourcescan be applied to out local needs." use decisions. Prior to considering whether or not a transportation proj-
The Administration's Fiscal Year2008 Budget proposes to reduce the ect is appropriate, we maintain that state and local governments should
Clean Water State Revolving Fund by $396 million from the 2007 level;, first agree on a sustainable vision for the affected region-a future land
providing only $688 million in 2008. Under the Admienistr0io :: use and conservation strategy that defines where to develop and what.
budget proposal, Florida would receive $23 million in 2008 fr clean to preserve. By promoting major new road projects before such a vision
waterbfunds, a reduction of $13 million from the 2007 level. exists, DOT threatens to essentially supplant the Department of
C.. Community Affairs (DCA), becoming a de facto land planning agency
"Protecting water quality is a major responsibility for local comniuni- by opening up new frontiers for growth with each new transportation
ties and often a tough one with the resources they have at their dispos- corridor proposed. Reviewing a composite map of the nine proposed
al," Boyd stated. "Unfortunately, the Administration's budget does not : corridors, it is strikingly apparent that if the development patterns
recognize this burden on our communities or the need for improved .:'which typically follow major roads continue, DOT's action plan will
wastewater infrastructure. I will work with my colleagues in the House become a blueprint for unplanned, uncontrolled growth throughout
Budget Committee to develop a fiscally responsible budget that sup- Florida.
ports programs that are helping our communitiesmeet their most press-, Of equal concern is the juxtaposition with which DOT's corridor ini-
ing needs." tiative sits relative to statewide conservation efforts. In order to retain
'the natural attributes that make Florida unique and protect the quality
of life of both current and future residents, it is essential that ongoing
Island preservation efforts are successful and that new or additional pres-
aterS treet Snares sure is not created to convert rural and agricultural property to other.
W t er t. e t'Sn e uses. We believe that any effort to advance a new transportation corri-
S-,,dor must be integrated with and conditioned upon an equally robust
Industry leader. land conservation initiative to ensure that state goals in the affected
/ H : "..- .:.< area'are met. Unfortunately, DOT's Future Corridor Action Plan offers
Joe Henry, CHA, has joined Water Street Hotel and no tangible mechanism to accomplish this. In the absence of an effec-
M rina as General Manager tive conservation strategy for the future, traditional mechanisms of buy-
Marna as ing land for preservation and strategies for retaining agriculture will be
Mr. Henry is renownrin the'hospitality industry for his twenty-four year' overwhelmed by the speculative'market generated by new road con-
career as Hotel Manager and General Manager of Gaylord Oprvland structiOn. At risk is the viability of nationally renowned ecosystems,:-
Hotel, leading the property's evolution from a 600 room hotel to a 284- water resources, listed species, traditional rural uses, and Florida's port--
room. convention facility. His later responsibilities as Senior Vice' folio of existing public lands.
President of Oprylarid Hospitality Group included design and develop-'. Since the adoption of DOT's action plan in December, DCA has
meant of two additional Gaylord Hotels in Floda and Texas.ressed serious concerns about its impacts on the future of growth


As Director of Resort Operations at Calloway Gardens, Joe had full
responsibility for the 800 room resort, conference center, condomini-
urns and villas- Recently, he managed membership services for Dream
Catcher Club, a collection of multi-million dollar homes throughout


.management. Similarly, reservations have grown among localgovern-
ments and -tate elected leaders who accurately perceive the new corr- ,.
dot mininave as potentially competing with more pressing and legiti-.
mate transportation needs'at the local level.


the US, Europe and the Ltanoean. .- In light of our concerns and those of respected state leaders, we urge
Joe received, his professional designation as Certified Hotel ,. yo to call upon DOT to rescind its Future Corridors Action Plan. In
Administrator while serving on the Board of Directors of the Amencan,. our view, Florida's growth management agency-the Department of
Hotel and Lodging Associanon He is past President of the Southern Community Affairs-is most appropriately equipped with the planning
Innkeeper's Assoct anon, as well as past President and Chairman of the- and intergovernmental coordination skills necessary to take the lead on
Tennessee Hotel and Lodging Association. this issue of statewide importance. On behalf of our respective organi-
zations, we ask you to direct DCA, under the capable leadership of
.When asked about his focus for the short-term goals at Water Street Secretary Tom Pelham, to engage stakeholders including but not limit-
Hotel and Maritia, Joe intends to concentrate on design features and ed to DOT, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, local
'furnishings, equipment, operational procedures, staffing and training, governments, regional planning ennties, agnculrure interests, and-
His first priority is to develop the highest levels of standards and tram .members of the environmental community in a collaborative discus-
,employees to deliver top notch service to the guest. sion Emerging from that collaborative discussion, we would anticipate
S :the creation of refined strategies and potential legislation affecting tar-.
Apalachicola Resort Development's Curt Blair enthusiastically claims geted areas of the state in order to more effectively integrate growth:
"We are fortunate to have such a highly qualified hospitality expert to management, conservation, agriculture, andtransportation planning at
guide us through the pre-opening and start-up phase Joe's leaders hip- a regional scale.


will be invaluable in assuring we have the smoothest opening possible


Take A Bite Out Of

Taxes! -
BY DAVID IILL AND JAMES HENDERSON,
SUNDANCE GROUP
Taxes of all kinds absorb about 50% of your total income If this.
sounds high, total the following taxes: income (state and local Socal
Security, Medicare, unemployment, sales, property, gasoline-tobacco-
liquor, and then add in the miscellaneous ones. You're lucky it your
total taxes are less than'50% of your income. What can you do to keep '
more of your hard earned dollars?
Many taxes cannot be managed or reduced; thus, you've got to manage;'
aggressively the ones that you can. You can maximize the tax breaks
like home interest, charitable deductions, etc. but generally these cost
you more than the taxes saved. You can't do much about earnings and
the associated employment taxes, but you can maximize your use of
IRAs, 401(k) and other pension plans that shelter income from imme-
diate taxes. How about the "extra" savings, or investments, you-set
aside for retirement:or a future use? For example, let's say you have a
$100,000 bank CD earning 4% that is earmarked for your rdtirement,-.-
'college funding or just a "rainy day" and will be used 10 years hence..-
Your CD earnings are taxed as ordinary income even if not with-,
drawn-reducing your earnings by $1,200 if you're in the 30%, tax
bracket. To stop this leakage you could put your money in a tax-free
Sbond or mutual fund. While your faxes will be reduced, there may be
'consequences: first, a lower tax-free rate; second, your money is at risk
The issuer could default or you sell before maturity and market rates
are higher. Either way, you've got a loss.
Since you've maxed out your qualified plans, why not use a tax-
deferred fixed- inuity? The annuity offers a fixed rate that will equal,
or maybe even beat, your bank CD, and an index-linked annuity offers
more potential for upside. All annuities earnings are tax deferred until;':
withdrawn. The 'annuities eliminate credit and interest rate risks but',
preserve the opportunity for good upside earnings. Annuity earnings"
don't even show up on your tax returns until you actually withdraw'-
them. The same 4% return, and it could be better, for 10 years, means';..
your annuity will be about $16,225 more than the after-tax value of
your bank CD. Granted you will have reportable income when the
earnings are withdrawn, but in the meantime you have triple com-
pounding: interest on principal, interest on interest, and interest on
money you'd have paid in taxes on your bank CD.
There is not much further you can do about the taxes you pay except
take advantage of homestead exemption for your home, control your''
taxable income if you're paying taxes on your Social Security, and curb
your expenditures to reduce sales taxes. You may not be aware, but'
"provisional income" above $34,000 for an individual and $44,000 for.
:a couple filing jointly means 85% of your Social Security benefits are
taxed. Provisional income is: adjusted gross income plus tax -exempt7:
interest plus one-half of your Social Security benefits. If you reduce
your provisional income, e.g., by substituting annuities for CDs or
reducing your tax-exempt investments, the taxes on your Social
Security may also be reduced.
There is something else that youtan do to lower your tax bite: get a sec-:
Sond opinion on the tax returns you've already filed.' The IRS allows,'
Syou to file attendedd returns for the past .three tax years; Studies have'
shown that tost Americans overpay their taxes, and in some cases by
sizeable amounts. How can this happen? There are several root caus-
es: first, filing in a hurry and without a careful review of your records
means you overlook allowable deductions, misclassify items and make
mistakes; second, your tax preparers (from CPA to do-it-yourself) are
also hurried and prepare your returns without conducting a thorough
review of your circumstances; third, legitimate deductions are not
taken for fear of triggering an audit. A tax recovery specialist will take
time to ferret out all, the deductions, understand your individual circum-
stances, apply retroactive tax laws, and find the mistakes, omissions and
misclassificatioos The result: refunds are found in about two-thirds of
the tax reviews. These amended returns can be defended if the' RS
-ever audits them-which they rarely do. What's more, tax recovery'J
specialists workforna contingency basis no refund, no fee. Plus, they-
show you ways to reduce taxes in future years.
How can you save taxes and get a second opinion on the tax returns
you've already filed? A financial advisor is generally the best source of
sound advice and guidance You can do it yourself but proceed'care--;
fully in this complicated arena' "


