Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00301
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: January 19, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00301
Source Institution: Florida State University
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K RATE
STAGE PAID
HICOLA, FL
2320
RMIT #8


5


Chronicle

Volume 16, Number 2 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER January 19 February 1, 2007


Kam and Jan with Shelter kitties.


Franklin County

Humane

FRANN Society Holds
FRAN K LIN .
COUNTY Fifth Annual
HUMANE "Art For Arf"
SOCIETY
BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
This Saturday (Jan. 20) Animal lovers will gather at 6:30 p.m. at Chef
Eddie's in Apalachicola for the fifth annual "Art for Arf" art auction
and dinner to benefit the Franklin County Humane Society. A silent
auction will commence at 6:30 and a live auction is scheduled for 7:30
and dinner will be served at 8:00. Tickets are $75.00 per person.
The Humane Society, besides running the shelter at 244 Hwy. 65 in
Eastpoint, has a mission to relieve animal suffering, prevent animal cru-
elty, eliminate animal overpopulation, promote humane education and
to enhance the human to animal bond.
Currently the shelter is nearly full and the director worries about the
possible need to turn people away that have animals that need homes
and protection. The Franklin County Humane Society is a non-profit
organization with a varied source of funds. In the nine months ending
on June 30, 2006, the Humane Society took in just over $118,000, of


which 47% came from fund raising, donation, etc and 52% was from
government support. In the year 2005 69% came from donations and
31% came from government funds. So far this year, the Franklin
County Board of County Commissioners has voted to provide $62,000
in funding or about 1/4 of the Humane Society's annual budget. The
"Howl-O-Ween" fundraiser at Harry A's Porch Club on St George
Island raised over $6,700 and fundraisers by "Sometimes It's Hotter"
and "Avenue Sea Restaurant" helped bring in much needed funds.
In the light of past problems in the Franklin County Humane Society,
the public certainly has a right to some questions about how these funds
will be spent. To answer these questions, I interviewed John Spohrer in
November and just this week talked with Jan Gorman, Sec't. of the
Board and Kam Marxsen, Shelter director. Mr. Spohrer published a let-
ter in the October 13, 2006 Franklin Chronicle outlining some of the
problems which were evident when he took over as president of the
Franklin Co. Humane Society. Since then valiant and highly successful
efforts have been made to address the problems and under the direction
of Kam Marxsen, the shelter has been made a cleaner and more hos-
pitable place for those loyal friends who are totally dependent on us for
their care. In a telephone conversation with an employee of the shelter,
I was told that Ms. Marxsen has made a tremendous change in the
atmosphere at the shelter. I asked Marxsen about the progress they have
made at the shelter since October and she said, "We have tested all the
dogs for heartworm and all the cats for leukemia. The animals are up-
to-date on their shots; we've cleaned the place up and thrown a lot of
stuff out, tried to organize files and, you name it, from top to bottom,
it's been cleaned up. We had eleven heartworm positive dogs. We got
sponsors for most of them." Sponsors have been necessary because of
the $400 to $700 cost of treating each dog. Most of the dogs have com-
pleted their treatments and are now heartworm free.
From September through November 51 dogs and seven cats were
adopted out, all of which were in first-class health with documentation
and fees paid. The fees for adoption have been set at $70 for dogs and
$65 for cats. The fees cover spay and neuter requirements as well as
standard pet fees.
One of the exciting programs starting at the Humane Society shelter is
an outreach program sponsored by the Colorado Humane Society. Jan
Gorman, secretary of the Humane Society Board, explains the pro-
gram, "The Colorado shelter in Denver has agreed to take up to 110
dogs from us. The only thing we have left, and were pushing hard to get
this finished in the next few weeks, is working out the logistics of trans-
portation. This is going to free us up to be able to take in another 50
dogs. That is so needed in this county because Kam can tell you she has
to turn them away everyday because we just don't have the capacity."
Some of the funds from the "Art for Arf" will go to that program but it
is the intention of the Humane Society to raise the funds for the pro-
gram separately. As of this writing, the Humane Society has contacted
a commercial animal transportation company which can safely transfer
20 animals at a time at a cost of $2000 per trip. The first trip has been
tentatively scheduled for the end of January with others to be scheduled
as funds become available.
Finally good things and exciting things are taking place at the Franklin
County Humane Society under the leadership of John B. Spohrer,
President. We will be waiting to see if the County commissioners will
act on some of the recent recommendations of Mr. Spohrer. The
Chronicle will be watching developments and keeping you, the interest-
ed public, informed as events unfold.


Citizen Advisory

Committee
January 8, 2007-Meeting Synopsis
The Citizen Advisory Committee (CAC) met at 6:00 p.m. at the
Carrabelle City meeting room. Gail Riegelmayer opened the meeting
with a brief discussion of the agenda and what the meeting was intend-
ed to accomplish.
The Balanced Growth and Enforcement Subcommittee and Support
the Seafood Industry and Working Waterfronts Subcommittee provid-
ed reports during the meeting.
Dan Rosier and Phil Calandra provided an update on Balanced Growth
and Enforcement Subcommittee actions. Since the last CAC meeting
several meetings were held with Alan Pierce and Mark Curenton of the
county planning office that focused on tow areas the Goal, Objectives
and Policies (GOP) of the Comprehensive Plan and a possible ordi-
nance for contributions to Affordable Housing. The Subcommittee had
re-worked the entire Housing Element and the agreement from the
meetings was to leave the majority of the GOP as they exist in the
approved Comprehensive Plan and address only those objectives and
polices that address Affordable Housing. This remains a collaborative
work in progress. A brief review of three affordable housing objectives
and policies was made to the CAC audience. These policies will basi-
cally define and address the creation of a local housing authority, fund-
ing, a land trust and processes necessary to implement an affordable
housing program. The priority goal defined inthe Comprehensive Plan
is to satisfy the demand of 2276 units of Affordable Housing by 2020.
Because these policies were still under review, it was felt that it was pre-
mature to take recommendations to the County Commission at the
January 16th meeting and that more time should be requested for the
final recommendations.
The subcommittee has scheduled a meeting with a broad range of peo-
ple from across the county and subject matter expert guest speaker for
Wednesday, January 10 from 2-5 p.m. at the Apalachicola Community
Center. Dan Rosier provided a list of invitees to the meeting which
included:
Sheneena K. Forbes-USDA
David Hintdn-Franklin County School Board
Vance Millender-Individual wanting to develop affordable housing
Cliff Butler-Chair of Franklin County Community Development
Corporation (FCCDC)
Dale Flint-FCCDC member and Builder Association Representative
Rose McCoy-FCCDC member
John Sink-FCCDC member
Danny Bolden-Gulf County CDC representative
Frank.Cook-City of Apalachicola-P&Z repiesentave ...
Loraine Schmidt-SHIP Program
Michael Channel-Technical Advisor for State Housing Coalition
Gil Chason-Developer from Tallahassee
Mel Kelly-Mayor, City of Carrabelle
Alan Pierce-Franklin County Administrator
Mark Curenton-Franklin County Planning Office
Cora Russ-CAC and Realtor
Bevin Putnal-Franklin County Commissioner
Commissioner Putnal offered comments in appreciation for the work
the subcommittee had accomplished and asked that Gene Langston
and Don Ashley be invited to attend the meeting because of their inter-
est and knowledge of the affordable housing issues. He reiterated that
the Commissioners would be better prepared to understand the final
recommendations of the CAC if they were presented information grad-
ually, rather than have final recommendations all at once with no idea
of the intermediate steps and background.
Dave McLain of the Support the Seafood Industry and Working
Waterfronts,Subcommittee explained that the subcommittee felt it was
critical that the CAC work in concert with the Seafood Task Force and
defer recommendations until the feasibility study currently underway
was completed with its recommendations. He then introduced Linda
Lampl of the Lampl Herbert Consultants that were under contract to
accomplish the feasibility study. Ms. Lampl provided a review of the
study findings to date and the remaining things to be accomplished by
the study. Completion time was not certain, but would be in the not too
distant future. Dave suggested that it was also premature for this sub-
committee to make recommendations and.that it would be best to defer
to a later date.
Gail Riegelmayer prompted the group for what the best way to move
forward and the following schedule resulted:
January 16-Subcommittee leadership would provide brief updates to.
the County Commission
February 5-CAC public meeting to review progress of the subcom-
mittees and agree deadlines for their work
February 20-County Commission would be provided an in progress
review, issues and requests
Dan Tonsmeire is developing a table to help track and coordinate pre-
sentations to the local groups as the CAC believes that continuing com-
munication and information is a critical part of citizen participation in
the county's future. The table will contain the names, schedule, and
contact numbers of community groups, CAC presenter, and record
which groups had been briefed..
Gail Riegelmayer indicated that she was asked by the St.,George Island
Civic Club Board to arrange a speaker from the CAC for its April 19th
meeting. Phil Calandra agreed to make the 30 minute presentation.


Kitties ready for adoption.


BUL
U.S. POi
APALAC


ing that newspapers benefit from a diversity of opinions. If Tom dis-
agreed with my editorial, he would sometimes write an opposing col-
umn to show readers another side of an issue. At the time, that kind of
bothered me. I remember once complaining to another newspaper
reporter about not being able to write an editorial without my publish-
er writing a rebuttal. But that journalist rightfully pointed out that I was
fortunate to write for a newspaper that gave writers the freedom to
express opinions contrary to those of its owner.
When I left The Franklin Chronicle in 1998 to serve in the U.S. Peace
Corps, Tom did not forget me. He sent care packages, copies of the
newspaper and encouraging letters that were always typed on his elec-
tric typewriter. Tom was always curious about my work in Zimbabwe,
and encouraged me to write about my volunteer experiences for the
newspaper. He remained a good friend and conscientious letter writer
in the years that followed.
Perhaps the most striking characteristic of Tom Hoffer was his senti-
mental commitment to friendships. He simply valued his friends, and
would go to great lengths to support them in any way necessary. I regret
not expressing my gratitude to him more often. But mostly, I just regret
not being able to say goodbye.
Brian Goercke
Windhoek, Namibia
Africa


FnThe P

Franklun


JzfcPe- Ntw Pca444M Evtly D49


"A Fiscally Responsible

New Year"
BY CONGRESSMAN ALLEN BOYD (D-FL)
For the past ten years, I have been outspoken in Congress about one of
the issues that I believe is most detrimental to our country's long term
health-our out-of-control national debt now rapidly approaching $9
trillion. On the second day of the 110th Congress, fiscal conservatives,
including myself, made a huge stride to rein in our national debt with
the passage of pay-as-you-go budget rules, commonly known as
PAYGO. This marks the first and most important step to ending
record budget deficits and curbing our national debt.
PAYGO prohibits Congress from spending on credit, a practice we all
know to be unwise and fiscally unhealthy, and requires that Congress
have the funds to pay for any new spending. This common-sense prac-
tice is followed by families, farmers, and small business owners in
North Florida every single day and should be practiced by the federal
government as well.
The pay-as-you-go concept was originated in the late 1980s by
Democrats looking for ways to reduce the deficit. It was first embraced
by President George H. W. Bush in the Budget Enforcement Act of
1991. PAYGO then was adopted by President Bill Clinton in his
deficit-reduction budget of 1993 and extended by President Clinton and
Congress in the bipartisan Balanced Budget Act of 1997. With
PAYGO rules on the books from 1990 to 2002, we saw deficits disap-
pear, huge projected budget surpluses, and rapid economic growth.
Following the expiration of PAYGO in 2002, a budget with a surplus
of $236 billion in 2000 was in deficit by $413 billion in 2004. History
has shown that PAYGO is an essential component of fiscal responsibil-
ity and necessary in order to put our budget on a glide path to balance.
PAYGO has worked in the past, and it will work again.
With our persistent call for meaningful budget reforms, the Blue Dog
Coalition deserves much of the credit for the swift passage of PAYGO
rules in the first week of the new Congress. The passage of PAYGO
demonstrates Congress' strong commitment to fiscal responsibility and
subsequently, a strong commitment to the future of our children, our
grandchildren, and our great nation. PAYGO is not a partisan issue,
but a common-sense remedy to our country's bad habit of deficit spend-
ing.
By reinstating the pay-as-you-go principle and prohibiting legislation
that will increase the deficit, Congress has begun to put the budget back
on track. Ultimately, PAYGO will help create a fiscally stable govern-
ment-a government that is able to focus on making progress for the
common good of the American people. However, we have a long way
to go, and our work is far from over. The return to PAYGO is simply
the first step to balancing our budget and reducing our national debt.
As the year progresses, the Blue Dogs will continue to lead the charge
to put our books in balance, keep our spending in check, and pay as we
go.


