Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00303
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: February 16, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00303
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA, FL


2320
IMIT #8


5


Chronicle


The ANERR Center is now in Apalachicola.


Volume 16, Number 4


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


February 16-March 1, 2007 ANERR Planning New
ANERR Planning New


Carrabelle City Council Meeting February 6, 2007

Yes To Bud, No To Bud, Yes To Bud

Commission splits its decision


John McInnis answers questions.


BY SKIP FRINK
Bud Chiles, developer of Pirates
Landing on Carrabelle harbor,
brought an interesting proposal to
the February 6 city meeting.
From last month's story: 'The
Architect, Katrina Cottages LLC
from Mississippi, has designed
these coastal cottage designs
(shows drawing) to be modularly
manufactured' ". The construc-
tion, particularly good for storm-
prone areas, will meet all Dade
County (Miami) wind standards,
and will bring a reduction in the
owners' insurance rates. It is said
to be built to last twice as long as
typical wood-frame housing. The
plans showed 3BR, 2BA homes
with metal roofs and perimeter
roofed porches to be 1000 square
feet in size, to sell in the $130 -
$150,000 range... emphasized


that rather than
end up with a
"project" look, the
goal is very much
to produce a
"neighborhood"
look by the use of
siting and land-
scaping. The
developer can pro-
vide financing. "
Mr. Chiles dis-
closed that the
manufacturer of
this housing is
Hexaport, from
New Hampshire.
The company is
interested in a fac-
tory location in
Carrabelle,'s
Airport Industrial


Park. Our town is on the short list
of sites under consideration,
according to Chiles, who also has
become an investor in the busi-
ness. He feels that Carrabelle
would have a good chance of get-
ting the plant, if the City is
amenable.to 50 or more well-pay-'
ing jobs which would bring a
multi-million dollar payroll.
Future expansion could bring a
total of 350 jobs and a total pay-
roll of $9 million to employees,
and full benefit packages.
John Mclnnis spoke for the City,
offering a 21-acre parcel for $10
per year rent (yes to Bud).
McInnis explained that the city
could apply for a CDBG grant in
the amount of $650,000 which
would fund.all the infrastructure
(roads, drainage, water, sewer,
power and building materials) for
the property. Hexaport would fur-


nish the installation labor on the
first building (60,000 square feet)
and the City would own it. If at
some time in the future the man-
ufacturer were to leave town, the
buildings would stay property of
Carrabelle.
The potential new Carrabelle
company is an outgrowth of
Chiles' efforts to donate 10
affordable homes and land to the
city. Pirates Landing overbuilt by
10 units according to land use
regulations, so the developer and
the City worked out a remedia-
tion compromise. If the process
continues as planned, the 10
homes may be built on land
owned by Vance Millender just
north of town, west of 67. They
could be the start of an affordable
subdivision of homes to sell in
the. $125-$175,000 range. Chiles
emphasized that the goal would
be to produce a pleasing "neigh-


borhood," not a "project".
Late in the meeting, which lasted
to 11:15 p.m., Michelle Clark and
Ben Betts appeared on behalf of
the Big Bend Saltwater Classic
fishing tournament. As last year,
the competition is going to be
based at the Carrabelle Boat Club
during its Friday Sunday run in
June.
The managers described their
expectations: 700 to 1000 anglers,
ESPN2 TV and one other sports
channel coverage, WCTV 6
Tallahassee, and Anheuser-Busch
to be the lead sponsor. Anheuser-
Busch brews Budweiser beer.
Traffic control by 2 policemen
hired for the weekend, 3 auxiliary
parking lots near the venue, no
on-street parking, limited hours
of operation and construction
fencing to minimize jaywalking.
Their request to the commission:
to allow the
lead sponsor
to sell beer in
I. plastic cups,
supervised by
trained per-
sonnel. After
much discus-
sion, Richard
Sands' motion
to approve
died for lack
of a second.
So for now,
' the answer is
"no" to Bud.
S ene "Geno"
"E v a n s
Director of
nmmission. Operations for


Center


Construction bids scheduledfor late spring
BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) has
long had a desire to consolidate the ANERR centers at Apalachicola
and Eastpoint. Since the damage caused by the storm surge from hurri-
cane Dennis in July 2005, the Eastpoint center has been closed and the
work there transferred to the Apalachicola ANERR Center. Now pre-
liminary plans have been completed and the new center is in sight. Seth
Blitch, Environmental administrator at Apalachicola, says the new cen-
ter will have expanded educational facilities with a visitor center, an
outside amphitheater and a multipurpose room capable of seating 130
people. The administrative buildings will be attached to the visitor cen-
ter but the laboratories will be in a separate area at the facility. The site
for the new buildings is located off Island Drive in Eastpoint directly
across from South Bay Shore Drive on the north end.
The 26 acres of the site are largely wetlands but there will be plenty of
room for the center without disturbing the local ecology significantly.
Administrator Blitch says they plan to build around the trees and many
trees that are in the way of construction will be moved rather than
destroyed. The entire project is designed to comply with a LEED green
building rating of "silver". The LEED rating system consists of four
ratings from "basic" to "platinum" and is based on points assigned in
five categories: sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmos-
phere, materials and resources and indoor environmental quality.
Among other "green" features Blitch tells us that the parking areas,
drives and walkways will be built with pervious surfaces so rainwater
will soak in rather than run off or pool up which would cause water
loss, erosion or pollution. Among the building features will be high tech
waterless urinals and "on-demand" hot water. >
The design is the product of the architectural firm of Eskew, Dumez
and Ripple from New Orleans. The Architects are also known for their
designs of The Shaw center for the Arts at Baton Rouge, LA and the
Charleston Aquarium. The buildings have been designed for low visi-
bility from either the bay or the road in order to leave a natural appear-
ance to the site.
Administrator Blitch says the project won't be open to the public for at
least two years but the new location is so much more easily accessible
that he expects greater attendance than they have had before. The
entrance to the new exhibit hall and visitor center will be from the road
to tourist favorite, Stk George Island and should attract many of the
Island visitors. Blitch expects the center to expand the sense of connec-
tivity between the Apalachicola River, the Bay and the Gulf, giving peo-
ple an awareness of the total ecology of the Apalachicola estuarine
system.


Continued on Page 4


Franklin County Dogs

To Denver
BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
On Monday, January 29, some worried looking dogs and several kittens
started on the long journey to their new homes in Denver, Colorado.
The staff and friends at the Franklin County Humane Society shelter
on Rt. 65 said their farewells to their furry friends and helped place
them in shipping containers for their trip. Small Animal Delivery of
Austin, Texas is delivering the animals to Colorado. Small Animal
Delivery provides pet transportation services nationwide. They are
S licensed and bonded and provide services to pet owners, breeders, pet
stores, zoos, veterinarians and shelters. I spoke to the drivers and I can
say with confidence," Don't worry, puppies, you'll be safe. These guys
are pros."
The 39 dogs and five kittens will be on the road for about two or three
days during which time they will travel in heated vans and have plenty
of exercise, food and water. The drivers said their policy is to stop and
exercise the animals at least every three hours. They take each animal
out individually on a leash so they will be safe and not worry people at
the rest stops. Two vans left on Monday and another was scheduled for
Tuesday afternoon. Pictures of the pets and their biographies have
already been sent to Denver and they will soon be in new homes with
loving families. Some of the dogs that are now adult dogs were actual-
ly born right here in the shelter and will be with families for the first
time. They have been trained and gotten used to people by the shelter
personnel who say they will miss them very much.
The Dogs to Denver Program is part of an outreach program by the
Colorado Humane Society. The Colorado group has agreed to take as
many as 110 animals from Franklin County to be adopted by Denver
area residents. This will free up much needed space at the Humane
Society shelter here. Funding for the animals' transportation was pro-
vided through the recently held "Art for Arf" art sale and dinner. Artist
David Lacey painted a landscape to raise money for the transportation
fund. During the auction of the painting several local people and busi-
nesses donated enough to raise the needed funds for this trip with some
left over for future shipments of pets to Colorado.
With most of the dogs gone to new homes, there are still about fifty cats
left at the shelter. Even though cats are smaller, it is just as expensive to
care for them properly-about $3,000.00 per month. That means that
at the present rate of adoption, seven cats adopted since the first of the
year, the shelter is still pretty crowded. The Humane Society board has
set a goal of a maximum of 55 animals in the shelter at one time. The
purpose of the restriction is to be sure that all animals are kept safe,
clean and happy during their wait for a new family. Also, the shelter is
in need of more volunteer help to exercise the animals, help clean the
shelter and play with the dogs and cats so they will be happy and well
socialized when they are adopted. It's very hard to find proper homes
- for frightened or mean animals.
If you can help and would like to share some love with these needy ani-
mals or if you have volunteered in the past and would like to help
again, please call Melody Townsend at (850) 899-5131.
President John Spohrer has, with the approval of the board, declared
February to be Adopt a Cat Month. Every Saturday during February,
weather permitting and volunteers being available, the Humane Society
will bring several cats and possibly a few dogs to the corner next to The
Tin Shed for people to see and hopefully to adopt. During February the


Melody Townsend cuddles an available adoptee.


adoption fees for cats will also be forgiven. These are healthy and affec-
tionate cats and will be an asset to any loving family. There are some
restrictions on the adoptions, however. The cats must be adopted as
inside pets and not left to wander the streets or the countryside. Home
inspections may also be arranged to be sure the pets are in a safe and
secure environment.
Won't you come down and see which of these friendly creatures will fit
best in your lap to keep you safe while you watch late night scary
movies from Netflix?
"What is man without the beasts? If all the beasts were gone, man
would die from a great loneliness of the spirit. For whatever happens to
the beasts soon happens to man." -Chief Seattle, 1864


IL
131 r, L
Wit.~r


Will Kendrick site showing construction progress.

Will Kendrick Sports

Complex

Construction well under way
BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
Construction of the new Will Kendrick Sports Complex near
Carrabelle is progressing rapidly with the installation of field lighting
now complete. The new sports complex, on Kenneth B. Cope Avenue
east of Carrabelle, is named for a Carrabelle resident, well-known
Florida House of Representatives member and seventh generation
Floridian, Will S. Kendrick. Mr. Kendrick has been a member of the
Florida House since 2000 where he remains the District 10 representa-
tive. He served as a Franklin County Commissioner from 1980-1984.
He was a member of the Franklin County School Board from 1986 to
2000 and served as Board Chairman from 1992 to 1999.
Franklin County acquired 80 acres of land for $80,000 in 2002 on
which to build the recreational area. About 35 acres of that land will be
used for playing fields and related facilities. The rest of the land is.cov-
ered by a wetland designation and will act as a natural buffer between
the playing fields and neighboring developments that might be created
later. So far, $600,000 has been dedicated to the complex and another
$200,000 has been applied for. Mr. Alan Pierce, Franklin County
Planning Director, says the project will be a multi-year, multi-phase
undertaking. Currently two baseball diamonds and main restrooms are
nearing completion and the soccer field, playground and picnic pavil-
ion are under construction as is the walking trail surrounding the area.
Basketball and volleyball courts are planned and other game fields are
being contemplated.
The construction is under the direction of project manager Van
Johnson. Mr. Johnson has arranged with county and state authorities
to use inmate labor wherever possible. The workers have come from
both the Franklin County jail and the Franklin Work Camp.
At present there is no set completion date for the entire project but the
walking trail and baseball diamonds should be finished sometime this
spring or early summer. The Will Kendrick Sports Complex is a total
recreation facility and is intended for use by all Franklin County resi-
dents for a variety of recreational purposes. It will be just one more
jewel in the crown that Franklin County is fast becoming. Projects like
this and the new Franklin County Consolidated School are very visible
products of far-sighted planning and conspicuous uses of our taxes. It's
good once in a while to actually see where our money is being spent.


Down this lane off Island Drive lies the site for the new
ANERR Center.


County Gets Big Bang

For Buck
BY SUE CRONKITE
Want to make a huge return on your investment? Give to the United
Way of the Big Bend. That's the advice Harry Arnold gave members of
the Apalachicola Rotary Club recently. "What we give to United Way
is no money compared to what we receive," said Arnold, local cam-
paign chair.
"In 2005 we raised $7,000 in Franklin County and in 2006 received
more than $50,000 back," said Arnold. "Thirty thousand went to hur-
ricane relief and over $20,000 went to agencies picked by people of this
county. Thirteen agencies each received roughly $2,000 apiece in
2006."
"This money stays in Franklin County," said Arnold. "The $7,000 we
gave in 2005 was almost twice what we gave in 2004, when we raised
$4,000.
"Last year Wakulla raised $125,000, and they have 25,000 citizens,
while we have half that, about 12,500 permanent residents," said
Arnold. "We're already up 500 percent over last year's total, and we're
continuing to keep pace."
"The entire Big Bend goal has about $700,000 to go, said Arnold.
"There has been about $6.7 million pledged for eight counties, all the
way to Monticello. We need to reach that goal so that we can provide
money for human-care services every day, fund prevention programs
and keep the volunteer-driven process going strong.
"We can continue to deliver the biggest bang for the buck when it
comes to local charitable giving," said Arnold. "Contact any of the
agencies, get with me, or call Ken Armstrong, United Way Big Bend
president, (850) 414-0853, or main offices at 414-0844. Or log on to
www.uwbb.org."
The number of Franklin County people served and services they
received from each agency included: American Red Cross with disaster,
health, safety, emergency, volunteer, youth, and military services: 2,735
people; America's Second Harvest of the Big Bend with surplus food to
needy through nonprofit agencies, distributed 218,142 lbs. of food.
Big Bend Cares provided education, support and compassionate care
for people impacted by HIV/AIDS and other diseases to eight citizens;
Big Bend Hospice with patient/family hospice and bereavement care
served 48 patients.
Boy Scouts of America, Suwannee River Area Council furnished youth
leadership development and prevention programs to 102 boys; Girl
Scout Council of the Apalachee Bend held camps, inner-city programs
and other programs to encourage healthy lifestyles to 39 girls.
Refuge House gave assistance for victims of domestic and sexual vio-
lence including safe shelter and 24-hour crisis hotline to 117 clients;
Elder Care Services provided a comprehensive program for 18 senior
citizens in need; Fellowship of Christian Athletes provided middle and
high school students with positive role models and peer experiences to
60 athletes:
"Four new agencies were added to Franklin County in 2006, so there
are no figures for outcomes yet," said Arnold. The new agencies
include Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida, Franklin's
Promise Coalition, Boys and Girls Clubs of Northwest Florida, and
Legal Services of North Florida.
Counties served by United Way of Big Bend include, in addition to
Franklin, Wakulla, Leon, Liberty, Jefferson, Gadsden, Madison, and
Taylor.