' On behalf of the undersigned organizations, we thank you for consid-
ering this request.
SSincerely,


Charles G. Pattison, AICP
Executive Director
1000 Friends of Florida
-Post Office Box 5948
Tallahassee. FL 32314-5948
Andrew E. Barnes
Chairman; Florida Board of Trustees
The Nature Conservancy
222 South Westmonte Drive,
Suite 300
Altamonte Springs, FL 32835
David Anderson
Executive Director
Audubon of Florida
444 Brickell Avenue, Suite 850
Miami, FL 43314
Manley K. Fuller, II
President
Florida Wildlife Federation
Post Office Box 6870
Tallahassee. FL 32314
Laurie MacDonald
Florida Director
Defenders of Wildlife
233 Third.Street North, Suite 201
St. Petersburg, FL 33701


SALES & SERVICE
CATERPILLAR DETROIT CUMMINS
TRANSMISSION. GENERATOR

MARINE SYSTEMS


ERIC PEUFER
Hwy.98
CARRABELLEFL


SHOP: (850) 697-2660
FAX: (850) 697-2670
MoBwLE (850) 524-2259


S|Miss Brenda's ..

SFamily Restaurant

SPizza Burgers Steak Seafood

Highway 98 in.Carrabelle ;
Open 11:oo a.m. til 9:oo0p.m. "
CLOSED MONDAY



MARINE SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES TRAINED MECHANICS
@YAMAHAK' r

MIKE'S MARINE SUPPLY
P.O. BOX 429 HWY. 98 PANACEA, FL 32346
PHONE: (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693 FAX: (850) 984-5698
www.mikesmarine-panacea.com
HOURS: MON., TUES., THURS., FRI: 8:00 6:00
WED.: 8:00 1:00 SAT.: 8:00 5:00
i- PRO-LINE > GHEENOE BOSTON WHALER
PONTOON BOATS- SEA PRO G-3 CENTURY


Listed below are the highlights of the fourth Quarter 200U MLS analy-
sis for Northwest Florida.
While partially attributable to seasonal trends, the market continues to
contract with declining absorption. In certain submarkets, discounts.in
residential lots possibly indicate Sellers finally giving ground.
While last year concluding with further contraction, from a national
perspective 2006 was the third highest year on record for housing. This
follows leading 2005 and second place 2004. A cooling but stable 2007
is predicted. Possible declining and low interest rates will aid as stand-
ing inventories are burned off.
While the information is displayed to draw your own conclusions, fol-
lowing are highlights:
Detached Single Family
* December 2006, the median existing-home price for the nation was
$221,600 with Florida's being $241,100. Specific to NWFL, the medi-
an price for 4Q was $197,921 with a median per foot of $119.24.
* In volume, the total market declined by 22.5% to 3,292 units
* Followed by Tallahassee, Pensacola leads the region in absorption.'-
The core submarkets in these areas have 9.3 months supply or less.
* Metropolitan Pensacola has 8.6 months of supply with a median price
of $150,000 and a median price per foot of $95.36.
* Leon County had a median price of $236,750 with a median per foot
of $136.04. Months supply is 8.2.
* Making up more than 25% of the volume sold in the Emerald Coast,
Crestview leads this submarket by transacting 223 units with a median
price of $200,000 and $111.07 per foot.
* Although the smallest submarket, the Forgotten Coast remains the,
most imbalanced at 78.8 months of supply. On average, eleven units
were absorbed per month with a median price of $310,000 and $228.36
per foot.
Condominiums
* Even though Pensacola gained, the remaining markets declined rais-
ing months supply to 28. Median price was $372,853 with a price per
foot of $282.27.
* Tallahassee remains the brightest sector'with 9.7 months worth of
supply and median sales price of $156,250 and $135.75 per foot.
* Total market available inventory remained unchanged from 3Q with -
median asking price of $488,362 and $418.58 per foot.
* Although new construction projects continue to attain their certificate.
of occupancy, close-out uncertainty remains.
Residential Lots
* Assumed to have the largest percentage of investors, this asset type ..
continues with the highest imbalance of 74+ months of supply.
Although available inventory remained constant from 3Q, absorption'
,declined by 33%.
* Indicative of Sellers lowering prices, lots traded at a 15%+ discount in-
both the Emerald Coast and Bay County markets. Specific submarkets
traded with even higher discounts.
* Although in excess of 35.months of supply, Sellers in the Tallahassee:.
market are trading with the.least discount.
* Although discounted higher priced lots are moving, the larger volume.
of entry level lots pulls the overall market median price to $48,881.
SAll asset types and markets slowed. Urban and affordable markets still:
prove the most viable in this evolving market. Although absorption
declined, available inventory remained relatively constant across all real
estate types and markets.
Still a strong year, 2006 ended with further contraction. Although there
was no year-end volume push, pervasive discounts in residential lots
may indicate movement in the standoff between Buyers and Sellers.
These discounts may need to spread to other asset types in order-for
demand to rebound.
As always, I would appreciate your feedback 404-695-8367.
Sincerely,
Richard Bell


Health Awareness Day At

Gulf Coast Community

College
The Counseling Center of Gulf Coast Community College will spon-
sor a Health Awareness Fair on March 21, 2007 from 9 a.m. to 11:304
a.m. in the Student Union East, Commodore Caf6 on campus.
Health Awareness Day is free and open to the general public, as well as
students. Participants will be able to speak with representatives from
Local organizations that promote healthy and safe choices.
Organizations include: Agency for Healthcare Administration,
Alcoholics Anonymous, American Cancer Society, American Home
Patient, American Red Cross, Anchorage Children's Home, B.A.S.I.C.,
Bay County Health Department, Bay County YMCA, Bay Medical-
Center, Bradford Health Services, C.A.R.E., Cory Everson's Fitness for
Women, Covenant Hospice, Disability Resource Center. Also Division:
.of Blind Services, Early Education and Care, Inc., Epilepsy.
Association, Florida State University-Panama City Campus, Gulf
Coast Community College-Health Science Division, Guardian Ad
Litem Program, March of Dimes, Positive Health Care, Salvation
Army-Domestic Violence/Rape Crisis, Second Chance of Northwest
Florida, State Attorney's Office-Victim Assistance Program, Ebony -
S.A.F.E. Program, AARP and many others.
For additional information, call Leigh DeVane Bailey at 769-1551 ext.
4861.











FOR- SALE
,HI~FT~%MR~


1991 CHEVY SCOTTSDALE 4x4
165,000 miles
350 V8
4 Speed Manual Transmission
AM/FM Cassette Radio
$1,500.00
Call Charlie at 370-6544 or 670-8100


%


g"


Friends and Colleaggies,








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 March 2007 Page 9


Property Taxes from Page 1
still have an increase in your revenue stream," said Mr. Pierce. "This
year you are not going to have that. The burden has been shifted back
to the legislative officials now on millage. Now it is going to be what
kind of a millage are you going to apply on property in order to gener-
ate the revenue you need. It will be very contentious this year. I don't
know how to say this but I will say it anyway; those ngn-governmental
entities that have received money in the past ... should not be put on
the same level as your required funding that you have to have for gov-
ernment ... the TDC is prepared and has set. money aside to help subsi-
dize some of those non-governmentals. We ought to inform the non-
governmentals that they ought to apply to the TDC and try and get
their money locked in soon as they can before they come to us-
because they may not get anything from the County."
"I think that last year the Board funded over $500,000 that went to non-
governmental (entities)," said Marcia Johnson.
"In order to get anything close to what you need, you are going to be
raising millage," Mr. Pierce informed the Board. "You will end up with
one third of the taxes, if you keep the millage where it is at."
"If it were ten mills I don't think that you could make up for it (the up-
coming losses in property taxes)," suggested Mr. Crofton. "I'm not sug-
gesting that we do that. In fact, I am suggesting that we not do that."
"The reason that we are going to be hit so hard is that we had a tremen-
dous increase in our tax base this last five years," offered Mr. Pierce.
"Those counties that haven't seen a big increase in their tax base-it
won't matter (to them). We went from 2001; we had about $600,000
million (base) to 2007 to 2 billion (base)."
"The people in Franklin County are going to be mad with us because
we are going to have to raise it (the millage rate)," stated Mr. Lockley.
"I'm going to make a motion at this time that we take the clerk's rec-
ommendation and write a letter to all department heads and ask that
those items that she has specified in her report- no raises in any depart-
ment," said Cheryl Sanders. Also, (send) a letter to the non-governmen-
tal entities that we have been funding ... and let them know that the
TDC is going to have (money) that is going to be available and that they
need to apply for that because we are probably going to have a short fall
this year."
The motion was passed unanimously. The TDC has approximately
100,000 in funds available to non-governmental entities and the wage
freeze will be in effect for the coming fiscal year.
Later on in the meeting it was pointed out by Mr. Osborne of the
Alligator Point Property Owners Association that the County short fall
as suggested by Marcia Johnson may not be quite so drastic when the
taxes on the new homes built since 2001 are factored in. Mr. Osborne
suggested that the difference may not be from 15 million to 5 million
but possibly from 15 million to maybe 12 million. This notion was
immediately countered by Alan Pierce who suggested that the adjusted
revenue might be closer to 7 or 8 million as opposed to Mr. Osborne's
suggested 12 million.
But whatever the short fall, there will be a short fall in future County
revenues due to the property tax roll back. Budget tightening is in store.