Toledo, Iowa Remembers

Tom Hoffer
After reading articles published in both the Times and the Chronicle by
David Adlerstein, Tim Croft, Sue Cronkite and Richard Noble, all of
which brought tears to my eyes, I want all of Tom's friends in Florida
to know that Tom was loved and will be greatly missed by many here
in Toledo, Iowa, his hometown.
On Thursday, December 14, 2006 at 11:00 a.m. a group of 40 gathered
at the graveside to say good-bye to a dear friend. It was a beautiful day
with a slight breeze but mild temperature for December in Iowa.
Following a prayer service and military honors by the American
Legion, the group were together for fellowship and lunch, sharing
memories of Tom's early years growing up here in Toledo. The memo-
ries included many humorous stories and we shared moments of laugh-
ter remembering the good times that Tom could always bring to any
gathering.
.Although Tom had not made his home in Toledo since his high school
graduation in 1956, he never forgot the town where he lived his first 18
years. He made frequent trips to Toledo and even after his parents were
no longer living'in Toledo, Tom visited often and he made it a priority
to keep in close touch with friends in Toledo. I will miss the phone calls
exchanged by Tom and myself as he always wanted to keep informed
of current happenings here.
His last visit was for his 50 year class reunion which was held
September 1, 2006. He enjoyed two evenings spent with 33 of his class-
mates. Tom also visited Toledo in October 2005 and September 2003.
Both of these visits included a gathering of friends for dinner. What I
. thought would be a group of 20 could escalate to 45, all friends who
truly loved time spent with him.
In his memories of Toledo which Tom wrote for our Sesquicentennial
supplement to the Toledo Chronicle, he stated "Growing up in Toledo
was among the most interesting times in my life. A childhood in a rural
community is a process of discovery-for yourself and about many,
many others." Tom was a filmmaker at a very early age. I remember his
matinee movies on Saturday afternoons in the family garage. My broth-
er Dean Striley and Tom had their own radio station which could
broadcast for several miles. Tom stated, "To this day, we have never
claimed to "invent" cable, but it certainly must have been a first for
Tama County." Tom and Dean were 14 years old at this time.
In 2002 my husband and myself visited Tom. When we arrived at the
Plantation on St. George Island, Tom was preparing a chicken casse-
role and asked us if we would mind attending a potluck dinner with
him. Bruce and I enjoyed our evening and a delicious meal. The
warmth and friendliness of the group made us feel very welcome. As
Tom loved Toledo, his love for your area was very evident. The com-
plex under construction was just in the early stages while we were there.
I am happy to hear that the complex will be completed and Tom's
dream will be fulfilled. Since I have been a reader of the Chronicle since
the first issue, I feel a connection to your area and hope to visit there
again. Thank you all for being a friend to my friend, Thomas W. Hoffer.
Barbara F. Muecke
1102 S. Broadway
Toledo, Iowa 52342-2304
e-mail: bmuecke@iowatelecom.net


Remembering Tom
I learned about the passing of Tom Hoffer with a great sense of sadness
and regret. Tom had been a kind friend to me for over 15 years. He was
also an incredibly patient and understanding employer. It took me years
to truly appreciate Tom's many contributions to my life and to the lives
of others. But as I write this remembrance, I am overwhelmed with
memories of his kindness and commitment to friends, family, col-
leagues and community.
I met Tom in 1992, while participating with the Panhandle Players in
Eastpoint. He was looking for "affordable" writers for The Franklin
Chronicle, and I was interested in gaining more writing and newspaper
experience. I would have never guessed that he would offer me the
paper's managing editor's position after just two years of writing main-
ly feature stories for him.
When Tom chose me for this position, he knew that he was not getting
someone with his worldviews. This has proven to me that he was broad-
minded and secure in his own beliefs. Professionally, Tom and I also
differed in our approaches to reporting the news. But despite our differ-
ences, Tom gave me an extraordinary amount of freedom to explore my
writing style, and to cover the news in my own way. Tom never cen-
sored my work or forbade me from covering challenging issues. In fact,
he frequently encouraged me to express my views in editorials, believ-









Page 2 19 January 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs

January 2, 2007
BY RICHARD E. NOBLE

Hubert Chipman-
Superintendent of Public
Works
"We would like to report to the
Board that one of our job appli-
cants has completed a drug test
and that we are waiting on the
results to arrive. We would also
like to express thanks to the com-
missioners for showing up at our
Christmas Celebration and Oscar
Sanders retirement party as well.
We would also like to request the
Board's permission to go ahead
with the winning bidder for the
fuel management system and get-
ting it installed."

Work Summary
Repaired shoulders of County
Road 67 in Carrabelle and 21st
street in Apalachicola with lime
rock. Worked on Will S.
Kendrick Ball Park in Carrabelle,
policed county roads in
Apalachicola, Carrabelle and St.
George Island. Repaired drive-
ways in Apalachicola and
Eastpoint and also installed a cul-
vert pipe on St George Island on
Cook Street.
The responsibility for the mainte-
nance of the future streetlight at
the new consolidated school on
highway 65 was discussed. The
County would like to transfer
that responsibility and the signals
at other, school zones to the
School Board in the future. Alan
Pierce made a request to contact
the DOT and see if such a change
in that authority and responsibili-
ty was acceptable. A motion was
made in support of Mr. Pierce's
suggestion. The motion was
approved.

Dan Rothwell-County
Engineer
"The airport project is going on.
They are going to start drilling
and placing concrete this week. I
have been working with the assis-
tant director of the Solid Waste
and the Franklin County
University of Florida Extension
Program director to get the cor-
rect application and any type per-
missions we might need to use
the compost enhanced-sludge.to.-
enhance the soil for the recre-
ation area in Carrabelle in the
playing fields. I have started the
preliminary list for road repairs. I
have two districts done and their
costs worked up. I would like to
wait until I meet with (all the
commissioners) before I make a
submittal to.the Board."

Bids on Fuel Management
System-Road Department
The-Fuel Management System is
a system to ensure proper pay-
ment and monitoring of fuel
allocations to the appropriate
users.
Bryco Enterprises-$18,175
Wiregrass Petroleum-
$21,998.79
The lower bid by Bryco, was
judged by Mr. Chipmen to be sat-
isfactory and was accepted and
then approved by the Board.

Bill Mahan-County
Extension Director
Coastal Training Elected
Officials Needs Assessment: I
have been asked by Dr. Bob Swett
(UF Sea Grant Boating &
Waterways Specialist) to do a fol-
low-up to the "Elected Officials
Coastal Training Needs
Assessment" that was funded by
the Florida Coastal Zone
Management Program and con-
ducted locally by the ANERR.
Attached for you review is a 3-
page summary of the findings
from the needs assessment. I
would appreciate it if you would
take a few minutes to review the
summary and provide me with
your feedback and results. I will
then pass your comments on to


Dr. Swett who is assisting the FL
Coastal Zone Management
Program with the study. I will
also be contacting several City
Commissioners/Mayors to get
their feedback.
Gulf of Mexico Fishery
Management Council Update:
The GMFMC's Ad Hoc Shrimp
Effort Working Group's-Final
Report has been released.
According to the report, on
September 26, 2006, NMFS pub-
lished the final rule implementing
Amendment 13 to the Gulf of
Mexico Shrimp Fishery Manage-
ment Plan. The most important
action under.-the new rule is the
establishment of a 10-year mora-
torium on federal shrimp permits.
The moratorium is expected to
cap participation in the EEZ
component of the fishery at
approximately 2,700 vessels.
Thus, at present, the EEZ compo-
nent of the shrimp fishery is no
Longer truly an "op -access" fish-
ery. Of the vessels expected to
qualify for moratorium permits,
only about 1,800 were actually
active in the shrimp fishery dur-
ing 2005. Thus it is the economic
conditions currently faced by the
COM shrimp industry (low
shrimp prices & high fuel costs)
that will limit participation and
effort in the foreseeable future.
Interstate Shellfish Sanitation
Committee Update: The ISSC
(Ken Moore) & U.S. Food &
Drug Administration (Don
Kraemer) will be holding a meet-
ing hosted by the Franklin
Seafood Industry Taskforce to
discuss Vibrio parahaeinolyticus
and control issues with the oyster
industry on January 16, 2007-
from 3:00 600 FM in the 3 floor
Courtroom. Robin Downey,
Executive Director of the Pacific
Coast Shellfish Growers
Association is also expected to
attend.
"This is something that we do
need to ... talk about (Interstate
Shellfish Sanitation Update),"
suggested Mr. Putnal. "It (seems
like) just another thing to try and
hurt the oyster, industry ...
Should we send out a letter to the
Oystermen's Association and the
Dealers' Association about this
meeting Alan?"
"I would imagine that they have'
already been notified," suggested
Mr. Pierce.
When it was discovered that they
had not been notified Mr. Pierce
then confirmed that he would get
out such notices to the Seafood
Task Force.

Rick Marcum-Opportunity
Florida
"I am here for a couple of rea-
sons. First, :,we (OQpportunity
Florida) have submitted applica-
.tions,,tq ls ,S for a iunmunity
Development Corporation as
well as a separate Community
Land Trust ... We now have our
501C3 status and in our bi-laws
we identify at least one commis-
sioner in each of our eight coun-
ties to sit on that Board. I am
requesting that you "identify
someone-maybe one person to
sit on the Community
Development Corporation and
one to sit on the Community
Trust-or one person to sit on
both ... Our first initiative will be
an outreach to get people quali-
fied. We are. not just going to go
out there and try and build hous-
es. We are going to try and get
people financed and then provide
a housing unit for that family.
Working through the media, the
libraries and the Chambers of
Commerce, we are putting appli-
cations out there so that we can
start getting people qualified.
One of the advantages that we
currently have is a program
where they 'can get up to a
$27,000 grant to go against the
purchase of that house. Now they
have to live there throughout the
life of that house mortgage to get
that grant totally forgiven. But
regardless, if they lived in- that
house five years there would be a
portion of that grant (earned) ...
But our first initial thrust will be
to get those people qualified and
into the process ..." Mr. Marcum
then went on to explain a propo-
sition sponsored by Enterprise
Florida to encourage business
development in the area. Mt
Marcum who is obviously a grad-
uate of Government Speak
University suggested-in the
most possible words-that the
County identify a possible site
and submit it for review and pos-
sible selection. "The state of
Florida's average per capital


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Franklin County Board of County Commissioners.


income is less than the national
average. In the rural counties we
are 34% less than our urban
cousins. That gap is continuing to
widen and this is one of seven ini-
tiatives that we feel are necessary
to stop that gap from continuing
so that we can build capacity. Our
primary mission is to build
"capacity". We feel that it would
be to Franklin County's advan-
tage to participate in this process.
We need to do whatever we can
to build a regional capacity in this
County ... We identified distribu-
tion and logistics as our number
one (business type) and construc-
tidn materials as our number two
target. We need to have some-
thing that works for the available
workforce that is here. We didn't
want to identify an industry that
included, you know, brain sur-
geons from all over because we
want something that the people
who live here can easily and
quickly be trained to accom-
plish."
"We got all that space out at the
airport," suggested Mr. Putnal.
"That airport would be a great
first candidate for Franklin
County to submit as a site-espe-
cially with distribution and logis-
tics as a targeted industry."
It seems that Mr. Marcum and
Opportunity Florida in co-opera-
tion with Enterprise Florida,
Florida's Great Northwest and
OTTED (Office of Tourism,
Trade and Economic Develop-
ment) are looking for a Mega-site.
This Mega-site can be in any of
the participating eight counties -.
and all will share somewhat in
the revenues generated. This' is a
regional development project.
Mr. Marcum suggested that par-
ticipation and attendance at these
regional planning meetings was.
very advantageous to the commu-
nities and counties involved. The
eight counties involved are;
Franklin, Gulf, Calhoun, Liberty,
Gadsden, Jackson, Washington,
and Holmes.
Mr. Marcum went on to explain
the need for coordinated school
curriculum to match the local
labor supply with the needs and
projections of the future. He
expressed disappointment in the
interest brought to Opportunity
Florida by local and regional
school boards. For some reason
the school systems are not aware
of the potential rewards for their
schools arid students. He suggest-
ed that both his group and the


school systems would have to
become more mutually engaged.
Mr. Lockley complained of a
lack of benefits to this communi-
ty via organizations such as the
one Mr. Marcum represents.
"I've toured only one county with
one commissioner-and she sits
right here on this Board," Mr.
Marcum countered. "I wish that
we could get other commission-
ers equally involved." Mr.
Marcum went on to explain that
Franklin County has benefited by
the addition of 350 new jobs in
the last few years due to the activ-
ity of Opportunity Florida. Mr.
Lockley suggested that Franklin
County needed more than just
seafood and prison related jobs.
Mr. Marcum agreed and added;
"Hopefully with the Mega-site
project we can employ a thou-,
sand to fifteen hundred people in
the region with spin-off indus-
tries we will be able to fill that
void."
The mammoth regional Family
Dollar Distribution Center is an
example of the type of business
that could be drawn to this area
through the efforts of
Opportunity Florida and their
associates-Federal Express was
another type business possibility;
VLA, Very Light Aircraft tourist
transportation was also men-
tioned. VLA emphasized the
importance of a community air-
port and its potential for new job
growth. Ecommerce was another
interest of Opportunity Florida.
They have a web site which offers
space for retailers and whole-
salers and independents to adver-
tise and sell their products on the
internet. "We are trying to do all
that,we can to raise the income
levels of the citizens in our eight
counties."

Jeff Lawson-North Florida
Medical Center
"I am here to give you guys an
update on what is going on at the
Eastpoint Medical Center. We
have completed the expansion
over there at the clinic-added
four additional treatment rooms
and we have hired an-additional
provider who will be starting
sometime in March. She is a
nurse practitioner and comes to
us through the National Health
Corps with a three year mini-
mum commitment. We are cur-
rently averaging about 22 patients
per day in the clinic. Our sliding
fee scale patients-those who do
not have any insurance-has


risen to 22% of the total number
of patients being seen. That is the
third highest of our seven med-
ical centers in the network. That
is a rise from about 10% when we
first opened up. So the word is
getting out to the people who
have no insurance that they have
some health care available to
them. The private utilization clin-
ic actually tied for second in our
network." Which indicates a
good balance between insured
and not insured patients, Mr.
Lawson explained.
Mr. Lockley asked Mr. Lawson if
his clinic was working in cooper-
ation with the local hospital with
regards to admitting patients. "I
don't know if (our Doctor) is
admitting patients or not--I real-
ly don't (know). I'm going back
by the clinic this afternoon and I
will be happy to find out."
Mr. Lockley expressed to Mr.
Lawson that the County would
be very appreciative if he could
get his clinic involved with the
local hospital-for lab work and
admissions etc. Mr. Lawson said
that he would look into the sug-
gestion and saw no reason pro-
vided the costs were compara-
tive-that they could not become
more involved locally with the
hospital.
Mr. Lawson also expressed the
notion that no one should be
being turned away from the
Eastpoint Medical Clinic
whether they have or do not have
insurance. "We are not closed to
new patients. Mr. Pierce knows
how to get in touch with me ...
please call me (if you hear of
anyone being turned away) and I
will address the issue personally."
Mr. Lawson went on to say that
the Eastpoint Clinic was now
averaging about 15 new patients
per week.
Mr. Putnal was concerned that in.
the past .the "Ndrth Florida'
Medical Clinic was not living up
to its mandate. "I guess that the
people were just not aware of the
services that are over there. I do
know that it is getting better than
it was." Mr. Putnal stated that in
the past he was hearing-a number
of complaints from citizens about
the clinic but this is no longer the
case. Mr. Lawson defended that
there was an interim period
where they were "getting their
house in order" and maybe what
Mr. Putnal was hearing was due
to that brief laps. But now he sug-
gested that things were under


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control and moving forward
strongly.