Franklin


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Page 2 16 February 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs
BY RICHARD E. NOBLE

February 6, 2007

Alan Pierce
Report to the Board of County
Commissioners
1 Provide Board with copy of
legislative budget requests sub-
mitted to Legislative Delegation
on Feb. 1.
2 For the record, provide Board
with copy of letter from
Emergystat voluntarily turning
over the Certificate of Public
Conveyance and Necessity for
the ambulance service to the
county, effective Feb. 1. No
action needed.
3 Provide Board with copy of
EMS Certificate for a Franklin
County owned ambulance serv-
ice called Weems Hospital
Ambulance Service that was sent
to the state. The original
Certificate was issued to Franklin
County Board of County
Commissioners but the state sug-
gested it be issued to Weems
Hospital the Certificate was
revised. No action needed.
4 Ms. Kimberly Bodine, Gulf
Coast Workforce Board
Executive Director, has requested
that Ms. Randi Turpin be
appointed to the Gulf Coast
Workforce Board to fill the seat of
a staffing or employee leasing
agency for Franklin County. Ms.
Turpin works for Adeco, a com-
pany which covers Franklin
County. Ms. Turpin does not live
in Franklin County but Ms.
Bodine says sfie has sought to
have this position filled by a resi-
dent of the county and can not
find one. This request was
approved by the Board.
5 Board action to sign document
associated with the release of
$200,000 of courthouse renova-
tion funds from the Chief Judge.
This is money appropriated by
the Legislature last session that
we are trying to get into the coun-
ty hands. This request was
approved by the Board.
6 Inform Board that Rep. Boyd's
Regional Healthcare Council will
meet Feb. 21 in Tallahassee. Mr.
Colvert, Weems CEO, will be
attending the meeting. Mr.
Colvert will be taking a list of
improvements being requested
for the Hospital. Commissioners
Lockley and Parrish may also be
attending.
7 Inform Board that DCA has
found the county's remedial
amendments to'the comprehen-
sive plan in compliance. There is
a 21 day period from Jan. 25 for a
challenge to be filed.
8 Inform Board that Franklin
County did not receive the
Workforce Housing Grant that
we had applied for. Bay County
did not receive one either. In the
scoring for the grant, additional
points were awarded if you were
a county with.a high growth rate
and neither Franklin nor Bay
received those points. Only
Walton County in the Panhandle
received a grant.
9 Inform Board that DOT is
reviewing our request for addi-
tional funding for the Bluff Road
Bike Path. The issue of safety
was something that might pro-
vide the county with additional
Funds according to DOT staff.
10 Ms. Lori Switzer, SHIP
Coordinator, met with Florida
Housing Coalition and they sug-
gest the county raise the purchase
price limit for a new or existing
home from $125,000 to
$237,031.20. If approved by the
Board, this would increase the
price of a house that SHIP funds
could be used for down payment
assistance. This price was
obtained from the U.S. Treasury
Average Area Purchase Price
index. The price ceiling should be
raised because there are very few
houses available at $125,000. The
Board felt that if anyone could
afford to make the payments on a
$25,000 home-they didn't need
Low Income assistance. The
range for approval was lowered to
between 125,000 and 150,000
and then approved.
11 Board action on proposed
site plan for new mechanic's


shop, and on continuing to keep
the shop part of the Public Works
Department. At this time the new
Shop is proposed to have a new
access created off a road the
county does not maintain. The
new access will require culverts
to cover a large ditch, and the
expense of putting new gates in
an existing fence. I have discussed
this with Mr. Chipman and Mr.
Johnson and they both agree the
new shop should use the existing
access from SR 65.
They also agree that until there is
a reason to create a separate
department the mechanic shop
should remain part of the Public
Works Department.
Board action to keep the shop
part of Public Works and to
direct Mr. Chipman to supervise
the location and access of the
shop since it will be inside the
Public Works compound. It was
suggested by the Board that the
.three departments involved in
this venture work together and
report back to the Board if any
new developments or problems
arise.
12 Based upon the comments
made at the Legislative
Delegation meeting about the
likelihood of changes by the
Legislature to property tax
exemptions, and based upon my
expectation that there will be lit-
tle change in the county's tax
base next year, and after consulta-
tion with the Clerk of the Court,
I recommend the Board institute
a hiring freeze effective March 1,
and to direct the Clerk to contact
the other elected officials and ask
that they comply. The hiring
freeze would last through Sept:
30. Any vacancies that came up
could only be filled with specific
approval from the Board. This
suggestion was approved by the
Board.
13 Alligator Point update.
A) Inform Board that Preble-Rish
is designing the west end of the
Road that will reconnect with the
existing Road. Preble-Rish is
designing the Road in front of the
fire station instead of behind it.
This change will keep the county
From interfering with the existing
helipad and encroaching on Fire
Dept. property, and will also
make the reconnecting intersec-
tion safer. I have informed South
Shoal of the proposed change.
Preble-Rish has been designing
this section of the Road without a
contract. Their fees are reim-
bursable by FEMA. I recom-
mend the Board approve a con-
tract with Preble Rish for
$27,112.72 for design, engineer-
ing, and project management of
the construction of,,a new road
from the. west end 'of. the South
Shoal property bic to the
Alligator Point Road. I have
directed Preble-Rish to go to bid
as soon as possible so that this
section of the Road be construct-
ed before June 1. The Board
approved.
B) South Shoal Road construc-
tion. As the Board is aware,
South Shoal is committed to
building that section of the Road
through its property and turning
it over to the county. South Shoal
is aware of the schedule the coun-
ty is on. If South Shoal is not
under construction by the time
the county begins its own con-
struction the Board will be forced
to make some decisions about
how to finish the project, as this
new road needs to be open to the
public by June 1, if at all possible.
C) Beach renourishment. The
county and its consultant, GSG,
are moving forward with the cal-
culations of lots to be assessed,
and the county has contacted
local lending institutions for bor-
rowing costs. Mr. Shuler has
asked for that information by
Feb. 15. When the true costs of
borrowing are known, then final
costs per lot can be calculated.
The project is moving forward as
if it will be an MSBU so at some
point in the spring or early sum-
mer the Board will be asked to
adopt an MSBU fee schedule that
will be placed on the property
tax.
14 Inform Board that US DOT
will be doing routine bridge
inspections on the Carrabelle
River Bridge on Wed and
Thursday, Feb. 7 and 8, and there
may be some traffic delays.
15 Board action to award air-
port road construction contract.
The Airport Advisory Comm-
ittee's engineering firm, URS,
recommends the contract be
awarded to the low bidder Ben
Withers. Bids were opened
1/16/07. Once it was established
that there was a performance
bond requirement, this request
was approved.


Van Johnson-Solid Waste
& Recycling
Budgeted Equipment Purchase
FOR BOARD APPROVAL: I'm
requesting Board approval to pur-
chase equipment approved dur-
ing the 2006-07 budget develop-
ment, from the Florida Sheriff's
Association, Florida Association
of Counties and Florida Fire
Chief's 06/07 bid list #06-14-
0821.
The equipment is as follows:
1. One New International
Regular Cab Truck with a 13,000
pound capacity Hook-Lift to
pickup recycling containers, at
the cost of $73,615.00, from Sun
State International. Payable from
the Consolidated Solid Waste
Management Grant. We budget-
ed $103,000.00, for this truck.
Difference: $29,385.00. This
request was approved.
2. One New International Crew
Cab Truck with a 30,000 pound
capacity Hook-Lift to pickup
recycling containers and trans-
port State Inmates, at the cost of
$90,529.00, from Sun State
International. Payable from the
Solid Waste Department Budget.
We budgeted $109,000.00, for
this truck. Difference:
$18,471.00. This request was
approved.
Sheriff's Offices and Local
Governmental agencies through-
out the State of Florida regularly
purchase their vehicles and
equipment from this bid list.
ACTION REQUESTED: Motion
approving the purchase of One
New International Regular Cab
Truck and One New
International Crew Cab Truck
from off of the Florida Sheriff's
Association and Florida
Association of Counties FY
06/07 bid list #06-14-0821. For
used. within the Recycling
Program. This request was
approved.
Kendrick Park Construction
Update ,
FOR BOARD INFORMATION
AND APPROVAL: Musco
Sports Lighting Company has
completed the installation of the
lights at Kendrick Sports
Complex in Carrabelle. The com-
pany's agreement with the county
was to install the poles and lights
for 5 Baseball Fields and 1 -
Football/Soccer Field. We, the
County agreed to wire the lights
to the control panels located
within the newly constructed
concession building.
I obtained a quote from Tlylor's
Building Supply in the amount of
$40,000. The quote was to pur-
chase the material at cost and to
solely use Inmate labor to wire
the lights,
I obtained another quote from
local contractor Stan Strowski in
the amount of $30,000. This
quote will provide a licensed con-
tractor, the material and the uniti-
zation of State Inmates to help
with the wiring.
With the high cost of the lights, I
recommend that we use the serv-
ices of a licensed contractor to
assure that the lights are wired
and work correctly.
Although this work is associated
with the construction of
Kendrick Park and funded
through a FRDAP Grant, I felt
Board approval was necessary
before expending this amount of
money.
ACTION REQUESTED: Motion
authorizing the expenditure of
$30,000, from the FRDAP Grant
to utilize to services of a licensed
contractor to wire the Ballfield
Lights -at Kendrick Sports
Complex. This was approved.


Commercial


Doris Pendleton-Property
Appraiser
"As we all know tax relief is a top
concern in the state of Florida
right now. I have been asked to
look at some of the things that we
.can take to the (state) legislature
to find out what we can do. We
can maybe make non-homestead
property have just a 10% cap. The
governor's office has come up
with something similar to that
but with a 3% cap ... I was also
asked to figure up personal prop-
erty on business-giving them a
$25,000 reduction on the top of
their assessments ... There is
another bill out there and that is
increasing the senior's exemption
from $25,000 to $50,000. It has
not been implemented yet. [We]
feel strongly that that will pass.
However that is going to be up to
the County to decide. You will
have to have a resolution making
it $50,000. We have got until May
1, but the bill hasn't passed yet.
But if it does you will have to
implement that for the seniors.
There is a $25,000 additional
now for low income seniors but
the bill will increase that to
S$50,000. I would strongly be in
favor of that. It is low income and
(that means) that your total fami-
ly income can't be over $25,000
Super year."
S"Aren't property values coming
down," interrupted Mr. Putnal.
"Well, I have been looking into
that. Property values are not
coming down-they just not
going anywhere. They're flat. But
we're not getting a thousand sales
Sa year like we have been getting in
the past. We are looking at that."
"The reason I was asking is
because we were offered a piece
of property-Mr. Nash's over
here on the water for a million
dollars and we had it appraised
and it wasn't worth but $300,000.
So I thought that maybe prices
were dropping. I think that what
has been going on is that people
have been building a lot of hous-
es just for an investment and not
to live in and there is for sale
signs on everyone of them and
they're not moving. Shouldn't
that make the values drop?"
"No," offered Mr. Pierce. "The
values won't start dropping until
they start selling for less."
Ms. Pendleton then discussed the
notion of carrying property equi-
ty-"Affordability." She suggest-
ed that if people are going to be
allowed to carry their equity with
them, the small counties would
suffer. .People could in effect
carry millions of dollars worth of
equity with them from the home
that they sold in Miami and carry
it to Franklin County or other
-less wealthy counties and conse-
queRtly end up payingno proper-
ty taxes at all. This -c-ould-leave-
the smaller counties without any
revenue or at least a serious short-
age. It was then suggested by Mr.
Lockley that the County send a
letter to Tallahassee with the rec-
ommendation that "affordabili-
ty" be limited to the individual
counties and not be allowed state
wide.
"Everyone in the County needs
tax relief," continued Ms.
Pendleton. "As we all know
Franklin County became famous











Peaei aal


ReEidential


almost over night. People were
coming to buy property. You can
see "the Forgotten Coast" (now)
advertised from here to Miami.
This all happened in the last 3 to
5 years. The taxable value when I
took office about 6 years ago was
about half a billion dollars. We
are looking now at over 4 billion.
Everybody was happy but now all
of a sudden (the last year and a
half) we have flat lined. Now
nobody's happy. Realtors aren't
happy; the developers are not
happy; the investors 'have done
packed their bags and gone'. Title
companies don't have the busi-
ness that they used to have.
Contractors aren't happy ...
What I would like to bring to the
attention of the public more or
less is whose fault is it. Is it my
fault; is it the county govern-
ment's fault? I don't think so. Did
we cause this confusion? I don't
think so. However who gets the
blame? The elected officials;
we're taking the blame for it. I
have-been told personally that it is
my fault that we're (people) hav-
ing to pay these high taxes. Is it
our fault? I don't think so. I think
that what we ought to do is stop
and take a look at the real cause
and try to come to a conclusion
as to what the solution is. We
need to stop placing blame and
start trying to come together and
come to a conclusion as to what
is in the best interests of this
County. We have got to try and
fix this thing and I think we are
,heading in the right direction
now with these tax reform meet-
ings."
"Doris, you hit the nail right on
the head when you said State
reform," offered Mr. Putnal. "It is
a State problem. Every county is
having tax problems."
"Exactly! Local Governments
have guidelines to follow. We are
mandated by the State. It is not
like that I am going to just a pick
a number out of the air ... you
don't do that. You have State
guidelines. We are under and in
depth audit this year. That means
that they send people in to see.if
you are doing your job. If you are
not, I'll tell you what's going to
happen. If I don't do my job they
will take it over. They will send
someone down; do my job for me
and then they will decide what is
going to happen. They will take
your Homestead away. They can
say that Franklin County is not
going to get Homestead
Exemption because they don't
deserve it."
"This is not just Franklin
County," offered commissioner
Sanders. "This is a State wide
problem and it is going to contin-
ue to be a State wide problem
until the legislature can figure out
what needs to be done and anoth-
er formula is used to calculate the
value of the property .. .


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850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836

SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


Dan Rothwell-County
Engineer
"The Apalachicola runway (at
the airport) is 85% complete. I
have assisted in grading loca-
tions-particularly at the football
field and field number 3. I fin-
ished the project enhancement
application. The FDOT will be
sending it out this week. You get
eight shoulders on 800 feet of the
south side of the St. George
Island Bridge. That will actually
enhance the safety for bicycles
and pedestrians. Myself and the
Board of Transportation educa-
tion office have been out in the
woods trying to find a good route
for emergency access to the new
Eastpoint school. We have not
yet found one that we can recom-
mend because of the wetlands. I
have had some meeting with the
local ... water management dis-
trict with regard to settlement
baffle boxes (to keep settlement
from going into the bay.
Yesterday afternoon I was told
that Franklin County was award-
ed 1.15 million dollars in grants
that we had applied for about
three months ago. I think that
was pretty good. That is all of my
report."