Apalach Commissioners from Page 1
also expressed concern with arrest procedures. There was never any,
specific complaint or request about procedures except Mr. Thomas
said, "If we're going to do arrests here in our city, I think that the
policemen should be professional enough to do the whole nine yards."
There was no specific complaint made about how the arrest was not
"professional" but the officer involved was named without specifics. No
follow-up was promised on this complaint. Mr. Thomas also com-
plained about the leakage from garbage trucks as they passed along the
city streets which creates a smelly condition and is hazardous for chil-
dren walking along the streets. His final complaint was about stray dogs
on city streets.
Following approval of accounts payable, a discussion about a revision
of Ordinance 61-4 generated a wealth of feeling and discussion. The
controversy started when Cindi Giametta, Planning and Grants
Manager, mailed a letter to business owners in the downtown
Apalachicola commercial district. The letter referenced a City Sidewalk
and Streetscape project and said, in part, that the city would soon begin
work on landscaping and sidewalk repair and replacement in parts of
the downtown ,rea. This would require merchants to remove items
placed on the sidewalks and city rights-of-way. This was certainly rea-
sonable and an expected part of any city improvement project.
Controversy, however, developed over a single sentence in the letter to
which most merchants strongly objected. The offending sentence read,
"After completion of work, no items will be allowed to remain on the
sidewalks or within the right-of-way." The letter, dated February 14,
2007, went on to state, "Please see that any items placed within these
areas is (sic) removed within 10 days from the date of this letter. Any
items not removed may be subject to removal and disposal by the city."
The letter was copied by many merchants and placed near cash regis-
ters in numerous businesses with a notation asking parties to, "Please
contact our city officials to say we want our benches and flowerpots to
remain." Petitions addressed to the mayor, Mr. Howze, and the City
Commissioners accompanied the copies. The petitions expressed oppo-
sition to the letter and stated that, while respecting the City's responsi-
bility with respect to safety and liability and applauding the City's effort
to improve the aesthetics of the downtown area, the signers of the peti-
tion, "respectfully request that benches, tables, chairs, flower contain-
ers, etc. be allowed to remain on city sidewalks to enhance the down-
town streetscape, provide character and individuality to the storefronts,
and serve as seating for area customers/visitors. We further request any
future restrictions that involve the downtown business district be
allowed representation from business/property owners."
The petitions were soon filled with signatures of residents, property
owners and businesspersons. Within a couple of days "The Sweet
Shoppe", owned by Dolores Roux, had five pages of signatures ready
for Mayor Howze and other businesses had many more signatures
ready. Joe Taylor, owner of "Avenue "E" and the "Blue Store" on
Avenue E, 'expressed his concern for the preservation of Apalachicola's
quiet ambiance when he said, "We want to take the good and not
homogenize ourselves." Many visitors to Apalachicola have expressed
good feelings about Apalachicola simply because it is the way it is. Ron
Tew, from Pensacola, came to town on'his sailboat and said he usually
stops here because, "The town is different... galleries, food, fresh oys-
ters. We like to talk to the shrimpers. We've met some interesting char-
acters here."
Actually, even before the Commission meeting, there had been discus-
sion between the Merchants' Association and the Mayor about work-
ing out a solution to the perceived problems. Even so, there were sever-
al speakers at the Tuesday meeting eager to get their opinions on the
record. Joe Taylor started the discussion by saying, "We'd like to ask




Boap ,Angel



FREE 2-NIGHT VACATION!
Donate Car Boat RV Motorcycle
1-800-227-2643
www.boatangel.comn


GENERAL CONTRACTORS
RG0055056


Tractor Work
* Aerobic Sewage Treatment Systems
Marine Construction
Septics Coastal Hauling


Foundation Pilings
Commercial Construction
Utility Work-Public &
Private


you to consider figuring out a way so we can place some benches and
flower containers and things that are appropriate to our businesses on
the city sidewalks. By no means do we want to have obstructions on the
sidewalk that would impede customer traffic. We are coming before
you for the opportunity of proposing guidelines for placing certain
things back on the sidewalk."
Other discussion followed, including the pertinent comment by Mayor
Boyd Howze that, "I agree with you. The benches, the planters, the
trees, the flowers, and everything bring a certain character to
Apalachicola that I don't want to see go away. As a matter of fact, I like
to have breakfast at Dolores's (Sweet Shoppe) and sit outside with the
guys and drink coffee. (The ordinance is) not going to go away but
we've got to have some guidelines to do it right and protect the citi-
zens."
The recommendation was made for the City Administrator, Betty
Taylor-Webb, to develop a set of guidelines for future action.
The Franklin County Humane Society has requested old fire hydrants
from the city that could be sold as part of a future fund-raising project.
The city has 64 old hydrants available, only a few.of which are usable.
The rest will be donated to the Humane Society.
Roy Solomon made a request to have zoning request approved that he
has been trying to get action on for more than three years. He owns
property known as Washington Square that has an R-l zoning now
although it was the site of the County Courthouse many years ago and
was the Chapman ballfield for many years. No one seems to remember
when or why its zoning was made R-l but Mr. Solomon has been try-
ing to get it changed to O/R and has been unsuccessful in his attempts
because no one seems willing to make a decision. He has been to the
Planning and Zoning Board but the Board has passed the buck to the
City Commission for a decision on the rezoning. The City was not hes-
itant in passing the buck right back with a recommendation that P and
Z begin the process that would result in a final answer to the request.
The City has no objection to the rezoning of Washington Square.
The next major business revolved around finding a building site for the
volunteer fire department building. The present building was damaged
by the Hurricane Dennis storm surge and was condemned by FEMA.
The building is incapable of being locked and consequently, equipment
and tools necessary to fighting fires has been stolen. The.volunteers
have lost chainsaws, tools, "jaws-of-life", and other supplies to theft.
After extensive and sometimes heated discussion, most of which was of
the "Not In My Back Yard" variety, although there were also objections
to putting a metal building in the historical district and needing the area
suggested for green space, the commissioners moved to continue the
study of the 8th and "F" lot for the new VFD Building, along with con-
tinuing to seek an exemption of the property from "flood zone" desig-
nation. Mayor Howze commented on the decision. He said, "The only
property we have left that we can do something with are these city
squares." "(Whatever we do), we're going to end up making decisions
that somebody's not going to like. We have to go forward."
The decision was modified to include the neighboring area in the study
as a possible site for the new police station. The process will continue
forward unless a suitable alternate site is found.


Camp Gordon Johnston
World War II Vets return once again to Carrabelle and Camp Gordon
Johnson memories. Camp Gordon Johnston was not really known as
"a home away from home" way back when it was an amphibious train-
ing center for the European invasion. In fact just the opposite. But as
the years go by and memories begin to fade the old soldiers remember
the good times and .the good friends.


the
Chronicle Bookshop


Mail Order Service *

P.O. Box 590
Eastpoint, FL 32328


' I,, *.j'

I, "f


Second Circuit Court Report from Page 7


RIVERA, RICARDO J: Charged with possession of controlled sub-
stance cannabis over 20 grams; possession drug paraphernalia.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Attorney J. Gordon Shuler, entered a plea of no contest and was adju-
dicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 2 years probation (one
charge), 1 year.probation ( another charge) concurrent; substance abuse
evaluation and treatment; no alcohol or drugs, random testing; AA 2
times per week with sponsor; $845.00 costs.
SPENCER, DARSHAN: Motion to withdraw plea. Motion granted.
Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
THOMAS, CLAUDE III: .Charged January 30, 2007 with sale of con-
trolled substance. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney
Ethan Andrew Way who entered a plea of not guilty. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
THOMAS, FRED W: Motion for modification of probation.
Probation modified to administrative. Defendant will pay
$300.00/month toward restitution.