Hospital Report
"They show a balance of
$71,971.03 that we have in there,"
said Ms. Sanders.
"Which is not enough for the
next payroll," added Mr. Pierce.
"But it is a new year and there is
money out there from Medicare
and there is money out there
from swing beds. The Hospital
has made contact with Senator
Nelson to help us get some
Medicare money freed up as he
did last time ..."
"We did talk to Senator Nelson's
office last week," said the hospi-
tal administrator, "and he is in
agreement with our request for
additional funds from the
Medicare agency. We have
$176,000 sitting on the Medicare
payment floor for our swing beds.
There is about $400,000 sitting
out there for swing beds. There
has been some progress but we
are still very cash strapped at this
moment in time." Mr. Colvert
explained that the hospital had
been handed a huge debt from
DaSee which is almost complete-
ly paid off at the present.
Medicare amounts to sixty per-
cent of the hospitals paying busi-
ness. Up until this point,
Medicare has been taking and not
giving. Money should start flow-
ing in a positive direction shortly,
Mr. Colvert informed the Board.
Nevertheless more bad debts are
still looming in the future.
The immediate need to adapt to
the current payroll shortage was
addressed.. The administrator
suggested the, possibility that
money was expected before the
deadline and that if it was not
made available before the dead-
line he would notify the members
of the .Board for emergency
action.
"The paramedics were very upset
with their pay and their benefits,"
Mr. Colvert informed the Board.
"That was voiced pretty vehe-
mently. I did talk to Mr. Duboise
afterwards just to inform him that
if I submitted to you at your next
meeting a budget that would sat-
isfy some of the paramedics, that
request would probably be
greater than what he is (current-
ly) asking in additional subsidy.
So there is an opportunity there
for him that he may continue on
with the ambulance service. I will
tell you that a number of the
paramedics have recently left the
ambulance service. Over the
Christmas Holidays they were
'only able to staff one ambulance.
New Year's Eve and New Year's
Day they were only able to staff
one ambulance. It is continuing
to be very difficult to even, staff.
one, ambulance 'at this point in
time. Wev will ,be.:prepared; .to:
come back to you before your
next meeting."
"Is that (no paramedics) because
they are not willing to pay
enough money to get the staff in
here?"
"The staff has left. They turned
in their notice and resigned and
they are going to other counties
to work in their ambulance serv-
ices."
"That is a bad situation," offered

Continued on Page 3


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R. Michael Whaley, Pastor

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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


19 January 2007 Page 3


Briefs from Page 2
Ms. Sanders, "because we had
some good paramedics."
"One of the things I will be sub-
mitting to you is the salaries
being paid in other counties. So
you will have that comparison."

Alan Pierce
Report to the Board of County
Commissioners:
1 Board action to complete
CBIRs list for state legislators.
List due in by Jan. 5. Items sug-
gested at this time are:
A) Buck O'Neal commemorative
statue and signage. Request-
$100,000
B) Weems Memorial Hospital
Improvements. Requests-
$500,000
C) Support for the current
FRDAP grant for $200,000 for
children's handicap park at
Kendrick Park.
D) $300,000 for courthouse secu-
rity equipment.
This recommendation was
approved by the Board.
2 Board action to authorize a
Certificate of Need to Weems
Memorial Hospital for an ambu-
lance service. Mr. RC Pippin,
Bureau of Emergency Medical
Services has informed Mr.
Colvert, Hospital CEO, that the
Board must grant a CON to
Weems. Action to be contingent
upon language and direction sup-
plied by Mr. Pippin.
This recommendation was
approved subject to investigation
and Mr. Colvert's report at the
next meeting.
3 Board action to sign DEP per-
mit for after-the-fact permit for
road re-construction Alligator
Point Road.
This was a storm water problem
that also required researching. A
motion to notify Preble-Rish to
look into and possibly correct the
problem was added to the.
approval of the above motion.
4 Board discussion with Mr.
Hubert Chipman, Road
Superintendent, regarding the
request by DOT for the county to
maintain new traffic signal on US
98 for the new consolidated
school. Approved.
5 In 2003, the county applied
for, and was awarded, a DOT
grant to build a bike path in the
Bluff Road right-of-way from the
Apalachicola city limits to D.W
Wilson recreational complex.
The grant was for approximately
$150,000. The project went to bid
and the lowest bid Was approxi-
mately $425,000. The project was
reviewed, and re-designed, but it
could never be brought to within
budget. At this time DOT is ask-
ing that the Board either provide
the additional funds, or ask DOT
to drop the project. I recommend
that we drop the current request,
and submit a new request when
we have worked out issues with
Mr. George Mahr, owner of the
property the bike path would
have run in front of The problem
with the current location is that
the right-of-way is not clear or
wide enough for the DOT


approve
a lot o
ting a b
rioht-of


ed bike path, so there was demand letters to delinquents
f construction costs in fit- with regards to the Revolving
F-a. r Gog Mh wl he ortlieyhefllwduper Or Just Fishy'?
,ike path in the Bluff Road Loan issue. The demand letters
f-wav Mr Ceorge Mahr will then most likely he followed


L- ~ ....-. -.... ,6 ...--.
supports a bike path, and may be
willing to provide land but does
not have his own development
plan completed yet. Board action
to drop current request and work
with property owner to create a
better application.
There was some question as to
whether or not the original
money could be retained or must
be forfeited. Alan Pierce was
asked to look into such a possibil-
ity but if not possible to retain
original grant the recommenda-
tion will be approved.
Bids on equipment for airport
equipment submitted at the previ-
ous meeting were reviewed and
presented to the Board for its
approval. The Board approved
the recommendations.
Al Shuler informed the Board
that he was still investigating a
court ruling on the Lanark
Village Water and Sewer
Problem. Ms. Sanders then
requested that the County
Attorney look into this problem
and find out what can be done as
soon as possible. Mr. Shuler
agreed to do so.
Mr. Snyder was present once
again and expressed his wish to
disband the Water Board or
District and to notify the Board of
signatures that he had gained in
support of a merger with
Carrabelle. He also expressed the
notion that the district was going
broke and that the County might
be dealing with the problem
sooner or later. He suggested that
the district could be disbanded by
law through referendum. And
since they had just recently had a
referendum could that not be
accepted as meeting the require-
ment for disbanding. Mr. Snyder
also suggested that since the res-
ignation of Mr. Courage the
Board was no longer legally
authorized to make any decisions
other than the routine decisions
of paying bills etc. Mr. Snyder
requested at minimum some sort
of oversight on the part of the
County Commission.
"My name is Sharon Thoman. I
am the Board chairman for the
Lanark Village Water and Sewer
District. I don't know where these
people are getting that we are
against a merger. Commissioner
Rohrs nor myself have ever stated
that we are against the merging
with Carrabelle. I have sent a let-
ter to Mayor Kelley Yes we have
asked for an emergency rate
study which we have been
assured is no cost to us. But in the
mean time we are very interested
in merging with the city of
Carrabelle. There are some issues
that I feel need to be discussed.
We have asked the City to sit
down with us and talk with us.
That is all that I can say at this
point."
There is no doubt that there is a
serious problem with the Lanark
Sewer and Water District and
that some action must be forth-
coming in the not so distant
future. Ms' Sander reiterated her
request that the Attorney have a
legal opinion by the next County
Commission Meeting.
A motion was made to send out


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THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 16, No. 2


January 19, 2007


Founder ................ .. ..Tom W. Hoffer
Director of Operations .......... Andy Dyal
Contributors ..................Skip Frink
Carol Noble
Richard Noble
Dawn Radford
Sue Cronkite


Photographer ......... ......
Advertising Design and
Production Artist ............
Circulation Associate ........
Production Associate ........


Tom Loughridge
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.. .Diane Beauvais Dyal
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...Richard Williams


by suits against the violators. If
something isn't done about this
issue similar type grants will not
be forthcoming to this County in
the future. The action to send
demand payment letters was
approved.



Boyd Sworn

In To 110th

Congress

Congressman Boyd begins
sixth term representing
North Florida
Congressman Alien Boyd (D-
North Florida) was sworn in as a
member of the 110th Congress
on January 4, 2007, beginning his
sixth term in the U.S. House of
Representatives. The day also
marks the official start of the
110th Congress.
"It has been an honor and a
pleasure to serve the people of
Florida's 2nd Congressional
District for the past 10 years, and
I look forward to another term
representing my fellow North
Floridians," said Congressman
Boyd. "There is much work to be
done in the upcoming year, and I
am eager to tackle the challenges
before us so that our country can
move forward in a positive direc-
tion."
In the 110th Congress, Congress-
man Boyd's top priority will be
working in a bipartisan way to
restore fiscal responsibility and
accountability to our federal gov-
ernment. As the leader of the
Blue Dog Coalition, Congress-
man Boyd will work with his col-
leagues to reinstate pay-as-you-go
spending rules, commonly
known as PAYGO, and to enact
meaningful budget reforms to get
our country back on track fiscally.
"It's time for some real fiscal dis-
cipline in Washington," Boyd
said. "I will work with my col-
leagues in.the Blue Dog Coalition
to advance fiscal responsibility,
accountability, and transparency
in our government."
Supporting North Florida's mili-
tary bases, rural communities,
and universities and colleges also
will be at the center of
Congressman Boyd's legislative
agenda.
Congressman Boyd will continue
to serve on the House
Appropriations Committee as a
member of the Subcommittee on
Defense, the Subcommittee on
Military Construction-Veterans
Affairs, and the Subcommittee on
Agriculture, Rural Development,
Food and Drug Administration,
and Related Agencies.
"This is an exciting and challeng-
ing time to be in Congress," Boyd
stated. "I look forward to build-
ing on past legislative accom-
plishments and addressing the
issues we face as Americans and
as Floridians in a bipartisan man-
ner."




[E FRANKLIN
CHOICLEI
COCREDWT

-UBIC NEES N


Not only can scams be found in
Internet e-mail, they can turn up
in the most unusual places. For
instance, take a close look at
restaurant offerings. What's on
the menu? Fake grouper, perhaps.
That's no fish tale-particularly
after the Florida Attorney
General's Office issued subpoe-
nas for vendor invoices and pur-
chase orders from 16 restaurants
in the Tampa Bay area.
The investigation started in
October, in response to a story in
the 'St. Petersburg Times. The
newspaper ordered up grouper
dinners and grouper sandwiches
from 11 local restaurants. DNA
testing of the fish found five of
the 11 restaurants actually served
a cheaper fish. A sixth restaurant
admitted it substituted Pollack.
"One Palm Harbor restaurant
charged $23 for 'champagne
braised black grouper' that actu-
ally was tilapia," the Times
reported in its August story. Bob
Jones, a representative for domes-
tic fish suppliers, told the newspa-
per that from wholesalers to
retailers, fish substitution is so
common that it "may be unstop-
pable."
The Times' investigation .was
prompted by a federal grandijury
indictment in May of a Panama
City seafood wholesaler. He was
charged with importing 1 million
pounds of frozen Asian catfish
for as little as $1.52 a pound. It
was then resold as grouper, which
can bring four times the price,
sometimes more.
The practice isn't limited to
Florida. Therion International, a
New York-based DNA testing
service, said in a survey of 39
restaurants in six Southeastern
cities, 19 of the samples of red
snapper were substitutions of
cheaper species.
In 30 restaurants where walleye
filets were ordered in four
Northern cities, the company
found 12 of the 30 filets served
were zander, a farm-raised fish
from Europe that sells for less
than the locally caught walleye.
The investigations in Florida are
starting to produce results. Late
last month, Fort Myers television
station WVZN reported that the
state cited 17 restaurants in
Collier and Lee counties for
advertising one fish but serving
another.
"We think it's a major problem,
not just in Florida, but every-
where," Dr. John Fruin from the
Florida Department of Agricul-
ture and Consumer Services told
the ABC affiliate. The depart-
ment also issued a stop-sale order
on nearly 8,000 pounds of farm-
raised Vietna-mese broadhead
filets this summer that had been
labeled as grouper.
"When residents of, and visitors
to, this state pay a premium price
to purchase a highly desirable fish
such as grouper, they are entitled
to receive it," said Charles H.
Bronson, commissioner of the
Agriculture and Consumer
Services Department. "Any indi-
vidual or company that substi-
tutes a cheaper fish is defrauding
customers." He added that by
selling broadhead for grouper
prices, the intercepted shipment
would have been worth an addi-
tional $15,000 to $28,000 to the
company.
Some of the trouble with import-
ed grouper filets starts with the


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catch itself. Grouper might be
mixed in with other fish that look
like grouper when the fish are
fileted for packing. But testing
companies may only test one fish
from a batch weighing several
thousands of pounds. "No one
can afford to test every fish," Lee
Ann Applewhite of Applied
Food Technologies told the St.
Petersburg Times. The Gainesville-
based company is one of the few .
fish-testing services in the coun-
try.
She added that the recent crack-
downs and publicity may have
helped improve labeling: In the
past two months, at least 80 per-
cent of her samplings of grouper
have turned out to be grouper.
The August issue of Consumer
Reports noted substitution also
occurs with fresh wild salmon.
Wild-caught salmon generally
sells for about double the price of
farm-raised salmon. Of the 23
supposedly wild salmon fillets
purchased in the off-season for
wild-caught salmon, more than
half came from salmon farms,


the product-testing organization
found.
Last week, the Florida
Restaurant and Lodging Associa-
tion, representing more than
10,000 hotels and restaurants,
announced it will hold a summit
this month aimed at finding a
way to authenticate shipments of
imported grouper. "We feel very
strongly that consumers and
restaurants, and everybody,
should buy what you feel you are
buying," said Gragin Mosteller,
spokeswoman for the association.
"On the purest and simplest level,
you can't have a business that is
not based on honesty."
The meeting will bring restaurant
owners together with fisheries
biologists, marketing experts, reg-
ulatory agencies and other
groups to discuss the best way of
making sure what's on the label
reflects what's in the package.
Until a verification system is in
place, consumers may wonder if
the grouper platter on the menu is
just another fish story.


What's Wrong With

Minimum Wages?

Why Don't We Just Leave. the Well-off Alone?