Don Lively-Fishing on
Carrabelle Beach
"I'm a commercial mullet fisher-
man. We have people who are
complaining about our warming


Don Lively
fires." Mr. Lively explained the
tradition of the net fishermen to
take a break from their fishing
and gather on the beach and
build a "warming fire". This
takes place during October,
November and December. Mr.
Putnal was aware of the tradition
and made the motion that the
fishermen be allowed to continue
this tradition but with the require-
ment of a free County seasonal
permit. The motion was
approved unanimously.,

Continued on Page 3


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R. Michael Whaley, Pastor

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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 February 2007 Page 3


Briefs from Page 2

Joyce Estes-Eastpoint
Library
Joyce Estes was concerned with
some criticism and opposition
"street talk" that she has been
dealing with in regard to the new
Eastpoint Library. She requested
a vote of approval from the Board
with regard to her efforts on this
project. "I just don't want any
more misconception of what I
am trying to do with the Friends
(Friends of the Library) Group. I
need some assurance, that I am
doing the right thing."
Denise Butler then stepped for-
ward speaking as chairman of the
Franklin County Public Advisory
Board that she has been a mem-
ber of for the last fifteen years.
"We are very appreciative of all
the things that Joyce has done.
We needed her energy; we need-
ed her expertise and we are cer-
tainly grateful for it. It is our role
as the Advisory Board appointed
by your Commission to play the
devil advocate. It is our role to
question. The questions that have
been raised are not whether we
need one (a library). We know we
need one and we know we need
one in Eastpoint. The concern all
along has been that we ask the
questions because we are doing
this differently than we have the
library in Carrabelle. What Joyce
has viewed as opposition has sim-
ply been that we are mandated by
you to ask the questions. It has
not been because we do not sup-
port what she (Joyce Estes) is
doing, but because we have an
obligation."
A motion was then made to give
official support to the efforts
being made by Joyce Estes with
regards to this project. The
motion was passed unanimously.

Chuck Colvert-CEO-
Weems Update
"I have Kurt Blair with me. He is
the chairman of our finance com-
mittee. You have just finished a
year of owning your own hospi-
tal. So what I want to do is bring
you up to date on how that year
went. As of last Thursday we
took over the ambulance service;
so I want to bring you up to date
on that... I am glad to say that as
of today we have a little over half
a million dollars sitting in the
cash account for the hospital ...
(all things stated) we ended the
year with just about break even...
The ambulance service: Since our
last County Commission meeting
we have hired a full-time director.
He is a paramedic. We were able
to recruit him from another coun-
ty. We have also hired a full-time
relief director. She is also a para-
medic. We have hired one other
full-time paramedic and four
part-time paramedics. We have
hired four EMTs; three full-time
and one part-time. That is how
we stand today. If we are going to
run two trucks 24 hours a day
seven days a week we need eight
and a half paramedics and eight
and a half EMTs. To our surprise
we took over the business at eight
a.m. last Thursday. About nine
o'clock the State showed up.
They were there for a survey. We
anticipated that they would be
here within the first 90 days; we
just didn't anticipate that they
would be here within the first 90


minutes. But that is a good thing.
We were able to get a good bench
mark from where we can go for-
ward ... Since last Thursday all
shifts have been covered with two
trucks. I do want to give thanks to
the Hardy family of Carrabelle
they have agreed to allow the
eastern ambulance station to be
housed in a building they own
and not charge us for that. We are
still working on-locations for the
central part of the County as well
as the western part of the county
... You own four ambulances now
and they are all insured and they
have all the equipment on them.
Two of the ambulances are in
good shape. We do have grant
money to buy two new ones. Two
of the four are only good for a
transport ... The new assistant
director is also a grant writer, so
she will be able to help us on that
too."

Kurt Blair-Finance
Committee Chairman
"I am vice-chairman of the new
hospital board I am here because
Gail (Dodds) is away. We have
found that there are several orga-
nizational structures that might
be available (Non-profits to run
the hospital) including a private
for profit company (etc.) ... The
Board has determined that the
most effective would be the 501
C-3 corporations. We have had
experience in the last ten years
with different private sector for-
profit companies and ... that just
doesn't seem to work in a small
rural area. There is just not
enough revenue for a private
company ... A creation of a non-
profit corporation we think
would accomplish a number of
positive advantages that are now
not available to the operation of
the hospital." Mr. Blair went on
to explain the many possible
advantages of a non-profit man-
agement-one of which included
possible benefits for the hospital
employees and a release of the
County from extensive liability.
"The process for setting up a non-
profit is extensive and could take
a number of months to accom-
plish. We think that it would be
wise to begin the process of set-
ting up the non-profit designa-
tion. We expect that we should
begin ... and that the coast of that
process won't exceed a thousand
dollars. Our recommendation to
you is that probably this is the
best model ... and that we should
go ahead and begin that process."
Mr. Blair's view of the future
financing of the hospital was
optimistic. He suggested that the
hospital should be able to break
even (with the previous and usual
subsidies still in place) and
assume payment on the County's
$600,000 dollar loan.

Lanark Water and Sewer-
Attorney Shuler
"I was asked to look at three dif-
ferent questions," said Attorney
Shuler. "Issue number 1 what is
the procedure for dissolving
Lanark Village Water and Sewer
District-it is a two step process.
Mr. Yonclas does not believe that
step one is required however I do.
Step one: the county commission
must first make a decision that it
does desire to dissolve Lanark.
The second step is that the district
must be dissolved in the same
manner in which it was created.


Vt r POST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
Facsimile 850-670-1685
1
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 16, No. 4


February 16, 2007


Founder ................... ...Tom W. Hoffer
Director of Operations .......... Andy Dyal
Contributors ................. Skip Frink
Carol Noble
Richard Noble
Dawn Radford
Sue Cronkite
Tom Loughridge
Photographer ............... ..Diane Beauvais Dyal
Advertising Design and
Production Artist ...............Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate .......... .Jerry Weber
Sales ........................Layla Soto

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein .................. Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis ............... Apalachicola
Skip Frink ................. Carrabelle
David Butler ..................... Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung .......... Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins .......Eastpoint
Barbara Revell .................. Lanark Village
Richard Harper ....................St. George Island

Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue
would cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the
Chronicle for price quotes if you seek several different
or similar issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96
including tax. Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26
including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2007
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


As far as Lanark was concerned it
was created first by a petition sub-
mitted by 10% of the property
owners within the proposed dis-
trict; the County Commission
then received that petition from
the property appraiser and she
confirmed that the signatures
were valid ... at which point the
County Commission held a refer-
endum to create it. In this case it
would be the same process except
that it would be for the dissolu-
tion as opposed to its creation.
Issue number 2: Can the County
Commission create an independ-
ent Water and Sewer District if
the existing independent water
and sewer district is dissolved?
The short answer is no. Issue


Nick Yonclas


number 3: how can Franklin
County create a dependent spe-
cial district? The short answer is
that you create a dependent spe-
cial district by ordinance."

Attorney Yonclas
"My name is Nick Yonclas. I am
a lawyer in Eastpoint and I repre-
sent a group in Lanark Village
called "Concerned Citizens of
Lanark Village" ... Michael
(Shuler) believes that there is a
two step process for dissolution
... That is that you all have to ask
for some sort of resolution and
then that allows citizens to go for-
ward. I think the citizens can go
forward without that additional
statement for you all. But I also
think ... assuming that this disso-
lution was voted on by the peo-
ple, the statute makes it pretty
clear that you would take over the
assets and the liabilities unless
you passed an ordinance other-
wise. The dissolution thing
became kind of messy-especial-
ly in the light of the pending
merger discussion between
Carrabelle and Lanark Village.
The one thing that we (Michael
and Nick) did agree on .was that
this county, in order to get some
help on this issue, could conduct
what is called an Oversight
Review process. It could study
these issues and come to the
Board with a report. We talked
about the County making a
request to get DCA who has that
expertise, to see whether or not it
could assist in that oversight
review. I do agree with Michael
that it would be chaotic if we dis-
solve with no plan in place. The
way to avoid that is through this
oversight review process which
requires that a plan be in place."

Brian Armstrong
Mr. Armstrong first explained
that Ms. Thoman was not on the
agenda to start negotiations with
Carrabelle at their last meeting,
but this week the proper arrange-
ments were made and the "talks"
will begin. "We have spoken
(Yonclas, Shuler and Armstrong)
and I really think that we are
enough of a mind that the
District wants to encourage your
oversight-if you want to believe
that you have some oversight ...
the direction that I have been
given is to work with Carrabelle
and see if we can get a merger
accomplished. And to make sure
that "the merger is going to be in
the best interest of everybody."
Mr. Crofton expressed the wis-
dom that the County ought to
"just stay out of it until the merg-
er talks fall apart or until the
negotiations fall apart. I don't
want to jeopardize the merger
talks because if Carrabelle walks
away from it then you are either
going to be stuck where you are


or the County is going to have to
take it over-which I definitely
don't want to happen. I would be
reluctant to disrupt the apple cart
at this point. I think that (the
County) doing anything right
now is a little premature as long
as the merger talks are going to
continue."
"That is a great point," said Mr.
Armstrong. "I really hadn't even
thought about that. With all of
this going on, I don't want to
have a tougher time convincing
the city of Carrabelle and the city
council that it does make sense."
"Is the City of Carrabelle meet-
ing tonight?" asked Mr. Parrish.
"Yes, the city of Carrabelle is
meeting tonight and our chair-
man (Thoman) will be there
again to make the formal presen-
tation and ask the mayor and the
city council to direct their staff to
have both parties sit down and
talk."
"Is there going to be any actual
discussion or is this going to be
just a matter of formality?" asked
Mr. Parrish. "Is there any mecha-
nism for making sure that the two
entities actually go into true
negotiations and try and do what
is best for the people of Lanark
Village?"
"Other than having both (parties)'
go in there on good faith and
directing their people to gd ahead
and do it? Commissioner I have
done this all over the state of
Florida. If people go in wanting it
to happen-it happens."
Commissioner Sanders then
expressed her hope that this
would proceed in a cooperative
manner with the best interest of
the people out at Lanark Village
at the forefront. She then rein-
forced the idea of bringing the
DCA into this-if they would be
willing to help.
"The governor's office has
called," Alan Pierce informed the
listeners, "The Governor's office
is investigating on their- own
about the situation out there as
well as the Department of
Elderly Affairs has called the
clerks office. There are groups
out there ..."
"This is really a serious situa-
tion," added Ms. Sanders. "We
the County Commission must
look at avenues where we can
assist Lanark and Carrabelle and
I want to put that in the form of a
. motion."
A motion was then passed to con-.
tact the DCA and find out how
the County Commission can help
resolve this situation for the peo- ,
ple out at Lanark Village.
"Now I want it to be understood
that this is not to derail any dis-
cussions," offered Mr. Crofton.
"The County Commission is just
seeking information from other
sources."




Panhandle

Players

Meeting
The Panhandle Players will be
holding their annual meeting,
February 28th, 7 p.m., at the Fire
Station in Eastpoint. The
Panhandle Players are comprised
of local residents who have a love
of the theatre and each year, put-
on two fabulous amateur produc-
tions at the Dixie Theatre in -
Apalachicola. During our
February 28th annual meeting,
current members, along with new
members will enjoy an evening of
food and fun. We will be solicit-
ing needs of the organization,
electing officers, as well as trying
to acquire volunteers for the
many needs of our association.
Whether you are interested in
acting, stage management, direct-
ing or just have a need to be part
of an outgoing, entertaining
crowd, the Panhandle Players are
the group for you.
Don't miss out on your chance to
become part of the Panhandle
Players. For more information
please call 670-8261.


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Fri. & Sat. Dinner: 3 p.m. 10 p.m.
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?t a e m


The Clerk Of

The Circuit

S Court

Your Public Trustee
S/ BY MARCIA JOHNSON
Q. I hear the County is considering rezon-
ing some property close to my neighbor-
hood. I would like to attend the County
MARCIA JOHNSON Commission meeting when this matter gets
discussed. How can I find out the items on the Commission's agenda?
A. It is the duty of the Clerk's office to provide public notice of the
County Commission's agenda. The Clerk is also responsible for taking
and recording the minutes of the County Commission meetings. The
Clerk and her Administrative Assistant attend the meetings, handle the
speaker request cards, and receive documents that need to go into the
record. The agenda and minutes are posted on the County's website at
www.franklincountyflorida.com. They are also available in the Clerk's
Office. The County's annual budget is also available on the website.
The Clerk maintains an email address for the County at
infol9@franklinclerk.com. Regarding rezoning requests, those are
usually addressed first to the Planning and Zoning Board. The vote of
that Board is reported to the Board of County Commissioners. The
County Commissioners may then vote to set the matter for a public
hearing. When this occurs, there will be a notice published in The
Apalachicola Times along with a map of the location of the rezoning
or land use changes. The ad will usually appear approximately twelve
days prior to the date of the public hearing before the County
Commission. Further information on rezoning and land use changes
is available at the Planning and Zoning Department at the Courthouse
Annex on Forbes Street in Apalachicola adjacent to the Main
Courthouse, and the telephone number is (850) 653-9783. If you have
any questions or comments about this column, please forward them to:
Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market St, Suite 203,
Apalachicola, Florida 32320.



Letter To The Editor

Fax: 850-670-1685

February 10, 2007
Dear Diane and Andy,
Tom was so incredibly blessed to have both of you in his life, as his
"chosen family," companions and efficient business administrators.
Tom cherished every aspect of your relationship and left his body with
love and gratitude for all that the three of you shared. What a magical
triumvirate you truly were.
Tom was an incredible man, whose sharp recall and archival talents
commanded great respect and reverence. I understood his "paper col-
lecting" and his desire to preserve history and translate it to all of us.
He did so with great passion. He is revered as a primary pioneer at FSU
Film School and will always be close to our hearts and at the top of
Franklin County minds.
In a recent conversation with renowned local musician, Martha
Gherardi, she remembered.Tom bringing his mother, Margaret, to the
Ilse Newell concerts in the 90's and how he so lovingly escorted her to
local events. Martha quipped. "I liked him for a number of reasons, but
mainly because he held local government and schools accountable, was
a real "truth-teller" and never minced his words."
My kinda' guy! I recall with huge smiles political conversations Brian
Goercke and Tom and I had over ten years ago, and admired how
Tom's objective manner never personalized our political differences,
and as Brian has so emotionally reflected, gave each of us our
allowances. Tom's legacy will live on to the newly created board's
efforts, and I'm quite sure, largely yours. I'm grateful for the enthusiasm
Tom shared with me and our love of Film, Production and all that is
Media. It is only with the fondest memories and the dedication to
details that colored his career that he will be so fondly remembered.
In gratitude for knowing Tom Hoffer and with Best Regards,
Karen Cox-Dennis


Rivertown Girls Concert
The Rivertown Girls will perform a live concert at St. George Island
United Methodist Church on Saturday, February 24th at 6:30 p.m. The
Rivertown Girls are a trio of young teens from Blountstown, Florida
who perform bluegrass and gospel music. The group consists of
Sharlyn Marie Smith on mandolin, Mary Cathryn Smith on fiddle,
Carolyne Van Lierop on banjo. They are accompanied by Buddy Smith
on acoustic guitar and Angus Hall on bass. Everyone is invited to
attend this free concert.