Bully from Page 3

this play "Bully" by Jerome Alden or the acting and interpretation by
stage manager/actor David Poirier. They both did a great job. And it
was great fun for me to have the privilege of watching something of this
caliber right here in good ole Apalachicola. Who would have ever
"thunk" it to be possible?
This play was produced by Dixie Partington and Jerry Hall.
On March 16, 17, 18 -23, 24, 25 it will be "The-Queen of Bingo" by
Jeanne Michels and Phyllis Murphy a play about ... dahhh ... Bingo.


Panhandle Players from Page 4

iday season. He plans to hold auditions sometime in the fall. Present
plans call for Joe Shields to work with Mr. Rolstad as assistant director
Son this play. The version of A Christmas Carol he has chosen is a short-
ened form of the well-known Christmas story with narration filling in
some of the scenes that are more difficult to stage.
Joe Taylor, local businessman and member of the Gulf Alliance for
Local Art (GALA) spoke as a representative of the Friends of the Dixie
Theatre and answered quite a few questions about the future of the
Dixie Theatre. Mr. Taylor's interest in GALA and the Dixie Theatre is,
as he told the Players, "As a business owner, I value things that bring
people to Apalachicola." The Dixie Theatre is going to continue bring-
ing varied entertainment to people and is now open Tuesday through
Saturday from noon to 5:00 PM. Susan Turner is in the box office so
people can purchase tickets to upcoming events and get information
about shows and events.
The Friends of the Dixie Theatre was organized with the intent to help
Dixie Partington keep the theatre running. Mr. Taylor spoke of funding
needs for improvements and repairs to the building as well as plans for
continuing programs at the theatre. Mr. Taylor said Friends of the
Dixie are, "Trying to make it a well-rounded program for the commu-
nity" with programs by professional theatre groups, local theatre, and
musical programs including blues, jazz, country and symphony during
the 2007 season and a children's theatre proposed for the summer of
2008.
I know, as a member of the Panhandle Players, I was relieved to know
there is a group showing serious interest in keeping this historic land-
mark from the wrecker's ball or being torn up to make another store
and apartments. We need places like the Dixie to help Apalachicola
remain the very popular attraction it is and help draw people from all
over the country to our unique village. A big thanks to the Friends of
the Dixie Theatre for their much appreciated efforts.
Persons who wish to join Friends of the Dixie in their cause can con-
tact them at the Dixie Theatre, (850) 653-3200, or by mail at Dixie
Theatre, P.O. Box 220, Apalachicola, FL 32329.













OooOOooooooooooooooooo
TWO CRACKED POTS PLANT NURSERY

o Sagos O Camellias O Century Plants
SBulbs 0 Custom Pots

DISCOUNTS ON PRE-ORDERS!
LANDSCAPE SERVICES AVAILABLE! .:_
Located corner of
V1 1st St. & Ave. A, Eastpoint, FL
0000000000000000000000000000


.
w -


~7i"F' >~:

~ t'ti
?. .,r


(316) Claude Pepper & Ed Ball, Politics, Purpose, and Power. By
Tracy E. Danese. The power struggle between Claude Pepper and Ed
Ball in the mid-twentieth century in large part determined the future of
Florida. This lively account of their interlocking careers-both domi-
nated by a personal quest for power, money, and purpose-illuminates
the historical role of these two forceful personalities. University of
Florida Press, hardcover, copyright 2000, 301 pp. Sold nationally for
$34.95. Bookshop price=$32.00.


(322) Pepper: Eyewitness To A Century. The Chronicle bookshop has
obtained a few previously owned copies of Claude Denson Pepper's
memoir sold nationally for $17.95 and published by Harcourt Brace
Jovanovich, 1987, 320 pp. This is thd tale of a man who has lived long,
made history, and compromised nothing. The story begins in 1900 and
nearly spans the century. These copies are in good condition. Bookshop
price = $10.00.

ORDER FORM AND MORE BOOKS ON PAGE 12


i: ii

.1,




~- ~i ~
:j
'


.41 .


' .
.I


'j


I I


(
i








Page 10 16 March 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


F Florida Classified


FCAN Advertising Network

Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience of

1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!

The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper with
the FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-1687, fax: 850-670-1685.


Announcements
What Destroys Relationships?
Answer pg 446 Buy and Read
Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard
Send $8.00 to: Hubbard
Dianetics Foundation, 3102 N.
Habana Ave., Tampa FL 33607
(813) 872-0722.

Auctions
2 AUCTIONS Sat. Mar. 24 NC
& GA Mtns. Lake Chatuge.
11AM 7 Mountain Lake Lots.
Clay Co., NC 2PM New
Condos & Townhouses. 3 br./2.5
& 3 Ba. on Lake Chatuge.
Hiawassee, GA. All amenities.
OPEN HOUSE 3/11 & 3/18,
Noon 4PM. J.L. TODD AUC-
TION CO. Rome, GA GAL
#137 & NC #2302. (800) 241-
7591. jltodd.com.

Automotive
$500 POLICE IMPOUNDS
Cars from $500! Tax Repos, US
Marshall and IRS sales! Cars,
Trucks, SUV's, Toyota's,
Honda's, Chevy's & more! For
Listings Call (800) 425-1730
x2384.

Building Supplies
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$
Buy Direct From Manufacturer.
20 colors in stock with all
Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available (352)498-0778
(888)393-0335 Mention code 24.
www.GulfCoastSupply.com.

Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE
Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines, Free Candy All
for $9,995. (888) 629-9968
BO2000033. CALL US: We will
not be undersold!
Learn to buy Foreclosures, tax
liens, and rehabs for pennies on
the dollar. Mentor walks you
through each deal A-Z to ensure
SUCCESS (800) 433-4556.
VENDING ROUTE: Snack/
Soda. All Brands. All Sizes!
Energy & Healthy too! Great
Equipment! .Great Support!
Financed w/$6,500 down. (877)
843-8726 local # BO2002-037.
Billboard Connection-Exciting
"home based" franchise opportu-
nity in the outdoor, advertising
industry. Low investment with
unlimited potential. For further
information please contact
Anthony Foley at (866)257-6025.

Collectibles
Cash for your American Coin
Collection, Gold Jewelry,
Military Items & Old Paintings.
Traveling throughout Florida &
paying premium prices. For
appointment call Ralph (800)
210-2606.

Education
Your accredited High School
Diploma in 30-days or less. No
classes. FREE evaluation.
www.FinishHighSchool.com
(866) 290-6596.

Employment Services
Post Office Now Hiring. Avg.
Pay $20/hour or $57K annually
including Federal Benefits and
OT. (800) 709-9754 EXT.5799
USWA Exam/Fee Req.

Financial
Facing Foreclosure!!! Delinquent
mortgage or bad credit? Get help
today. Call (800)632-6977
Madison Equity Corporation.
Time for a fresh start.
Ref.#NP100 Lic.#ML0600008.
ATTENTION CONTRAC-
TORS & SUBCONTRACTORS!
$$MONEY$$ Available for our
accounts receivables and equip-
ment financing/ leasing. SBA
lending. All credit OK. Call (888)
784-2516 www.tgfbf.com Email:
lenny@tgfbf.com.
11% CD INTEREST, CALL
(800) 946-7441, Order FREE
Report 24/7 with highest CD
interest rates in your area.
Minimum investment $5,000
required. NO FEE'S, FD'IC
APPROVED!

Help Wanted
DRIVERS! ACT NOW! 21
CDL-A Drivers Needed 36-
43cpm/$1.20pm $0 Lease
NEW Trucks CDL-A + 3 mos
OTR (800) 635-8669.
Driver-CLASS-A CDL DRI-
VERS- Now Hiring OTR &
Local Drivers- New Equipment;
Great Benefits; Premium Pay
Package. Call Oakley Transport,
(877) 882-6537.
Driver-BYNUM TRANS-
PORT needs qualified drivers for
Central Florida- Local &
National OTR positions. Food
grade tanker, no hazmat, no
pumps, great benefits, competi-
tive pay & new equipment. (866)
GO-BYNUM. Need 2 years
experience.