Commentary
BY RICHARD E. NOBLE
I have worked for minimum wage or below for the majority of my
employment career-which started when I was about ten years old. I
have always known that it is because of me that the world, at large, and
the U.S. in particular, has been going to hell in a handbag. My bosses
have explained this to me over and over.
You see, it is because of my demanding this exorbitant minimum wage
that we have inflation, constantly escalating prices, unemployment,
teenagers idling on street corners and a vanishing industrial and manu-
facturing base.
Strangely enough, people who make exorbitant paychecks and profits
as owners of businesses and CEOs and CFOs, and Doctors, Lawyers,
Dentists, Stock brokers, people receiving dividends from their stock
portfolios and Indian chiefs who own gambling casinos in Miami have
just the opposite effect on the economy. Their pay increases do not
cause inflation or increase prices; instead their extra money acts as a
stimulus to the economy, promotes investment at home and abroad,
creates jobs everywhere and, in general, makes the world a better place
for everybody to live.
It goes like this: if you give Michael Jordan or some such wealthy per-
son another billion dollars a week, as opposed to giving another dollar
a week to:,each employee at the Nike factory in Slumbovia, or,
Bumslavia, or Weallstarvingistan-nothing negative, economically,
occurs. Pricesido not go up because Michael.Jordan or another among.
the minority of the rich has more money. They already have everything
they ever wanted. They don't need to buy anything. How many
Hummers,. BMWs, yachts, and diamond rings can one person have?
Besides if the price of a quarter mile long yacht goes from 147 million
to 150 million who would notice. This increase wouldn't even make it
into the pages of Money Magazine.
You can give all the money you want to rich people and nothing in the
economic world will change. This is an economic fact that was proven
in the laboratory of real life economic science in 1929 by that great
American monetary savant, Herbert Hoover.
On the other hand, an extra dollar in the pockets of a bunch of poor
people automatically throws any economy into a tailspin. Right off, the
price of M-D 20-20 skyrockets along with bread, peanut butter, and
Chevrolet automobiles. This hits the commodity and retail markets
immediately. The price of grain and legumes all over the world goes
nuts. Farmers instantly begin double cropping, planting in-between the
rows, and doubling up on fertilizers and polluting pesticides; govern-
ment subsidies go through the roof, while profits to the farmers go
down and the price of a tomato at the IGA in Wisconsin goes to a
buck-fifty apiece. General Motors has to increase production, but the
cost of labor in the U.S. is bankrupting them; so their new plant in
China gets the contract while the DuPont family sells off all of their
shares in Aunt Jemima Pancakes. It's chaos.
If I, and those of my ilk, were willing to work for half or one third of
minimum wage, my boss then could hire two or three more morons like
me and, of course, the unemployment problem would vanish. This
would also, more than likely, solve the illegal immigrant problem
besides.
You see, if I were willing to pick tomatoes and sleep in an abandon
building or old slave cottage or a farmer's barn or root cellar while defe-
cating in the woods or orchards or behind the hedges of better-off peo-
ple in the San Bernardino mountains like illegal immigrants do, then
the farmers would not have to encourage Coyotes to smuggle poor
Mexicans and Central Americans across the Rio Grande and into
Miami, Seattle, New York, New Jersey and Kalamazoo Michigan. Nor
would they have to continue to falsify their labor and Social Security
reports.
But because I, and others like me, are unwilling to do this, these poor
farmers and packing house owners, and cottage-garment industry
sweat-shop owners, and restaurant and construction company owners
and landscapers, and concrete company and gas station owners, and
grocery stores, and chicken and beef processing houses, and home
cleaning and domestic services, and large chain department stores etc.,
all have to do all of these illegal, immoral things.
We minimum wage earners are like the pornographic video and book-
Continued on Page 4


Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein ............... . Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis ............... Apalachicola
Skip Frink ........... ... ........Carrabelle
David Butler ..................... .Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung .......... Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins .......Eastpoint
Barbara Revell ............... .Lanark Village
Richard Harper ..... ... ........St. George Island

Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue
would cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the
Chronicle for price quotes if you seek several different
or similar issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96
including tax. Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26
including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.

All contents Copyright 2007
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


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Page 4 19 January 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


What's Wrong With Minimum Wage from Page 3
stores in Holyoake, Missouri-we are the evil temptresses that lure the
Jimmy Swaggarts and Tammy Faye Bakers into the snake pit of moral
depravity; we are the Chunky Cheeses to the video game addict; we are
the irresistible impulse luring the unsuspecting all over the world we
are the ones who are ruining the economic world. It is us, with our
benign satisfaction with mediocrity, or unwillingness to achieve, and
our ignorant and obstinate choice to remain unsuccessful.
Why is it that we continually choose to work at JR stores, and wash
dishes in greasy-spoon type restaurants who provide no health insur-
ance? Why do we continually take up residence in crime ridden ghet-
toes? Why the heck don't we just move; why don't we make application
to better universities; why do we accept advice and principles from par-
ents who are even dumber than we are?
All of our kind hearted, generous employers are, of course, very good
people; they are not criminals-it's us; it's me. And you know, I don't
know what is wrong with me. I don't know why I act like this. I have
tried to get help for this problem but I have been unable to find any psy-
chiatrists who are willing to work for minimum wage. They feel that if
they work for any less than one hundred dollars a minute, research in
mental health will be abandoned and more nutty folks, like myself, will
be put out onto the sidewalks and alleyways of the American inner
cities. This, of course, will increase the perv quotient, promote crime,
juvenile delinquency and the threat of terrorism everywhere.
It was because of people like me, way back when, demanding their pays
to be raised to a minimum that forced the textile mills to leave New
England. It was the same type of ugly Americans in the Midwest and
eventually in the South that forced these poor, patriotic hard working
mill owners to go to South America, India and Asia where now, unfor-
tunately, they are forced to deal with the same type ungrateful breed
over there. We minimum wage earners keep breeding like flies there
seems to be no end to our kind.
What is the matter with us minimum wage workers? When will we ever
learn?
If we continually ask for more money, this just makes the prices of
things rise; and after the prices go up, we still don't have any more
money than we used to have. So what is the sense to it? What will it
take for us to learn that we must figure out how to live on whatever it
is that the boss is willing to pay us?
We certainly can't ask the bosses to take less money. Why just look
around they are barely getting by on what they have now. And besides,
there are so few of them and so many of us. I mean, if we took all the
money from the 10% who own and control everything-all the rich
people in the world and divided it up among all the poor in the
world-the price of peanut butter and jelly in the U.S. would be a thou-
sand dollars a jar-M-D 20-20 would only be served at fine restaurant-
golf courses would disappear and America would become one huge
bowling alley-yes; every other cardboard house that the poor have
built in the garbage dumps of the.world might get a new tin roof big
deal.
Poor people just don't seem to understand-if God wanted poor peo-
ple to be better off, He wouldn't have created economics.


A Poem By Dawn Evans

Radford
A poem by Dawn Evans Radford of Eastpoint has been published in
Hurricane Blues: Poems about Katrina and Rita. The anthology, edited by
Philip C.I. Kolin and Susan Swartwout and published by the Southeast
Missouri State University Press in 2006, includes works by distin-
guished and emerging poets from around the United States.
Poems in the collection address loss and hope, nature and politics. The
editors chose poetry as a literary medium because of its "truthfulness
and visionary qualities" as well as its potential not only "to record his-
tory but to serve in some way as a balm, a relief effort toward the
inevitable reconstruction of the region." '11
Ms. Radford's poem, "A Peripheral Blow," addresses the hurricane's
disruption of the seafood harvests of the Apalachicola Bay and result-
ing damage to the lives of local seafood workers.
A Peripheral Blow
For weeks after the storm,
the bay shrimper, fatigued
by tons of hurricane trash choking
his nets, and by meager gains of scarcely
succulent shrimp, would putter home
to throw himself upon the mercy of his:family church.
For weeks, the long-proud harvesters
of bay oysters, the oysterman
and his oyster shucker neighbor,
grieved in silence, waiting
while the estuary cleaned itself.
In a stoic and starving months-long wake,
they suffered through a further
catastrophe blowing its own ill winds:
distant, agenda-driven, myopic politics
that might some day bestow blessings,
grant them back their harvest rights
to the Gulf's pearl of produce,
its world-renowned bay of oysters.
Further information about Hurricane Blues: Poems about Katrina and
Rita is available on the website of Southeast Missouri State University
Press: http://www6semo.edu/universitypress.
Contact: Dawn Evans Radford at phone: 850-670-1315.


Old-Fashioned Hog

Butchering
Saturday, Jan. 20, 2006, 8 a.m. (CST) until after lunch
You won't want to miss this old fashion event, where family and friends
would have gathered to prepare and preserve their meat for the coming
months. Come experience this tradition and take part in our dinner on
the grounds, as plates of fresh cooked down home food will be for sale.
You will experience the meat being processed and cooked on site. The
event will take place next to the Wells cabin, on the Settlement grounds.
There is NO charge for the event!
The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is located in Sam Atkins Park,
about 1 mile west of the intersection of Hwy 71 and Hwy 20. Follow
Hwy. 20 West out of Blountstown.Look for signs for Sam Atkins Park.
Turn North at Lindy's Fried Chicken (Silas Green St.). Plenty of park-
ing!
The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is a nonprofit organization dedicat-
ed to the preservation of rural life in the Florida Panhandle.
For further information on the Settlement call: 850-674-2777.


Book Review


Benjamin Franklin

Autobiography (1706-1790)
BY RICHARD E. NOBLE
I was watching "Book Notes" and this famous author was talking about
the fact that as a youth he was forced, as were all grade-schoolers of his
day, to read the autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. He hated it, the
book being so "dull, pompous and laden with platitudes", he said.
I've just finished reading the Autobiography of Ben Franklin, and I
have gotten a belly laugh out of just about every chapter. The man is
hilarious. I really haven't decided whether the whole book is an outright
tongue-in-cheek put-on, or that old Ben is just such a practical, unemo-
tional fellow, that his guidelines for living a virtuous life sound like a
biology professor trying to explain to a slow student how to rationally
distinguish his left hand from his right.
The story of his courtship with "Miss Read", his eventual wife, I'm
sure, is not something that "Miss Read" cut out of her husband's book
and hid away in a trunk of loving. memorabilia in an upstairs attic,
along with her first love poem and a piece of her wedding cake. She was
"deserving ... pitiable and a good and faithful helpmate", says Ben.
And, believe it or not, she nearly lost Ben's attentions by her inability to
get her parents to cough up one hundred pounds as her dowry. In fact,
she did loose Ben for a good period during the negotiations, and in the
interim Ben being left hot to trot explains that; "In the meantime, that
hard to be governed passion of youth hadharried me frequently into
intrigues with low women that fell in my way." He goes on to explain
his thankfulness at not catching "distemper" or something worse.
His battle with being a perfect, virtuous individual he compares with a
man attempting to buy a shinny ax. After a few hours and some time at
the hard work of turning the wheel for the blacksmith who is trying to
get the man's desired ax to shine, the customer decides that a speckled
ax will do just fine. This becomes even funnier when you remember
that Ben is talking about his own moral character here. So when put
next to the hard work of becoming moral and virtuous, Ben's decision
is that he would just as soon have a speckled soul to carry to his Maker.
Oh, my goodness!
And this has got to be the best one of all. Ben is going into his shop on
Craven Street one morning whereupon he finds a "poor ... very pale
and feeble" sickly woman, sweeping the walk in front of his door. He
asks her who hired her to sweep his walk and she replies; "Nobody; but
I am poor and in distress, and I sweeps before gentle folks' doors and
hopes they will give me something."
Oh, my, doesn't that nearly break your heart? So what does old compas-
sionate Ben do? Why he offers the feeble, poor, pale, very sickly woman
a shilling to sweep the whole darn street. When she comes for her
shilling he presumes that a woman in her obviously poor condition
couldn't have done a very good job, so he sends his servant, out to check
her work. Jeeves reports that the poor, dying, old lady has really done
an excellent job-so what does Ben conclude? that she deserves, pos-
sibly, a permanent, full-time job back at the Franklin plantation or
something of the like? Not quite: "I then judged that if that feeble
woman could sweep such a street in three hours, a strong, active man
might have done. it in half the time."
Ben Franklin, the grandfather of compassionate conservatism-and
possibly several illegitimate children-so, what's new.


Book Review

Book By Barbara Farris

President, Blue Dolphin II
Lies Behind the Pulpit is a non-fiction book.by Barbara Farris.-This
book details the life of the author, with all its ups and downs, twists and
turns. It tells of a little girl who is lost from the onset due to an absent
father and a mother with more issues that one can count. It recounts the
days of innocence of a little girl full of hope. Yet as the days pass, this
girl sees, hears and experiences things and feelings no one should
endure. As she grows up she doesn't seem to have choices of which
path to take, so instead of her living her life, her life lives her. This way
of living sees her into her adulthood where she struggles to finally come
to the understanding that those who are victimized, do not have to be
victims. She learns that through struggle comes strength and through
strength comes hope. Barbara isn't someone far, far away. She is the
lady you pass on the street or at a school function ... Or maybe, she is
you.
Lies Behind the Pulpit is set primarily in the South, but as in Barbara's
life itself, the setting takes a few unexpected turns.
Other important characters include Barbara's brother Daron; her moth-
er Cheryl, step-father Herman and her grandparents. The story
recounts Barbara & Daron's childhood as they found their lives torn
between parents and grandparents who lived very different lives in very
different places.
This book will appeal to readers who enjoy a story with truth, sub-
stance and a good story. It will also appeal to anyone who has either
been a victim or known a victim. These readers will not only enjoy the
complexity of the story, but feel as they're actually Barbara as her life
unfolds.
This book is targeted to all readers. It is the author's hope that it will
touch each reader in a way that will make them pro-active to stopping
abuse in it's every form.
Barbara Farris is 35 years old and lives in the Panhandle of Florida. She
is a mother of a 15 year old son. She has a diversified professional life
with multiple ventures. Currently she commits most of her efforts to the
process of developing mixed use commercial and Jim Fowlers Life In
the wild and Celebrity Coast theme park in Bonifay Florida.


THE'ANKIN

"ERNILEIS


DIXIE

THEATRE


Dixie Theatre

2007 Season
The Dixie Theatre's 2007 Season
opens with a bang on Friday,
January 19th, with a new, live pro-
fessional play and Opening Nite
Gala event. Don't miss all the fun!
Call The Theatre At 653-3200 To
Reserve Tickets. Season Tickets
Are Now Available At A 10%
Discount-$67.50 or $135/Pair.
Please check details below. SEE
YOU AT THE DIXIE!