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Page 4 16 February 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Yes To Bud from Page 1

Weems Hospital, and Fred
Heitzman, head of the new
ambulance service, spoke about
their status and personnel needs.
Paramedics and EMT's are need-
ed to-have an more effective serv-
ice. The 4 ambulances are divided
up: 2 to provide BLS (basic life
support) and 2 ALS (advanced).
Only the ALS vehicles have a
paramedic. With more of each
employee, the service can be
upgraded. Evans expressed that
the goal of the hospital is to have
ER visitors see a doctor within 6
minutes of arriving. The men
received a standing ovation.
Commissioner Parmenas related
that there is an effort in motion to
secure fleet discounts for the city,
to reduce costs. Also, P&Z may
begin work on laying out needs
for sidewalks in town.
Mayor Kelly: Carrabelle will pro-
vide to any business that has a
building visited by the public, free
certification (for maximum num-
ber of persons allowed at one
time). Our Comp Plan is now in
effect as of February 1. February
11-17 is Hazardous Weather
Awareness Week by the Red
Cross. Upcoming fall elections:
election date is 9/4. Qualifying
deadline is 7/10. Must be a regis-
tered resident by 8/6.
John McInnis invited Jeremiah
Slaymaker, survey head of
Baskerville-Donovan, to describe
the BDI plan to digitize the
Carrabelle city map. The cost,
then approved by the commis-
sion, willbe $3850. The AutoCad
digitizing process will make our
map totally accurate, repro-
ducible in any size, and just very
professional. '.
Our police reports are now view-
able on the website, so will notbe
part of this meeting.
Prison labor donated a. total of
$21,144 to Carrabelle last month,
a total of 2643 hours.
The knuckle truck is now in serv-
ice.
Phase 4 of the Water and Sewer
project, the last phase, is the run
to Carrabelle Beach and the last
of River Road. Royal American
low bid at $1,915.921. Second
lowest bid was $2,526,696.
Stormwater bid was too high, re-
bid for a 2/17 opening. West ele-
vated water tank (River Road


area) will take 270 days to build.
BDI recommended Ben Withers
of Panacea to do the "Well,
pump and piping" work at FCI
for their low bid of $989,447.36.
Commissioners approved, with
the stipulation' that the city will
procure the pipe.
February 15 the City will have a
second public hearing on the
application for a $650,000 CDBG
grant (see top of story).
Olin Granthum's offer of sale of
property near the cemetery to the
city was tabled to the 2/15 special
meeting.
Mrs. Pat Bragdon will fund the
Wall of Honor at Veteran's Park
in honor of her late husband
Sonny. Volunteers are needed to
join the committee to design the
project, which will feature bricks
with names of veterans and their
dates of service.
Waterfronts Florida Partnership
Community status for Carrabelle
will be decided at the 2/15 meet-
ing. The city needs .non-profit
"partners" to qualify to join the
program.
Lanark Village Water and Sewer
District was represented by all 3
Lanark commissioners. Sharon
Toman, Chair, spoke in a back-
and-forth conversation joined by
commissioners as well as citizens.
Her purpose was to officially
invite the City. of Carrabelle .to
take over the Lanark district,, and
to dispel doubts of her board's
sincerity on the question. Mayor
Kelly invited Cheryl Sanders, of.
the County Commission, to
come forward to address .the
issue. Ms. Sanders made it clear,
that the County is not interested
in being in the water and sewer
business. John. McInnis, .after
having talks at state level, asked
the commission to vote to pro-
ceed with a cost package workup
to aid this decision. Approved.
The St. James Utility Company, a
St. Joe Company, asked to secure
a temporary connection to our'
water/sewer system for Summer
Camp. The reason is that their
new system cannot operate with
any efficiency with very few
homes built; 60 homes are need-
ed to run well. The connection
will be a mile or less, from Sands
North (Lorenzo's old location) to
Summer Camp.
The commission agreed, with the
stipulation that the engineers
agree that no harm could come to


the system as a result. Humanity And The Dixie
Approved to refund old $50 water
tap fees to unserviced homes in Theater


Carrabelle, and that if the fees are
left in the account, they will be
applied to any future water serv-
ice.
Riverfront Festival road closings-
tabled to the March meeting.
Alcoholic beverage license
approved for the new Tiki Hut
Restaurant (yes to Bud).
Saturday, April 21 all city plant
locations will be open for public
inspection.
Approved the month from 2/9 to
3/9 to be "Company's coming;
let's cleanup Carrabelle!" month.
This in preparation for the Camp
Gordon Johnston reunion week-
end in March.




Black

Heritage

Art Display

And

Reception

At -Gulf

Coast
February 5, 2007
The Culture Diversity Committee
at Gulf Coast Community
College and the Visual and
Performing Arts Department, in
honor of Black History Month,
will host the "The Art of Letting
Gd," art display on February 16
from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. in the
Amelia Center Theatre on cam-
pus. A reception will be held in
the Amelia Center Gallery.
The art display will feature paint-
ings by Andrea Smith, artist from
Birmingham, Alabama. Artistic
works by local artist Richy Steele
presenting African. American
Heritage. The opening of the
event will be honoring African
American History Month. The
arts show is free and open to the
public.
For more information, call 769-
1551.


(* , $ *:-W The Canmp Gotdon' ohnkton Association presents......

A SALUTE TO VETERANS WEEKEND!
March 9, 10 and 11
.- Downtown Carrabelle




JAe

Friday:
*LCU "New Orleans" arrives from Tampa and docks on Marine Street at City dock.
*Veterans registration at CGJ Museum.
*Welcome back Social hour at Post 82, Camp Gordon Johnston on'Friday evening at 6 P.M.
Entertainment by "Not Quite Ready"






Saturday.
* 10:00 A.M. Dedication of veterans sacrifices at Veterans Park on Hwy 98
S10:45 A.M. Parade on Hwy 98 featuring Military units, vehicles, marching bands and more...
All veterans are welcome to participate in the parade Contact Sid Winchester at: 697-8575 for
details. A review stand for veterans will be set up on corner of Marine Street and Hwy 98.
*12:00 P.M. Complimentary lunch furnished by the City in front of Fire Station.
*Tour of many Military Vehicles, LCU and USCG Cutter "Sea Hawk" at end of Marine Street.
*Vendors welcome to set up in front of City Hall
ODinner/Dance Saturday.Evening at Senior Center on Avenue E beginning at 5 P.M. Tickets
on sale for $30.00 per person. This event will be catered by Carrabelle's "Hog Wild" Barbeque
and will feature a full meal option of Seafood Platter or Barbeque Chicken. The "Tallahassee
Swing" Band will perform beginning at 5:30 until 8:30 P.M. Call 697-8575 for reservations.
Sunday:
*Breakast at Riverview Restaurant.
* CGJA Meeting At Museum
*Veterans depart..

Public T.V. Station WFSU will be
at reunion to interview veterans
for an upcoming Special on Franklin .
County's Contribution to WWII.


BY RICHARD E. NOBLE
In-between driving a ten-wheeled swinging beef delivery truck and
unloading sides of beef every morning from five to seven-thirty; I was
a student of the "Humanities." I was working to save more money so
'that I could return to the Merrimack College in Andover, Mass. and
resume my studies in the "Humanities." My money ran out before I
ever learned the actual meaning of the word "Humanities." I think that
I was the only truck driver who ever worked at S.H. Brennan's
Meatpackers who walked around in his disgusting, blood-stained, once
white meatpacker's outfit with a book of poetry by Emily Dickinson or
Descartes' Discourses in his back pocket.
Twice a month on Friday evenings me and two of my buddies went
over to Phillips Academy in North Andover (an intellectual, very pres-
tigious reform school for spoiled, little rich boys) and listened to people
like Henry Kissinger or the ex-ambassador to China talk about world
peace.
My two buddies and I actually signed up for the lecture series at Philips
Academy because we had hope of the possibility of marrying wealthy.
In those days they accused all the girls of going to college to get their
MRS degree and us three guys thought that to be a very intelligent aspi-
ration. The ambassador to China, Sir Waldo Ferdinand DeMaura,
could have a daughter or two and they might even be at his lecture-it
could happen.
Unfortunately that was hardly the case. All the "girls" who attended the
lectures on World Peace or International Poverty at Phillips Academy
were older women-I mean really older. Some of them were pretty
attractive though-all that money just came shinning through those
women's business suits and that silver gray: Some of them actually liked
us younger guys. They were, really impressed that "boys" our age were
taking World Peace or International Poverty or whatever seriously. But
even after several beers down at, the Andover Grill and Tavern after a
lecture, none of us "boys" could imagine even having a brief affair with
a woman who looked like 'Eleanor Roosevelt or Margaret Thatcher.
Even with our serious hormone imbalance, we found this possibility
beyond Sociology or even Advanced Promiscuity II. Of course it had a
.possibility in Social Disorganization in America but we had no desire
to become members of the Socially Disorganized. We wanted to join
John Kenneth Galbraith in the Affluent Society and wonder about how
people could be motivated when they had too much money. You know
like why would you want to:go to work and put up with all them other
monkeys if you "be rich." Certainly we qo,uld find other things to do
that would be "funner."
In any case, I still don't know what "Humanities" is ... or are or am and
in my continued attempt to "better"'myself, I went to the Dixie Theater
this past weekend-not to meet girls-but to listen and watch a man by
the name of LeRoy Mitchell Jr. who was pretending to be James
Weldon Johnson. Before I went to the Dixie Theater, I didn't know who
either of these people were-or are.
It was a very interesting experience to watch a grown man, Mr. LeRoy
Mitchell Jr., pretend to be James Weldon Johnson but there are people
who do this for a living all the time as I understand. And if you don't
believe me, you can go to the Dixie Theater yourself and see some of
these type people pretend to be somebody else-I'm not joking!
I saw Mr. Mitchell "do his thing" for free and there, will be others
appearing at the Dixie Theater who are sponsored by the Florida
Humanities Council who you too can observe-maybe even for
"free"-in the future at the Dixie Theater.
So if you would like to explore and possibly discover the meaning of
the word "Humanities" you might give the Dixie Theater a call and get
their schedule of events (850-653-3200). [There will probably be some-
one down there who will answer the phone who is pretending to be an
Employee. I don't think that you can really be an ejnployee unless you
Sget paid. So the person who'"ariswers the phone might just be pretend-
i ing to be something else:], .' :" '
If, on the other hand, you are looking to meet "chicks", the crowd this
past weekend looked pretty much the same as the one at Phillips
Academy. Although I must admit, at my present age Margaret Thatcher
and Eleanor Roosevelt really don't look all that bad-to tell the truth
World Peace and solving International Poverty-or just National,
Poverty-doesn't sound all that silly anymore, either.


Tyndall Eye

AAFES Holiday Hours
The Tyndall Base Exchange and AAFES locations will be open during
the following hours Feb. 19 in observance of Presidents Day:
" Base Exchange Main Store: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
" Class Six: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
* Felix Lake Shoppette: 6 a.m. to;9 p.m.-
* Anthony's Pizza: 11 a.m. to, 4p.m,
* GNC store: 10 a.m. to 4:30 pr.mt.'

Eye Care for Retirees
The 325th Medical Group' Optometry Clinic has two full-time
optometrists and provides comprehensive eye care to include contact
lens fitting exams to active duty, active duty dependents and all eligible
retirees and retiree dependents.. To make an appointment, please call
central appointments at 283-2778 or make an appointment online at
www.tricareonline.com.

TRICARE Briefing
A TRICARE briefing will be held Feb. 13 at 1 p.m. in the Raptor
Conference Room located in the T\ ndall Medical Facildr, The briefing
will discuss issues and policies pertaining to TRICARE Prime,
Standard, Extra and TRICARE for Life: All active duty, active duty
dependents, retirees and retiree dependants are highly encouraged to
attend. RSVP is not required. For more information, contact the TRI-
CARE Operations and Patient Administration front desk at 283-7331
or 283-7332.
2007 Gulf Coast Salute to America's Heroes
Tyndall will host the 2007 Gulf Coast Salute air show and open house
Saturday, March 24. Gates open' at 9 a.m. Parking and admission are
free.
Visit www.tyndall.af.mil for a schedule of events, directions, photos,
security information and more.


Title

Insurance

Title Insurance protects your
home investment.
A home is usually your largest
single investment. When you pur-
chase a home, you purchase
homeowner's or hazard insur-
ance to protect against loss from
fire, theft or wind damage.
Title insurance protects against
hidden title hazards that may
threaten your financial invest-
ment in your home. You see,
when purchasing a home, you are
really purchasing the title to the
property-the right to occupy
and use the land and improve-
ments.
Other types of insurance focus on
possible future events and charge
an annual premium. Title insur-
ance is purchased with a one-
time premium and safeguards
against loss from hazards and
defects that already exist in the
title.
There are two basic kinds of title
insurance: lender or mortgagee
protection, and owner's coverage.
Most lenders require mortgagee
title insurance as security for their
investment in real estate.
Owner's title insurance lasts as
long as you, the policyholder-or
your heiis-has an interest in the
insured property. Depending on
local practices and state law
where the property is located,
you may pay an additional premi-
um for an owner's policy or you
may pay a simultaneous issue
charge for the separate lenders
coverage.

Title search and
examination is the first step.
Insuring a home's title begins
with a search of public land
records affecting the property.
The title agent or attorney work-
ing on behalf of the title under-
writer examines pertinent docu-
ments to determine whether the
property is insurable.
Those documents (among others)
include deeds, wills, trusts, out-
standing mortgages and judg-
ments, property liens, highway or
utility line easements, pending
legal actions and notary acknowl-
edgements.
When title problems are dis-
closed during the search process,
the-are-corrected whenever pos-
sible to avoid future claims.
According to surveys done by the
American Land Title Association
AltaA), title problems consis-
tently arise in 36 percent, or one
out of three real estate transac-
tions.
The process of performing title
searches and curing title prob-
lems does not come cheap.
Industry studies find that title
insurers spend an average of 92
cents out of every premium dol-
lar as their cost of doing business.

What if a problem is hidden
or missed?
After all this searching and exam-
ination, title problems may still
be hidden or missed. A signature
can be forged on a deed; an
unknown heir can step forward to
claim ownership of the property;
a power of attorney used during a
property transfer could have been
expired or forged; a public record
may be incorrect.
In each of these cases and many
more, when there is the appropri-
ate title insurance coverage, a pol-
icy will offer financial protection
(subject to the terms and condi-
tions of the policy). The title
insurer defends the title and
either "perfects" the title or pays
valid claims.
In 2005, title insurers paid
approximately $916.4 million in
claims, up from $699.1 million
the year before.
With title insurance, you have
financial protection against cov-
ered title hazards. Your home is
your most important invest-
ment-protect it with an owner's
title insurance policy.


The Dixie Theatre presents... The 2007 Season
' A. Not-For-Proli Theatre
,," -m r -p--.--- .