"Can You Dig It?" Heavy
Equipment School. 3wk training
program. Backhoes, Bulldozers,
Trackhoes. Local job placement.
Start digging dirt Now. Call
(866)362-6497 or (888)707-6886.
Drivers-Car hauling career.
GREAT HOME TIME!
Exceptional Pay & Benefits! Paid
Training! Min. 1 yr. Class-A
CDL exp. req. THE WAG-
GONERS TRUCKING (912)
571-9668 OR (866) 413-3074.
Driver: DON'T JUST START
YOUR CAREER, START IT
RIGHT! Company Sponsored
CDL training in 3 weeks. Must be
21. Have CDL? Tuition reim-
bursement! CRST. '(866) 917-
2778.
Host Families & Representatives
sought for foreign exchange stu-
dents ages 15-18 arriving August.
Has own insurance/spending
money. For more info call 1-800-
SIBLING (1-800-742-5464)-
www.aise.com.
Post Office Now Hiring. Avg.
Pay $20/hour or $57K annually
including Federal Benefits and
OT. (800)709-9754 EXT.5799
USWA Exam/Fee Req.
Part-time, home-based Internet
business. Earn $500
$1000/month or more. Flexible
hours. Training provided. No
investment required. FREE
'details. www.K348.com.
Area Coordinators needed for
High School Exchange Program.
Part-time on a contract basis. Call
(888)446-5437 for additional
information or fax resume to
(405) 810-8714.
Sales/Sales Managers/ No-Fee
Distributors $9K Wk
High/$100K Yr $1 Million
Yr/Future 2-3 Pre-Set Leads
Daily- Overrides/Bonuses/Mgrs
Not Multi-Level (800) 233-9978.

Homes For Sale
PALM HARBOR Factory
Liquidation Sale. 2006 Models
Must Go! Modular, Mobile &
Stilt Homes. 0% DOWN When
You Own Your Own Land!! Call
for FREE Color Brochure. (800)
622-2832.
NEW MANUFACTURED
HOMES Hwy 441 Ocala,
Doublewides start $39,900/$500
Down EZ Financing, $5000 in
FREE furniture ROOMS-TO-
GO! Free delivery-FL Kinder
Homes (352) 622-2460 or
www.kindersales.com.
$0 DOWN HOMES Gov't &
Bank Foreclosures! Low or no
down! No credit OK! Call Now!
(800) 749-2905.
PALM HARBOR HOMES
Certified Modular & Mobile
Home Specialists. Call for FREE
Color Brochures (800) 622-2832.
Owner Held Financing available.
10 single family homes rented
and making money. For sale by
Owner. All central heating/AC,
2006 upgrades. Seller will man-
age. All in 3 mile radius in south
St. Petersburg, Florida, Pinellas
County. $9500 per month net
income less $50 management
fee/expenses. Call Jay Vernette
(813) 477-9551.

Instruction
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPER-
ATOR TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT: Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators; National Certifica-
tion, Job Placement Assistance;
Associated Training Services
(800) 251-3274 www.equipment-
operator.com.
AMERICA'S DRIVING ACAD-
EMY ,Start your driving career
today! Offering courses in CDL
A. Low tuition fee! Many pay-
ment options! No registration fee!
(866)889-0210 info@americas-
drivingacademy.com.

Land For Sale
So. Central FL. Waterfront Land
Sale 1 to 3 Acres from $199,900
So. Cen. Fl's finest lakefront
community. Enjoy two large nat-
ural lakes & numerous man-
made lakes & ponds in a great
loc.! Gated, private. Excellent
financing. Call now (866) 352-
2249 x 1183.
South Central Florida. Owner
Says Sell!! 5 Acres-$199,000.
50% Below Recent Certified
Appraisal. Unbelievable opportu-
nity to own 5 acres of meadows
& woods in excellent location.
50% OFF recent appraisal!!
Great financing. Call now (866)
352-2249, x 1197.
FL Land Bargains. 5 to 100 Acres
30% to 50% below market. Call
(866) 352-2249, X. 1200.
OWNER SAYS SELL! 10 AC-
$150,000. 50% below cert.
appraisal. Great location in So.
Central FL. Paved rd, util's, exc.
financing. Call (866) 352-2249,
x.1000.


Miscellaneous
DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS
children, etc. Only one signature
required! *Excludes govt. fees!
Call weekdays (800)462-2000,
ext.600. (8am-6pm) Alta Divorce,
LLC. Established 1977.
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Busi-
ness, *Paralegal, *Computers
*Criminal Justice. Job placement
assistance. Computer provided.
Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866) 858-2121 www.
onlineTidewaterTech.com.
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-
Train for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid
if qualified Job placement assis-
tance. CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance (888) 349-5387.
WANTED: 10 HOMES To Show
Off Our New Lifetime Exterior
Paint. Call Now to see if your
home qualifies. (800) 961-8547.
(Lic.#CBC010111)

Real Estate
AAH! Cool Mountain Breezes!
MURPHY, NORTH CAROLI-
NA Affordable Land, Homes,
Mountain Cabins, on Lakes,
Mountains & Streams. FREE
BROCHURE (877) 837-2288
Exit Realty Mountain View
Properties www.exitmurphy.com.
BUY NOW! Coastal North
Carolina Land or Homes. Low
Taxes & Insurance. CALL
TODAY! Coastal Carolina
Lifestyle Realty (800) 682-9951
www.CoastalCarolinaLifestyle.
info
North Carolina Cool Mountain
Air, Views & Streams, Homes,
Cabins. & Acreage. FREE
BROCHURE (800) 642-5333.
Realty Of Murphy 317 Peachtree
St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.com.
NORRIS LAKE PROPERTIES
Waterfront- #902, .77ac's only
$125,000 Lake view- #144,
3.5ac's only $48,900 Call
Lakeside Realty @ (888)291-5253
or 'Visit www.lakesiderealty-
tn.com.
Beach Living at its Best! Ocean
Isle, NC. Exclusive island resort
lots. Close to Myrtle Beach and
historic Wilmington. From 450k.
(910) 579-2800.
BEAUTIFUL N. CAROLINA.
WINTER SEASON IS HERE!
MUST SEE THE BEAUTIFUL
PEACEFUL WESTERN NC
MOUNTAINS Homes, Cabins,
Acreage & INVESTMENTS.
CHEROKEE MOUNTAIN
GMAC REAL ESTATE... chero-
keemountainrealty.com Call for
free brochure (800) 841-5868.
Lake Access Bargain 1+ Acres,
$34,900 with FREE Boat Slips!
RARE opportunity to own land
on spectacular 160,000 acre
recreational lake! Mature oak &
hickory, park- like setting with
lake access. Paved rd, under-
ground utilities. Excellent financ-
ing. Prime waterfronts available.
Call now (800) 704-3154, X 915.
NEW Coastal Georgia Comm-
unity 1/2 to 2 acre homesites
starting in the $200s. Marsh front
with live oaks, palm trees and
panoramic views. Perfect for fam-
ily retreat, weekend getaway, or
retirement. Showing March 24th
by appt only. Call (866) 432-7320.
VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS Log
cabin shell on 2 private acres near
very wide trout stream in the
Galax area and New River State
Park, $139,500 owner (866) 789-
8535.
Coastal Georgia-New, Pre-
Construction Golf Community.
Large lots &.condos w/ deepwa-
ter, marsh, golf, nature views.
Gated, Golf, Fitness Center,
Tennis, Trails, Docks. $70k's-
$300k. (877)266-7376 www.coop-
erspoint.com.
Maine Ocean Access Bargain
Only $115.29/Mo. Nicely wood-
ed 3+ acre lot w/deeded rights to
private sand beach & dock. Only
$24,900. Private gated communi-
ty along Maine coast. Owner
financing to qualified buyers.
(20% down ($4980), 4.9% fixed
rate, 25yr term. Only
$115.29/mo.) Call L&S Realty
(207) 781-3294.
NEW PRICE! 10+ AC-
$299,000! UPSCALE EQUES-
TRIAN GATED COMMUNI-
TY! 200 Year old Oaks.
Established lush pastures. Paved
private rds, u/g utilities. 2 miles
from HITS! Exc financing! Call
(866) 352-2249 X 1156.
Owner Says Sell! 36+ AC-
$197,000 50% BELOW Recent
Cert. 'Appraisal Nicely wooded
acreage in private, secluded set-
ting. Mature oaks & pines, abun-
dant wildlife, gated community.
Registered survey, power &
phone. Excellent financing. Must
see! Call owner now (866)352-
2249 x. 1179.