January 19 (Gala Event After Show), 20, 21 ~ 26, 27, 28-
CATCH ME IF YOU CAN
Overflowing with mirth, this Broadway whodunit is exciting from
beginning to end. An advertising man who has brought his bride to the
boss's mountain lodge for a honeymoon calls in the local police to
investigate her sudden disappearance. "The final 15 minutes will
reward you as a murder mystery should." -N.Y Times "Ingenious."
-N.Y. World Telegram & Sun
February 16, 17, 18 ~ 23, 24, 25-SMOKE ON THE
MOUNTAIN
The year is 1938. It's Saturday night in Mount Pleasant, NC, and the
Reverend Oglethorpe has invited the Sanders Family Singers to provide
an uplifting' evening of singing' and witnessin'. The audience is invited
to pull up a pew and join in the rollicking good time. "Totally beguil-
ing ... foot stomping soul food." -N.Y. Post
March 16, 17, 18 23, 24, 25-THE QUEEN OF BINGO
Where can two sisters on the other side of fifty, who want to add a lit-
tle zest, fun and excitement to their lives, find it? Bingo! On any Bingo
night at St. Joseph's, you can find Father Mac, Lonnie and Cindy
Conklin, Marge Meranski, Coach Anderson, and the many off-beat,
colorful regulars we meet through the eyes of Sis and Babe.
February 2-James Weldon Johnson, Florida's Renaissance
Man
February 3 (Saturday at 7:30 p.m.) and February 4-Bob
Milne Concert
February 10-Habitat for Humanity Mardi Gras
March 9 & 10-THE DIXIE DOES NASHVILLE,
Two magical nights of music-writers in the round. Each night hosts a
different group of some of Nashville, Tennessee's most successful song-
writers. Hear them perform the hits they've written for some of your
favorite country artists like Brooks & Dunn, Faith Hill ,Tim McGraw,
Kenny Chesney and many more. It all begins with a song, don't miss
these incredible writers doing what they do best, playing and perform-
ing the songs that became hits for country music's biggest stars
Show Times
The show times for all Dixie Theatre productions are listed below,
unless otherwise specified in the event descriptions above.
Friday and Saturday: 8:00 p.m. and Sunday: 3:00 p.m.


[E] PJrr3raPii rJIr IrJiraJIriir rJiIriri rairlrJIrJIrJIrlriaiiralrI r JIrI rJ IIr-EiUlSaL ar i

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Open 11:oo a.m. til 9:00 p.m.
CLOSED MONDAY
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The Dixie Theatre presents... The 2007 Season
S A Not-Fdr-Profit Theatre
__-__________. _____ ___ _e___.....


WiMW" - ll aB.-
Ow'n-' Live Professional Theatre at it's best! rIp s stwe

Catch Me If You Can January 19, 20, 21- 26, 27, 28

S'mol e On Th1 Mountain- February 16, 17, 18-23,24,25

The Queen of Bingo March 16, 17, 18- 23, 24, 25
Season Tickets Now on Sale! Save 10% Schedule sujct tochange

.J ,U Call 850/653-3200 THEATRE
1. 11 1 L a .... IIMI1. V11


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


19 January 2007 Page 5


Apalachicola Bay

Chamber Of Commerce
Calendar Of Events 2007
January 19-28, 2007
Catch Me If You Can
Live professional theatre at its best Catch Me If You Can. Show times
are Friday, Saturday 8:00 p.m., 3:00 p.m. on Sundays. Call (850),653-
3200.
January 21, 2007
Trio Internazionale
Martha Gherardi, violin, R Bedford Watkins piano and Luciano
Gherardi contrabass perform at the historic Trinity Church at 4:00 p.m.
as part of the Ilse Newell fund for the Performing Arts.
Call (850) 653-9550.
February 4, 2007
Pianist Kevin Sharpe
Winner of national and international competitions, Kevin Sharpe will
perform at the historic Trinity Church at 4:00 p:m. as part of the Ilse
Newell fund for the Performing Arts.
Call (850) 653-9550.
February 11, 2007
10th Annual Forgotten Coasts Chef Sampler
Join us for the dining experience of the year! Area chefs will put out
their finest fare at the Fort Coombs Armory Avenue D and 4th Street
in Apalachicola. Tickets are $50.00 each or tables can be purchased.
Proceeds will benefit the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce.
For More Information, call (850) 653-9419 or info@ apalachicola-
bay.org
February 16-25, 2007
Smoke on the Mountain
Live professional theatre at its best Smoke on the Mountain. Show
times are Friday, Saturday 8:00 p.m., 3:00 p.m. on Sundays. Call (850)
653-3200.
February 25, 2007
Jill Anna Ponasik
Jill Anna Ponasik performs at the historic Trinity Church at 4:00 pm as
part of the Ilse Newell fund for the Performing Arts. Call (850) 653-
9550.
March 3, 2007
St. George Island Charity Chili Cookoff &
Auction
Over sixty contestants square off in the largest Regional Chili Cookoff
in the nation. Musical entertainment, great auction and fun for the
whole family. Proceeds benefit St. George Island Volunteer Fire Dept.
For more information contact the Fire Depart (850) 927-2753 .
March 4, 2007
Judy Gail
A drama presentation by Judy Gail, storyteller, speaker and musician
portrays early Coconut Grove resident and activist Mary Barr Monroe
at Trinity Church at 4:00 p.m. as part of the Ilse Newell fund for the
Performing Arts. Call (850) 653-9550.
March 9-11, 2007 .:
Camp Gordon Johnston Days
SI !i .. .:l .'^ ~*
A celebration of all veterans who have served in both war and peace.
Events include a Friday social mixer, a parade and an evening dinner
dance, military memorabilia displays and vendors. This is truly a "vet-
eran's weekend" whereby a small town takes time to say "Thanks" to
America's veterans. For further details call (850) 697-8575 or go to
www.campgordonjohnston.com.
Marchl6-25, 2007
The Queen of Bingo
Live professional theatre at its best The Queen of Bingo. Show times
are Friday, Saturday 8:00 p.m., 3:00 p.m. on Sundays. Call (850) 653-
3200.
March 17, 2007
Eastpoint Fire Department 4th Annual Charity
Rib Cookoff
Come eat some of the best BBQ ribs and chicken and support the
Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department. In addition to thegreat food
there will be live music all day, a car show, face painting and rides for
the kids. Did we mention apple dumpling and ice cream? Prizes will be
awarded to rib cookoff contestants and car show contestants. Join us
for a day of fun and good eatin'. For more information call (850) 670-
9000.
March 23-24, 2007
Rock By The Sea
St George Island's First Annual Rock By The Sea will feature some of
the best rock music you may have never heard- Jackson Rohm, Five



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Star Iris, Wide Awake and other bands will perform to benefit Lyrics
For Life. For more information call (850) 443-3663 or (850) 591-4770.
March 24, 2007
Apalachicola Art Walk
Art in all forms will be woven in and around picturesque downtown
Apalachicola where artists and musicians will be showing, selling and
demonstrating their talents from 12:00-6:00 p.m. The festivities contin-
ue into the evening with a wine tasting at 6:00 p.m. Afterwards area
chefs will prepare special dishes at their restaurants pared with special
wines. The evening's finale will be a professional performance of The
Queen of Bingo at the Dixie Theatre at 8:00 p.m. For more informa-
tion call (850) 653-9419.
March 25, 2007
Keyboards and Chorus
Bedford Watkins plays a selection of early keyboard instruments
including Trinity Church's 1840 Erben organ. Show starts at 4:00 p.m.
at the Trinity Church as part of the Ilse Newell fund for the Performing
Arts. Call. (850) 653-9550.
April'28, 2007
9th Historic Apalachicola Antique & Classic
Boat Show
Join us in beautiful historic downtown Apalachicola for the 9th annual
Antique & Classic Boat Show. All types of antique boats, classic exam-
ples of a traditional vessels, work boats, fiberglass classics, antique out-
board motors and antique cars. The Gulf Alliance for Local Arts will
hold an art show in conjunction. There will also be a dinner and a lec-
ture by at 6:00 p.m. Reservations for the lecture are required. For more
information call (850) 653-9419, or e-mail info@apalachicolabay.org.
May 5, 2007
15th Annual Spring Tour of Historic Homes
2006 marks the 14th year Historic Trinity Episcopal Church Spring
Tour of Historic Homes. Many of Apalachicola's private homes and
buildings only be viewed from the exterior except for this unique day.
For a $12.00 donation you can take a guided tour through architectur-
al and historical significance homes, churches and commercial build-
ings. Benefits the Trinity Episcopal Restoration fund. Call (850) 653-
9550.
October 5-7, 2007
Oyster Spat Festival
Treasure hunt, onshore fishing tournament with cash prizes, 5K race,
kayak race, food court, parade and great live entertainment. Call (850)
927-5039 for more details.
October 5-7, 2007
7th Florida Panhandle Birding & Wildflower
Festival
Guided field trips on lands and water to St George Island, St Vincent,
Little St George, St Joe Bay. Lectures on hawks, eagles and dolphins.
Educational displays, reception and shrimp boil. Call (850) 229-1797
or www.birdfestival.info.
October 5-6, 2007
Apalachicola Community Yard Sale
From attic treasures to unique merchandise, this event promises to be
the best yard sale you'll ever attend! (850) 653-9419.
October 10, 2007
4th Annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber Golf
Tournament
Tee up with business members from around the Franklin, Gulf, Leon
and Wakulla County areas at the 4-h annual Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament Tee-time is 1:00 p.m. on the
' beaurtiul, ne N St James Ba3 Golf Course in Lanark. Prizes worth
$4,000 for the top three teams. Scores will be totaled and prizes award-
ed at a reception following the tournament. Tournament proceeds will
go toward the Chamber's programs. (850) 653-9419.
October 12-13, 2007
The Dixie Does Nashville
This magical event brings some of Nashville's most talented songwrit-
ers to Apalachicola for two nights of "writer's in the round". This will
be the second in a series, having proved to be one of the most exciting
and enchanting opportunities to hear the writers whose hits have been
recorded by Garth Brooks, Brooks and Dunn, Faith Hill, Kenny
Chesney, Keith Urban, Tim McGraw, and many more, perform their
own material. This is not your typical "country show", no sir-eee!!!
For reservations and information call (850) 653-3200.
November 2, 2007
Downtown Oyster Roast
Friday evening, November 2nd, the Apalachicola Bay Chamber will
host its annual oyster roast. Enjoy roasted and raw oysters, artichoke
and oyster soup, shrimp, crabs, and homemade desserts under the stars
on Commerce Street. Musical entertainment, great micro-brewery
beers and wines, plus some of the freshest seafood in the country will
be served up. Tickets are available through at the Chamber office (850)
653-9419.
November 2-3, 2007
44th Annual Florida Seafood Festival, Battery
Park
The oldest seafood festival in the state. If you love great seafood, arts
& crafts, fine folks and wonderful entertainment all wrapped into a
magnificent family atmosphere, then join us in Apalachicola for the
44th Annual Florida Seafood Festival. The event will feature quality
entertainment and maritime crafts paying tribute to the Apalachicola
Bay's commercial fishermen. There is also an oyster shucking contest,
oyster eating contest. For more information go to www.floridaseafood-
festival.com








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November 9-10, 2007
Jazz Festival
Jazz Festival at the Dixie Theatre (850) 653-3200.
November 23, 2007
Historic Apalachicola Annual Christmas
Celebration
The Historic Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up
Apalachicola from 4:30-8:00 p.m. the streets of downtown
Apalachicola will be lined with luminaries and filled with holiday spir-
it. Merchants will be open late and the sounds of carolers will echo
through the streets filling the evening with Christmas spirit. The high-
light, of course, will be the big guy himself. Santa will arrive on a
shrimp boat at 6:00 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street, across from
City Hall. Santa will hear children's Christmas wishes and carolers will
sing. Join us for, an old-fashioned Christmas celebration! For more
information contact the Chamber office at (850) 653-9419.
December 1, 2007
Island Lights
Celebrate the holidays Island style with the lighting of the palms trees
in the center of St George Island. Santa, will be there and there will be
food, beverages and fun. For more information call (850) 927-2604.
December 1, 2007
Holiday Fresh Market
Why fight the crowds and traffic at the malls? Come for the day or the
weekend. Shop in a relaxed, hassle free environment. Buy hand craft-
ed Apalachicola specialities from fresh seasonal wreaths to vintage
European glass bead jewerly. Your gift shopping has never been easier
(850) 653-9419.
For more information call (850) 653-9419 or visit our website
at www.apalachicolabay.org



Make It Your New Year's

Resolution To Make A

Difference: Become A

Teacher In Florida
ABCTE Offers $100 Savings on State-Approved Passport
to Teaching CertificatiOn Program in January
As 2007 begins, make it your New Year's resolution to make a differ-
ence in your community. Become a teacher!
Experts predict that America's schools will need.over 2 million teach-
ers in the next decade. In Florida alone, schools need over.30,000 new
teachers every year.
This January, the American Board for Certification of Teacher
Excellence (www.abcte.org) wants to help talented career changers
transition into rewarding teaching careers. ABCTE is offering a $100
savings off of the Passport to Teaching program fee when individuals
enroll by January 31, 2007.
ABCTE's Passport to Teaching is officially recognized as a route to
teacher certification in Florida.
Designed specifically to break down the barriers that deter career-
changers from pursuing teaching, Passport to Teaching allows individ-
uals to prepare for certification on their own time and at their own pace,
using preparation materials available from a variety of sources.
Individuals who earn certification by June are eligible to attend the
Great Florida Teach-In, where hundreds of school district representa-
tives inter.viewoand hire prospective teachers., '
Candidates for Passport to Teaching certification must hold a lbache-
lor's degree, demonstrate mastery on examinations of subject area and
professional teaching knowledge and pass a federal background check.
No additional college courses are required, and individuals do not need

to quit their current jobs as they prepare to earn certification.
To enroll in the Passport to Teaching program and save $100, visit
www.mypass.abcte.org and enter the code NewYearsl00 on the online
enrollment form, or call 1-877-669-2228 to enroll by telephone.
ABCTE Facts
* In an independent survey, 95 percent of principals who have hired
ABCTE teachers said those teachers are as effective or more effective
than other educators.
* More than 3,000 individuals have enrolled or have earned certification
through Passport to Teaching nationwide. This includes more than 660
Floridians.
* The U.S. Conference of Mayors unanimously supports widespread
adoption of alternative certification programs, including ABCTE.
* ABCTE has worked with more than 25 school districts in Florida to
recruit teachers, and has invested hundreds of thousands of dollars in
teacher recruitment activities to help mitigate the state's critical teacher
shortage.



Apalachicola Area

Historical Society
Apalachicola Shipwrecks
Apalachicola Shipwrecks will be the topic by Dr. Della Scott-Ireton at
our January 20th meeting. The presentation will start at 1 p.m. at the :
Carriage House, followed by a refreshments break, then a short busi- -
ness meeting.
Dr. Scott-Ireton is Director of the Northwest Region of the Florida "
Public Archaeology Network (FPAN). She is presently located at the
University of West Florida, Pensacola. FPAN was created in 2004 as
part of the Florida Historical Resources Act. Archaeology is a comple-
ment to historical documents that may be incomplete or inaccurate and
the Society is "Dedicated to the Preservation of Area History" as noted
on our stationery.
Lately photographers and filmmakers have brought the River to the
public's attention again. Mueller wrote of the many steamships that
had trouble navigating the Apalachicola in his book "Perilous
Journeys..." and Mrs. Patrick Jeremiah Lovett noted in her book,
"Trilogy of the Tri-Rivers..." that federal work to deepen the
Apalachicola River began as early as 1828.
This presentation certainly is a fitting topic for residents in the port of
Apalachicola with its history of ships and shipwrecks.
Janice Moore's Blountstown students were astonished to learn that
Apalachicola had been the third largest cotton shipping port on the
Gulf. Janice was so pleased to exchange information, she sent a CD of
Calhoun Co. Court Records, 1848-1870. Calhoun was formed in 1838
from Washington and Jackson Counties; and of course Franklin Co.
was formed in 1832 from Jackson Co.; so the CD is very interesting to
history buffs. It will be made part of our archives.


Speaking of archives, the Society's records need to be catalogued and
put into the acid-free containers we purchased last year. Volunteers??
Furnishings of the Raney House Museum need photographing and the
contents' list brought up to date. This has not been done in the last 13
years, (maybe longer) and quite a few items have been lent or donated
to the Society.
Susan Buzzett Clementson and Lee Buzzett Smith have donated a won-
derful old wood-burning kitchen stove. This is the beginning of a dream
to have a real kitchen at the Museum, instead of a storeroom.
Unfortunately, it is still a storeroom and the stove is.at present in the
Carriage House.
Most of our winter visitors will be visiting here in the next few months.
Docents are needed for the Raney House Museum, Saturdays
1-4 p.m.
Please bring a friend (and future member) on January 20th.








-Page 6 19 January 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


It's The

Law In

Florida!

People Who Own (or
Owned) Land Underlying
'or Adjoining Certain
Railroad Corridors in
KFlorida May Be Entitled to
'Money
-If you own or have owned land
-underlying or adjoining railroad
corridors in Florida, you may be
entitled to money from the settle-
ment of a pending class action
lawsuit.
The rail corridors in question are:
, Tampa to Feather Sound
. Ft. Myers to Ojus (CSX)
.* Ft. Myers to Ojus (Florida East
,"Coast)
* Orlando to Tampa
Orlando to Ojus
f Jacksonville to Orlando
'- Jacksonville POP Div.
*. Hollywood Diversity
-Hollywood to Miami
,Anternational)
.AT&T, which owns telecommu-
-pications cable on the properties,
,.has agreed to pay net compensa-
',tion benefits of up to approxi-
mately $1.40 per linear foot to
,:qualifying claimants.
;If you, or an estate or entity you
-represent, own or have owned
land along these corridors, your
:rights may be affected by the pro-
.-posed legal settlement.
.-For more information or forms,
.:contact The Florida Case
,-TeleCable Settlement Center by
.calling (800) 436-6136, writing
:-P.O. Box 131110, Dallas, TX
,75313-1110, or e-mailing
:TeleCableCenter@lecg.com. The
-settlement home page is'
,http://att.fsiwebs.net/rrcorri-
.dors.
-The deadline to comment on,
:object to or opt out of the settle-
:ment is March 2, 2006. A fairness
hearing is scheduled in Orlando
on March 28, 2006, and the dead-
line for filing a claim is May 16,
-2006.


Before
-, A~I ....L...


-Strikes,

Inventory

oAnd Record
:Your

i Personal

IProperty
=As hurricane season approaches,
*:be sure to inventory and digitally
.record your home's contents to
'avoid confusion and unnecessary
,.loss should disaster strike.







mON ERN1





PLIINERES
AND NOT A
0 PROFITMARGI



WILL Tv-pvfL:

!5up n ro gid
inrdcd ocis
Nojbtosalo


With the 2007 hurricane season
promising to be devastating, most
people are ready with their disas-
ter supply kit and have planned
their evacuation route. But many
people forget to inventory their
home's contents. Don't let your
home's contents become a fading
memory-develop a hurricane
readiness checklist that includes
creating a digital record of all
your data. Helpful resource sites
such as Save Your Data
(www.saveyourdata.org) outline
resources you need to consider to
be fully prepared should any dis-
aster strike.
Today's home computers store
everything from invaluable
addresses, to precious baby pho-
tos, to back taxes, to home
movies, to your favorite tunes.
But you should also create a digi-
tal inventory of your home's con-
tents and valuables using a simple
spreadsheet program.
First, use your digital camera to
inventory your home's contents,
and then download the photos to
your computer. Next, create a
room-by-room spreadsheet. You
should also scan your important
documents, including insurance
policies, banking and investment
records, tax forms, and create dig-
ital files of them as well.
Taking some time now will save
you headaches and heartaches in
the future. By creating a digital
record, you won't have to recall
your home's contents from mem-
ory should you have to fill out
complicated insurance docu-
ments. Your photos and spread-
sheets will make the job much
easier and less stressful, leaving
you to focus on more immediate
needs like your family's safety
and security.
But you're not finished yet. Once
you create a digital record, con-
sider an off-site file backup serv-
ice for your computer files.
Memory sticks, floppies and CDs
can easily be lost, damaged or
stolen and could fall into the
wrong hands. But an off-site.
backup service is secure, reliable
and accessible no matter where
you are. Even if you are evacuat-
ed, displaced or relocated, you
know your data will remain safe
and that security is priceless.
For more information on hurri-
cane readiness, go to www.savey-
ourdata.org. There, you'll find
useful information on creating
home inventories and digital'
records, including a link to a file
backup service with a 90-day free
trial that will get you safely start-
ed preparing for hurricane season
and even beyond. You'll also find
links to other disaster prepared-
ness websites.


5paetti

Dinner/

Dance

Fund-Raiser


Scheduled in

J anuar


There will be a
fund-raiser for
the Camp
Gordon


Johl
Associ
the Ca
Senior
C
JanuE
2C
Music
Quite

Time: 5
until ??


Price: $
person

FOR FL
INFO C
(850) 69


nston
nation at
rrabelle
SCenter
on
ary 20,
)07.
by "Not
Ready"

:30 p.m.



$7.00 per



JRTHER
ALL:
97-8575


jI If I

SMexicain grit t natina

I Buy 1 Dinner at Regular Price, I
I Get Second Dinner I
I 50% OFF I
I One coupon per person, per visit. Offer good in Apalachicola only.
I 75 Market Street *Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8555 I
L mInI nIiI II ill




Want to purchase minerals

and other oil/gas interests.

Send details to:

P.O. Box 13557

Denver, Colorado 80201




MARINE SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES TRAINED MECHANICS
eYAMAHAK M

MIKE'S MARINE SUPPLY
P.O. BOX 429 HWY. 98 PANACEA, FL 32346
PHONE: (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693 FAX: (850) 984-5698
www.mikesmarine-panacea.com
HOURS: MON., TUES., THURS., FRI: 8:00 6:00
WED.: 8:00 1:00. SAT.: 8:00 5:00
PRO-LINE GHEENOE BOSTON WHALER
PONTOON BOATS SEA PRO G-3 CENTURY


^-K


CAROL ANN WILLIAMS
Lic. Real Estate Broker/Owner
Cell Phone: (850) 899-0664
Summer Camp! You must come
experience the peace and tranquili-
ty of this special place which has
been kept a secret for many many
years, between St. Teresa and St.
James/Lanark area. This lot fea-
tures a Gulf View with a beach
easement and a beautiful sawgrass
area in front of you. Close to
Turkey Point Beach and the pro-
posed Turkey Point Beach Club.
The new Welcome Home Center,
General Store and Diner, are all
under construction at the corner of
319 and 98 between St. Teresa and
St. James Bay Golf Course. Gulf
View Lot, only $575,000. MLS #
159831 and MLS#202698.
Gorgeous BEACHFRONT lot in
area east of Eastpoint, called HID-
DEN BEACHES. Gated Subdivi-
sion with Palacial homes and
restrictions to keep the values high.
Come get the sand in between your
toes. 4.24 acres more or less. This
tract is $1,550,000. MLS#111213.


'U


FARMS, GROVES
15.5 Acres in Smith Creek,
Wakulla County. Beautiful house
with Cathdral ceiling, 2300 sq. ft.,
family room looking out over the
pine woods, his and her baths in
master suite, custom kitchen with
Corian countertops and custom
cabients, roll out shelves, near
National Forest and many fishing
ramps and streams, huge shop with
baths and a kitchen and 4 RV
hookups for your friends. Much,
more, must see to appreciate.
$649,000. MLS#156922 TBR and
MLS#202025.
19 Acres More or Less in Wakulla
County fronting on Hwy. 61 and
on Cajer Posey Road. -This land is
zoned 2 per acre if you will put the
public water in. A large pond or


MAIN OFFICE:
Carrabelle
Phone: (850) 697-9604
Fax: (850) 697-9605
BRANCH OFFICE:
Crawfordville
Phone: (850) 926-1340
Fax: (850) 926-8640
AND ACREAGE!
sink hole on the back corner adds
interest. Price $1,200,000. MLS
#201609.
Fenced, Landscaped, Mulched,
Paved and Everything You Need.
This warm, comfortable home,
lined in Cedar, with 2 porches and
3 bedrooms, 2 baths, is compli-
mented with new vinyl siding and
new metal roof. Around the corner
from the house is a aeriated pond,
full of catfish, with a pier and a
gazebo, a 30 x 60 barn, a game
room, a picnic area, 2 shops, an RV
parking port and a carport for a
luxury car, with a storage house or
Kid's playhouse. Security lighting
and cameras over all of property.
All for only $499,000. Telogia, FL.
MLS#200345.


Hospital Expenditures


HOSPITAL EXPENDI UNTY BUDGET FUNDED (EXCLUDING GRANTS)


HOSPITAL F
DATE DESCRIPTION


1/13/2006
1/132006


payroll
Payroll


1/13/2006 Payroll Processing
1/27/2006 Payroll
2JIO/2006 Pavrall


2/24/2006 Payroll
3/9/2006 PR TAX 01113/06
3/10/2006 Payroll
3/24/2006 Payroll
3/27/2006 Refund PR Ins Deductions
4/7/2006 Payroll
4/21/2008 Payroll
5/5/2006 Payroll
5/19/2006 Payroll -
6/2/2006 Payroll
6416/200 Pams


84.108.26 84,108.26
93.137.17 177 24 43


33.245.98 512.652.39


98.649.19


AT 12/31/06


1/13/2006:Supplies 13.077.81
1/17/2006!Supplies 39,374.62
1/20/2006 Expenditures 5,040.00
1/23/2006 Expenditures 1.411.74


1/26/2006 Expenditures 23,454.67
' 1/31/2006 PExnndituras 59. I


3/3012006 Expenditures 1,198.00
4/4/2006;Expendltures 64,55295
4/6/2006 GRANT RECEIPT (52,903.23
47/2006 Expenditures 52,903.23
4/17/2006 GRA T RECEIPT (7,200.00:
4/18/2006!Expendi ures 88,467.38
5/2/2006 Expenditures 53,605.15


52,452.431 229,834.11
57,492.43'
58.904.17!


82,358.841
82,954.19


5 83.833.44,
4 121.208.78! 400,952.32
2 132.157.301
0 184.565.90' 561.371.05
3 198.817.03 678,223.44
0 200.117031


205.107.001
252,148.60, 731,555.01
252,504.32!
325,886.241 935,538.07
327,084.24
391,637.19! 1,101,100.15
338,733.961
391.637.19i
384,437.19,
472.904.57! 1,278,332.65
526.509.721 1.428, 6.5 F


4.891.604.35


TOTAL EXPENDED YTD COUNTY FUNDS & HOSPIA FNS


TOTAL GRANT FUNDS EXPENDED 128,052.47
I IFI
AT 12/31/06 TOTAL EXPENDED YTD COUNTY FUNDS, HOSPITAL REVENUE & GRANTS 1 5,019,656.82

HOSPITAL EXPENDITURES FUNDED FROM OPERATIONAL REVENUES (EXCLUDING GRANTS)
I I I I III
HOSPITAL PAYROLL HOSPITAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES MO COST YTD COST
I FOR PAYROLL FOR PAYROLL
DATE DESCRIPTION AMOUNT TOTAL for MO DATE DESCRIPTION AMOUNT I TOTAL for MO & OPERATING EXP & OPERATING EXP
6/30/2006 Payroll 82,943.81 92,943.81 6/202006 Expenditures 23746.29 23,746.29 116,690.10
6/30/2006 Termnet chg Jan-June 309.27 24,055.56 116,999.37
72 r TOTAL EXP -JUNE 118,999.371
7/14/2006 Payroll WireTransferExp 108,941.20 108,941.20 7/5/2006 Expenditures 129,854.02 12,854.02
7/26/2006 Payroll WireTransferExp 106,021.40 214,962 7/18/200Expenditures 95,843.14 225,69716
Trrermnet chg JanJuly 192.76 Ii -,-
I TOTAL EXP JULY 433.106.521 550,105.89
8/8/2006 Payroll WireTransfer Exp 96,945. 6,945.60 8/1/2006 Expendiures 88,96.17 88.96.17
8/23/2006 PayrollWireTransferExp 104,436.20 201.381.80 8/5/2006 Expenditures 83,403.041 172,399.21
I Termnet chg August I 103.46 / 171,905.54 I
TOTAL EXP AUGUST 373,287.34 923,39323
9/7/2006 payroll Wire Transfer Exp 96,251.32 96,251.32 9/5/2006jExpenditures 171728.44 117268.44
9/21/2006 Payroll Wire Transfer Exp 102,324.52 198.575.84 /i
9119/2006 Expeindihres 115,188.22 24,456.66
Termnet chg Sept 162.841 224,619.50
TOTAL EXP SEPTEMBER 1 423,195.341 1,346,588.67
10/4/2006 Payroll Wire Transfer Exp 104,751.58 104,751.58 10/32006 Expenditures 44,564.63 44,564.63
10/18/2006 PayrollWire Transfer Exp 103,002.78 207,754.36 10/17/2006 Expenditures 146,73.25 191,302.88
10/30/2006!Expenditures 176.11 191.480.991 1
o Termonet Chg Oct. 135.081 191,616.07!
S TOTAL EXP OCTOBER 399,370.43 1,745,959.00
11/1/2006 Payroll Wire Transfer Exp 94,758.87 94,758.87 11/7/2006 Expenditures 149.817.90 149,817.901
11/16/2006 PayrollWire Transfer Exp 99,535.77 194.294.64 11/21/20061Expenditures | 95,134.78 244,952.68i
11/29/2006 Payroll Wire Transfer Exp 112,964.79 307,259.43 ITermnet Chg Nov I 111.04 245,063.72 5 2
1 TOTAL EXP NOVEMBER I 552323,11 2298,282.15
12/14/2006 PayrollrWie Transfer Exp 105,576.57 106,576.57 12/6/2006Expendtures 176292.72 176.29272
12/28/2006 Payroll Wire Transfer Exp 110,510.98 216,087.55 12/1/2006 xpenditures 30461.1 206,754.53'
Termrnel Chg-Dec 8.01 206.882541
.I TOTAL XP -DECEMBER 1 422,970.091 2,721,252.24
HOSPITAL REVENUE/EXPENDITURE RECONCILIATION
i i I i I I I Ii I Ii
.HOSPITAL REVENUESOURCES OTHER DEPOSITS EXPENDITURES
CAFETERIA PATIENT ITERMNET STATE DISP MEDICAID I MEDICARE HOSPITAL I LOANS TERMNET MONTHLY ACCOUNT
MONTH DEPOSITS PAYMENTS DEPOSITS SHARE DE P EFEP I EFTEP GRANTS INTEREST CO FUNDS REFUNDS CHARGES HOSPEXP BALANCE
dn)660 49393 1,428.33. 0.00 000 1.9222
Feb-06 748.45 1,62B.75 35' 151 4,297.30
Mar-06 878.50 3,419 4.092.60 3.58 13 12,800.07
Apr-On 608.00 6.074.131 1.954.00 I 60,103.23 5.990 144.72 60.103.23 21.297.47
May-06 524.50 56,953.421 2.034.20 278,30541 51,606.11 52.12, 10,000.00 85.19 51.606.11 369,081.93
Jun-06 857.00 72.671.321 4.731.45 20.833.00 157.811 | 64.05' 116.690.10 351,578.36
Jul-6 744.75 92,360.361 2.657.09 127.67200 214.020.26i 7,746.00 134.59 '. 192.761 44065976 356060.89
Aug-06 1006.00 101,479.12 4,555.00 0.00 29.445.85 21.566.90 74.68i 300,000.00 103A46 373,781.01 440,30397
SeP06 774.50 88.848.29: 2.017.40 37,841.85 90.48 162.84 431.032.50 1380688.15
06 77.00 1 ~ 4,.08 000 43 6 21.4976 1054 250,00000'00 135.08 ,399.235 359,52244
NO. 521.25 8.672.91 2,850.59 .6690 6017.2 33247159.74 5.38.34 11.04 552.212.11 381.271.58
Dec-06 706.75 106,530.66' 1,910.41 0.00 42 00 84.36 126.011 422,842.08 71.791.53
TOTAL REVENUE I
2,354,861.66 860.60 3 732,552.13 30,998.82 513,479.411 394,838.101 533,310.33 141,022.24 86624 50,1,142.46 1 2,84.1,162.251.


"n I n d I i' a"o n I Ies.






CARRABELLE REALTY, INC.

P.O. Drawer 708 1526 Highway 67 in Carrabelle, FL
www.carrabellerealty.net

1(850) 697-2181 1 (800) 530-1473

We are a small, independently owned agency. YOU, the customer, are
our most important asset whether you are BUYING or SELLING, we
go the extra mile to make sure you receive excellent service. If you
don't want to get lost in the crowd, stop by and get personal attention!

Carrabelle Realty is proud to announce an addition to our staff:
Mrs. Dale Millender is now a Sales Associate. Call her for all your
real estate needs at 850-519-7048.

-!












House 002: Country home in a private set- Golf Course: Prestigious lot on the-9th tee,
ting, 3BR/2BA, enclosed garage, separate corner lot, reduced to $299,000
workshop, fireplace, on 1 acre. Come take owner/agent.
a look and make an offer! $239,000








7-4 r








2003: 32'x64' double-tide on 1.96 acres on Harbor Rd., 3BR/2BA, large
pond, beautiful property $249,500.

NEW LISTINGS
Beach lot in private area, 50'x100', $895,000.
50'x150' MH lot, Lanark, $165,000. Reduced to $150,000.
(2) Five-acre tracts on Hwy. 67, $195,000 each.
One acre on Harbor Rd., high & dry, $109,500.
Walk to Lake Talquin, 32'x64' Redman DW, 3BR/2BA, great room on 1
acre at end of cul-de-sac, $118,500.
Weekend Retreat, 2BR Mobile Home on Corner Lot. $103,500.


C


I


Now is the tim

to subscribe

to the

Franklin

Chronicle!


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


19 January 2007 Page 7


the
Chronicle Bookshop

Mail Order Service *
P.O. Box 590
Eastpoint, FL 32328

SEE PAGE 10 FOR MORE BOOKS AND ORDER FORM

(316) Claude Pepper & Ed Ball, Politics, Purpose, and Power. By
Tracy E. Danese. The power struggle between Claude Pepper and Ed
Ball in the mid-twentieth century in large part determined the future of
Florida. This lively account of their interlocking careers-both domi-
nated by a personal quest for power, money, and purpose-illuminates
the historical role of these two forceful personalities.
Ed Ball, brother-in-law of Alfred I. duPont and trustee of the duPont
empire, was at one time the single most powerful businessman in the
state. Claude Pepper, a senior U.S. senator was the state's heir to the lib-
eral legacy of New Deal politics. By mid-century, the duPont-Ball
empire controlled a major part of the Florida business and political


Tracy Danese, whose law career has often brought him into close con-
tact with Florida's political scene, describes the economic setting in
Florida when Ball and Pepper arrived in the twenties and the prelude to
their conflicts, and shows how their careers developed in tandem
throughout the depression era and World War II and its'aftermath. He
discusses milestones in this story: Pepper's unopposed election in 193(1.
influenced by corruption in Hillsborough County politics in the 193-4
senate election; conflict between Pepper and Ball over the presidential
veto of a 1044 \war funding measure; their acrimonious struggle over
-:owXnestulp-Ott tlih AIJlinrK.C.i'.ta Linc RjiLruad, the. famous Elorida-
SEast Cloast Radl'..a, strike that led to measures that forced the duPont


trust to divest itself of the largest banking chain in Florida; and their
final titanic clash over the senatorial election of 1950.
With a strange blend of principled behavior and personal ambition, the
men personified the ambiguous nature of politics. Ed Ball adamantly
upheld what he viewed as his property rights; Pepper unabashedly
sought political power. Until now, only bits and pieces of their dynam-
ic clash have been told. The two figures still are fresh in the minds of
many Floridians, and this story will be welcomed by historians, politi-
cal scientists, and general readers alike.
Ball and Pepper arrived in Florida as young men at the height of the
Florida Boom. Claude Pepper came seeking his fortune with only a
Harvard law degree and a deep-seated ambition to achieve political
position and power. Ed Ball came in the company of Alfred I. duPont,
who chose Florida as the place where he would focus his talents and
vision to build a legacy. When the boom collapsed, followed by the
nMore profound disaster of the Great Depression, these two men found
their respective paths to power closely tied to the effects of the com-
pounded economic disaster that befell Florida.
Pepper seized on the promise of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New
Deal as the means to distribute more equitably the bounty of a restruc-
tured nation. His successful bid for a U.S. Senate seat following only the
two-year term in the Florida House of Representatives was a major
accomplishment for one with so little political tenure in the state. It
marked him as a major state political figure, and his prominence as a
Roosevelt loyalist in the Senate got him national attention.
Ball ascended to total control of the banking and manufacturing enter-
prises controlled by the duPont Trust in 1935 on Alfred's death. He
continued to build the Florida National Bank chain throughout the
Great Depression and also implemented the West Florida phase of
duPont's grand plan for a manufacturing business founded on Florida's
timberland resources. In the early 1940s, he emerged from Alfred's
shadow as his own man when he initiated the long fight to acquire con-
trol of the bankrupt Florida East Coast Railway Company.
University of Florida Press, hardcover, copyright 2000, 301 pp. Sold
nationally for $34.95. Bookshop price=$32.00.


CiaadeDeiif~e per wiih Hai s-Gorev


(310) Spring Creek Chronicles, I by Leo Lovel, Illustrated by
Clay Lovel and edited by Ben Lovel. Here is the second volume
written by a northern Floridian in a collection of observations,
opinions, true-life experiences and related tales gathered from
living and working on the Gulf Coast. Many take place in or
near the community of Spring Creek, a small fishing village
located at the end of County Road 365. Commercial fishing,
crabbing and oystering have been the backbone of this economy.
Author Lovel tells these stories with a glimpse back to what it
was like to live and work around the woods and waters of the
Old South, a time and place he reminds the reader that is quick-
ly being erased into history. Paperback, sold across the
Panhandle for about $14.95, the Chronicle bookshop price. Leo
Lovel owns and operates the Spring Creek Restaurant at 33 Ben
Willis Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, phone: 850-926-
3751.


(322) Pepper: Eyewitness To A Century. The Chronicle book-
shop has obtained a few previously owned copies of Claude
Denson Pepper's memoir sold nationally for $17.95 and pub-
lished by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1987, 320 pp. This is the
tale of a man who has lived long, made history, and compro-
mised nothing. The story begins in 1900 and nearly spans the
century. These copies are in good condition. Bookshwp.pricS =
v*4 v' i '. 4


New Duplex For Rent: 1600 sq. ft.!

A new, unfurnished duplex apartment with two bedrooms is now available for rent on a six-
month or one-year lease at the Chronicle compound, at 33 Begonia Street, Eastpoint. The .
apartment is 1600 square feet. Call Andy Dyal at the Franklin Chronicle for details at ':,
850-670-1687. It's on Eastpoint water and sewer; has brand new appliances including stove,
dishwasher, disposal, refrigerator, washer and dryer-all General Electric. Heat pump for heat- ,. ..."
ing and cooling.
Rent = $800 per month, unfurnished. First and last months rent due upon signing of the lease:
damage deposit required. Small animals are permitted. The building is paired with another
duplex, and surrounded with chain link fence, creating a one-acre kennel. -l iN

I. PI














Private Entrance ABOVE: Living/Dining Room
with Kitchen in Background


equipped with Bedroom on Right.
Refrigerator/Freezer,
......:. .. Dishwasher, Stove,.
Disposal adjacenttoanc BELOW ABOVE: Bathroom with TiletBath in
_Pantry equipped with Background. Walk-In Closet
Washer/Dryer. All GE on the Right.













For Hallway. Secondcall:
equipped withinforoomi




















Andy Dyal
Rear of Duplex on WeRefrigst erator/FreezerThe Franklin Chronicle
Side Disposawith Concrete Pto io.: BELOW850-670-1687 Bathroom with Toilet/Bath in
...... -u T 850-6701687


I








Page 8 19 January 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


C Florida Classified

FCANAdvertising Network

Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience of

1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!

The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper with
the FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-1687, fax: 850-670-1685.
i


GENERAL CONTRACTORS
RG0055056


Announcements
What Destroys Relationships?
Answer pg 446 Buy and Read
Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard
Send $8.00 to: Hubbard
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Automotive
$500 POLICE IMPOUNDS
Cars from $500! Tax Repos, US
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Health Insuraice
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Call now (800)704-3154, x 916.
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& woods in excellent location.
50% OFF recent appraisal! Great
financing. Call now (866)352-
2249, x 1097.
VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS
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trout stream with private elevated
homesite, secluded, great view,
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(866)789-8535.


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North Carolina Cool Mountain
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BROCHURE (800)642-5333.
Realty Of Murphy 317 Peachtree
St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.com.
WATERFRONT BARGAINS! 1
TO 7 acre waterfronts in,
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wooded, panoramic water views,
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Call now (800)564-5092 X 527.
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- $95,900; Snow-capped moun-
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Recreational paradise. Low taxes.
EZ terms. Call Utah Ranches,
LLC. (888)541-5263.
MOUNTAIN FARM in Western
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long-range views in high eleva-
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$699,000. valleytownrealty@veri-
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http: //valleytownrealty.cor
(800)632-2212.
NC MOUNTAINS Log Cabin
shell on mountain top, view,
trees, waterfall & large public lake
nearby, paved private access,
gated community, $139,500
owner (866)789-8535.
LARGE POND, INCREDIBLE
MTN VIEWS, 1200' OF MTN
STREAM, 17 AC $239,900.
Possibly the greatest mtn views
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pond. Call owner directly now
(877)777-4837.
SPORTSMAN'S PARADISE
`DIRECTLY 'ADJOINING
7.00 (00 ACRE .NATIONAL
FOREST, 16+ AC $159,900.
LUniruted hunnng.'hikifg, camp-
ing and trophy trout fishing all in
your back yard. New Release!
Hurry, only one! (877)777-4837.-
270* UNOBSTRUCTED, 40
MILE MTN VIEWS, STATE
ROAD FRONTAGE 8 AC
$129,900. Build your, dream
cabin with direct 40 miles mtn
views all around you. Private
ownership to direct National
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stream. Ready to build. Call now
(877)777-4837.
Coastal Georgia- New, Pre-
Construction Golf Community.
Large lots & condos w/ deepwa-
ter, marsh, golf, nature views.
Gated, Golf, Fitness Center,
Tennis, Trails, Docks. $70k's-
$300k. (877)266-7376 www.coop-
erspoint.com.

Steel Buildings
STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory
Deals. Save $$$. 40 x 60' to 100 x
200'. Ex: 50 x 100 x 12' =
$3.60/sq ft. (800)658-2885.
www.rigidbuilding.com.
METAL BUILDING-Dealer
Cost-National Steel
Manufacturer Offering Premium
Straight Wall Buildings,
Substantial Discounts. 2,000-
100,000 square feet. Shop, Retail,
Industrial, Strip, Farm, Mini-
warehouse. Erection Available.
(800)720-6857.
BUILDING SALE...Jan/Feb
delivery or deposit holds till
Spring. 25'x36'x14' $5400.
40'x60'x16' $12,800. Front end
optional. Rear end included.
Many others. Pioneer, (800)668-
5422 or www.pioneersteel.com.


HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR EMPLOYMENT


Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders, Scrapers, Excavators
-National Certification
-Job Placement Assistance


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Associated Training Services www.equipmentoperator.com


mm Is-R i'n


Foundation Pilings
Commercial Construction
Utility Work-Public &
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MARKS INSURANCE

AGENCY, INC.





WRITING:
Home, Auto, Life, Business, Marine, Bonds
and Other Lines of Insurance
See us for your insurance needs at:
61 Avenue E
Apalachicola, Florida 32320
850-653-2161 800-586-1415




Do You or a Family Member Need:

oxygen motorized ouam Ii
or manual wheel-
chairs hospital
bed lift chairs *
diabetic shoes Ol i
bedside commodes
FRANKLIN COUNTY: (850) 670-5555
TOLL FREE: (888) 831-6754
LEON-WAKULLA COUNTY: (850) 926-9602
REBA BRASWELL, MANAGER RAY BUTLER, ASST. MANAGER
CLEVE LINDSEY, CERTIFIED EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN
DEAN FEEHRER, LICENSED RESPIRATORY THERAPIST
AMBER BRANCH, RECEPTIONIST


r


Looking for friendly, self-starter and self-moti-
vated person who wants to earn excellent com-
missions selling ad space for the Franklin
Chronicle on a part-time basis to start. Will
train. Interested persons who are willing to be
a team player are invited to send their resume
and three business references to: Franklin
Chronicle, Attention: Personnel, P.O. Box
590, Eastpoint, FL 32328.


Tractor Work
* Aerobic Sewage Treatment Systems
Marine Construction
Septics Coastal Hauling


SALES

HELP WANTED


FOR SALE


1991 CHEVY SCOTTSDALE 4x4
165,000 miles
350 V8
4 Speed Manual Transmission
AM/FM Cassette Radio
$2950.00
Call Charlie at 370-6544 or 670-8100


C


MARGIlI Y ~YYN I


CZ'i


~I











The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


19 January 2007 Page 9:


Mike Marshall: 850-899-5319 Office: 850-697-3428
Michael Marshall: 850-528-6200 Michael Mann: 850-899-5323


Marshall Marine
Fiberglass & Transport, LLC

Boat Repair Fiberglass Fabrication & Supplies
Full Service Boat Yard Custom Boxes
Over-the-Road Boat Transport Meter Covers

Shipping: 1205 SE Ave. B MMarsh3139@aol.com
Carrabelle, FL 32322 www.boattransport.net 5







2x2 Rates 2x4 Rates
Statewide $1200 Statewide $2400
Regional or National Regional Placement
Placement also available also available
Regions: North, South, Central Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million Total Circulation: 2.2 Million



















Child Custody Real Estate

Child Support Criminal "JUStiCe Will Prevail"
Living Trusts Pobate & more! We AreHere To Help You!
"ve ae.Here io Help YOUo


Call Toll-Free (800)231-9679





CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date ofthisNotice 1/09/07 InvoiceNo. 10533
Description of Vehicle: Make Nisson Model Altima Color Tan
Tag No.H563XZ Year 1997 state FL in No. 1N4BU31D2VC189911

To Owner Cleveland Ece Dear To Lien Holder"
32 School Road
Eastpoint, FL 32328



You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 1/04/07 at the request of FHP that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 160.00 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you are hereby notified that on 2/07/07 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described.above will be sold at public auction '
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint; FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219






Now is the time to

subscribe to the


FRANKLIN


CHRONICLE

The Chronicle is published every other Friday.
Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County

are $16.96 including taxes for one year, or 26
issues. The out-of county rate is $22.26 includ-
ing taxes.


Subscriber

Address


City

Zip

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E-Mail
O Renewal*


State


Basic Subscription, 26 issues.

O Out of County O In County
Date:

*If renewal, please include mailing label


Please send this form to:


Franklin Chronicle
Post Office Box 590
Eastpoint, Florida 32328
850-670-1687


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle
pages is an efficient way to promote your business to
the public and save money at the same time. These
ads are strictly business cards magnified to 2 columns
by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two
insertions. Send your business card or copy to:
Franklin Chronicle, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL
32328 or fax 850-670-1685. Your check for $15.00 will
guarantee position in the next issue.










COASTAL CYCLE SERVICE

Electrical/Fluids/Brakes
Suspension/Tuning

Service and Repairs Call: 850-653-3881
Apalachicola, Florida
12-08/12-22/01-05/01-19












Stop reusing old red rubber catheters!
Get FDA approved antibiotic "Germ-Killing"
catheters that help reduce UTI's!

*Covered by Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross Blue Shield,
United Healthcare, Aetna, GEHA, and many more.
*Insurance billed directly.. No out-of-pocket cost* if qualified.
We take care of all the insurance paperwork.
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Free samples.* Professional, caring staff.


HAIR NAILS PEDICURE SPA WAXING

FACIALS BODY WRAPS TANNING

Connie Roehr, Nail Tech Angela Creamer, Stylist
407 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL 32328
Telephone: 850-670-5220 01-1902-02






BACKFLOW ENCLOSURES

By Marshall Marine &
Fiberglass
Carrabelle, Florida


Office Phone: (850) 697-3428
Mike Marshall cell: (850) 899-5319
Curt Chisholm Sales: (850) 899-5327

www.boattransport.net mmarsh3139@aol.com











WALK-IN


BATH TUB


New Freedom for

Catheter Users.


Call Today. suILZN n. -


1-800-755-7880
*Medicare deductible and co-pay may apply. Prescriptions are required and
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If you, a deceased spouse or parent suffered from any of the fol-
lowing ailments on or before November 21, 1996 and
were advised by a treating doctor that the condition was
a result of cigarette smoking, you may be eligible to file a lawsuit
against big tobacco.

Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer
Kidney Cancer Laryngeal Cancer
Bladder Cancer Pancreatic Cancer
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Oral Cavity/Tongue Cancer
Call Fleming & Associates toll free at 1-800-940-3365 for more information.


Andres Pereira with Fleming & Assoc. LLP. is
licensed to practice in FL and has his principle
office located in Houston, TX.


Fleming &Associates,L.L.P
1330 Post Oak Blvd., Suite 3030
Houston, TX 77056-3019


The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.













CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 1/11/07 Invoice No. 10534
Description of Vehicle: Make Ford Model Taurus Color Black
TagNo.Q49DS Year 1997 State FL VinNo. 1FALP53SXVA313177

To owner. Tiffany & Scott To Lien Holder Robert Folger
Youngblood 8356 Cherish Drive
833 Bellevue Street Micco, FL 32976
Palm Bay, FL 32907

You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 1/07/07 at the request of FHP that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 402.90 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of$ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4)'.of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you are hereby notified that on 2/10/07 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


H erita e The donation is tax deductible.

fhBi B d "Pick-up is free.
-, B li. d We take care of all the paperwork.
















Pay The County Bills

The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of-
$937,226.60 at their January 2, 2007 meeting. The bills are listed as fol- o
lows, published for the Board by the County Finance Office.

/ I tirA.T'.Ui. ,:1 FRANKLIN COUNTY '1


1 Ed, rit.CI. : W
oANt' 'EltC-,
ft8 i *:t,- : ^ C-cr .'> :*: **'


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001272
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002029
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NEECE TIRE & AUTO SERVICE
NEXTEL PARTNERS INC
OFFICE DEPOT
OFFICE L STATE ATTO
PARKER SERVICES. INC.
PAUL'S PEST CONTROL, INC
PENDLETON/DORIS B.
PIERL LLC/ANTR ONY
POSTMASTER EASTPOINT
POUNCEY/PAUTIRE & AUTO SERVICE

OQALITY OATHE SUPPLY
QUILL CORPORATION
R PRAY K ASSOCIATES, INC
REDDYY ICE-ALBANY
RELIABLE CORPORATION
FRIEND POWER CORPORATION
SCOTT/WILLIAM E.
SHULER/THOMAS M.
SIEMENS BLAUUSTILDIN
SIGN DE-SIGN
SOUTHERN AVIONICS COWEEKLPAN
SPERRY
SPIRIT SERVICES COMPANY
STANDARD INSUCORPORANCE COMPA
STONE/MELANIE R
SWEARING POWERN-LORD EQUIP CO
SMITZER/ LORI
TAX CO/WLLECTOR FRANKLIN
TAYLOR SIEMENSBUUILDING SUPPLY
TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
TERMINIX


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38050 01/02/ 07
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38057 01/02/07
3806 01/02/07
30961 01/02/07
3806 01/ 02/07
38063 10 1/ 2 07
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3 064 01 /02 0
38066 01 02/07
38067 01/02/07
38068 0102/07
38069 01 30207
38070 1 0207 '
38071 01 02 07
38072 01/02 07
380735 012/207
380746 0102 07
38057 01/02 07
380768 01/02/ 07
38077 01/02/ 07
380780 01/02/ 07
380791 01/02/ 07
38082 01/02/ 07
38083 01/02/ 07
380824 01/02/ 07
38085 01/02 07
380846 01/02/ 07
380857 01/02/ 07
38086 01/02 07





38087 01/02/07
38088 01/02/07
38089 012/207
38090 01/02/07
38091 01/02/07
38091 01/02/07


GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
FUND RECAP:
FUND DESCRIPTION
001 GENERAL FUND
120 FINE AND FORFEITURE
130 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT FUND
137 FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC LIBRARY
140 ROAD AND BRIDGE
142 MOSQUITO CONTROL
163 ENHANCED 911 FUND
170 AIRPORT FUND
180 AFFORD.HOUSING ASSIST TRUST
305 FRANKLIN COUNTY RECYCLING
TOTAL ALL FUNDS


BANK RECAP:
BANK NAME
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
TOTAL ALL BANKS


OL540R-V06.71 PAE 1i


AMOUNT


133.21
118.41
.9 .II
*l.ii. 00
69 90
?9209 99
i 00.00
1 5 .51
,'.49 .13




820.00
,7,749.13
60.00
2,.3 00

150.00
1, 502.77.
629.64,
6l-,:! 00

4,327.05
24F 'S"
43 90.00
3 ,44 72
',0 00
3 .I73 53
2*- 8-' 30
4 ,30l 01
0 a5.0u
785.00
102 00

460.32
2,300.00
3 3,450 00
451,7833.00'
:.7B .00
30.00
141.98
54.18
16.99
1,597.04
295.80
60.00
169,685.50
1,440.00
195.00
180.00
2,293.00
379.93
180.99
.104.85
142.93
11,695.00
105.60
251.46
185.21
207.74
3,551.00
2,900.00
150.00
1,646.48
4,125.00
S32.07
601.80
150.00
227.37
2,750.00
50.85
71.31
133.86
31.47
3,750.37
195.90
286.00
937,226.60


DISBURSEMENTS
369,409.12
497,405.95
13,450.00
3,606.64
20.862.84
568.74
2,752.92
1,646.48
23,398.91
4,125.00
937,226.60



DISBURSEMENTS
937,226.60
937,226.60


MEDICAL I








Page 10 19 January 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


(22) Newly Discovered Copies Of Lynn Willoughby's Out-Of-
Print Fair to Middlin', The Story Of The Antebellum Cotton
Trade Of The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee River Valley,
University of Alabama Press, 1993, 202pp. Doing business in
the antebellum South required a very delicate balancing act -
with the central role in the process played by the coastal mer-
chant. From this vantage point the merchant manipulated the
resources from the upriver suppliers and through an intricate
economic and banking network provided cotton to the interna-
tional brokers. It was, in effect, a closed system on each river
under the careful control of the coastal merchants. This study
focuses on the port of Apalachicola, Florida, and the business-
men who created a chain of international finance and trade in
the promotion and distribution of the Old South's major source
of income.
Fair to Middlin' provides a detailed, highly readable description
of a regional antebellum economy in the Apalachicola/
Chattahoochee River valley and reinforces the argument that
the South was self-sufficient and not dependent on other regions
for its food supply. Willoughby explains in fascinating detail
how the businessmen associated with the area's cotton trade
coped with the poor conditions of transportation, communica-
tion, money, and banking.
Early regional economies revolved around the rivers that repre-
sented the primary transportation arteries for trade in the Old
South. Cotton businessmen located along the waterway and on
the coast neatly divided the labor necessary to market the
region's major source of income. Local money and banking con-
ditions retarded the economic growth of this frontier area, and
only the innovations of these coastal businessmen enabled the
continuance of this vital trade network.
The advent of the railroad shattered this ongoing business
arrangement and completely altered the cohesiveness of the
river economy. Railroads fundamentally changed the business
customs and trade routes so that boundaries of the once sepa-
rate river economies blurred and eventually faded, gradually
leading to an integrated national economy. Bookshop price
$29.95. Hardcover.


The Ant,
Apal,
. -


,/ru to-






ebellum Cotton Trade of the
achicola Chattahoochee
River Valley


(126) Shipwreck and Adventures of Monsieur Pierre Viaud.
From 1768, the sensational story of a shipwreck near Dog
Island, and the adventures of Pierre Viaud and his search for
survival. Published by the University of Florida Press, 139pp.
Hardcover. Sold nationally for $24.95. Bookshop price =
$20.95.











The St. Joe Company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle

.". ..


L?~~ v r(lizn b ?


(124) The Expanding Vista by Mary
Ann Watson. Hardcover, Oxford
University Press, 273 pp. This is the
story of American television in the
Kennedy years beginning with the
groundbreaking first "TV debates,"
and ending with the muffled drums
and a united population still trying to
comprehend the unthinkable death of
its President, united electronically in
national mourning. Watson has writ-
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Americans, and how the medium
emerged. Here is also a documented
yet memorable telling of the story
fading rapidly from the American
mind. Originally sold nationally for
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(317) Green Empire, The St. Joe Company and the Remaking
of Florida's Panhandle. By Kathryn Ziewitz and June Wiaz.
Based on hundreds of sources-including company executives,
board members, and investors as well as those outside the com-
pany-this factual and objective history describes the St. Joe
Company from the days of its founders to the workings and
dealings of its present-day heirs. For all readers concerned with
land use and growth management, particularly those with an
interest in Florida's fragile wildlife and natural resources, Green
Empire will generate important debate about an often-over-
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(21) Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers.
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Rogers traces and documents the economic, social and political
emergence of the Gulf coast port of Apalachicola and the pris-
tine barrier island, Saint George. From the earliest times, both
the island and Apalachicola have become intertwined. The
account of machinations of controversial developer William
Lee Popham is the first phase of area development, later leading
to the controversial struggles of the 1970s when environmental-
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and economic fate of the Bay area. The Chronicle has obtained
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(318) Home To War, A
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