' '4


Live Professional Theatre at it bests!


SmoKe On The Mountain February 16,17,18- 23,24,25

BULLY ~March3&4 The DIXIE Does Nashville~-March9&10

rThe Queen of Bingo ~ March 16,17, 18 -23,24,25
Schedule subject to change
IXIE
,cU, t&. Call 850/653-3200 THEATRE
A"r Eurft L www.dixietheatre.com Where Qualiy i P n
N," 6"f Where uathy is Paramounttrlt


You too can have an investment
in paradise with

MORE BEST LOANS

ON THE PLANET
from Bank of America
For details about all Home and Lot Loans, NO FEE Home Equity
Lines of Credit and Construction Terms, please contact:
Chollet Ramsey, Vice President
850.927.4812
chollet.ramsey@bankofamerica.com
BankofAmerica.
/f -


I


Phdh 5 ascv









The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 February 2007 Page 5


Second Circuit

Court Report
Judge William L. Gary
January 9, 2007
BY CAROL NOBLE
Allpersons listed below are innocent
until proven otherwise in a court of law.
PRE-TRIAL CONFERENCE
CARGILL, STEPHON EUGENE JR: Charged September 2, 2005
with driving while license suspended (felony); resisting officer without
violence; refusal to sign summons; Charged January 7, 2006 with driv-
ing while license suspended (felony). Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney Nancy Jones Gaglio. Pre-
trial Conference continued to February 13, 2007.
CARGILL, STEPHON EUGENE JR: Charged December 20, 2005
with driving while license suspended (felony); Charged January 20,
2006 with sale of controlled substance; charged January 21, 2006 with
2 counts sale/possession of controlled substance with intent to sell
within 1,000 feet of a church; possession of cannabis with intent to sell
within 1,000 feet of a church; possession of ecstasy. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Nancy
Jones Gaglio. Pre-trial Conference continued to February 13, 2007.
DAVIS, DON L: Charged August 25, 2005 with purchase controlled
substance cocaine (State Attorney's Office to drop charge); Charged
October 30, 2005 with flagrant violation of net law; Charged November
' 22, 2005 with possession net larger than 2 inch stretch; possession
undersized red fish. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest
and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 2 days in
jail with 2 days credit for time served; 12 months probation; $410.00
court costs and fees.
EVANS, JOHN E: Charged December 10, 2005 with sale of controlled
substance. Defendant released on own recognizance. The defendant
was represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
FENNELL, LATOYA L: Charged August 26, 2006 with possession of
controlled substance cocaine (State Attorney's Office to drop charge);
Possession of cannabis. Bond was $2,000.00. The defendant was repre-
sented in court by Attorney Gregory Cummings. Pre-trial Conference
continued to February 13, 2007.
FULLER, SAMUEL EUGENE: Charged November 14, 2004 with
premeditated 1st degree murder. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was represented in court by Attorney Rachel Chesnut. Case
Management continued to February 13, 2007 by court order and Pre-
trial Conference set for March 13, 2007.
PORCHE, EDWARD: Charged December 23, 2005 with grand theft.
Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. Trial set for January 10, 2007.
WALKER, DANIEL WILLIAM: Charged October 24, 2004 with fla-
grant violation of net law; possession of net larger than 2 inch stretch.
All charges dropped January 8, 2007.
ARRAIGNMENT
ALEXANDER, TERRY L: Charged November 17, 2006 with aggra-
vated assault with firearm; possession of firearm by convicted felon.
Bond was $7,500.00. The defendant was represented in court by
Attorney Ethan Andrew Way who entered a written plea of not guilty.
Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
ANDERSON, AMY E: Charged 4 times November 29, 2007 with sale
of cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represent-
ed in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way who entered a written plea
of not guilty. Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
CREAMER, JAMES A: Charged October 11, 2006 with sale of con-
trolled substance cannabis. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was
present in court and entered a plea of not guilty. Case Management
continued February 13, 2007.


CREAMER, PHILLIP: Charged. November 22, 2006 with dealing
stolen property. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of not
guilty. Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
CROOM, KENDRAH W: Charged November 10, 2006 with traffick-
ing in controlled substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea
of not guilty. Case Management continued to February 13, 2007.
DOBSON, DANIEL GERARD: Charged November 18, 2006 with
sexual battery on child under 12 years of age by defendant 18 years of
age or older. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represent-
ed in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a written
plea of not guilty. Case Management continued to April 10, 2007.
ENLOE, CHRISTOPHER G: Charged August 17, 2006 with grand
theft of a firearm; attach improper license plate. Defendant was incar-
cerated. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan
Andrew Way, entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty.
The defendant was sentenced to 145 days in jail with 145 days credit for
time served; $410.00 court costs and fees.
ENLOE, CHRISTOPHER G: Charged September 6, 2006 with 2
counts uttering (passing worthless document); 2 counts grand theft (3rd
degree). Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, entered a plea of no contest
and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 125 days
in jail with 125 days credit for time served; $410.00 court costs and fees.
ENLOE, CHRISTOPHER G: Charged September 15, 2006 with sale
of controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was present in court with Attorney. Ethan Andrew Way, entered a plea
of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced
to 116 days injail with 116 days credit for time served; 24 months pro-
bation; 50 months in prison (suspenided'upon completion of drug reha-
bilitation program); restitution to victim; 6 months NPI (drug rehabili-
tatiol); $510.00 court costs and fees.
ENLOE, CHRISTOPHER G: Charged October 2, 2006 with battery
on inmate. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, entered a plea of no contest
and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 99 days in
jail with 99 days credit for time served; $762.00 court costs and fees. All
fines, all cases to begin by partial payment plan 60 days after comple-
tion of NPI.
FALK, SAMANTHA JILL: Charged November 29, 2006 with aggra-
vated battery with deadly weapon. Bond was $1,500.00. The defendant
was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way and entered a
plea of not guilty. Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
FLEMING, PATRICK B: Charged 4 times November 16, 2006 with
sale of cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was pres-
ent in court with Attorney Lynn Thompson and entered a plea of no
contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentenced to 90
days injail with 55 days credit for time served; 3 years probation; 1 year
community control; substance abuse evaluation and treatment; no alco-
hol or illegal drugs, random testing; $470.00 court costs and fees. All
cases concurrent.
GETER, SYLVIA: Charged October 12, 2006 with aggravated battery
with deadly weapon. Bond was $10,000.00. The defendant failed to
appear for court and a capias (warrant for arrest) was issued. Bond was
forfeited.
JONES, BOBBY C. JR: Charged November 15, 2006 with sale of
ecstasy; sale of cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. Case
Management continued to February 13, 2007.
JONES, DORETHA: Charged November 27, 2006 with sale of
cocaine. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender
Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of not guilty. Case Management con-
tinued to March 13, 2007.
KINER, CLEVELAND D. II: Charged November 13, 2006 with sale
of cocaine; Charged 2 times November 8, 2006 with sale of cocaine.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not guilty. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
LAKE, WILLIE CARR: Charged October 31, 2006 with sale of
cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented
in court by Public Defender Kevin' Steiger who entered a plea of not
guilty. Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.


THE CHRONICLE IS
CONCERNED WITH
IT M
PU13LIC WINTER
ST AND
NOT APROFIT MARGIN


SM
BAR-B-Q
Hickory-smoked the old-fashioned
way with all the fixns prepared from
our own recipes.
Now serving some of the
best seafood on the coast!
LUNCH BUFFET
Sunday-Friday.
HOBO'S ICE CREAM
1593 West Highway 98-Carrabelle
697-2776
"Worth Driving 100 Miles For."
OPEN
Sun.-Thurs. 11:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 11:00 9:00 p.m.
Closed Tuesday


LEE, LAVELLE D: Charged December 6, 2006 with grand theft.
Bond was $1,500.00. Arraignment continued to March 13, 2007.
MARTIN, KELVIN A: Charged November 15, 2006 with resisting
officer with violence. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way who entered a
written plea of not guilty. Case Management continued to March 13,
2007.
MCDANIEL, ROGER: Charged December 22, 2006 with worthless
check over 150 dollars. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a
plea of not guilty. Case Management continued to February 13, 2007.
ONEAL, LORENZO: Charged 3 times November 16, 2006 with sale
of cocaine. Total bond was $3,000.00. The defendant was present in
court and entered a plea. of not guilty. A public defender was appoint-
ed. Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
RAY, KEITH: Charged December 1, 2006 with sale of cocaine.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and was
adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 39 days in jail with
39 days credit for time served; 36 months in prison (suspended); 36
months probation; $510.00 court costs and fees.
RICHARDS, CHRISTOPHER RALPH: Charged September 15, 2006
with felony fleeing or attempt to elude; grand theft motor vehicle; pos-
session prescription drug without prescription; criminal mischief (3rd
degree felony); property damage $1,000; driving while license suspend-
ed (felony); disorderly conduct; resisting officer without violence;
Charged December 20, 2006 with possession of cannabis. Bond was
$50,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan
Andrew Way and entered a plea of not guilty. Case Management con-
tinued to March 13, 2007.
RUMPH, WILLIAM C: Charged September 5, 2006 with possession
of controlled substance marijuana over 20 grams; driving while license
suspended or revoked. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of
no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to
6 days in jail with 6 days credit for time served; 36 months probation;
no drugs, random testing. Defendant taken to Leon County for NPI.
THOMAS, CLAUDE III: Charged October 13, 2006 with sale of
cocaine. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was present in court and
entered a plea of not guilty. A public defender was appointed. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
TOPHAM, JIMMY: Charged October 28, 2006 with driving while
license suspended (felony). Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant failed
to appear for court and a capias (warrant for arrest) was issued. Bond
was forfeited.
YON, CORA BETH: Charged November 29, 2006 with possession
with intent to sell cannabis; possession of controlled substance cocaine.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger
and entered a plea of not guilty. Case Management continued to
February 13, 2007.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION ARRAIGNMENT
CAMPBELL, ERIE LEO: Charged November 26, 2005 with attempt-
ed burglary of dwelling; Charged November 29, 2005 with sale of con-
trolled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was rep-
resented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea
of denial. Case Management continued to February 13, 2007.
COX, SHELLEY D: Charged August 13, 2005 with resisting officer
with violence. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present
in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Probation reinstated and
modified to include treatment at Avon Park and any aftercare. Case to
be reviewed February 13, 2007.
DOUDS, MICHAEL: Charged November 6, 2004 with possession of
controlled substance; possession of cannabis. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger, admitted being in violation and was found in violation of pro-
bation. Probation revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 24 months
in prison (suspended); NPI and aftercare; probation reinstated, any
conditions not met, re-imposed.
PATTERSON, ZACHARY W: Charged August 5, 2005 with 2 counts
possession of controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present-in-court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way.
Probation reinstated, modified to include 34 days in jail with 34 days
credit for time served.
REYNOLDS, PATE L: Charged July 23, 2003 with sale of controlled
substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin.Steiger, admitted being in violation
and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked and adju-
dicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 18 months in prison
(suspended); probation reinstated, any conditions not met, re-imposed.
RICHARDS, JOSEPH D: Charged January 5, 2005 with grand theft.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial. Case
Management continued to February 13, 2007.
SELLERS, LISA MARIE: Charged January 4, 2004 and February 9,
2004 with grand theft. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in
violation and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked
and adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 18 months in
prison (suspended); 92 days in jail with 92 days credit for time served;
24 months probation; any conditions not met, re-imposed.
SHIVER, KENDALL W: Charged September 8, 1993 with aggravat-
ed battery. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Warrant dismissed and pro-
bation reinstated. Conditions of probation re-imposed.
SLOAN, DOUGLAS D: Charged January 26, 2006 with dealing in
stolen property; Charged with grand theft of motor vehicle; grand theft.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and admit-
ted being in violation of probation. The defendant was adjudicated
guilty and found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The
defendant was sentenced to 24 months in prison and 18 months in
prison, various charges, with credit for time already served.
STEPHENS, MELVIN BERNARD: Charged November i5, 2005
with sale of crack cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered .
a plea of denial. Case Management continued to February 13, 2007.

Continued on Page 6


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pI RPMW








Page 6 16 February 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Second Circuit Court Report from Page 5

TAGLARIS, ANTHONY: Charged January 25, 2005 with 3 counts
uttering (passing worthless document); Charged January 24, 2005 with
uttering (passing worthless document). Defendant was incarcerated.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Probation reinstated and modified to include NPI and aftercare (both
cases). Any conditions not met, re-imposed.
WALKER, WILLIAM HATCH: Charged December 23, 1996 with
trespass occupied structure or conveyance. Defendant was incarcerated.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger
admitted being in violation and was found in violation of probation.
Probation revoked and terminated.
WASHINGTON, RICK: Charged May 29, 2006 with aggravated bat-
tery great bodily harm. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered
a plea of denial. Violation of Probation Hearing set for February 13,
2007.

DISPOSITION
SALMON, JAMES A: Charged September 3, 2006 with grand theft
motor vehicle; false imprisonment; battery; burglary of dwelling x 5.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, entered a plea of no contest and was
adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 24 months proba-
tion with credit for time served; substance abuse evaluation and treat-
ment; no alcohol or illegal drugs, random testing; no contact with vic-
tim; 10 pm to 6 am curfew; The defendant admitted being in violation
of probation and was adjudicated guilty. All cases concurrent.

CASE MANAGEMENT
AMISON, JAMES STEWART: Charged May 17, 2005 with battery;
Charged August 14, 2006 with carjacking; battery; Charged September
8, 2006 with felony fleeing or attempting to elude officer; resisting offi-
cer without violence. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
ANDERSON, AMY E: Charged December 12, 2003 with grand theft;
Charged September 28, 2005 with aggravated battery with deadly
weapon. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented
in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Violation of Probation
Hearing set for March 13, 2007.
AROCHA, AZARY: Charged July 3, 2006 with felony fleeing or
attempt to elude; child abuse; driving while license suspended (3rd or
subsequent); resisting officer without violence. Bond was $7,500.00.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant
was sentenced to 60 months in prison (suspended); 36 months proba-
tion with credit for time served; 1 year license suspension; $410.00
court costs and fees.
BATES, RUDOLPH: Charged November 16, 2006 with sale of con-
trolled substance; sale of cocaine. Total bond was $40,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way.
Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
CARGILL, GEORGE FREDERICK: Charged March 2, 2005 with 3
counts possession of controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver;
possession of firearm by convicted felon; Charged May 21, 2005 with
driving while license suspended (felony); Charged January 20, 2006
and January 21, 2006 with sale/possession of controlled substance
with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a church; Charged January 21,
2006 with possession of cannabis with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of
a church or business; possession of ecstasy. Defendant was incarcerat-
ed. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney Gregory
Cummings. Case Management continued to February 13, 2007.
COOPER, CHARLES B: Charged October 11, 2006 with sale of con-
trolled substance. Bond was $15,000.00. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case. Management contin-
ued to March 13, 2007.
COPPEDGE, DAVID BRIAN: Charged September 29, 2006 with
driving while license suspended (3rd or subsequent). Bond was
$2,500.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Lee
Meadows, entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated.guilty. The
defendant was sentenced to 18 months probation; $370.00 court costs.
CREAMER, JAMES D: Charged July 15, 2005 with grand theft motor
vehicle; Charged August 1, 2006 with grand theft motor vehicle; driv-
ing while license suspended or revoked. Defendant was incarcerated.
The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin
Steiger. Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
DUNCAN, BOBBY J: Charged October 11, 2006 with sale of sub-
stance in lieu of cocaine. Bond was $10,000.00. The defendant was rep-
resented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management
continued to March 13, 2007.
ELLIOTT, ALYSSA J: Charged March 6, 2006 with possession of
controlled substance with intent to deliver; delivery of controlled sub-
stance. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Robert
Culpepper II. Pre-trial Conference set for February 13, 2007.
ENLOE, CHRISTOPHER G: Charged May 11, 2003 with dealing
stolen property; possession of firearm by convicted felon. Defendant
was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Attorney
Ethan Andrew Way. Probation reinstated, modified to include 151 days
in jail with 151 days credit for time served; 2 years drug offender pro-
bation; 2.years regular probation; NPI; concurrent with other cases.
ENLOE, CHRISTOPHER G: Charged May 11, 2003 with 6 counts
uttering (passing worthless document). Defendant was incarcerated.
The defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way
admitted being in violation and was found in violation of probation.
Probation revoked and terminated. The defendant was sentenced to
151 days in jail with 151 days credit for time served (concurrent).
FORD, TOMEIKA D: Charged July 16, 2006 with aggravated battery
with deadly weapon. Bond was $542.00. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest
and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 2 days in
jail with 2 days credit for time served; 24 months probation; no contact
with victim, restitution reserved on 60 days; no drugs or alcohol, ran-
dom testing; $762.00 court costs and fees. This is case concurrent with
another case.
FORD, TOMEIKA D: Charged August 26, 2006 with possession of
controlled substance cocaine; possession of cannabis. Bond was
$3,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender
Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld.
The defendant was sentenced to 2 days in jail with 2 days credit for time
served; 24 months probation; no alcohol or drugs, random testing;
$410.00 court costs and fees. This is case concurrent with another case.
GOLDEN, RICHIE DONALD: Charged April 19, 2006 with burgla-
ry of a structure. Bond was $7,500.00. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management contin-
ued to February 13, 2007.
GRIGGS, DEMAR L: Charged July 9, 2004 with sale of controlled
substance; Charged June 4, 2005 and June 13, 2005 with grand theft;


charged October 4, 2006 with sale of cocaine. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin
Steiger. Case Management continued to February 13, 2007.
GRIGGS, QUINNELLA: Charged 2 times November 13, 2006 with
sale of controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered
a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 13 months in prison with 57 days credit for time served; all
cases concurrent with any sentence no serving.
HARRIS, SAMUEL SMITH: Clarged April 10, 2004 with battery on
child. Defendant was incarcerated. Case Management continued to
February 13, 2007.
HICKS, VANNESSA ANN: Charged October 11, 2006 with sale of
oxycodone. Bond was $25,000.00, The defendant was present in court
with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management continued to
March 13, 2007.
HUTCHINS, SHERI M: Charged August 20, 2003 with 2 counts
delivery controlled substance to minor; murder (3rd degree). Defendant
was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and was found in
violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 5 years in prison (suspended); 36 months probation with 58
days credit for time served; substance abuse and mental evaluation with
recommended treatment; any conditions not met, re-imposed.
JACOBS, DANIEL ROY: Charged May 27, 2005 with grand theft.
Defendant was incarcerated. Case Management continued to April 10,
2007.
JAMES, MARK DIMITRIOS: Charged October 5, 2006 with burgla-
ry of dwelling. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management contin-
ued to April 10, 2007.
JONES, ANTHONY ALLEN: Charged January 21, 2006 with sale of
controlled substance; charged March 29, 2006, 2 times July 24, 2006
with sale/possession controlled substance with intent to sell within
1,000 feet of a church. Defendant:was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Pre-trial
Conference set for April 10, 2007.
JONES, TRAVIS N: Charged March 30, 2006 with sale of controlled
substance; Charged 3 times Noveriber 6, 2006 with sale of cocaine.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management continued to April
10, 2007.
KEIGANS, TIMOTHY D: Charged August 24, 2006 with sale of con-
trolled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was rep-
resented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management
continued to February 13, 2007.
KEITH, TINA N: Charged October 16, 2006 with burglary of
dwelling; Charged October 27, 2006 with petit theft value greater than
$100.00. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to
February 13, 2007.
KILPATRICK, ANTHONY B: Charged September 5, 2006 with pos-
session of controlled substance marijuana over 20 grams; possession
drug paraphernalia. Bond was $10,000.00. The defendant was present
in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Pre-trial Conference set for
March 13, 2007.
KUHNE, JEFF: Charged October 11, 2006 with sale of cocaine. Bond
was $25,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney
Rachel Chesnut. Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
LOWERY, GEORGE ANDY: Charged August 4,' 2006 with posses-
sion controlled substance with intent to deliver; possession of cannabis;
possession of paraphernalia; Charged 2 times August 4, 2006 with sale
of controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case
Management continued to March 13, 2007.
MARTIN, KELVIN A: Charged 2 times December 13, 2003 with
Ssale/possession controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000
feet of a church; Charged November 1, 2005 with sale of controlled
substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented
in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Violation of Probation
Hearing set for March 13, 2007. '
MAXWELL, MICHAEL KYLE: Charged September 6, 2006 with
sale of controlled substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management
continued to March 13, 2007. {
MILLER, DEMETRIUS PAUL: Charged.March 30, 2006 with sale of
controlled substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was present
in court with Attorney Robert Culpepper II. Pre-trial Conference set for
April 10, 2007.
MISSLER, ANDREW SCOTT: Charged May 13, 2006 with lewd las-
civious act in presence of child under 16. Bond was $2,500.00. Case
Management continued to February 13, 2007 by court order.
MOORE, KATIE NICOLE: Charged March 2, 2005 with 3 counts
possession of controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver. Bond
-Was $2,500.00. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to February 13,
2007.
MOSES, CHARLES D: Charged September 9, 2006 with felony flee-
ing or attempt to elude; DUI. Bo:nd was $3,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of
no contest and was adjudicated guity. The defendant was sentenced to
2 days in jail with 2 days credit .fri time served; 18 months probation
(count 1); 12 months probation; DUI school; 50 hours community serv-
ice work; 10 day vehicle impound 6 months license suspension; sub-
stance abuse evaluation and recommended treatment; $1,080,00 court
costs and fees. Counts concurrent
NEEDER, GEORGE R: Charged October 11, 2006 with sale of
methadone. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan
Andrew Way and entered a plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld.
The defendant was sentenced to 2 days in jail with 2 days credit for time
served; 30 months probation; attend and complete outpatient
methadone program; $410.00 court costs and fees.
NELSON, DANIEL TREVOR: Charged October 5, 2006 with posses-
sion of controlled substance cocaine; possession legend drug without
prescription. Bond was $10,000.00. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to
February 13, 2007.
NOWLING, WILLIAM R: Charged July 8, 2006 with possession of
firearm by convicted felon. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and was
adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 1. day in jail with 1
day credit for time served; 24 months probation.
PARMELE, CHRISTOPHER DWAYNE: Charged March 10, 2006
with cultivation of cannabis; possession of paraphernalia. Bond was
$15,000.00. The defendant failed to appear for court and a capias (war-
rant for arrest) was issued. Bond was forfeited.


PARRAMORE, FLOYD B: Charged April 29, 2006 with battery."
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to
February 13, 2007.
POLOUS, BARBARA SUE: Charged November 10, 2006 with grand
theft. Defendant released on own recognizance. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management
continued to March 13, 2007.
POLOUS, TONY D: Charged November 10, 2006 with grand theft.
Defendant released on own recognizance. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management contin-
ued to March 13, 2007.
PROVENZANO, MICHELE D: Charged 2 times September 29, 2005:
with aggravated child abuse with deadly weapon; Charged November
15, 2005 with sale of controlled substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The"
defendant failed to appear for court and a capias (warrant for arrest)'
was issued. Bond was forfeited.
PUTNAL, JOSEPH GLEN: Charged October 2, 2006 with aggravat-
ed battery with deadly weapon. Defendant was incarcerated. The.
defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Case Management continued to February 13, 2007.
RANDOLPH, MANUEL JR: Charged January 13, 2005 with grand,
theft. Bond was $7,125.00. The defendant was represented in court by
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to
February 13, 2007.
RATLEDGE, ROBERT P: Charged December 7, 2004 with grand'
theft motor vehicle; burglary of a conveyance. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan'
Andrew Way. Violation of Probation Hearing set for March 13, 2007.
RAY, KEITH: Charged January 26, 2005 with sale of controlled sub--
stance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation
and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defen-
dant'was sentenced to 36 months in prison (suspended); 36 months pro-
bation; 118 days in jail with 118 days credit for time served. Any con-
dition not met, re-imposed.
RAY, LAWRENCE WILLIAM: Charged December 28, 2004 with
sale of controlled substance; Charged 3 times October 11, 2006 with
sale of cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was repre-
sented in court by Attorney Gregory Cummings. Case Management
continued to February 13, 2007.
RICHARDS, JOSEPH D: Charged August 29, 2006 with grand theft;
June 15, 2006 with criminal mischief (3rd degree felony). Bond was
$2,500.00. The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender-
Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to February 13, 2007.
ROBINSON, BRANDON DEMAR: Charged February 12, 2005 with
armed robbery with deadly weapon; aggravated battery with deadly:
weapon; grand theft motor vehicle. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,.
admitted being in violation and was found in violation of probation.
Probation revoked and terminated. The defendant was sentenced to 36
months in prison with 493 days credit for time served.
RUE, CHARLES A: Charged August 13, 2006 with possession with
intent to sell cannabis; no valid driver license. Bond was $3,600.00. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger..
Case Management continued to February 13, 2007.
SALTER, ALBERT JR: Charged 2 times December 10, 2004 with sale
or possession controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet
of public housing; Charged August 2, 2006 with lewd or lascivious con-
duct; Charged October 4, 2006 with sale/possession controlled sub-
stance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a church. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney
Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
STRONG, WILLIAM A: Charged November 9, 2006 with possession
of controlled substance cocaine; possession drug paraphernalia. Bond
was $6,000.00. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney
Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
TRAIL, SHELTON WILLIAM: Charged March 31, 2006 with sale of,
controlled substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was repre-
sented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Violation of"
Probation Hearing set for March 13, 2007.
WALLACE, ALFRED OLIVER: Charged August 19, 2005 with bur-
glary of a conveyance (X5); grand theft 3rd degree (X5); burglary of
conveyance while armed; grand theft of a firearm ( X3). Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney
Ethan Andrew Way. Violation of Probation Hearing set for March-13,
2007.
WARUI,.TIMOTHY JAMES: Charged July 27, 2006 with possession
of controlled substance cocaine; Charged October 2, 2006 with child
abuse. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Violation of Probation
Hearing set for April 10, 2007.
WEBB, CURTIS B: Charged October 2, 2006 with possession of con-
trolled substance cocaine; possession of cannabis; possession of para-
phernalia; indecent exposure. Bond was $5,500.00. Case Management
continued to February 13, 2007 by court order.
WIGGINS, CARRIE LENETTE: Charged November 10, 2006 with !
aggravated battery with deadly weapon. Bond was $1,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Case Management continued to March 13, 2007.
WILSON, JUSTIN WESLEY: Charged January 6, 2006 with dealing
in stolen property; Charged January 23, 2006 with burglary of a struc- a
ture. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and a
was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked and terminat- a
ed. The defendant was sentenced to 1 year and 1 day in prison with 119
days credit for time served.'Case's and counts concurrent.
WYNN, RICHARD N: Charged April 19, 2004 with grand theft.
Defendant released on own recognizance. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation;

Continued on Page 7


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Carrabelle is seeking names of all
military veterans from this city
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forces of the United States during
any period of United States' his-
tory.
A Veterans' Wall of honor has
been proposed for Veterans Park.
Please notify City Commissioner
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any Carrabelle veteran you wish
to have remembered.
Names of veterans, plus service
branch and dates of' service
should be delivered to
Commissioner Sands at City
Hall, 106 Ave. B South or call
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Phone: (850) 697-9604
Fax: (850) 697-9605
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__









The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 February 2007 Page 7


Second Circuit Court Reportfrom Page 6
and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defen-
dant was sentenced to new 36 month probation; any conditions not
met, re-imposed.
YANCEY, JAMES ROBERT: Charged February 22, 2006 with lewd
or lascivious molestation, victim under 12; Charged June 29, 2006 with
lewd or lascivious molestation victim under 12. Bond was $25,000.00.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Case Management continued to April 10, 2007.
ZACKERY, REGINOLD T: Charged November 3, 2005 with felony
fleeing or attempting to elude officer, property damage; Charged
January 30, 2006 with driving while license suspended (felony). Bond
was $1,500.00. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney
Gregory Cummings. Case Management continued to February 13,
2007.
HEARINGS
RICHARDSON, TEELIAH: Restitution Hearing continued to
February 1-3, 2007.
RIVERA, RICARDO J: Motion to suppress. Hearing continued to
February 13, 2007 by court order.
VIOLATION OF PROBATION HEARING
CREAMER, HEATHER: Charged February 20, 2006 with possession
of controlled substance cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. The
defendant was.sentenced to 91 days in jail with 91 days credit for time
served; probation modified and extended to include 12 months commu-
nity control probation; 24 months drug offender probation; attend and
complete out-patient treatment; restitution to State; any conditions not
met, re-imposed.
DEVER, ANTHONY P: Charged September 7, 2006 with burglary of
a structure. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation
and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked and rein-
stated to include substance abuse evaluation and treatment; no drugs or
alcohol, random testing; anger management; 72 days in jail with 72
days credit for time served.
DEVER, ANTHONY P: Charged with battery. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of
no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to
39 days in jail with 39 days credit for time served; $582.00 court costs
and fees.


Panhandle Players Issues
Casting Call for "Harvey"
Please pass along to someone you know, who's been looking for a great
local, community theater group to get involved with! The performance
is set for April, at The Dixie Theater, in Apalachicola. These guys have
been around for quite a while-and do great stuff. Cast AND Crew
needed!
Panhandle Players will be presenting the comedy "Harvey," by Mary
Chase, for the spring production, set for April 19, 20, 21 and 22.
Anyone interested in participating in this production, whether as cast
or crew, should attend auditions and sign-up on Monday, February 12,
at 6:00 p.m., at the Eastpoint Fire Station on 6th Street in Eastpoint.
"Harvey" is an imaginary six-foot rabbit befriended by mild-mannered
Elwood P. Dowd, who is the only one.who can "see" Harvey, to the
consternation of Elwood's family and friends. Everyone thinks Elwood
is crazy. There are acting roles for six males and six females, plus the
need for several crew members.
If you cannot attend the Monday, February 12, auditions and sign-up
meeting at 6 p.m., at the Eastpoint Fire Station, but you are still inter-
ested in participating in this "Harvey" production, please contact the
director, Pam Vest, at 927-3183.
Kim Harrison, Gulf Alliance for Local Arts, kim@kimharrison.com,
www.gulfalliance.com, 850.227.4960 cell.


A Simple Matter Of Black
And White
'A Modest Proposal"
BY RICHARD E. NOBLE
Richard Harper-Concerned Citizens of Franklin County,
Inc.
"My name is Richard Harper and I am here this morning to represent
the Concerned Citizens of Franklin County Inc. I'm sure that you have
seen some of our ads in the local paper ... We already have over a hun-
dred a sixty members and are excited about having the human
resources to help the Commission study how the budget works-or
doesn't work as some would say and how each department spends tax
dollars. Our early focus was going to be on property tax relief and
county spending. But we have been asked by many, many Franklin
County citizens about what the Commission intends to do concerning
"at large" voting. It is not an issue that we intend to bring before you at
this time but it seems to be on everyone's mind. As you know 69% of
the voters want this changed ... It has been almost three months since
the election in November last year when you elected to put this ques-
tion on the ballot ... You put it on the ballot to find out what the peo-
ple wanted you to do-now you know what they want you to do. We
have heard rumors about your plans. What we have heard is that the
Board intends to take no action. We ask that you schedule a public
hearing for March 20th and take action on that date. Chairman Crofton
we ask that you schedule this meeting at this time."
"A public hearing?" offered Mr. Crofton. "I think that there ought to be
a little more education of the citizens on what the entire impact on this
would be-and the legal aspects. I would be in favor of a public work-
shop to educate everyone and then proceed from that point. I could do
that."
"I want to get our lawyer's opinion on this," said Mr. Lockley.
"Commissioner there is a federal injunction that prohibits us from
going to "at large" voting at this time. There has been an order that has
released us to redistrict but it did not release us to go back to at large
voting. So that is the legal opinion. We are prohibited by law."
"So Mr. Shuler," asked Mr. Harper, "we are still under that 1986 court
order?"
The discussion then turned to a more recent court order. Mr. Harper
was of the opinion that the recent order had relieved the County of its
Federal obligations. Attorney Shuler disagreed.
"I am the lawyer that attained that court order, Mr. Harper and I think
that I am in the best position to know what it means and what it does-
n't mean. It doesn't mean that we have been released to go back to at
large voting. It does not mean that. If you disagree, there is a forum in
Tallahassee and we can go see Judge Stafford in Tallahassee and see if
he agrees with your opinion. However it is my opinion that the County
is still subject to the at large injunction."
Mr. Harper then submitted to the Board a copy of an order vacating the
injunction which he and his group interpreted as permission from the
court to release the County from the federal mandate against at large
voting. Mr. Shuler disagreed explaining that the order was ambiguous
and could be misinterpreted by those not familiar with legal terminolo-
gy. and procedures. Mr. Harper then asked the Board and the audience
to put aside Mr. Shuler's legal expertise along with his opinion and read
the order vacating the injunction themselves and see what they felt that
it said.
"If you disagree with my interpretation," said Mr. Shuler. "You have
relief. You can go to the judge yourself and ask him that question. Go
to the source."
Mr. Harper was not content with Mr. Shuler's recommendation and
persisted in his desire to make his opinion public knowledge. Mr.
Lockley then advised the Board to accept the County Attorney's advice
that the issue not be addressed and that Mr. Harper seek enlightenment
at the source-and go to the judge who wrote the court order.
"All that order says," explained Mr. Shuler, "is that we can redistrict
now or redistrict later and we don't have to go back to the court. It does
not mean that we have been released from the at large issue. I know that
one lawyer that you (Mr. Harper) talked to is not even licensed in the


state of Florida and he told you that it did not mean, in his opinion,
that you have been released from at large. He also said that it was over-
ly broad ..."
"He did not tell me that!" stated Mr. Harper. "I don't know where you
got that."
"I got it from his mouth to my ear," said Mr. Shuler.
"I'm not a lawyer but I can read. I see what the judge wrote and you
have to assume that is what the judge meant."
Ms. Sanders then stated that she was also present when the decision
under discussion was rendered and "not once was at large even men-
tioned".
"That is exactly right," emphasized Attorney Shuler. "And my whole
point is that the court is not going to provide relief that it is not asked
for. I think that it would be astoundingly irresponsible to say that the
judge gave us relief that was not asked for."
"Well, it says what it says," argued Mr. Harper.
"What I am saying is when you go to court there is a thing called due
process. Part of that is that you clarify the issues before the court by fil-,
ing pleas and motions. That way the court and all the parties know
what issues are being argued. The judge then renders opinions and
judgments that are based on the issues as they are framed in the pleas.
In the 2003 case the exclusive issue was a redistricting plan and a
release from the injunction to'implement the redistricting plan. There
was never a moment's thought not the first word; not even the first bit
of evidence on at large voting. The County did not ask to be released
from the at large injunction ... My recommendation is that the Board
take my legal advise and if they (Concerned Citizens) think that I am
wrong then the burden is on them to go to the court. I recommend that
you do not ask me to seek a verification of the court's order and accept
the interpretation that I have given you. And if they disagree with that,
they have a remedy."
An argument then ensued with Mr. Harper claiming that his view rep-
resented the opinion of 70% of the voters of Franklin County. Mr.
Shuler then pointed out that the 70% figure that Mr. Harper was quot-
ing merely represented the number who voted in the November election
and in actuality barely represented a third of the registered voters of.
Franklin County-all of which would be moot in relation to a valid
Federal Injunction which takes into consideration the rights of the
majority and the minority when it is rendered. The Supreme Court has
also rendered several opinions on this issue, the, most prominent of
which was Baker v Carr in 1964 which set the priorities for our present
required districting. A decision which Chief Justice Warren said was
the biggest decision of his career.
There were other people in the audience who wanted to comment and
they began to speak out from their seats.
"If I start taking public comments on this, it will turn into a public fias-
co," suggested Mr. Crofton.
"Mr. Crofton," interrupted Ms. Sanders. "I would like to hear some of
the public. I think we need to hear from the public. And if it takes all
day, it takes all day because this is an important issue."
"Allen Feifer, president of the Concerned Citizens of Franklin County.
It is important to talk about the five hundred pound gorilla that is in the
room at the moment. There is a conflict of interest here with the status
quo maybe wanting to keep things the way they are versus what the cit-
izens want. The only issue in my mind is whether it is legal or not. I
would like everyone in the audience to understand that this is an issue
that is of paramount importance to change in the County. I plead with
the County to don't make us have to go out and sue the County or make
the County spend money to defend this position if in fact it is an inde-
fensible position. If there is an easy way to find out if the judge in fact
meant what he said in writing to vacate the entire paragraph 5 of his
decision-let's do that ... We'll do it if we have to (sue Franklin
County) but the citizens have spoken. Let's not subvert their wishes.
Let's do County-wide voting if it is feasible; if it is not then we have
other avenues that we can follow to get to that point."
"Commissioners there is nothing unclear about the order," advised Mr.
Shuler.
Rose Etta McCoy- educator from Apalachicola- then stepped to the
podium. C'
h ?Continued on Page 9


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Page 8 16 February 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Florida Classified


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Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience of

1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!

The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper with
the FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-1687, fax: 850-670-1685.


Announcements
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Answer pg 446 Buy and Read
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Automotive
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Cars from $500! Tax Repos, US
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feet of a large private trout
stream. Great low rate financing
available. Call now, new to mar-
ket. (877)777-4837.

Steel Buildings
BUILDING SALE...Feb/March
delivery or deposit holds till
Spring. 25'x40'x12' $4800.
40'x60'x16'' $12,800. Front end
optional. Rear end included.
MANY OTHERS! Pioneer,
(800)668-5422 or www.pioneer-
steel.com.
Wanted To Buy
CASH PAID FOR-Used Dish
Network (NOT DIRECT)
Satellite boxes (not dishes).
Highest Price Paid. Have model
number & receiver ready and call
(866) 642-5181 x1134.


ISMO EITR ESTED- IN SER VING







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850-670-1772
Hours: Tues-Fri 10-5, after 5 by apt. Sat. 10-until
TAKING CARE OF
Stacy Williams, ALL YOUR HAIR
Stylist CARE,
347 Highway 98 MANICURES,
P.O. Box 977 PEDICURES &
Eastpoint, FL 32328 ACRYLICS




Air-Con of Wakulla, LLC
HEATING AND COOLING
850-926-5592
Installation
Service
Repair
Gary Limbaugh, owner Lic # CAC1814304
Serving Franklin and Wakulla Counties since 1988



* I


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0416 MEDPIC"


FRANKLIN COUNTY: (850) 670-5555
TOLL FREE: (888) 831-6754
LEON-WAKULLA COUNTY: (850) 926-9602
REBA BRASWELL, MANAGER RAY BUTLER, ASST. MANAGER
CLEVE LINDSEY, CERTIFIED EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN
DEAN FEEHRER, LICENSED RESPIRATORY THERAPIST
AMBER BRANCH, RECEPTIONIST


Franklin, Iad on


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2x2 Rates
Statewide $1200
Regional or National
Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


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Statewide $2400
Regional Placement
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Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


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UThe Fankin ChTW ronjr~icle at850670168


Want to purchase minerals

and other oil/gas interests.

Send details to:

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Denver, Colorado 80201












The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 February 2007 Page 9


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A Simple Matter Of Black And White from Page 7

"I would like to remind the Commissioners that you really didn't have
the majority of the electorate in November. You actually had about
35.3% that voted yes. You didn't have a majority percentage. I would
also like to remind you that our district has come a longway. We have
made tremendous progress. We are extremely proud of that progress.
We are extremely proud of Franklin County. That progress has allowed
us to insure opportunities for the election of a minority in our County;
not only on the Franklin County Commission but on the Franklin
County School Board. I stand here to tell you that the 1986 ruling in the
United States District Court for the northern district of Florida upheld
the plaintiff's complaint that "at large" system in Franklin County
denied African American citizens of Franklin County an equal oppor-
tunity to participate in the political process and to elect candidates of
their own choice, I urge:you and there are others here that uige you not
to even reconsider going back to court or getting another opinion espe-
cially if it means the retention of the single member district. And if
accountability of all commissioners that are present here is a major
concern to all of the voters, then I suggest to you that you make
changes within the structure to make all commissioners accountable to
"all" of the people in Franklin County. That is what you are up there
doing. You are making provisions for us-not a select few. The
December 3, 2003 ruling allowed the County to simply implement
what you asked for in your resolution. It allows the County to imple-
ment a new redistricting plan if that is your pleasure. It does not stipu-
late that the Commission vacate the single member district or that you
do away with the at large voting (restriction). If you take a look at the
resolution that was presented ... They did not tell you that you had to
eliminate your single member district. They did not give you permis-
sion to go back to your at large voting. I would urge you to not consid-
er doing this. The system is working. It is very functional. We are proud
of the progress that all of you have made. And we want you to consid-
er all of the people, and all of our desires, not just a select group. Thank
you."

Clarence Williams--Ex-County Commissioner

"The reason I am here today is because a few years ago we went
through this same thing. It was because there was no way that a black
man could win an office ... The only way that we could get a black man
elected is when the court went to a single member district. Mr. Tollover
served for ten full years; I came and then served eight; and Mr. Lockley
has completed two. When you go to the at large system there is no way
that the black man can win-it has been proven in court. We don't need
to be fighting here among ourselves; we need to be here, together ...
What we need to do is leave this just the way it is so that we don't have
people left out of this election system."

Mr. Williams also spoke to the increased cost of campaigning involved
in county wide voting; his point being that it will take more money and
be more difficult for a candidate with fewer dollars to spend.

Another speaker spoke to the issue of "power"-discounting the race
issue.




Now is the time to


subscribe to the


FRANKLIN


CHRONICLE

The Chronicle is published every other Friday.

Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County

are $16.96 including taxes for one year, or 26

issues. The out-of county rate is $22.26 includ-

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Eastpoint, Florida 32328
S850-670-1687


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle
pages is an efficient way to promote your business to
the public and save money at the same time. These
ads are strictly business cards magnified to 2 columns
by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two
insertions. Send your business card or copy to:
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guarantee position in the next issue.


eritag The donation is tax deductible.

' f thB i d -* Pick-up is free.
to eB W* We take care of all the paper


SPay The County Bills

The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of
S $1,967,331.21 at their February 6, 2007 meeting. The bills are listed as
follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Office.


ACS GOVT FINANCIAL SYSTEM
02/05/2007 15:
BANK VENDOR
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT


ork.


r Boaq4rngeI




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In an at large system an organized minority of voters could theoretical-
ly elect all of the commissioners; thus making Franklin County less
democratic, less diversified, and less representative. If the "Concerned
Citizens" or the seafood workers, or the real estate industry and devel-
opers were capable of voting as a block, they could control the entire
County Commission. In other words the same powerful "minority" of
voters voting county wide could elect all the candidates. With the pres-
ent system that can not happen-each candidate must get a majority in
each district.

Mr. Lockley then made the motion that this issue be left to stand and
that the Concerned Citizens of Franklin County seek a clarification at
their own initiative and expense-much the same as the black commu-
nity was forced to do in their original petitioning process.

The motion was passed 4 to 1 with Commission Crofton voting against.
Mr. Crofton was of the opinion that the question was one that needed
an' aner .nr

"I'n'ake the'motion," advised Mr. Putnal, "that we continue with Mr.
Lockley's motion until somebody can put written proof in front of us
that this thing has been done away with (Injunction against county
wide voting)." This motion was approved unanimously.

As has often been said there are few issues that are simply a matter of
black and white, unfortunately this issue is just that. The five hundred
pound gorilla in the room mentioned by Mr. Fiefer was not the County
Commission's obstinacy or obfuscation of this issue but the perception
of racism; a perception clearly visible by the division of races sitting in
the Commission room and the clear contrast of opinions being
expressed at the podium. Franklin County is between 15 and 20 percent
African American and Apalachicola is 35 to 40 percent African
American.

I have no doubt that this issue will sell newspapers-but I fear if this
issue is pursued it will bring to Franklin County not fame and publici-
ty but shame and notoriety. In fact, I think that it can be guaranteed.





ABEA


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 1/30/07 Invoice No. 14262
Description of Vehicle: Make Ford Model Escort Color Red
Tag No.NoTag Year 1992 State FL VinNo. 1FAPP15J7PW216720

To Owner Kathy Ann & Rivera Gomz To Lien Holder'
994 Treasa Avenue
Eastpoint, FL 32328



You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 01/13/07 at the request of FCSO that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 244.50 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you are hereby notified that on 2/16/07 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


Check Register


001121 AARON'S ELECTRIC INC
002352 ACE AIR CONSULTING
000100 ACTION FIRE & SAFETY EQU
002366 ALLEGRA PRINT & IMAGING
001379 ALLEN ENTERPRISES, INC.
001670 ALLTEL
002326 ALTERNATIVE ELECTRIC CO
000301 ALTHA FARMERS COOPERATIVE
000214 AMERIGAS
002172 APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE
000394 APALACHICOLA BAY CHAMBER
002281 ARAMARK
002576 ARNOLD/HARRY
001000 BAKER AND TAYLOR
000554 BAY MEDIA SERVICES
002645 BCC WEEMS HOSPITAL
001854 BIG BEND EQUIPMENT COMPA
000194 BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD O
000111 BONDY'S FORD INT.
001845 BROWN/JAMES
002722 BUTLER/RHONDA
000547 C.W. ROBERTS CONTRACTING
001543 CAMP GORDON JOHNSTON
001994 CAPITAL TRUCK, INC.
000563 CARRABELLE CHAMBER OF CO
002210 CERTIFIED PLUMBING &
001097 CHAMPION CHEVROLET
002624 CHEMICAL & JANITORIAL SP
000192 CITY OF APALACHICOLA
000869 CITY OF CARRABELLE
000593 CLERK OPERATIONAL ACCOUNT
001085 CVSOA
000634 DAVIS SAFE AND LOCK INC
000872 DEPT OF MANAGEMENT SERVI.
001806 DOTHAN TARPAULIN PRODUCT
000202 EASTPOINT WATER & SEWER
000292 EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUPPLY,
000883 FAIRBANKS SCALES
001921 FLORIDA COMBINED LIFE IN
001672 FLORIDA EMERGENCY PREPARE
001149 FLORIDA LIBRARY ASSOCIATE
002092 FLORIDA LIGHTING SPECIAL
000226 FLORIDA MEDICAID-COUNTY
000256 FRANKLIN CO;SR.CITIZEN C
000267 FRANKLIN COUNTY HEALTH D
002691 FUENTES COMPUTER NETWORK
002284 G&N PAINTING
002331 GADSDEN COUNTY BOARD OF
001830 -I lii'. '-.'.IT: L.f
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002676 i LOCKLEY'S PORTABLE' TOILE'
002063 TMEDIACOM
001610 'ITKE PARRISH
MOCK/MIKE
C'''',- ..l ,h i ,: :- P .
..: ILL,-L T iC AUTO SERVICE
0021H *TAYLr !C-1LD SP:YT
r,,.,C OFFICE OF THE STATE ATTO
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T E i, E ' .'L :
:: "i;iLU .-H TT
.... -i-- F.,.i :' II:F,-, FL:F IDA ,
001972 .,_.'-,.i W ` I i L'.' F
001489 ui LL N S I- -' A 1 ,I
001841 f '--' I*-,i- I:*.*: i INC
: i-, i E L UE -'L ir.
002255 Fi-Lr'.:.i ic".i ili
000168 RING POWER CORPORATION
002410 RUNDEL/MICHAEL
000217 SCOTT/WILLIAM E.
000642 SHADE TREE TOWING
000729 SHULER/THOMAS M.
000312 SPEARS SMALL ENGINES & T
000132 SPIRIT SERVICES COMPANY
001642 ST.JOE RENT-ALL, INC.
001929 STANDARD INSURANCE COMPA
002735 STITCH AMERICA INC
002513 STONE/MELANIE R
002186 SUWANNEE RIVER SUPPLY, I
002424 SWITZER/LORI
002669 TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
002670 TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
002671 TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
002672 TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
002673 TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
002674 TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
001851 TERMINIX
000205 THE APALACHICOLA TIMES
.04514 TIM EDWARDS
000241 TOMMY'S GLASS & MIRROR C
001812 TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT COMP
.04512 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
002416 VARNER PLUMBING INC
002425 WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF
002377 WARD/LAURA
001725 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF PC
001993. WATER MANAGEMENT SERVICE
GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT


BANK RECAP:
BANK NAME

BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
TOTAL ALL BANKS


FRANKLIN COUNTY
GL540R-V06.71 PAGE 1


CHECK# DATE


38199 02/06/07
38200 02/06/07
38201 02/06/07
38202 02/06/07
38203 02/06/07
38204 02/06/07
38205 02/06/07
38206 02/06/07
38207 02/06/07
38208 02/06/07
38209 02/06/07
38210 02/06/07
38211 02/06/07
38212 02/06/07
38213 02/06/07
38214 02/06/07
38215 02/06/07
38216 02/06/07
38217 02/06/07
38218 02/06/07
38219 02/06/07
38220 02/06/07
38221 02/06/07
38222 02 06/07
38223 02/06/07
38224 02/06/07
38225 02/06/07
38226 02/06/07
38227 02/06/07
38228 02/06/07
38229 02/06/07
38230 02/06/07
38231 02/06/07
38232 02/06/07
38233 02/06/07
38234 02/06/07
38235 02/06/07
38236 02/06/07
38237 02/06/07
38238 02/06/07
38239 02/06/07
38240 02/06/07
38241 02/06/07
38242 02/06/07
38243 02/06/07
38244.02/06/07
38245 02/06/07
38246 02/06/07
38247 02/06/07
38248 : ,
38249 ,"; "
38250 '
38251 ." ,"; -
38252 6:. ,:, .,.
38253 -J :" ,:,
38254 v "




M' M .





















38295 02/06/07
38296 02/06/07
38297 02/06/07
38298 02/06/07
38299 02/06/07
38300 02/06/07
38301 02/06/07
38302, 02/06/07
38303 02/06/07
38304 02/06/07
38305 02/06/07
383061 02/06/07
38307 02/06/07
38308 02/06/07
38309 02/06/07
38310 02/06/07
38311 02/06/07
38312 02/06/07
38 13 02/06/07
38 14 02/06/07
38 15 02/06/07
38 16 02/06/07
38 17 02/06/07
38 18 02/06/07
38 19 02/06/07
38 20 02/06/07
38 21 02/06/07
38 22 02/06/07
38 23 02/06/07
38324 02/06/07


831.00
909.22
117.50
261.08
1,467.12
928.08
892.00
795.00
208.68
644.01
2,864.65
786.77
1,200.00
190.60
294.00
244,020.00
360.03
92,449.88
38.34
900.00
38.16
469,385.50
500.00
107.01
50.00
53.38
66.44
303.00
1,531.53
49.36
205.30
125.00
567.25
125.64
302.50
2,527.77
'637.63
639.00
7,546.01
75.00
120.00
237.00
990.00
7,500.00
50,755.50
130.00
2,. 00.00
7,070.64
1,094.79
2,420.00
19,263.00
645.00
3,750.00
525.00
2,978.33
2,374.47
43,900.00
1,979.04
980.65
c. 8i 73'
1, 3:1 ,.,3
87.50
21,399.18
27,877.00
225.00
75.00
2,205.00
50.00
110.00
54..00
200.93
5,284.70
10,000.00
150.00
28.01
2,500.00
451,783.00
232.20
500.00
250.00
1,590.30
117.49
88.09
2,821.45
137.39
320.00
341,458.90
180.00
29,996.00
9,531.66
134.25
714.54
947.78
2,350.00
'.66.00
3,'125.00
901.54
227.00
274.01
10.00
4,403.00
37.90
532.07
839.00
601.80
413.70
150.00
637.92
1,833.33
207.94
1.98
263.76
178.02
676.88
64.57
286.00
1,949.55
2,486.70
621.66
73.01
25.00
625.00
12,204.33
300.00
868.92
384.57
1,967,331.21




DISBURSEMENTS

1,967,331.21
1,967,331.21


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 1/30/07 InvoiceNo. 14291
Description of Vehicle: Make Honda Model 2 Door Color White
TagNo.3A7481Y Year 2004 State AL VinNo. 1HGCM73634AO17629 .

To Owner Sonya Elanie Henderson To Lien Holder' USAA
5018 Washington Ferry Rd. P.O. Box 660986
Montgomery, AL 36108 Sacramento, CA 95866



You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 01/24/07 at the request of FHP that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 309.50 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you are hereby notified that on 2/27/07 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


AMOUNT








Page 10 16 February 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


(22) Newly Discovered Copies Of Lynn Willoughby's Out-Of-
Print Fair to Middlin', The Story Of The Antebellum Cotton
Trade Of The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee River Valley,
University of Alabama Press, 1993, 202pp. Doing business in
the antebellum South required a very delicate balancing act -
with the central role in the process played by the coastal mer-
chant. From this vantage point the merchant manipulated the
resources from the upriver suppliers and through an intricate
economic and banking network provided cotton to the interna-
tional brokers. It was, in effect, a closed system on each river
under the careful control of the coastal merchants. This study
focuses on the port of Apalachicola, Florida, and the business-
men who created a chain of international finance and trade in
the promotion and distribution of the Old South's major source
of income.
Fair to Middlin' provides a detailed, highly readable description
of a regional antebellum economy in the Apalachicola/
Chattahoochee River valley and reinforces the argument that
the South was self-sufficient and not dependent on other regions
for its food supply. Willoughby explains in fascinating detail
how the businessmen associated with the area's cotton trade
coped with the poor conditions of transportation, communica-
tion, money, and banking.
Early regional economies revolved around the rivers that repre-
sented the primary transportation arteries for trade in the Old
South. Cotton businessmen located along the waterway and on
the coast neatly divided the labor necessary to market the
region's major source of income. Local money and banking con-
ditions retarded the economic growth of this frontier area, and
only the innovations of these coastal businessmen enabled the
continuance of this vital trade network.
The advent of the railroad shattered this ongoing business
arrangement and completely altered the cohesiveness of the
river economy. Railroads fundamentally changed the business
customs and trade routes so that boundaries of the once sepa-
rate river economies blurred and eventually faded, gradually
leading to an integrated national economy. Bookshop price =
$29.95. Hardcover.


(126) Shipwreck and Adventures of Monsieur Pierre Viaud.
i. From 1768, the sensational story of a shipwreck near Dog
Island, and the adventures of Pierre Viaud and his search for
survival. Published by the University of Florida Press, 139pp.
Hardcover. Sold nationally for $24.95. Bookshop price =
$20.95.




.





The St. Joe Company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle

ON R!.:
I. iM i '"

'
;in~~l:;:l;,d r


(124) The Expanding Vista by Mary
Ann Watson. Hardcover, Oxford
University Press, 273 pp. This is the
story of American television in the
Kennedy years beginning with the
groundbreaking first "TV debates,"
and ending with the muffled drums
and a united population still trying to
comprehend the unthinkable death of
its President, united electronically in
national mourning. Watson has writ-
ten an engaging and insightful look at
American television in the Kennedy
years and the lives of many
Americans, and how the medium
emerged. Here is also a documented
yet memorable-telling of the story
fading rapidly from the American
mind. Originally sold nationally for
$22.95. Bookshop price = $12.95.


(317) Green Empire, The St. Joe Company and the Remaking
of Florida's Panhandle. By Kathryn Ziewitz and June Wiaz.
Based on hundreds of sources-including company executives,
board members, and investors as well as those outside the com-
pany-this factual and objective history describes the St. Joe
Company from the days of its founders to the workings and
dealings of its present-day heirs. For all readers concerned with
land use and growth management, particularly those with an
interest in Florida's fragile wildlife and natural resources, Green
Empire will generate important debate about an often-over-
looked part of the state and will invite public scrutiny of its
largest landowner. University of Florida Press, 2004, 364pp.
Paperback. Bookshop price=$24.95.


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REA L. G 0 ooDS




SOLAR

LIVING

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BOOK












YOUR COMPLETE GUIDE
TO RENEWABLE ENERGY
TECHNOLOGIES AND.
SUSTAINABLE LIVING

JOHN SCHAEFFiR.

The Definitive Solar Handbook
SOLAR ENERGY/NATURAL BUILDING


Solar Living


Sourcebook

(325) Your Complete Guide to Renewable Energy
Technologies and Sustainable Living
This Is Solar Living!
Do you want to harvest sunlight, wind, or falling water to
power your home?
Do you want to sell that renewable energy back to your elec-
tric utility and run your electric meter backwards?
This is the book that gives you the how, when, what, and why of
solar living. The Real Goods Solar Living Sourcebook is now in
its Twelfth Edition, with more than half a million books sold
since 1982. Fully updated with brand new sections on finding
land, natural building, and sustainable transportation, this book
will be your most important tool in turning your dream of ener-
gy independence into a delightful daily reality.
Inside you will find essential information on creating a self-
reliant lifestyle.
"This is a fabulous compendium of hows, whys, and widgets
for making a sensible home under the sun." -Amory B. Lovins,
CEO, Rocky Mountain Institute
"The Solar Living Sourcebook is scrupulously honest, techni-
cally flawless, and steeped in experience and practical wisdom.
There is nothing like it in the world" -Paul Hawken, author of
Natural Capitalism and The Ecology of Commerce
"John Schaeffer has had as much experience with the practical-
ities of sustainable living as anyone on the planet. With zest and
intelligence, this book describes his vision, his tools, and his
pragmatic problem solving for those of us who expect to follow
a parallel path" -Denis Hayes, Chair of the Earth Day
Network
"The Solar Living Sourcebook is a critical resource, to supply
both information and inspiration, in this time when US depend-
ence on foreign oil and the US foreign policy that supports that
thirst, are wreaking havoc across the globe." -Amy Goodman,
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* "Epic in scope, comprehensive in content, hopeful in spirit, the
Real Goods Solar Living Sourcebook might be the most indis-
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The Last Hours of Ancient Sunlight;
Sold nationally for $35.00. Bookshop price = $35.00. Please
add $8.50 postage due to the weight of this paperback. 564pp.


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(21) Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers.
University of Florida Press. Hardcover, 297 pp. In this book,
Rogers traces and documents the economic, social and political
emergence of the Gulf coast port of Apalachicola and the pris-
tine barrier island, Saint George. From the earliest times, both
the island and Apalachicola have become intertwined. The
account of machinations of controversial developer William
Lee Popham is the first phase of area development, later leading
to the controversial struggles of the 1970s when environmrental-
ists and seafood industries fought to determine the ecological
and economic fate of the Bay area. The Chronicle has obtained
a fresh supply of newly reprinted volumes at an attractive
price. Available elsewhere for $35.95 plus shipping and han-
dling. The Chronicle Bookshop prie is much cheaper at $25.00
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(318) Home To War, A
History of the Vietnam
Veterans' Movement. By
Gerald Nicosia. An epic nar-
rative history that chronicles,
for the first time, the experi-
ence of America's Vietnam
veterans who returned home
to fight a different kind of
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