RARE! NATIONAL FOREST
FRONTAGE & TROPHY
TROUT STREAM. LARGE
ACREAGE PARCELS NEW TO
MARKET. www.National-
ForestLand.com.
Won't last! Price Reduced 50% 29
ACRES/$195,000 Great location
close to Cedar Key. Nice meadow,
scattered pine & oak, abundant
wildlife. At end of private rd.
Utilities, survey, excel. Fin. Call
(866) 352-2249 x 1192.
GA/FL Border-Huge Savings!
23.55 AC, only $109,900 (was
$124,900) Coastal region. Wooded,
loaded w/wildlife. Long rd
frontages, utils, new survey.
Subdivision potential! Excellent
financing. CALL NOW (800) 898-
4409 X 1178.
Coastal GA. 135+ AC, $249,900!
GA/ FL border. Mature pines,
abundant wildlife. Long rd
frontages, until, black rail fencing.
Potential to subdivide! Excellent
financing. CALL NOW (800) 898-
4409 x 1172.
Ashe High Country is an investors
paradise. Discover the NC
Mountains. Vacation homes, log
homes, river tracts, view lots &
farms. Century 21 Heritage Realty
(800) 865-4221 www.c21heritagere-
alty.com
Waterfront 116' Scottsboro, AL.
Elegant 5000 sq. ft. Brick Home.
Media Room, Formal Areas,
Fireplace, 5/Bedrooms, 4/Baths, 1
Acre. $699,900. Debbie Mathis
Realty (888) 574-2525 (256) 599-
5910.
HOT SPRINGS, NC Gated resi-
dential community surrounded by
National Forest. Paved roads, club-
house, waterfall, pond, hiking trails
and more. Lots. starting at $60K.
Call (877) 477-3473.
Got North GA Mountain Fever?
We Have The Cure... We can Help
You Find The Perfect Place Here.
Sales and Rentals. Toccoa
Wilderness Realty & Cabin Rental,
LLC. www.Toccoa-
WildernessRealtyandCabinRental.
com (706) 632-2606 OR (706)435-
8735 NorthGeorgia-4Sale@tds.net.
ASHEVILLE, NC AREA
Breathtaking mountain view &
river parcels. 1 to 8 acres from the
$80's. Nature trails, custom lodge,
river walk & more. 5 min. from
town of Hot Springs. Call (866)
432-7361.
GRAND OPENING Save $20,000
"One Day Only" Saturday, March
24th New Coastal Georgia
Community Homesites up to 4.5
acres, marshfrdnt, live oaks, palm
trees and panoramic views make
this Georgia's Best Kept Secret.
Excellent on financing. Shown by
appt. Call Now (866) 432-7320.
NC MOUNTAINS Large 2 to 10
acre tracts in last phase of popular
gated mountain community with
great view, trees, waterfall & large
public lake nearby, paved private
access, $69,500 and up, call now
(866) 789-8535.
THE BEST LAND VALUES IN
COASTAL GEORGIA! As much
as 30% below recent appraisals. 1+
Acre Marsh View from $49,900 1+
Acre Marshfront from $124,900
Gated entrance, marina'access, &
more 90 mins Jacksonville/ 30
mins Savannah GRAND OPEN-
ING SALE Saturday, March 31st
Call NOW! (888) 525-3725 X.
2228.
Tennessee Lake Bargain 3+
Acres-$19,900. FREE Boat Slips!
Save $5000 during pre-construction
sale! Enjoy access to private, Jimmy
Houston. endorsed bass lake. Paved
roads, utilities, soils tested. LAKE-
FRONT available. Excellent
financing. Call now (866) 685-
2562, X 1006.
GA LAND BARGAINS! 20+ AC
Great price, location and financing!
www.gaforest.com.

RVs/Campers
MARCH MADNESS RV Selloff!
March 16th-19th. Nation's #1
Selling-MONTANA-5th
WHEELS-All on Sale! Suncoast
RV, 12201 W Colonial Drive,
Winter Garden, (866)482-7220.
www.suncoastrv.com.

Steel Buildings
STEEL BUILDINGS FACTORY
Sale- As low as $3.89/square foot.
Straight Wall Commercial Grade.
2,400 to 100,000 square feet.
Garages, Shops, Strip Malls,
Warehouses, Mini-Storages, etc.
Factory Erection Available. (800)
720-6857.

Vacation Rentals
Ocean Isle, NC. Rent new, beauti-
ful, private oceanfront home. Close
to Myrtle Beach and historic
Wilmington. Perfect for larger
group retreat.
www.ChateauDeChef.com, (910)
579-2800.
Wanted To Buy
CASH PAID FOR-Used Dish'
Network (NOT DIRECT)
Satellite boxes (not dishes).
Highest Price Paid. Have model
number & receiver ready and call
(866)642-5181 x1134.


Commercial Residential




ALTERNLATI VE

ELECTR .,LLC

850.92. 6,0




www.alternauive-electric.com



E i O a ii OUDO Mexican Restaurant
MEXICAN FOOD 65W. Gorrie Drive
Breakfast: 6 a.m. 11 a.m. St. George Island 32328
Lunch: 11 a.m.- 3 p.m. Phone: 850-927-3496
Dinner: 3 p.m. 9 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. Dinner: 3 p.m. 10 p.m.
Authentic Flavor of Old Mexico -
WE SERVE MARGARITAS s
AND BEER




Air-Con of Wakulla, LLC
HEATING AND COOLING
850-926-5592
Installation
Service
Repair
Gary Limbaugh, owner Lic # CAC1814304
Serving Franklin and Wakulla Counties since 1988





Stacy's Hair Design

850-670-1772
Hours: Tues-Fri 10-5, after 5 by apt. Sat. 10-until


Stacy Williams,
Stylist'
347 Highway 98
P.O. Box 977
Eastpoint, FL 32328


TAKING CARE OF
ALL YOUR HAIR
CARE,
MANICURES,
PEDICURES &
ACRYLICS


r


Looking for friendly, self-starter and self-moti-
vated person who wants to earn excellent.com-
missions selling ad space for the Franklin
Chronicle. Will train. Interested persons who
are willing to be a team player are invited to
send their resume and three business refer-
ences to: Franklin Chronicle, Attention:
Personnel, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL
32328.


P.O. Box 13557

Denver, Colorado 80201
Denver, Colorado 80201


SALES

HELP WANTED'


I -










The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 March 2007 Page 11


Espresso Ice Cream
*Pastries Soups
*Coffee Salads
Sandwiches




Carrabelle Junction

88 Tallahassee Street 697-9550
Across from the Post Office 03-16/03-30


Near many Natonal & State Forests where you can hunt, fish, camp
or canoe Horses OK. Ideal for permanent, vacation or retirement.


From89,900 Fom $4,995 Down


Flexible Owner Financing I X CIUSWIG COS7S I First Come, First Served


Mal",


B The dnation is dax dediilible
Sr Pl.pis 15 free
or t heBlind We lake are (c. all the paperwork











te Park


@b N March 17 & 18, Sat & Sun.

10 a.m to 4 p.m.

Palm Coast 4th Annual Fine Arts Show
Community Center and Morel
305 Palm Coast Pkwy NE Ai Vendors

SMusIC
Contact: LIZ Monaco
386-871-8895 Food
a Kid's Crafts
or
www flaglercountyartleague com r Demonstrations
For a list of hotels with AlP rates' Clinics
And a 15 ton Sand Sculpture
Presented ny The Flailer County Art FREE ADMISSION
League and City ol Palm Coastr Dept l FREE SSIO
Recreaton & Parks j. I .

2007 Sponsors. hank you '-

S'Il!...' bright house -
*^ LAWN A PI.T C..NTROL '

News-Joumal






Now is the time to

subscribe to the


FRANKLIN


CHRONICLE

The Chronicle is published every other Friday.

Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County

are $16.96 including taxes for one year, or 26

issues. The out-of county rate is $22.26 includ-

ing taxes.


Subscriber ...

Address


City

Zip..

Telephone

E-Mail-


State


O Renewal*

Basic Subscription, 26 issues.

O Out of County O In County
Date:

*If renewal, please include mailing label


Please send this form to:


Franklin Chronicle
Post Office Box 590
Eastpoint, Florida 32328
850-670-1687


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle
pages is an efficient way to promote your business to
the public and save money at the same time. These
ads are strictly business cards magnified to 2 columns
by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two
insertions. Send your business card or copy to:
Franklin Chronicle, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL
32328 or fax 850-670-1685. Your check for $15.00 will
guarantee position in the next issue.


2x2 Rates
Statewide $1200
Regional or National
Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


2x4 Rates
Statewide $2400
Regional Placement
also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


Reah oer Mllin Rades b calin














Lake 0conee


Lake Sinclair Georgia


WMWW. 1 .1 I Yakeocu11e4.co


If you a iJdeae'd spouse or parent suffered from any of the fol-
lowing ailments on or before November 21, 1996 and
were advised by a treating doctor that the condition was
a result of cigarette smoking. Iv;ii nay be eligible t.i lhi a awsull
gainn l bD g :oh; r ii C

Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer
Kidney Cancer Laryngeal Cancer

Bladder Cancer Pancreatic Cancer
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Oral Cavity/Tongue Cancer
Call Fleming A'.c uile ltoll re a3t l1-i00 940 3365 tr mor m e information.


Fleming &Associates,L L.P
13"D lcar P 7' Sole 3I03v
H.,jlar, T- 771)-,7,'jQJ4


jlll 1111111j Uf Ll U. V. 01H o n 11111avp inir dw i .- l :h h idd h ?m ld ot'v ul, perio asertim ennll is.
bol'Ie o ll d6 d aI 'L Pnd 'vu hE11j l 9 iili'I lm19hrin a16 boliiur ulI quli ,h ll iand *pciience














CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No,
Date of this Notice 2/26/07 Invoice No. 13066
Description of Vehicle: Make Chrysler Model Sebring Color Silver
TagNo.V148XW Year 2005 State FL VinNo. IC3EL55R15N613888

To Owner -Justin Eric Messer To Lien Holder' Capital One Auto Finance
2113 Messer Road P.O. Box 255605
Carrabelle, FL 32322 Sacramento, CA95865



You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 02/19/07 at the request of FCSO that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will'be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 244.50 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle-from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you are hereby notified that on 3/26/07 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


HOME TOWN BP & DELI

113 ST. JAMES AVENUE, JUST OFF
HIGHWAY 98 IN CARRABELLE 697-5111

Friendly atmosphere and

the best chicken and burgers

in town!

LIVE BAIT FOR SALE
Now serving 7 days a week full breakfast 03-16/03-30







SMOKING


ILLNESS ALERT


The Corea Firm, P.L.L.C. is representing Florida

residents, and their survi\ orsv. Ilo sulfered medical

conditions caused by tobacco products.


You may he entitled to compensationn for
smoking related illnesses.


Call The C'lrea Firm, P.I..L.C. Iill-rree for a free consultation



1-888-335-2962


[ h r Ilinw i. 1, I.l i Lt. I ll r- L ni' lll i-I ,. .hl, i n l l i II..I I I i.t11I 1..ILJ d-,ll.l L. oi
.I, LrIm i UL .-. ,' i I- l l.I 11 11 r'L ir il .n lrn ; iil.5 i hiI.',ui l
L U.1 ilII. ll- 4l- 1 Fn d L'|I V Lr-n r l mdrl. i A llu r T,' .l ILiC i rI U i. l Rr p i hi'l.' tl "1n iiillu 'i
I, \J, i, r.' .F4ll, ik b'.*r ini-. aJ ,I 1, onL ir.'l












Pay The County Bills

The Franklin County' Commission approved the expenditure of
$1,026,598.66 at their March 6, 2007 meeting. The bills are listed as fol-
lows, published for the Board by the County Finance Office.


31..''ll I. CnooicReg'6n'76a


-"'c-a DAII


'I .2


*At, .l7rraL 6',0 '*' .'.*r


OU, 1 4

.6.7 I

'1'5.3
-.i171/.1















r,a i.




on0r. "4i
01104

(iii~



















r..j

0-il 9 1
-i 00 E;
.10iI-



























OG19931
D01822
04520
000.1791
'6j) l
56"- 16"
-u14,?'7
,.,tl 0551
'.6.-l~
"'6'~



?U1'.';
000143
0101,01?
;1.02.02

I,,? 4-Il
0- 0 4.11
n020 14


102406j

013.171
.10' 14.
01'9a4
.7' 7r, 2 4' .
oS 2,1 C
OIo 1.,9
11.0444

'I,,,?:


00-)3
.10'F1"





001P3


0026721


AA r TL~cel ,.
4A4..1. r* IL IT.1"
-LL, L
AHE"' TC.Virhrf INC
Al-ER 'IC 51
NPAFLA- 11.:-I A-. 'IA, 414.

Apt ( ,r i.'- 45 7' r4f
L C'. 1 rC I > -- 'lS
3LL -I MOI',, ..rEL'
EFACEW.-LL I NC
CAL i r'Zl JJ tA XV-11il-r-I&- T
cool iir..f.4. -:o1,7.1be'C'r. ii'
UAPITAL.PULK 4INC.

Cc's"F O~Ci~t,.l-IEI'i OW~
'70..'.iI,J'I I I

wI'. ''F .I-il0..el'L Ic
PJI'I,7rr iIZet-'Flkz
F.J11I1A .i-LIL.P T'
010', `-Aa.L T7(1:4,0660
FLOP.411.-X:'i,1L'JE LI3 1 III
r1....-akr-0.iSF-YAlO'
P 131091, (1744 I;'4 'A .
4roj At1TC 00011 V
.66 Q [-C-F7C

X A5I .- RE.'C 4t1'

tIULO C.AE 11.1




.ACKE..7 P11f. A It c
P ".1l-I I6"' 5
A
Iin I 7jr~1 F cO 31.
I'F .VC 'itt3A.14004t
L.5 [,P M'ILLF, E IATFP &
E.X7171 '1,4'I"5 P I r'LS
LIBECOT',.7;11OIt'A,.1
LCI.iEV .JR1 C 1 S
OLaLEY"-.: FOO'TAIBE r.7iLE
MrfM r.VR',ZH
MILLFFPVAA NEl IN

I0.'0AR5I. 99I.
M.)40311 m i-IAIR
W ;C PCATZ LICKTINCrl LL
:131p3.h T7.f & AHICC. L FkCI
TC.'EL PA 510117 101174
m,.7(74. PAtPIN P INC
O"FICS bU iSMESS 5,57044
OFF! CE Dcr.--T
OFFICE -' r AW;-'AT IT7E
PA1l5AS1,LE L .TAFRY ACCESE
FAlit'S POUT MrITL'..c. 410
PEAV S O6N CNSTFUCTIO13
Pu.UNi. 661, P100AI
PRruiI L 'I Inln
F'OEOiI-1I14I 10c7L
r E7.0Oar0: 47iFA.C.0 7LL,'1A.
CrUcLI.' iLrS'I I IS'FLI
I., I Av.
2111011. AREI Th(1t' Y AT374
sF06DC.11, :0 2 7 114
sc.l'h4iur ,,66V1.2 '
.-r P21(-% 1-71 4,1 1
3 i:LPT ,E" ICEF CI:JIPANN\
ur Jor ZE[ITT11I.E. INCi
Zi'.ANDARD INSURTANCE C0w4A
STON510/LN10511 N
SW0170(6, LOII
rAYL7a1 BUELLVINC SUPPLY


TAYLOR ,II(X-;74, ;IUPP6%c
r"' TL2'("ih 61 IIIJI 52.14'G 1.6
TAYLV -- 'll)I 15610.'
rAYLBR tUiLC1 -CU 6tJP4'1
Th't I .1W '. 01' ,9 1,4D t 1 tJF I'L
TRI'm ll '
1414TCR E,LIIP4,. VT :",i
WLFr,';.Anj&
UliSrr,'.j4UAELMf.
WAIR.), F-LVACE4MPr4FJ' 't'.'-'
rj~F~ JlnWs IL, LV' WAE-
S..F, -'JrR 7.1
,J1L..U6' i 41A7U.L


ilo41. 11 6.107

'n4.t' 01.0.-Vti


-4~ 4'1 '- 7/

6' 0r C.1 '' -7i


3IlCl 0', r 1ljO'



.4 74,jn,




4 4i
4 t .r. t '.'IF



-.3 rj 06









.1,, n -. "

It u, c. .7 7
3'6. .,liD
.to6~n t 6.1/C'1












113 d f, oO-
34'.1%'1 6
Pt ,,.2"7.










E1SO4 i-, 05,,.7
.4441, 0 '76ifl








ic,1 I c ., n f
1350n'. a ".
]%03l I Of 07
'C 0.7.1.''1







F, .3 Cl LI~
3 "1 0C/4'16



4.' 31 i L'itm.'0
i3'7'70 '1i ci,07







'2 ; III. 1' 6, 1'1
3 3541 j3 V,5 r.
'18542 1.


GFREM1 R BANK ACCOUNT


A(1 CGOWT PINANCIAL SYSTEM
03/05/205UI15.31.3


FUND O DKSCRIPTLOI

001 GZNEPIRL FUND
120 FINE 4A1N D'CltFEI.;7tC
.137 FRANKLIN C6 rimLi.: 1.15A15RY
139 SAW P1.0T-, 901367 17'I tlt
.40 ROAD AND 0 OGIr
142 MOSgLTO CONOtLt
163 SUR (1 91 1001ND
170 AIRPORT KMD
160 A4'V01 0 11.3H IGASSIST i',.-
304 LANDFILL, TIFPPItNGP66 P 'U .
'rOTfL. ALL ,4)005



RANK H"19

0ANX OE2OERAL RANK ACCOUNT
Tmrvl A0L 41)4366


0" 7
1 5L, g



r. n
IF0
0:-






C. I Iu
.74.'







90c ., .1
lu iaa

7 7';
44 S ?



L... .4
'.41 '7l r


1.: 0 0
s ,a c. f
.44 6;

0r'











7L,
11




iu j .



.1 .15
7144



611 617
6000
2j4J






13.080 OP
1 10
Ma0 'I
6440




154

R 674t
608(.00


.545.95





714. 16
Ifl
25000
1 to
tAs ,6
2C3 t.0
SO~ oll
alt ..
401 60







'3 '11

340.00f
'79,60
62S5.6$


4'3" ..14

50, 35Q S1
736.66





DIelUilnSKIO~rrS


All~ 4hl I l n H, !'11 1'









Page 12 16 March 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


(22) Newly Discovered Copies Of Lynn Willoughby's Out-Of-
Print Fair to Middlin', The Story Of The Antebellum Cotton
Trade Of The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee River Valley,
University of Alabama Press, 1993, 202pp. Doing business in.
the antebellum South required a very delicate balancing act -
with the central role in the process played by the coastal mer-
chant. From this vantage point the merchant manipulated the
resources from the upriver suppliers and through an intricate
economic and banking network provided cotton to the interna-
tional brokers. It was, in effect, a closed system on each river
under the careful control of the coastal merchants. This study
focuses on the port of Apalachicola, Florida, and the business-
men who created a chain of international finance and trade in
the promotion and distribution of the Old South's major source
of income.
Fair to Middlin' provides a detailed, highly readable description
of a regional antebellum economy in the Apalachicola/
Chattahoochee River valley and reinforces the argument that
the South was self-sufficient and not dependent on other regions
for its food supply. Willoughby explains in fascinating detail
how the businessmen associated with the area's cotton trade
coped with the poor conditions of transportation, communica-
tion, money, and banking.
Early regional economies revolved around the rivers that repre-
sented the primary transportation arteries for trade in the Old
South. Cotton businessmen located along the waterway and on
the coast neatly divided the labor necessary to market the
region's major source of income. Local money and banking con-
ditions retarded the economic growth of this frontier area, and
only the innovations of these coastal businessmen enabled the
continuance of this vital trade network.
The advent of the railroad shattered this ongoing business
arrangement and completely altered the cohesiveness of the
river economy. Railroads fundamentally changed the business
customs and trade routes so that boundaries of the once sepa-
rate river economies blurred and eventually faded, gradually
leading to an integrated national economy. Bookshop price =
$29.95. Hardcover.
.0.
' l ;' l .. -- I Il l













i, ,
.- --_-









"-t'. l 1" ~/I l
.t -/ t'


the
Chronicle Bookshop


Mail Order Service *

P.O. Box 590
Eastpoint, FL 32328


(126) Shipwreck and Adventures of Monsieur Pierre Viaud.
From 1768, the sensational story of a shipwreck near Dog
Island, and the adventures of Pierre Viaud and his search for
survival. Published by the University of Florida Press, 139pp.
Hardcover. Sold nationally for $24.95. Bookshop price =
$20.95.





The .-- ,a Rf-

T2^, f_ Ih R.j i i. v ..




The St. Joe Company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle


RICHARD EDWARD NOBLE



(305) Hobo-ing America by Richard Edward Noble,
Paperback. A humorous, light-hearted, workingman's true life,
travel adventure story. Work your way around America with
Dick and Carol ... feel the pain and the joy ... shake the cal-
loused hands that make America what it is. Bookshop price =
$12.00.


The Antebellum Cotton Trade of the
Apalachicola Chattahoochee
River Valley


.1


(124) The Expanding Vista by Mary
Ann Watson. Hardcover, Oxford
University Press, 273 pp. This is the
story of American television in the
Kennedy years beginning with the
groundbreaking first "TV debates,"
and ending with the muffled drums
and a united population still trying to
comprehend the unthinkable death of
its President, united electronically in
national mourning. Watson has writ-
ten an engaging and insightful look at
American television in the Kennedy
years and the lives of many
Americans, and how the medium
emerged. Here is also a documented
yet memorable telling of the story
fading rapidly from the American
mind. Originally sold nationally for
$22.95. Bookshop price = $12.95.


(317) Green Empire, The St. Joe Company and the Remaking
of Florida's Panhandle. By Kathryn Ziewitz and June Wiaz.
Based on hundreds of sources--including company executives,
board members, and investors as well as those outside the com-
pany-this factual and objective history describes the St. Joe
Company from the days of its founders to the workings and
dealings of its present-day heirs. For all readers concerned with
land use and growth management, particularly those with an
interest in Florida's fragile wildlife and natural resources, Green
Empire will generate important debate about an often-over-
looked part of the state and will invite public scrutiny of its
largest landowner. University of Florida Press, 2004, 364pp.
Paperback. Bookshop price=$24.95.


(310) Spring Creek Chronicles, I by Leo Lovel, Illustrated by
Clay Lovel and edited by Ben Lovel. Here is the second volume
written by a northern Floridian in a collection of observations,
opinions, true-life experiences and related tales gathered from
living and working on the Gulf Coast. Many take place in or
near the community of Spring Creek, a small fishing village
located at the end of County Road 365. Commercial fishing,
crabbing and oystering have been the backbone of this economy.
Author Lovel tells these stories with a glimpse back to what it
was like to live and work around the woods and waters of the
Old South, a time and place he reminds the reader that is quick-
ly being erased into history. Paperback, sold across the
Panhandle for about $14.95, the Chronicle bookshop price. Leo
Lovel owns and operates the Spring Creek Restaurant at 33 Ben
Willis Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, phone: 850-926-
3751.


t..-~P" .....h
CL~-

~'~*. 4..


(21) Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers.
University of Florida Press. Hardcover, 297 pp. In this book,
Rogers traces and documents the economic, social and political
emergence of the Gulf coast port of Apalachicola and the pris-
tine barrier island, Saint George. From the earliest times, both
the island and Apalachicola have become intertwined. The
account of machinations of controversial developer William
Lee Popham is the first phase of area development, later leading
to the controversial struggles of the 1970s when environmental-
ists and seafood industries fought to determine the ecological
and economic fate of the Bay area. The Chronicle has obtained
a fresh supply of newly reprinted volumes at an attractive
price. Available elsewhere for $35.95 plus shipping and han-
dling. The Chronicle Bookshop price is much cheaper at $25.00
per volume.


(318) Home To War, A
History of the Vietnam
Veterans' Movement. By
Gerald Nicosia. An epic nar-
rative history that chronicles,
for the first time, the experi-
ence of America's Vietnam
veterans who returned home
to fight a different kind of
war. Published by Crown,
Hardcover, 690pp. Sold nation-
ally for $35.00. Bookshop
price = $30.00. Due to the
weight and length of this
work, please include $6.00 for
shipping and handling.


r --- -- -- ------ --- -- -
I Order Form '
I Mail Order Dept., Chronicle Bookshop
Please Print:
I Name._
Address
City__ State Zip ___
I Telephone -.
Book # Brief Title Cost


Shipping & Handling
1 book $2.50
2-3 books $3.50
4-5 books $4.00
6-10 books $5.00


Total Book Cost
Sales tax +
(6% in FL)
Shipping & +


Bookshop List Of .
16 March 2007 TOTAL
Amount enclosed by check or money order. Please do not send cash.
I All book orders must be on this form. When complet-
I ed, please mail this form and your check or money
I order to: Franklin Chronicle, Post Office Box 590,
I Eastpoint, FL 32328. Be sure to add sales tax and ship-
Iping charges. Incomplete orders will be returned.
I I-
LI-------------------- ----


More Savings

A $35+ purchase order in books will earn you a bonus
one-year subscription to the Franklin Chronicle at
no additional charge!

(Please complete the form below)
I have enclosed my purchase order for $35+ in books and now
request the bonus subscription to the Chronicle. My address and
other data are as follows:

Name

Address

City -

State Zip code + 4

Subscriptions will begin within a 3-week period.

Telephone Number: (
You may renew your subscription to the Chronicle under this plan.
Please indicate a renewal by checking the block below and placing
your mailing label to this form.
RENEWAL
Attach Mailing Label Here

Please Note
Books from the mail service of the Chronicle Bookshop are new and used,
and are so-designated in each item description. Some titles may be tem-
porarily out of stock, in which case a second shipment will be made, nor-
mally in 14 days. Books are shipped in 48 hours, normally. Some of our
books are publishers' closeouts, overstocks, remainders or current titles at
special prices. Most are in limited supply and at these prices may sell out
fast. If any book is sold out your money will be refunded by bank check.
To offer the lowest possible prices all orders must be prepaid. We do no
billing and do not accept credit cards.


~'' ''
I'

!ih
t
c


M 1


fIST"
AMERICAN TELEVISICH
SI mTE NMEI0Y YE 9


i
: I


kk o if g. h b.)




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs