Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00289
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: August 4, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00289
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA, FL
32320


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., Franklin





.Chronicle

Volume 15, Number 16 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER August 4 17, 2006


Millage Rate Set At

4.054 By County

Commission

Budget Hearings Set
The Franklin Board of County Commissioners established the
tentative millage rate at their meeting on Tuesday, August 1,
2006 to be the same as last year, 4.054.
Marcia Johnson, County Clerk of Court, told the County Com-
missioners:
"The Board needs to decide on the millage rate for the TRIM
(Truth in Millage) Notices. Your millage rate for the current
year is 4.0504 mills per $1,000 of taxable property value. The
rolled back rate (the millage rate to generate the same amount
of taxes as last year) is 3.3284. The tentative budget right now
would require 3.8378 mills to fund. If the Board approves the
same millage rate as last year of 4.0504 mills, that should
generate another $874,000 in tax dollars over the tentative
budget.
"There are some unknown budgetary items we are dealing with
right now such as property and health insurance increases
estimated at around $290,000 and support for the hospital.
Once the millage rate is set, it can be lowered; however, in
order for it to be increased, notices would have to be sent out
to every taxpayer in the county and because of time constraints,
I'd recommend* you approve a millage rate that would allow
funding for all necessary activities. I'd also like to remind you
that should a decision be made regarding the hospital that
results in its closure, the County will be responsible for am-
bulance service and would have to increase the number of
ambulances operating at this time which would be a substan-
tial amount of money also. I have the figures on amounts of
increases should you desire to increase the millage rate over
this year's rate of 4.0504 mills."
"The Board needs to set a date for the first public hearing on
the budget. We have to meet deadlines with the newspaper
and work around the budget hearings of the school board, so
I'd like to schedule the first public hearing on Wednesday,
September 6th at 5:30 P.M. You have-your first workshop
scheduled all day on Tuesday, August 8th, and that will give
you several weeks to have any other workshops before the
first public hearing."



Library Students Attend

Advanced Space

Academy In Huntsville


TIGERS students suited up at Space Academy.


One week in June will be re-
membered as the highlight of
summer vacation, 2006, by
ten TIGERS/BEST students
from the Franklin County
Public Library's award-win-
ning after-school program.
The Carrabelle and
Apalachicola students and 22
members from Gulf and Bay
County's youth programs at-
tended the Advanced Space
Academy at the U. S. Space &
Rocket Center in Huntsville,
Alabama. The Gulf Coast
Work Force Board, which
funds TIGERS (Teens In Gear
Enjoy Realize Succeed) and
the programs from Gulf and
Bay Counties, awarded full-
tuition scholarships to the
students for attendance at the
weeklong, college-accredited
program. The University of
Alabama-Huntsville awards
one hour of freshman-level
general science credit to all
graduates of the Academy.
The TIGERS students from
Franklin County participated
in Advanced Space Academy
hands-on training in the Pilot
and Mission Specialist Tracks
with students from all over the
world, some of whom paid
thousands of dollars each to
attend .this prestigious Acad-
emy. Participants learned
teamwork, leadership, sci-
ence, and math skills as well
as the physical and emotional
demands that astronauts and
engineers must face on each
space mission. Students re-
ceived scuba training, experi-
enced weightlessness, built
rockets, and received exten-
sive instruction on the orbiter,
space station, and mission
control.
The ten students from
Franklin County were:
Tomilee Dowden, Pamela
Jones, Chelsea Soderholm,
Patrick Jones, Zachary
4


Jones, Asenath Thomas,
Tydron Wynn, Leighton
Morris, Charles Goggins,
and Derick Rhodes.
Quotes from the Advanced
Space Academy trainees in-
clude: "I got to learn all about
the astronauts and I got to gc
scuba diving!" "We did [brief-
ings] on solar physics, Rus-
sian space history, the
anatomy of a shuttle, and
many more." "[In the 24 foot
deep scuba tank] we got tc
hold a 100 pound ball on our
finger!! Everything seemed tc
be weightless." "Space camp
was cool. I learned a'few
things, for example, the or-
biter and space station sur-
vive using the ECLSS...the
Environment Control Life
Support System." "We did
Mission Control where we had
to act like we were giving or-
ders to the people in space.
"During orientation we found
out that we would be doing
activities for 16 hours each
day. I said to myself, 'What a
great way to loose weight.'
ended up meeting a lot of nice
people and it was definitely a
great experience."
Two adult program chaper-
ones from the TIGERS pro-
gram took pictures and filmed
the students' achievements
throughout the week. At the
graduation ceremony on Fri-
day, Tomilee Dowden o
Carrabelle, was singled out tc
receive the Right Stuff medal
which is given to only one stu
dent from the entire Academy
each week. Coordinator B. J
Neshat stated that "all the stu
dents who attended, benefited
in some positive way" and
Helen Sinclair, program coor-
dinator, said, "It was a gooc
experience for me as well as
the students and I am grate-
ful for the opportunity."


Inside This Issue
10 Pages
Travel Highlights: Franklin County ....... 1, 6, 7
Library Students at Space Academy................ 1
Franklin Briefs .............................................. 2
Editorial & Commentary ...................... 3, 4, 5
Ashley Enters Commission Race .................. 7
FCAN ........................................................ 8
Business Card Directory .............................. 9
Bookshop ................................................... 10


Weems Management

Meeting

By Richard E. Noble
"The County took over the management of the hospital (Weems)
on January 1," Mr. Alan Pierce began. "We entered into.a con-
tract with Blackhawk Health Care to manage the hospital on
behalf of the County. And in this six month period it has not
all been a smooth progression. There have been issues ... that
were unexpected. I thought that it would be a good time-after
six months-to evaluate where we are and to see if it is the
direction that we want to go in or if there are changes that we
want to make ... We now have a sense of where we are and
how much it is costing ... I would like to recommend that your
hospital Board become active in the issue of whether we want
to improve and refine our management tools or we ought to
leave them the same. I think there are some issues ... that we
now have a better handle on ... Your hospital Board is in place
now: we ought to utilize that board; we ought to ask their
advice. I want to take this opportunity today to have the Board
talk a little bit and have Blackhawk come up and give you a
run down at least on the revenues and the expenditures. I
guess that the easiest way to start is with a brief overview of
what has been accomplished in this last six months."
Gail Dodds from the hospital Board then introduced the new
head of nursing at the Weems hospital, Candy Foxx, who will
start officially on August 7 and will be coming before the Board
in the future.
Ron Wolfe, current Weems administrator, was then called for-
ward. "I just wanted to make a couple of opening comments-
to give you an operational report on where we stand. We have
now been running the hospital for six months and we have
been doing quite a bit to try to refine the operation and in-
crease the "paying" business. Paying business of course means
the people with insurance and Medicare or Medicaid. We have
tried to get new services at the hospital tb capture new busi-
ness that has been leaving the County. The hospital has, of
course, an old facility and we do not have all the best equip-
ment in the world but we do have some equipment and re-
sources that we can take advantage of and we are doing that.
"We opened our GI Lab several weeks ago and that is going
strong. We have our Sleep Lab equipment in. In the next two
or three weeks we are going to start taking patients there. We
are also in the process of trying to reopen the surgery depart-
ment-(this would mean) more pace-maker business and sur-
gical business. All that will produce future revenues in Medi-
care and Medicaid which is what this hospital needs.
"We have a tremendous core of employees over there. Their
loyalty is unquestionable; they have worked under some pretty
strained circumstances-without benefits-but yet they stuck
by this hospital and this County and they are ready to con-
tinue that trend into the future. Really they deserve all your
* praise and commendations. I have been very pleased to work
with them ... You can all be very proud of what you haie over
there.
"We all know that we are experiencing these financial difficul-
ties, many of which were unforeseen; many of which were be-
yond the County's control and our control-but they are going
to be eventually resolved.
"We still continue to get a lot of self-pay-which are indigent,
bad debt etc. and these continue to straddle the hospital quite
a bit; because these are the revenues which we are going to
have the most difficulty in collecting in the futures well as
today. That is why we want to increase the other services to
offset that.
"I am really pleased at the way the resources are going. You
have really picked a tremendous Board. Ms. Dodds has been a
gem to work with and I think that she deserves a round of
applause. She knows her business and she has been very help-
ful coming out to the hospital on her own time. I agree with
Mr. Pierce that this (hospital) Board can stand a lot more re-
sponsibility to take some of the weight off the County
Commission's shoulders.
SMr. Peterman from the Blackhawk group then came forward
to speak for the Hospital. "First of all I just want to say that
back in January when we first came here to help out, we just
wanted to make sure that whatever we did would be beneficial
Sto the County; that it would be a partnership and that we
Should work together-and if it didn't work out we would un-
t derstand that. We just want to be a blessing to the community
Sand if it is not working out that way then we can talk about
how to resolve that.
S"But what we would like to talk about today is that we would
First like to acknowledge the issues. We all know why I am
here today. We all know that billing and collections has not
happened as quickly as we all would have liked. We apologize
Sfor the fact that it hasn't. But some good things have hap-
Spened in the last couple of weeks. We received a Medicaid
payment for $188,000. We are expecting a minimum of
$110,000 this week. We received a Blue Cross payment this
week as well. So everything is starting to open up and the
billing and collection is starting to happen. We have compiled
a six month report and we are going to be presenting that and
a we will prepare a report on a month to month basis from now
[ on.
John Russell then addressed the Board with regards to the
I hospital's financial status. "We have an income statement here
e and a balance sheet for the first six months. Through the first
a five months the hospital had .a loss of $113,000. As of June
30th we have a loss of 55-56 thousand dollars. The facility is
doing very well financially. It is doing better financially than
even our expectations. This was a turn-around situation ... In
general the facility is performing very well ... there has been a
small loss over the six months. Your busy season is actually
e right now. I would expect that as your tourist season contin-
- ues we (the hospital) will continue to have good months.
f "Back in January we discussed the billing to Medicare and
) Medicaid and that we didn't intend to bill right away. There
were lots of reasons why we decided to do that. If we were to
have billed our Medicare that immediate amount would have
y been withheld from the moneys that we billed (and paid against
old debts from previous hospital owners and operators). That
may still be the case ... the bottom line is that we have got
1 verbal communication that no matter who bills and when they
1 bill those moneys will be deposited into the County's operat-
ing account. As far as what is out there from Medicare we
\ have about $900,000 of net Medicare. So if we billed right
s away we would get about $900,000 of Medicare reimburse-
ment."
Continued on Page 10


Travel Highlights:

Franklin County

Publisher's Note: This piece is part of a continuing publi-
cation of notable sights and locations for the visiting trav-
eler, and perhaps the local residents as well. Telephone
numbers are given when available along with additional
directions to these sometimes overlooked locations. The
list does not include commercial or private entities.
1. Apalachicola National Estuarine Reserve
A visitor center with exhibits, videos, "hands-on" room, lab,
auditorium and greenhouse complete with tanks and aquari-
ums with live fish, turtles and other marine life.
In Apalachicola at the end of Market Street, (850) 653-8063.
www.nos.noaa.gov/acrm/nerr/reserve/nerrapalicola
Bring the whole family to enjoy the following features:
.* Nature Trail Boardwalk
* Educational Exhibits
* Aquaria with local fish, turtles and more
* Bird Viewing Areas
* Natural Resources Information
Directions: Drive north on Market Street past the yellow blink-
ing light to the end. Turn left and go through the entry gate to
the first building on the left. 850-653-8063.


Research Reserve


Over the past two years the Reserve has been involved in the
design of a new facility that will house all staff that are cur-
rently in the Apalachicola and Eastpoint offices and include a
visitor's center and multi-purpose room. Construction design
for the new facility, which will be located on a 26.5-acre site
off Island Drive in Eastpoint, is complete. The architectural
and engineering design was accomplished by Eskew, Dumez
& Ripple, a New Orleans based firm, and meets LEED (Lead-
ership in Engineering and Environmental Design) certification
at the silver level. Some of the sustainable features of the build-
ing and grounds include pervious parking and walkways, use
of native vegetation for landscaping, cisterns to collect drain-
age from the roof, a highly efficient air handling system and
light fixtures, zero and minimum flow toilets, use of recycled
materials, and positioning windows to allow for maximum
natural lighting. A 5,400 square foot visitor's center, multi-
purpose room with seating for 130,. amphitheater, and media
room round out-the public amenities planned for the new fa-
cility. For visitors, the facility is meant to demonstrate the
connectivity of natural habitats, and the connections with the
Apalachicola Bay system that the. human community shares
and relies on for its own cultural and economic well being. In
short, it will offer a.sense of place.
To protect these distinctive natural features for the enjoyment
of future generations;-:the Florida Legislature created aquatic
preserves. The first aquatic preserve was established in Estero
Bay in 1966, the result of an increased environmental aware-
ness among Florida citizens in the early 1960's. By 1975 the
Florida Aquatic Preserve Act was passed rand the existing pre-
serves were brought under a standard set of management cri-
teria.
Aquatic preserves are submerged lands of exceptional beauty
which are to be maintained in their natural or existing condi-,
tions. All but five of these 42 preserves are located on the
coast in the shallow waters of estuarines and the continental
shelf. Estuaries are protected nearshore waters, such as bays
and lagoons, where fresh and salt water mix. Their unique
environmental conditions create very delicate and productive
ecosystems. Various types of marine organisms spend all or
part of their life cycles in these estuarines, forming fragile com-
munities in which the complete dependence between plants
and animals is crucial to the survival of all the species in-
volved.
2. Apalachicola Wildlife and Environmental Area
The best way to explore the land and water of the Apalachicola
River Wildlife and Environmental Area (WEA) by canoe or
kayak. Hundreds of miles of scenic natural waterways wind
through pristine floodplain forests and intertidal marshes, of-
fering excellent opportunities for paddlers on the Apalachicola
and its tributaries.
Best times to paddle are fall or spring when temperatures are
pleasant and bugs are few. April and October are great months
to view swamp lilies, swamp roses, and asters. Call (850) 488-
5520 to request a-free, detailed map of the Apalachicola River
WEA Paddling Trail System, or download from our Web site:
MyFWC.com/recreation/apalachicola_river/paddling.asp.
Paddlers can choose from 11 lightly-traveled routes (or devise
one of their own), ranging from easy half or full-day trips to
more challenging multi-day explorations, through the remote
floodplain forests and salt marshes of the Apalachicola River
WEA. The map also includes useful tips for paddling in this
remote wilderness area.
How to get to Apalachicola River WEA
From U.S. Highway 98 between Carrabelle and Eastpoint, turn
north on Florida Highway 65. Travel about 9 miles to Sand
Beach Road on the left (west). An informative kiosk there will
orient you to the considerable recreational offerings of this
site.
Need to know more?
Web site: MyFWC.com/recreation
Need a hunting or fishing license?
Dial toll-free, either 1-888-HUNT-FLORIDA (486-8356) or 1-
888-FISH-FLORIDA (347-4356), or go to MyFWC.com/license/
3. Apalachicola National Forest-Apalachicola
Ranger District
The 564.000-acre Apalachicola National Forest is the largest
of Florida's three national forests and one of the state's most
impressive natural areas. This vast forest contains a wide di-
versity of habitats and plant communities and more than 300
wildlife species. Highlights include the 29-mile Vinzant Horse
Trail, the 10-mile Munson Hills Mountain Bicycling Trail, more
than 60 miles of hiking on the National Scenic Trail. Canoeing
on numerous rivers and creeks, such as the Sopchoppy and
Ochlockonee and hundreds of miles of dirt roads suitable for
hiking and biking are also available.
The Hickory Landing and Wright Lake campgrounds are avail-
able in Franklin County. The access sign is just south of
Sumatra on SR65. Turn west onto National Forest Road (NFR)
101 and go 1.2 miles to Hickory Landing sign at NFR 101 B.
Wright Lake, a five-acre lake, is about 2 miles on NFR 101.
The campgrounds are situated in a heavily wooded pine grove
and Hickory Landing is adjacent to Owl Creek with some sites
overlooking the creek. The Apalachicola River is accessible from
Owl Creek. No reservations are necessary.
A nice day trip, not far from Sumatra, FL, located on the
Apalachicola River, is Fort Gadsden. Visit the Fort and experi-
ence its history spanning from the War of 1812 through the
Civil War.

Continued on Page 6










Page 2 4 August 2006 "


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs

July 18, 2006

Present: Chairperson
Cheryl Sanders;
Commissioner Russell
Crofton; Commissioner
Bevin Putnal;
Commissioner Jimmy
Mosconis and
Commissioner Noah
Lockley, Jr.

Solid Waste Director
Van W. Johnson made the fol-
lowing report:
Small County Solid Waste
Grant
I have for the Board's approval
and the Chairman's signature
the Small County Solid Waste
Grant Agreement. The grant
is an annual appropriation
from the State and adminis-
tered through the Department
of Environmental Protection.
The purpose of the grant is to
assist small counties finan-
cially with solid waste man-
agement issues. The grant
period is from October 1, 2006
September 30, 2007 and the
award is $191,176, un-
changed from last year
amount. The Commissioners
accepted the award.

IFAS Extension
Bill Mahan made the follow-
ing report:
Tilefish Fishery Update: The
commercial fishery for tilefish
in the Gulf of Mexico federal
waters will close at 12:01 AM.
Eastern Time on July 22nd.
when the tilefish quota of
440.000 pounds, gutted
weight, is projected to be
reached. The fishery will re-
open at 12:01 AM local time
on January 1. 2007.
Chesapeake Bay Oysters: In
a story in August 2006 Na-
tional Fisherman it is reported
that on the Virginia side of the
Chesapeake Bay, oystermen
are having the best oyster sea-
son that they have had in
many years. It is estimated
100,000 bushels will be har-
vested this year. Recently.
harvests have been around
20.000 biushels. Other facts'
175 boats in the fishery, two-
year wait to get into the lim-
ited entry fishery; gear -
tongs (about 15-people) and
small hand-scrapes (22-inch
dredge): season typically Oc-
tober June; it is estimated
that the oyster population is
1% of what it was in the
1870's-10-million bushels
harvested/yr.; oyster seeding
projects focus on low salinity
waters to avoid problems with
MSX and demo oyster-dis-
eases.
Nation Rifle Association Grant
Proposal:.I would like to
Board's approval to submit a
phase I grant proposal to the
NRA for $2,300 for the pur-
chase of equipment to begin
a Franklin County 4-H Shoot-
ing Sports Program. If ac-
cepted by the NRA we will be
eligible for Phase II funding
($2,300) in 2008. Approved.
The Board was informed that
C-30A will be closed in
Franklin County for two
weeks from July 24 August.
Four cross culverts will have
to be replaced and it will be
faster and safer to close the
whole road rather than con-
tinue traffic through a work
zone.
Mr. Grady Leavins. Seafood
Industry Task Force Chair-
man, and Mr. Dave McClain,
Coordinator for the Task
Force. have compiled a six
month progress report of what
the Task Force has accom-
plished and what more they
hope to accomplish. I have
attached the entire report to


my report. The Task Force has
broadened its role so that the
Franklin County Seafood
Workers now participate in
the Task Force. Mr. McClain
is working with the Seafood
Workers so that the Workers
can continue to be in good
standing with the Division of
Aquaculture. The Task Force
is examining potential sites
for oyster boat launch and
landing in all sections of the
Bay. These sites will ulti-
mately have to be procured by
the County in order to protect
the industry. The Task Force
is also examining the feasibil-
ity of a seafood industrial
park. The Task Force, with
Mr. McClain, successfully
planned and executed a relay
program this summer. Last
week, the Task Force ar-
ranged for DEP Secretary
Castille to join members of the
Governor's Office, and report-
ers from the Atlanta Consti-
tution to examine the effects
of dredging on the River.
In summary, as a county ap-
pointed committee, the Task
Force is just beginning its
work in being a leader for pro-
moting and protecting the
seafood industry. The
$75,000 OTTED study which
has paid for this work will run
out this fall. The Task Force
recommends the Board allo-
cate county funds to cQntinue
this work in the coming bud-
get year. Board direction.
Board action to authorize the
payment of $428.05 for out-
of-pocket expenses for Mr.
Dave' McClain in his trip to
North Carolina and Virginia to
visit other seafood industrial
sites for ideas that might work
in Franklin County. Approved.
Provide Board with copy of
county enrollment in NACo
Prescription Drug Program. It.
will take 10-12 weeks for the
cards to be printed and sent
to Franklin County. The Pro-
gram should be in place and
effective October 1.
Provide Board with copy of
NACo voting registration for
Commissioner Lockley.
Board action to approve a
Resolution of Appreciation for
the Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church in
Apalachicola being in exist-
ence 100 years.
The Board was provided a
copy of the document relating
to sites in Franklin County
being placed on the Great
Florida Birding Trail by the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Com-
mission. There are sites in
Bald Point and St. George Is-
land.
Board action for Chairman to
sign Application for Federal
Assistance to rehabilitate
Runway 13/31.'Application is
for $856,000 worth of federal
funds. Approved.
Board action for Chairman to
sign contracts with Ms.
Belcher (Roumelis Planning
and Development Services,
Inc.) for CDBG grant writing
and administration. Ap-
proved.
Board action to approve Reso-
lution related to the CDBG
projects. Resolution autho-
rizes Director of Administra-
tive Services to sign CDBG
documents when completed
by Ms. Belcher: announces
that the CDBG project is con-
sistent with the Comprehen-
sive Plan: and announces the
Comprehensive Plan is the
community development plan.
Board action to approve the
submission of a CDBG grant
with the Eastpoint sewer and
water extension as the main
project, and the Lanark Vil-
lage water project as the al-
ternate project if money is
available. Ms. Belcher advises
that the scope of the
Brownsville project is such
that it would take all the funds
so that-it can not be done in
conjunction with the others.
Ms. Belcher also felt that the
Brownsville project is less
competitive because the num-
bers of low income house-
holds and likely sewer con-
nections are fewer, and the
county would have to provide
$250,000 in matching funds.


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850-670-1772
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TAKING CARE OF
Stacy Williams, ALL YOUR HAIR
Stylist CARE,
347 Highway 98 MANICURES,
P.O. Box 977 PEDICURES &
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comimer'cial


Resgidentil


Board action to sign a new, 2
year Hold Harmless Agree-
ment with Progress Energy for
the usq of off-runway areas at
the airport as a staging area
in the event'of hurricanes in
the area. This agreement will
run from July 1, 2006 to Dec.
31,2008.
Provide Board with copy of
2005 Compass Report which
is a Medicaid reimbursement
report. As directed by the
County Attorney.
Inform Board that the Plan-
ning and Zoning Commission
did not make a recommend,
tion regarding changes to the
R-4 zoning as requested by
the Board. The Commission
voted to direct Ms. Denker to'
submit her suggestions for
changes to Mr. Shuler, and
once the attorney's have
worked out some language the
Commission would review
and comment on that.
Inform Board that several
months ago, Ms. Bruce Drye,
announced her resignation
from the Commission. She sat
in the real estate industry
seat. The Board directed staff
to advertise and that was
done. Two people responded.
Mr. Bob Landiss, a realtor for.
Prudential Realty, sent in a
letter, and Ms. Angela
Huggins called. Ms. Huggins'
is not a realtor. She said she
was an engineer.
Board action to approve a.
Resolution recognizing Na-
tional Health Center Week
August 6-12.
By Richard E. Noble

From The Planning &
Zoning Commission
Report to the Board of
County Commissioners
July 11, 2006
The Planning and Zoning
Commission met on Tuesday,
July 1:1, 2006 with the follow-
ing recommendations:

R-4 Single Family Home
Industry Discussion
1. Approve (unanimous)-it
was the recommendation of
the Planning and Zoning
Commission to send this item
back to the Board of County
Commissioners so that Randy
Denker, Attorney for Anthony
and Toni Taranto and
Franklin County Attorney,
Michael Shuler come up with
language and work .out the
issues concerning the vague-
ness of R-4 Single Family
Home Industry for the Plan-
ning Commission to review.
This--reeenmein4a-tien ,-was
tabled pending a meeting of
the minds of the various at-
torneys involved.

Critical Shoreline
Applications
2. Approve (unanimous) con-
sideration of a request to
modifQ and existing Single
Family Dock and converting it
into a' Multi-Family Pier at
1693 U.S. Highway 98 West,
St. George's Bluff, Eastpoint.
Franklin County, Florida. Re-
quest submitted by GEA, Inc,
agent for Coastal View Devel-
opment. LLC. applicant. This
recommendation was ap-
proved.
3. Approve (unanimous) con-
sideration of a request to con-
struct a Single Family Private
Dock on Lot 6, Bay Cove Vil-
lage, 2035 Sand Dollar Trail,
St. George Island, Franklin
County, Florida. Request sub-
mitted by GEA, mc, agent for
William Tipka, applicant. This
recommendation was ap-
proved.
4. Approve (unanimous) con-
sideration of a request to
modify and existing Single
Family Private Dock and con-
verting it into a Multi-Family
Dock for "Cedar Oak Subdivi-
sion" 162 Pogy Road.
Apalachicola, Florida. Re-
quest submitted by GEA, me,
agent for Cedar Oak Subdivi-
sion, applicant. This recom-
mendation was approved.


5. Approve (unanimous) con-
sideration of a request to con-
,struct a Single Family Pier on
Lot 4, Driftwood, 2668 U.S.
Highway 98 East, Carrabelle,
Franklin County, Florida. Re-
quest submitted by GEA, me,
agent for Chester Krawczuk,
applicant. This recommenda-
tion was approved.
6. Tabled (tabled) consider-
ation of a request to construct
a Single Family Pier on Lot 23,
Carrabelle, Franklin County,
Florida. Request submitted by
GEA, me, agent for Chester
Krawczuk, applicant. This
was approved.
7. Approved (unanimous) con-
sideration of a request to con-
struct a Single Family Dock
at 146 Pogyl Road,
Apalachicola, Franklin
SCounty, Florida. Request sub-
mitted by GEA, me, agent for
Lawrence Gentile, applicant.
This recommendation was
approved.
Sketch Plat Approval
8. Approved (unanimous) con-
sideration of a request for
Sketch Plat approval and a
Special Exception to Cluster
a 19 lot subdivision named
"Shell Bay" on a 19.8 acre
parcel lying in Section 35,
Township 7 South, Range 5
West, Carrabelle, Franklin
County, Florida. Request sub-
mitted by GEA, mc, agent for
Shell Bay Development Cor-
poration, applicant. The mo-
tion was to approve this 4 con-
tingent upon getting the Spe-
cial Exception to Cluster
abandoning the existing plat
of record. There was comment
from the audience and the
request was tabledor f further
investigation and discussion.

Report to the Board of
County Commissioners
from the Advisory Board
of Adjustment
July 18, 2006, 5:00 p.m.
The Advisory Board of Adjust-
ment met on July 12, 2006
and submits the following rec-
ommendations:
1. Approve request for a vari-
ance to construct a house ten
feet into the front setback line
and ten feet into the Critical
Habitat Zone on Lot 21, Block
U, Lanark Beach, Unit One,
.Franklin County, as submit-
ted by Nancy Demos, agent for
David & Mary Houle and
Giovanni Vatiante, owners.
The applicant has agreed to
construct 1,000 square foot
footprint house. This recom-
mendation was approved.
2. Approve request to cbn-
Sstruct a rip rap revetment"
with4~i4'Lhe Critical Hlabitat-;
Zone on property described as
41 South, Bayshore Drive,
Eastpoint, Section 36, Town-
ship 8 South, Range 7 West.
Request submitted by Andrew
and Susan Antekeier, owners.
This recommendation was
approved.
3. Approve request to con-
struct a rip rap revetment
within the Critical Habitat
Zone on property described as
47 South Bayshore Drive,
Eastpoint. Section 36, Town-
ship 8 South. Range 7 West.
Request submitted by Harvey,
and Pat Harrington, owners.
This recommendation was
approved.
Notice Of Zoning
Change
The Franklin County Board of
County Commissioners pro-
poses to adopt the following
by ordinance: An Ordinance
Rezoning the following Tracts
of Land in Franklin County:
A 2.75 acre parcel lying in
Section 13, Township 7
South. Range 5 West, off Mill
Road, Carrabelle, Franklin
County, Florida, as shown on
the map below is changed
from 1-1 Industrial to R-I
Single Family Residential.
A public hearing on the pro-
posed changes will be held on
July 18, 2006 at 5:35 p.m.. at
the County Commission Meet-
ing room in the Franklin


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County Courthouse Annex in
Apalachicola, Florida. More
information can be obtained
and the proposed changes
may be inspected at the
Franklin County Planning
Department, 34 Forbes Street,
Suite #1. Apalachicola,
Florida, telephone (850) 653-
9783.
Persons wishing to comment
may do so In person at the
public hearing or in writing to
the Franklin County Board of
County Commissioners, 33
Market Street, Suite 203,
Apalachicola, Florida 32320.
Transactions of this public
hearing will not be recorded.
Persons who wish to appeal
any action resulting from this
hearing should make the nec-
essary arrangements to as-
sure that a verbatim record is
made, including testimony
and evidence, if any. upon
which the appeal is to be
based.
PUBLISH: July 6, 2006
Commence at the Southwest
corner of Section 13, Town-
ship 7 South, Range 5 West,
Franklin County, Florida (as
monumented), thence run
North 1828.93 feet, thence
run North 89 degrees 59 min-
utes 22 seconds East 2199.40
feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. From said POINT OF
BEGINNING run South 00
degrees 10 minutes 32 sec-
onds West 487.48 feet to the
Northerly right-of-way bound-
ary of Mill Road, thence run
South 58 degrees 03 minutes
12 seconds East along said
Northerly right-of-way bound-
ary 325.08 feet to the inter-
section of said Northerly right-
of-way boundary with the
centerline of a 60.00 foot ,
Roadway Easement (Kal
Lane), thence leaving said
Northerly right-of-way bound-
ary run North 05 degrees 53
minutes 56 seconds West
along said centerline 401.98
feet to a point of curve con-
cave to the Southeasterly,
thence run along said
centerline and said curve with
a radius of 403.83 feet,
through a central angle of 13
degrees'34 minutes 35 sec-
onds for an arc distance of
95.69 feet, chord being North
00 degrees 51 minutes 21 sec-
onds East 95.47 feet, thence
leaving said centerline and
said curve run North 54 de-
grees 59 minutes 57 seconds
West 286.23 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING containing
2.75 acres, more or less.

Hangar/Office at
Airport,
There was only one bid to
build an. 80 x.8Q .angar at, he..
Apalachicola Airport. It was
for $317,980 ... After review;
Mr. Mosteller recommended
that the bid be approved with
provisions and advisory rec-
ommendations. The proposal
is subject to FDOT moneys
and approval.

Marcia Johnson-Clerk
of Courts
"The first two items on my re-
port are requests from the
Supervisor of Elections. She
needs you to appoint a mem-
ber to the Canvassing Board
to replace Chairman Sanders
.. I need a Board action ..
"I nominate Mr. Crofton," said
Mr. Mosconis.
The motion was immediately
seconded:and unanimously
approved.
'I think that I just got rail-
roaded." responded Mr.
Crofton with a smile.
"Ms. Gibbs also requested
that the Board approve the
County Attorney Michael
Shuler to serve as the legal
advisor to the County."
The request was approved.


"I need approval on a budget
amendment. Over the last
several months the cost of the
Carson and Atkins-Labor
Attorneys-has risen signifi-
cantly due to hospital issues.
For the months of January
through July payment to
them has totaled over
$26,000. The Board also ap-
proved payment to the Levy
Law Firm in the amount of
$14,500 on behalf of the Prop-
erty Appraiser. So I am ask-
ing that the categories of Pro-
fessional Services be in-
creased. The source for the
increase is to be from the
Carrabelle Redevelopment
Trust. That (account) was
based on the millage rate ...
so really there is less money
needed in that category now."
The request was approved.
"I have received quotes on the
flood insurance on the Main
Courthouse as well as this
Annex building. It can be car-
ried in basic limits up to
$500,000 coverage. The Board
has to make a decision with
regards to the excess cover-
age."
The County Planner then ad-
vised the Board that flood in-
surance was necessary be-
cause otherwise FEMA will
not cover the damages.
The motion to get the basic
coverage and ignore the ex-
pensive excess coverage was
approved by the Board.

Shuler Report
A deed swap on a property
owned by Mr. Grady Levins
was approved.
A settlement agreement sub-
mitted by attorney Brian
Duffy was approved.
Mr. Sheraden in Carrabelle
was notified that the junk cars
were to be removed from his
property within ninety days.
A claim of overpayment on
.property taxes by an indi-
vidual was recommended to
be refunded by the County.
Medicare Billing-"At this
point the recommendation of
Blackhawk and myself is that
you go ahead and bill Medi-
care.":
This suggestion,was approved
with some allowance to the
County Attorney's discretion
as to the exact day for this
billing which will most likely
be in the very near future.


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


4 August 2006 Page 3


EDITORAL & COMMENTARY


With-it! Renewed For

Third Year

$100,000 Grant
Eileen Annie Ball, Director of the Franklin County Public Li-
brary, is pleased to announce that the Florida Department of
Juvenile Justice and the State Advisory Group have reviewed
the WITH-IT! (Winners In Tune Have It Together) Program's
second year performance and have renewed the program for
the third consecutive year.
WITH-IT! is a Title II Community Delinquency Prevention Grant
Program targeting Franklin County youths primarily from 10-
17 years of age. The grant award is again $100,000.00. Addi-
tional project funds designed to enhance the program and pro-
vide required matching funds are made possible by a grant
from the J. Ben Watkins Foundation. The Friends of the
Franklin County Public Library provide support and serve as
fiscal agent for this popular youth project.
WITH-ITI is an after school and vacation program conducted
at the Eastpoint and Carrabelle Branches of the Library and
at the New Life Center in Apalachicola. This year's program
will focus on providing homework assistance, on-site tutor-
ing, and a variety of life skills training projects. Guest speak-
ers and training workshops will add further dimension to the
program. Students will take part in reading and other group
discussions. Based on the special arts projects from the previ-
ous years, youth at each site will create and complete a group
arts project. Field trips of educational interest will be offered
to students. Some evening events may include: student and
parent activities, movie night, music or art programs. The pro-
gram is offered at no cost to participants. On-site registration
is required.
Project Coordinators are Michelle Creek, Suzanne Creamer,
Carol Barfield, Bonny Ball, and Helen Sinclair. For more in-
formation call 670-5250 in Eastpoint, 653-2784 in
Apalachicola, 697-9216 in Carrabelle.


FWC Exposure March

Planned For October

"Fishing For Freedom," (FFF) a statewide group of citizens con-
cerned about Florida's environment, economy, citizens and
constitution are planning a Key West to Tallahassee march in
October to coincide with the Florida Governor election cam-
paigns. The march will be designed to expose the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) refusal to pro-
vide due process, obey any checks and balances in govern-
ment, and their intentional forcing of commercial fishermen
to unnecessarily kill and waste of the state's marine resource.
The march will originate from the southern most tip of Key
West and will end at the Capital's steps, where upon arrival,
three flags that will be carried throughout Florida will be de-
livered. One flag will symbolize the U.S. and Florida constitu-
tions requiring separation of powers in government, another
flag will symbolize-the "Due Process" guaranteed by both the
U.S and Florida Constitutions, and the third flag will symbol-
ize the millions of juvenile fish that the FWC are intentionally
forcing Florida commercial fishermen to unnecessarily kill and
waste in seine nets each year in violation of the constitution.
The March's major goals include:
1. Educate the public that an agency without Separation of
Powers, such as the FWC, acting alone without ANY oversight,
threatens to destroy our constitution if allowed to continue to
exist in its 'present form.' '
2. Share that all Amencans-are guaranteed "due process" and
"equal protection of the law," yet the FWC have REFUSED to
allow ANY constitutional due process for citizens it governs
since 1999.
3. Expose the FWC's gross and intentional mismanagement of
our state's resources using the court proven example of 98
million juvenile fish unnecessarily being killed and wasted for
every 7 million pounds of legal fish brought to market.
Some of the other issues/stories the march will expose in-
clude:
* Documented horror stories of how the FWC, an unaccount-
able agency with its own law enforcement branch have de-
stroyed innocent lives.
* How the FWC have "thumbed their nose" at the legislature
and refused to obey our elected lawmakers in an attempt to
create their own "communist" environment of tyranny.
* Expose that the head of FWC Law Enforcement admits to
arresting citizens under PROPOSED LAWS, and show that the
commander had promised the Legislature NOT to do so just
before the arrests were made.


,, POST OFFICE BOX 590
^ )EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
Facsimile 850-670-1685
~ e-mail: hoffer531@gtcom.net
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 15, No. ,16
Publisher ... .........
Director of Operations ....
Contributors ...........




Photographers ...........

Advertising Design and
Production Artist.........
Circulation Associate .....
Production Associate .....


August 4, 2006
..... Tom W. Hoffer
......Andy Dyal
..... .Skip Frink
Geri Moore
Carol Noble
Richard Noble
Dawn Radford
......Diane Beauvais Dyal
Geri Moore

......Diane Beauvais Dyal
......Jerry Weber
......Richard Williams


Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein .. ............... .Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis .............. ..Apalachicola
Skip Frink .................. ... .Carrabelle
David Butler ................... Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung .......... Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins ...... .Eastpoint
Barbara Revell .................. Lanark Village
Richard Harper ................... St. George Island

Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling: For example a 10 page issue
would cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the
Chronicle for price quotes if you seek several different
or similar issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96
including tax. Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26
including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2006
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


* And a lot more.
Fishing For Freedom is in the early stages of setting up this
monumental event. They are presently mapping out a safe route
which will take place along the west coast of Florida, planning
lodging, and working out the fine details. FFF have already
started receiving pledges of money, fish to be donated fo'r the
cause, and volunteers to either help along the way or make a
portion of the walk. The organization is also beginning to Work
with law enforcement agencies to assure compliance with state
and local laws.
The march's purpose is not only to educate Florida's citizens.
but to garner national and local media attention to the above
listed abuses and more. FFF believes that if the Nation is edu-
cated to what is happening in Florida, Floridians and their
Legislators, will either put enough pressure on the commis-
sion to force them to provide constitutionally guaranteed due
process, stop the unnecessary killing and waste of our sea-life
and fall under the authority of the U.S. and Florida Constitu-
tions, or else be abolished in the upcoming Legislative Ses-
sion..
All groups and concerned citizens will be encouraged to join
in a portion of our walk. Some of the committed walkers in-
clude environmentalists, law enforcement officers and veter-
ans.
Fishing For Freedom is also planning to take along a large
traveling cook wagon. The cook wagon was donated by
Savannah's Country Buffets in Tallahassee. Fish dinners will
be served along the Key West to Tallahassee route. Donations
will be gladly accepted.
For more information contact: David Grix, VP Fishing For
Freedom, Web: http://fishingforfreedom.net, Phone: 561-
252-0550, E-mail:fffsouth@aol.com.


The State Of The Florida

Seafood Industries

Southeastern Fisheries Association
54th Annual Meeting
PRESIDENT'S REPORT
By Tom Hill
Welcome to beautiful Key Largo for SFA's 54th Annual Meet-
ing.
We have an outstanding array of speakers today covering most
of the issues affecting our industry. I thank them for taking
the time to be here.
The past year was very fast. The past year was also very chal-
lenging.
Hurricanes, hurricanes and more hurricanes came our way
and destroyed our spiny lobster and stone crab seasons. Traps
were strewn throughout the landscape with millions' of dollars
in lost gear and production as a result.
This year's hurricane season started 8 days ago. We hope and
pray any hurricanes that form will take a northeasterly route
and blow themselves out before reaching any land mass.
This past year saw an unusual number of shark attacks, mostly
by Bull sharks. SFA monitors shark attacks and has always
had concerns about their presence nearshore since the net
ban was implemented and since some shark species were
placed on the threatened list.
FWC's "No More Backdoor" investigated over 70 cases the
last time they met with us and some backdoor sales have
been reduced in certain areas. It's still going on, hard to
catch but FWC is trying as hard as they can to keep illegal
fish from entering the restaurants trade.
Red grouper was a high priority item for SFA last year. In July
the Gulf Council tried to get NMS to only close red grouper
during November and December but NMFS decided to close
all grouper fishing during those two months. CCA filed a law-
suit in federal court saying NMFS was using flawed data and
the closure for gag and other groupers should not be applied
to recreational fishing. CCA won their lawsuit and NMFS had
to remove total grouper closure for November and December..
SFA formed the Seafood Restaurant Alliance in August and
over 125 restaurants signed a petition to the Florida Congres-
sional Delegation opposing any reallocation of the grouper
quota. Restaurants depend on fresh Florida grouper arid the
only way they can get it is from legal commercial fishermen.
Too often managers forget about non-boaters and the restau-
rant trade, which is huge.



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Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) continues their push
to ban shrimp trawling in areas where there is a red snapper
bycatch in certain times of the year and at certain water depths.
CCA filed their lawsuit saying the Gulf shrimp industry did
not achieve the 44% reduction in bycatch. However, due to
hurricanes, high fuel costs and hurricane damage, it has been
estimated there is now a 58% reduction in bycatch simply
from the fact that far fewer vessels are operating in the Gulf of
Mexico.
SFA was calling on the federal and state government for some
financial relief as early as October but it did not come and I
have to report none has come yet. We literally fell through the
cracks.
In early November we started talking about the prospect of
some property tax relief after several of the members were
wondering how they could keep up with the ever increasing
values put on their fish houses by the property appraisers. In
some high value areas, companies pay more than $5,000 PER
MONTH in property tax.
Eugene Raffield met with his local legislator who happened to
be the Speaker of the House, Allen Bense and brought this
problem to him. The Speaker was very sympathetic and one of
his main staff persons met with Eugene and worked with Bob
to see if some relief could be gotten.
Representative Aaron Bean of Fernandina Beach did file a bill
to give fish houses the same status as agriculture. The bill
raised quite a stir with the Agriculture Coalition right off the
bat. This very powerful, highly financed group knew that if the
statute was opened for an amendment to let the fish houses
in, the environmental interests would do everything they could
to change this statute in a way that it would cause the whole
agricultural industry pain and suffering.
We met with the Ag Coalition and they agreed to assist us in
the next session of the legislature to find a way to help reduce
property taxes for fish houses.
Even though we have their support it remains to be seen if the'
property appraisers and local government will be okay with
reducing the amount of taxes they receive annually by classi-
fying fish houses and processing plants as agricultural. This
is a big issue that will carry over to next year.
In December Randolph Hodges, longtime friend and supporter
of the Florida seafood industry died. We have not had any
other state leader who worked as hard for our industry as
Randolph. He leaves a great legacy in all that he did for the
state of Florida and its natural resources.
Congress repealed the Byrd Amendment on a very close vote,
which adversely impacted the domestic shrimp industry. This
was a bitter fight with international implications. There will
still be some tariff funds distributed to those shrimpers and
companies who signed on to the lawsuit, which could be sub-
stantial.
During this past year Mote Marine lab became a seafood whole-
sale dealer. It doesn't seem fair that a private lab supported in
part with state tax dollars can become a seafood business and
compete with legitimate seafood businesses. When they sell
their first shrimp we will then move to delete any state or fed-
eral tax dollars they receive because of unfair competition.
Why should we support our competitor with our hard earned
taxes?
SFA lost two more pioneers. Bert Jensen of Fort Myers was
part of the Association since its inception and an active par-
ticipant right up to his death. Senator Elmer Friday, also of
Fort Myers was the person most responsible for establishing
the Tortugas Shrimp Sanctuary. He fought for the commercial
fishermen, farmers and working folks all his life. These two
fine gentlemen will be missed.
The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council is consider-
ing banning the sale of fish by anglers in allstates under their
jurisdiction.. Florida already bans the sale of angler caught
fish (mostly) but the other South Atlantic states allow it. The
angler sale has been a long time coming and the sooner it
becomes law the better.
SFA is still battling the sale of large, mostly female king mack-
erel caught. by anglers during the many King Mackerel tour-
naments held in Florida each year. There is a loophole in the
law that allows the anglers to "give" the fish to the tournament
director who then sells them to a wholesale dealer. These very
large fish are high in methylmercury and should not be sold.
Both FDA and Florida Health Department have Advisories
against their consumption by certain groups of consumers.
Governor Jeb Bush has nominated Bob Gill as his number
one nominee to serve on the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Manage-

Continued on Page 5



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Page 4 4 August 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The.Fa.k.n.... ich


EDrrTRL & COMMENTARY


Seafood Task Force

July 18, 2006
To: Board of Commissioners, Franklin County
From: Franklin County Oyster/Seafood Task Force
Subject: Progress Report (1st 6 months)
SWe agreed when the Commission chartered the Task Force to
provide periodic progress reports, and to receive new direc-
i tion, as required by the Board based on these reports. Below
I is a summary of key actions taken by your Task Force to date,
and a projection of next steps as we see them.
Work Completed
SFranklin County appointed an Oyster/Seafood Task Force (TF)
to oversee the execution of the feasibility study and appointed
David McLain as Task Force Coordinator and staff represen-
tative to participate on the Study team. McLain then conducted
initial organizational meetings with the Task Force, gained their
acceptance of proposed terms of reference for the study and
advertised as required in a Request for Quotation for the best
qualified Study Team. We evaluated the qualifications submit-
ted and recommended to the TF and to the Franklin County
Commission that the consultant firm of Lampl-Herbert be se-
Slected, pending successful negotiations and development of a
detailed study plan.
The Task Force is meeting on a regular basis; group discus-
sion includes topics such as the benefits and challenges asso-'
ciated with a seafood industrial park and consideration of other
options -for the Franklin County seafood industry. The Task
Force hosted a panel discussion with representatives of the
Florida Department of Agriculture and the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection on the health of the bay and bay
management on 10 May.
McLain also made several attempts to establish a coordina-
tion process with the conduct of the separate, but related,
OTTED grant to the City ofApalachicola without success. None-
theless, we did have the Apalachicola Mayor attend and speak
to our last Task Force meeting and coordination attempts will
be revisited as each study progresses. We have asked their
representative (Jim Waddell, Jr.) to make a short presentation
at our monthly Task Force meeting later this week.
Linda Lampl began interviews with members of the Task Force
and other key members of the community regarding a pro-
posed Seafood Industrial Park -what it should contain, where
it might be located, etc. These interviews will continue through-
out the study as options are examined prior to making recom-
mendations to the TF and the County Commission. Site visits
were made by McLain and Lampl to existing Seafood Indus-
trial Parks in NC and VA on the 18th thru 21st of June, and a
First Impressions report was made to you at your earlier meet-
ing this month
An important component of the commercial seafood industry
and of the Task Force was determined to be the Franklin County
Seafood Workers Association (FCSWA), Inc. Two members of
that organization were recruited to participate in TF meetings
;As TF Coordinator, McLain assisted that organization in elect-
ing new officers and passing new by-laws for execution of the
existing contract with the Division of Aquaculture, FLDOACS.
Their annual fees as a corporation in Florida and an organiza-
tional update have been hand-carried to the Dept of State in
Tallahassee.
The Study team also began initial site surveys to identify po-
Stential locations for oyster harvesting boat launch-and-oys-
ter-recovery sites along the County shoreline. These sites would
have to be procured by the County to ensure the continuation
of the'oystermeri's access to harvest areas and their market
desifte 'kpl'sive Etdastafl property values. Site assessments to"
that end continue.
In coordination with the Division of Aquaculture, DOACS, and
the Task Force Coordinator, FCSWA successfully planned and
executed an initial re-lay effort in the Bay to move oysters
from a "non-harvest" area to re-seed the Winter bars. This
effort is an essential activity to improve the productivity of the
Bay.
On Thursday, members of the Task Force, as Florida Stake-
holders, hosted a "day on the River and Bay" for Stacy Shelton,
the environmental reporter for the Atlanta Journal and Con-







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stitutioh. We were joined by Sec: Castille and 2 others from
FDEP, plus two staffers out of Governor Bush's office. We put
in 2 Riverkeeper boats at Gaskins Landing, Wewahitchka for
the three hour down-river trip to the Bay. Along the way the
party saw the damages to the floodplain by COE dredging and
dumpirig dredged spoil in-banks, sand mountain and recent
restoration efforts.
On arrival in Apalachicola, the party met with Task Force
members Steve Rash of Water Street Seafood, Smokey Parrish
of Buddy Wards shrimp house, John Richards, president of
the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association, and David
Barber of Barbers Oysters in Eastpoint. All Task Force mem-
bers and the Florida Stakeholders stressed how critical ad-
equate freshwater flows are to the health and productivity of
our River and Bay. Sec. Castille's presence and active involve-
ment in the day had a significant positive impact on the mes-
sage carried back to Atlanta. Ms. Shelton's article should ap-
pear in the Atlanta Journal and Constitution next Sunday,
the day before the next ACF hearings in Judge Bowdre's Court
in Birmingham.
Potential Next Steps
* The OTTED Study will continue, and its scope will continue
to be County-wide.
* The composition of the Task Force will likely expand to in-
clude representation from commercial crabbers and clam har-
vesters.
* The Task Force will continue to be an effective communica-
tions forum to address common areas of interest and poten-
tial conflict among its members.
* The Task Force will continue to make periodic progress re-
ports and provide coordinated Commercial Seafood recommen-
dations to the Commission.
Grady Leavins
Task Force Chairman


The Clerk Of The

Circuit Court

Your Public Trustee
By Marcia Johnson
9. I need to have a matter settled by.the
Court but I'm unable to hire an attorney.
-InHow cr n th e Clrlk's" Office heln mre?


MARCIA JOHNSON "" -.- -....-. .
A. Florida Statutes 28.215 states, "the clerk of the circuit
court shall provide ministerial assistance to pro se litigants.
Assistance shall not include the provision of legal advice". I
recognize that my office has an obligation to explain court pro-
cesses and procedures and inform litigants or potential liti-
gants how to bring their problems before the Court for resolu-
tion. I feel we have built a system of services that addresses
the needs of the public to assure meaningful access tojustice.
The Clerk's office provides written information on small claims
filings, foreclosure actions, evictions, and tax deed applica-
tions. We also have forms available in our family law division
for injunctions against violence, simplified divorces, name
changes, and various other family law matters. The public is
also informed of the Florida State Courts website at
www.flcourts.org where family law forms and instructions can
be accessed. We also make the public aware that free or low-
cost legal assistance may be available through Legal Services,
of North Florida in Tallahassee at (850) 385-9007. There 'i a'
fine line between giving legal advice and pro se assistance. but
I feel the Clerk's Office has practices in place that benefit all
the parties in any litigation yet remain within the law as stated
above.
If you have any questions or comments about this column.
please forward them to: Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court,
33 M ket Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320.



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Library Happenings

By Judi Rundel
The Friends of the Franklin County Public Library will meet
on Wednesday, August 9th, at 5:30 p.m., at the Eastpoint
branch. The public is welcome to attend.
The Franklin County Public Library encourages students to
be prepared for the new school year. Tutoring can be sched-
uled through the FROG Family learning programs by calling
Marlene at 697-2091 or Jhaki at 670-4423.
Ongoing activities at the Franklin County Public
Library include:
Every Monday, 4:30 p.m.: FROG Family Learning Program
offers computer classes at the Eastpoint branch. Call Jhaki at
670-4423 to reserve a space.
Every Monday and Thursday, 4:30 5:30 p.m.: Yoga class
at the Carrabelle branch, hosted by the FROG Family Learn-
ing Program. Call Marlene at 697-2091 for information.
Every Monday and Friday, 10:00 a.m. 12 noon: GED
classes are offered at the Apalachicola Program site (148 8th
Street). Call Jhaki at 670-4423 or 653-2784.
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 2:30 5:00 p.m.: Tu-
tor Time for students is available at the Carrabelle Branch
with Marlene. Adult education in literacy, computer instruc-
tion, pre-GED work and GED preparation can also be obtained
by calling 697-2091 for more information and to make an ap-
pointment.
Every Tuesday and Thursday, 5:00 p.m.: FROG offers GED
classes at the Eastpoint branch.
Wednesday, 2:30 3:00 p.m.: Members of the young adult
book club, The Book House, are reading and talking about
their favorite books. It is a great way to find out what every-
one is reading. Call Ms. Tonia or Ms. Michelle at 697-2366 for
the scoop.
Every Thursday: "Read To Me"-reading to pre-school chil-
dren is held at the Eastpoint branch from 11:00 11:30 a.m.
Ms. Tonia delights young children and their caregivers with
one half hour of stories from the many books in the library's
collection. For further information, call Tonia at 670-4423.
Thursday, 3:00 3:30 p.m.: Teen Book Club at Eastpoint
with Ms. Tonia.
Every Friday, 9:30 a.m.: "Read To Me" with Ms. Tonia at the
Carrabelle branch.
Friday, 3:00 4:00 p.m.: Chair exercise-realistic and help-
ful for persons of varying degrees of ability, gentle movements
are all done while sitting in a chair. This program is at the
Carrabelle branch: Call Ms. Marlene for more information,
697-2091
The Franklin County Public Library's programs-FROG, WITH-
IT! and TIGERS-are offered at no cost to participants. Regis-
tration however is required. For information about the Li-
brary and any of its programs, please call 697-2366, 670-8151,
or 653-2784 or view the Library's website located at
www.franklin.lib.fl.us.
]| Ir rJrrlrJ|rJrlr F lralirilir|lir-arJl rJirJiir-lrlurJi~rrJlrairJirJsrJirJririr ilriniar IirirlrJlwrJ|j N

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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY 0 WNED NEWSPAPER


4 Au "ua 20 .Xar


EDITORIAL COMMENTARYY


Seafood Industries from Page 3
ment Council. Bob is more than qualified for this position and
we have worked very hard for his nomination. We wish you
well Bob for we know the workload you will have to carry to
fulfill your obligations and responsibility as a voting member
of the Council. (Mr. Gill was subsequently appointed by the
US Secretary of Commerce and begins his term in July.
In closing I want you all to know what a great trip Gail and I
had to Tallahassee. We saw how the legislative process works
and it is complicated and dynamic. We had the grand tour of
the Capitol and met with the staff of Representative Sorenson
to give our support for property tax relief to fishing businesses.
Thank you for the privilege of serving as your President. It was
an exciting period of time. We are lucky to have the staff we
have in Tallahassee keeping us informed on a dally basis.
Tom Hill, President
Southeastern Fisheries Association 2005-2006


Local United

Methodist

Churches

Hold

"Celebrate

Jesus" Week

By Tom Loughridge
iDuring the week of July 16
through July 27, the United
Methodist Churches of
Franklin County and the Tal-
lahassee area held a "Cel-
ebrate Jesus" week. A team of
six Celebrate Jesus
Missioners arrived in Franklin
County on July 15th to stay
in the St. George Island
United Methodist fellowship
hall for the entire week. The
team is leading local church
participants from Apalach-
icola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint
and St. George Island in a
busy week's activities. Besides
the morning missions, there
are free bottled water and.hot
dogs on St George Island pub-
lic beach, a free car wash and
a free come one/come all
block party at the Eastpoint
Methodist church on Friday.
Celebrate Jesus had its begin-
nings in the 1980's in the Brit-
ish Methodist Church which
perceived a failure in their
churches to live out the Great
Commission. They planned a
renewal event under the Rev-
erend Rob Frost and called it
."Share Jesus". It was such a
success they realized it was
rnt an "erent", but a new per-
Spective in the churches.
Other Share Jesus Missions
evolved in the ears to come.
* mI m *** ***** 1


By 1998 Share Jesus had
found its way to Florida and
caught the attention of a num-
ber of people who were look-.
ing for new ways to do evan-
gelistic outreach. In 1999
Share Jesus became Cel-
ebrate Jesus and continues
today.
Celebrate Jesus is not about
strengthening a church or
ensuring its survival; it is
about desiring for people to
know Jesus. It is about recov-
ering connection to the com-
munity. In the words of Ray
Hughes, pastor of the St.
George Island United Method-
ist Church, "I feel a lot of
times, a church can become
so focused on itself that we
miss the people that are liv-
ing right next door. The whole
idea about Celebrate Jesus is
to tell people that God loves
them and the church cares
about them and that they're
important. We offer (our com-
munity) the message of
Christ. Just simple acts that
say, God loves you. This is not
about preaching, it's not
about a sales pitch. It's about
simply saying to people that
they matter to God and they
matter to the church. They are
loved by God and we want to
show them that we love them
too."
Celebrate Jesus involves nu-
merous churches in a geo-
graphical area offering God's
love in practical ways to their
neighborhoods. It is an instru-
ment to form a community out
of local churches and their
neighborhoods.
Churches all over the state of
Florida are beginning to look;
beyond the walls of the'ii
buildings through offering:
shelter, food, outreach, new
youth groups, community


barbecues, car washes and
other acts of kindness, exhibr-
iting God's love in practical.
ways.
People from all four churches,
Apalachicola, Carrabelle.
Eastpoint and St. George Is-
land are participating in local
missions throughout the
week. The missions are hap-
pening in all four of the towns.
in the county at various times.
.during the week:
The program has been a great'
success for the participants,
and a lot of good fellowship for
all participants, including
your reporter. In the words of
Bryant, a teenager from
Titusville, Florida, "I have
never been so close to a group.
in my life. I was a little wary
about having four churches
but now that I see that these
four churches are so amazing
I'm so happy that I'm in the '
area helping these people!"


Camp

Gordon

Johnston

WW11

Museum

Possibly

Featured In

WWII

Magazine

Mr. Richard Fisher of Talla-
hassee, Florida is about to
submit an article on Camp
Gordon Johnston and the
Camp Gordon Johnston Mu-
seum to WWII Magazine, a"
PRIMEDIA publication, with a
large subscription based cir-
culation. WWII Magazine is
also distributed throughout:
many chain bookstores in-
cluding Borders and Barnes
and Noble.
Mr. Fisher's article will cen-
ter on Camp Gordon
Johnston and the museum's
efforts to preserve the
Franklin County history of the
Amphibious Soldiers who
trained here. Mr. Fisher has
previously published two ar-
ticles in a sister magazine e
Vietnam' He will c'rircel-iltra ti
his current articI n historic n
CGJ photographs and articles
taken from the CGJ Newslet-


Eastpoint Medical Center will be hosting a


FREE HEALTH FAIR
on August 8, 2006 from 2 to 5 p.m.

The public is cordially invited!


We'd like to thank the folks at the following
agencies for committing their time and services
to help us with this event:


Heel Dexascan to be done by Radiology Associates,
Tallahassee.
Cholesterol to be done by Franklin County Health
Department, Apalachicola.
Body Mass Index to be checked by Bay Medical Center,
Panama City.
Spirometry and Pulse Oximetry to be done by Respiratory
Solutions, Crawfordville.
Posture Screening to be done by Apalachicola Physical
Therapy, Apalachicola.
Blood Pressure taken by Emergystat Transport Service,
Eastpoint.
* Hemoglobin to be done by North Florida Medical
Centers, Inc.
* Blood Sugar performed by OMNI Home Health, Panama
City.
* Foot Sensory Testing checked by Novo Nordisk Diabetic
Supplies, Tallahassee.




PREE F E 'AREE


Trained personnel from the above-named organizations
will be offering these screenings,
they re ABSOLUTELY FREE and
EVERYONE IS INVITED to attend.


DOOR PRIZES, FREE SCREENINGS, REFRESHMENTS!!!
LOCATED IN THE POINT MALL IN EASTPOINT
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ter, as well as information
obtained on the internet. Mrs.
Linda Minichiello, Museum
Director, met with Mr. Fisher
in,mid-June in Carrabelle at
the museum and conducted
a tour, as well as giving writ-
ten permission to use the
minany photographs from the
research library she has com-
piled and categorized Ifor the
'museum. If used, all photos
in this and all future articles
will credit the CGJ WWII Mu-
seum.
Also, the CGJ WWII Museum
has recently increased its re-
,search library tremendously.
It has received a large amount
of historical information on
the Newport Ship Company
that was located in Newport,
Florida. Many landing craft
Were manufactured here. The
materials were donated by
Thomas C. Watson of Talla-
'hassee, Florida. One of Mr.
Watson's relatives worked at
the shipyard during WWII.
That is what peaked Mr.
Watson's interest in the sub-
ject. He purchased these ma-
terials from the National Ar-
chives and donated copies of
this material to the Museum.
Mrs. Minichiello has also
catalogued this material, and
it is now part of the research
library and is available to the
public. Mr. Watson also do-
nated eight books on Am-
phibious warfare and landing
craft. This gives the museum
an extensive collection on this
.subject.
As another attempt to further
promote the museum, the
Camp Gordon Johnston Asso-
Sciation recently joined' the
United States Army Historical'
Foundation. Founded in
1.983, the Foundation is dedi-
cated to the'promotion' and
preservation of U.S. Army his-
tory, from its beginnings in
the Revolutionary War
through the current war on
terror. Based in Arlington,
Virginia, the foundation has a
national membership of over
40,000 members. It has re-
ceived a $100 million grant
from the Army and a 90 acre
construction site at Fort
Belvoir, Virginia for a national
museum of the United States
Army. It is expected to cost
$300 million dollars and to
open on the Army's birthday,
June 14, 2011.
The CGJ Museum continues
to receive artifacts on a weekly
;basis; and is still searching fort
land for permanent location.;
As its collection of artifacts
and research material con-
tinue to grow, a permanent
site becomes more critical.


NWFWMD Embarks On

Efforts To Update Flood

Hazard Mapping


The Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency's (FEMA)
flood hazard maps are one of
the essential tools for flood
mitigation in the United
States. Unfortunately, many
of these maps have become
outdated, especially in high
growth and development ar-
eas including Florida. FEMA
has established a broad goal
of modernizing flood hazard
maps nationwide. In lieu of
the destructive hurricanes
that have swept over the state
since 2004, accurate flood
hazard maps are especially
important for identification of
floodplain and flood hazard
information.
The Northwest Florida Water
Management District was des-
ignated by FEMA in Decem-
ber 2002 as a Cooperating
Technical Partner (CTP) for
the State of Florida in north-
west Florida. As a CTP, the
NWFWMD has begun to work
collaboratively with FEMA to
create and maintain accurate,
up-to-date flood hazard data
for the communities served in
northwest Florida. This in-
cludes the sixteen county ar-
eas of Bay, Calhoun,
Escambia, Franklin, Gads-
den, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson,
Leon, Liberty, Okaloosa,
Santa Rosa, Wakulla, Walton
and Washington counties and
the' westernmost portion of
Jefferson County. Floodplain"
management and protection is
a primary area of responsibil-
ity and a priority as part of the
District's mission.
The FEMA Map Modernization
program, "Map Mod", builds
upon recommendations of the
Technical Mapping Advisory
Council articulated in 2000.
Congress approved a $1 bil-
lion dollar investment to bring
flood hazard maps up-to-date
nation-wide over a 5-year pe-
riod. The NWFWMD vision for
the Map Modernization initia-
tive is to provide more accu-
rate and complete flood haz-
ard information for counties
and communities within the
District. As part of this work,
the NWFWMD has embarked
in an endeavor to map and
conver-t Ilo'd insurance rate,
maps' (FI Ms) into a digital
format covering all sixteen
counties in the NWFWMD.
This includes the collection of
new, accurate elevation data,
new flood studies, and will
result infupdated digital flood
insurance rate map panels
(DFIRMs) meeting FEMA's lat-
est multi-hazard flood map
modernization standards. Ef-
forts through other water re-
sources and emergency man-
agement programs by the lo-
cal government, District,
State and Federal programs
are also under way to obtain
more accurate and detailed
elevation imagery in a digital
format.
The digital component of the
new maps is a key because
they are easily accessed by the
public and displayed on the
web. The web displays are
capable of showing actual
earth images and topography
with the flood zones and flood


Tractor Wo
* Aerobic Sew
Marine Cor
Septics C


hazard information as map
overlays. Residents and prop-
erty owners will be able to
view the areas mapped as
flood hazard zones with a very
clear aerial image of the earth
along with the structures they
live in. The web based digital
flood maps will also allow for
easy updates as development
changes occur. With the up-
dated DFIRMs and the
District's ongoing emphasis
on protection and acquisition
of flood prone areas, the flood
protection goals and the
non-structural floodplain
management strategy of the
NWFWMD will be enhanced.
FEMA funding for flood stud-
ies is limited. The objective of
the CTP program is to lever-
age available funding to obtain
more and better multi-hazard
mapping with the available
resources. Currently, the
FEMA Regional Office in At-
lanta manages Federal fund-
ing through a Cooperative
agreement with the
NWFWMD. This funding will
be used to remap all of the 16-
county area of the District in
a digital format that will be-
come accessible through the
Internet and other printable
media. The NWFWMD is pro-
viding funding and staff re-
sources to leverage this fund-
ing; The NWFWMD is also re-
lying on the services of county
and city governments and the
data and information re-
sources they have as "in-kind"
leverage to assist the District
in obtaining federal funding.
Map Mod touches'a broad
stakeholder community who
will see different benefits.
Community planners and lo-
cal officials will gain a greater
understanding of the flood
hazards and risks that affect
their community. Builders
and developers will have de-
tailed information for making
well-informed decisions on
where to build and how they
can affect flood zones. Insur-
ance agents and lending in-
stitutions will clearly under-
stand map changes and what
they need to do. Home and
business owners will be bet-
'ter informed about their cur-
rent flood risks.
Overall, the program will pro-
vide: better and more accurate
floodplain mapping service to
northwest Florida communi-
ties; more protection of water
resources from adverse im-
pacts: more accurate and bet-
ter knowledge to prevent de-
velopment disasters; the data
necessary to allow for long-
term sustainable growth; and
better public access to up-
dated floodplain and hazard
information.
Ron Bartel is the Director for
the Northwest Florida Water
Management District's Divi-
sion of Resource Management
who provides program over-
sight of the FEMA Map Mod-
ernization Program in North-
west Florida. More informa-
tion on the NWFWMD Map
Mod Program can be located
at www.nwfwmdfloodmaps.com


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4 Aurmust 2006 Page -;









Page 6 4 August 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


IL g4F -- --i--- -x la- A -MAXI% llk


The Franklin ChroniclP


of 1812, it was abandoned by the British in 1815. At the time,
Garcon, a Black military leader, assumed command of the Fort.
On July 27, 1816, Col. Duncan Clinch from Fort Scott in Geor-
gia attacked what had become known as the Negro Fort. The
Negro Fort was taken after a,bloody bombardment. In 1818,
Andrew Jackson instructed Lt. James Gadsden (for whom the
fort is npw named) to build a new fortification at the Negro
Fort site as a supply base. Lt. Gadsden maintained the Fort
until 1821. After that, Fort Gadsden was virtually forgotten
until 1862 when the Confederate Army took control of the Fort.
Via the Apalachicola River, it was a supply resource for Con-
federate troops in the north. After the Civil War, Fort Gadsden
faded into history: Today, a tour of the Fort provides visitors
with insight to life at a 19th century fort.
SR 65 South of Sumatra or North from Eastpoint to NFR 129
west to NFR 129-C. Proceed to the Fort.


Apalachicola National Forest


Fort Gadsden

5. John Gorrie State Museum
Historic museum-history of Apalachicola and John Gorrie's
invention of the ice machine-museum for Dr. John Gorrie
refrigeration pioneer: Historic look at local area history of
Apalachicola.
Corner of Avenue "D" and 6th Street, 46 6th Street, 1 block
east of US Hwy 98.
Dr. John Gorrie (1803 1855), an early pioneer in the inven-
tion of the artificial manufacture of ice, refrigeration and air
conditioning, was granted the first U.S. Patent for mechanical
refrigeration in 1851. Dr. Gorrie's basic principle is the one
most often used in refrigeration today; namely, cooling caused
by the rapid expansion of gases. Using two double acting force
pumps he first condensed and then rarified air. His appara-
tus, initially designed to treat yellow fever patients, reduced
the temperature of compressed air by interjecting a small
amount of water into it. The compressed air was submerged
in coils surrounded by a circulating bath of cooling water. He


4. Fort Gadsden
For history or Civil War buffs a visit to Fort Gadsden Historic
Site is a must. Fort Gadsden has been a part Florida's history
since the early 1800's. Built by the British as a base from
which to recruit Native and African Americans during the War


-t


91"t Jiaptist eiLwA

St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!

Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.
Sunday. Night 7:00 p.m.
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU













850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


raC


N 1\ .


Travel Highlights from Page 1

Contact the U.S. Forest Service, Apalachicola Ranger District
for location information: Florida Highway 20; Post Office Box
579; Bristol, FL 32321. (850) 643-2282. www.gorp.com.


-- c I,,,i
-.-~:----.**-- -

-i ___-I
.~~*-r ---- ---




Ochiockonee River


St. George Island
United Methodist Church

You ARE INVITED TO
SUNDAY WORSHIP 9:30A.M.

201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org *Pastor: Ray Hughes
g I



Wind Your Way To The Grill!

FOR THE BEST SEAFnnrD AND. STEAKz
Ok N Ti-i- F,-,-..-.'TFEN _,.,ST


thing to please even the most discriminating tastes. Located in the
beautiful St. James Bay Golf Community you can dine indoors or enjoy a
relaxing meal on our patio. A beautiful gazebo and full banquet facilities
make this the perfect setting for that special occasion.
Daily Breakfast from 7:00am-10:00pm & Lunch from ll:00am-3:00pm.
Open Thursday Sunday for Dinner from 5:00pm-9:30pm.
SBreakfast Lunch Dinner Banquet Facilities
SReservations 850.697.5050 *

CROOKED RIVER GRILL
at ST.: JAMES BAY
LOCATED IN THE ST. JAMES BAY GOLF AND RESIDENTLAI. COMMUNITY
6 MILES EAST OF PICTURESQUE CARRABELLE ON Hwy 98 ''VWWSTJAlMESBAI/ COM


CARRABELLE REALTY, INC.
P.O. Drawer 708 1526 Highway 67 in Carrabelle, FL
www.carrabellerealty.net


1 (850) 697-2181


* 1 (800)530-1473


We are a small, independently owned agency. YOU, the customer, are
our most important asset whether you are BUYING or SELLING, we
go the extra mile to make sure you receive excellent service. If you
don't want to get lost in the crowd, stop by and get personal attention!


House 002: Country home in a private set-
ting, 3BR/2BA, enclosed garage, separate
workshop, fireplace, on 1 acre. Come take
a look and make an offer! $269,000


2003: 32'x64' double-wide on 1.96 acres on
pond, beautiful property $249,500.


Golf Course: Prestigious lot on the 9th tee,
corner lot, reduced to $299,000
owner/agent.
*


Harbor Rd., 3BR/2BA, large


NEW LISTINGS

* Beach lot in private area, 50'x100', $895,000.
* 50'x150' MH lot, Lanark, $165,000. Reduced to $150,000.
* (2) Five-acre tracts on Hwy. 67, $195,000 each.
* One acre on Harbor Rd., high & dry, $109,500.
* Walk to Lake Talquin, 32'x64' Redman DW, 3BR/2BA, great room on 1
acre at end of cul-de-sac, $118,500.
* Weekend Retreat, 2BR Mobile Home on Corner Lot. $103,500.
*r


then allowed the interjected water to condense out in a hold-
ing tank, and released or rarified, the compressed air into a
tank of lower pressure containing brine; This lowered the tem-
perature of the brine to 26 degrees F. or below, and immersing
drip-fed, brick-sized, oil coated metal containers of non-saline
water, or rain water, into the brine, manufactured ice bricks.
The cold air was released in an open system into the atmo-
sphere.
The first known artificial refrigeration was scientifically dem-
onstrated by William Cullen in a laboratory performance at
the University of Glasgow in 1748, when he let ethyl ether boil
into a vacuum.
Dr. Gorrie submitted his patent petition on February 27, 1848,
three years after Florida became a state. In April of 1848, he
was having one of his ice machines built in Cincinnati, Ohio,
at the Cincinnati Iron Works, and in October, he demonstrated
its operation. It' was described in the Scientific American in
September of 1849. On August 22, 1850, he received London
Patent #13,124, and on May 6, 1851, U. S. Patent #8080. Al-
though the mechanism produced ice in quantities, leakage and
irregular performance sometimes impaired its operation. Gorrie
went to New Orleans in search of venture capital to market
the device, but either problems in product demand and opera-
tion, or the opposition of the ice lobby, discouraged backers.
He never realized any return from his invention. Upon his death
on June 29, 1855, he was survived by his wife Caroline (1805
- 1864), his son John Myrick (1838 1866), and his daughter,
Sarah (1844 -1908). Dr. Gorrie is buried in Gorrie Square in
Apalachicola, his wife and son are buried St. Luke's Episcopal
Cemetery, Marianna, Florida, and his daughter, in Milton,
Florida.
6. Ochlockonee River Canoe Trail
Easy canoeing requiring beginner level of skill. Beginning near
the Georgia line, the upper 26 miles of the Ochlockonee wind
toward Lake Talquin. The upper river is shallow and often silty
and may require portaging during low water. Willow trees line
the river and surrounding woodlands are home to wildlife com-
mon in the Panhandle, including deer, wild hog, opossum,
raccoon, and many kinds of wading birds. The lower 65 miles
flows from Lake Talquin to the Ochlockoree River State Park.
Water levels can vary with rainfall and may also require por-
tage during dry conditions. Habitats along the lower stretch
vary from high bluffs with pine, beech, magnolia and oak to
cypress swamps and quiet sloughs. Wildlife is abundant with
wading birds common, including the unusual limpkin. Scores
of ducks can be seen during winter months. Fishing for bass,
breaml, speckled perch and catfish is excellent along much of
the trail. The river winds gently through the Apalachicola Na-
tional Forest and broadens and slows as it approaches the
Ochlockonee River State Park.
Contact the Florida Department of Environmental Protection,
Office of Greenways and Trails for a brochure/map indicating
access points and special features: 3900 Commonwealth Blvd.;
MS 795; Tallahassee, FL 32399; (850) 488-3701.

Continued on Page 7


You too can have an investment
in paradise with the

BEST LOT LOAN ON

THE PLANET
For more details on this, other interest-only
products and Construction Perms, please contact:

Chollet Ramsey, Account Executive.
850.927.4812
chollet.ramsey@bankofamerica.com
BankofAmerica.
v -


9










The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


4 August 2006 Paee 7


Travel Highlights from Page 6


Tate's Hell Folklore
There is a mystery story tied into the geography of
Tate's Hell, dramatized in a film feature produced in
the College of Communication. When restored, this
motion picture will be presented at the Eastpoint
Theatre when it is opened. The two production stills
are from the publicity for the film and these contain
explanations of the subjects.


I,.





The three principal characters in "A Tale From
Tate's Hell" record their lines off-screen for a sound
take in the FSU College of Communication film.
Bruce Lake (left) plays law student Jim Knight, hus-
band of Angela, played by Marcella Shaffer. Bill
Gwyn (right) plays the legendary Cebe Tate, after
whom the northern Florida swamp, "Tate's Hell" is
named.


Mark Mandler (right) holds a shotgun replica dating
back to 1875, while Julian Ganoudis (center) oper-
ates the film camera for a shot in "A Tale From
Tate's Hell." Dr. Tom W. Hoffer (Communication)
directs the shot. The shotgun was furnished by
James Levy, in Historic Sites and Properties
Division of the State of Florida Museum
(Tallahassee) from his private collection.


St. George Island

-Reialty


BEAUTIFUL BEACH FRONT
HOME 3 large Masters. Extras
include crown molding, Corian
countertops, Jenn Aire range,
mature landscaping, screened &
open porches, widows walk, roll
down shutters, 100 feet on the Gulf
of Mexico!
MLS# 107603 $1,590,000


Phone: 850-927-4777
' Toll Free: 800-344-7570
www.sgirealty.com


BAY VIEW HOME! 3BR/2BA
upstairs and a nice ground level in-
law's suite with a full bath.
Spacious Master has garden tub
and opens to porch and deck.
Meticulously kept, nicely fur-
nished, huge deck and porch with a
gazebo. Priced right!
MLS# 201048 $545,000


7. St. George Island State Park
Pristine beaches and dunes on the Gulf of Mexico and St.
George Sound. Voted one of the top 10 beaches in the country.
Surrounded by Apalachicola Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, this
barrier Island offers nine miles of unspoiled beaches, high
dunes, pine flatwoods, and oak hammocks for hiking. Sandy
coves and salt marshes allow scenic canoeing.
U.S. Hwy 98 to CR 300 to Gulf Beach, drive east. Park is lo-
cated at the east end of the island, 850-927-1211.
8. St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge
12,490 acres of public land managed in a natural state. Wild-
life observation in a primitive setting.
West on highway U.S. Hwy 98 from Apalachicola, west on C-
30, south on C-30B. Contact Donald Kosin at (850) 653-8808.
/www. fws.govi~r4eao/nwrsvn.html.
9. Tate's Hell State Forest
Tate's Hell State Forest is located between the Apalachicola
and Ochlockonee Rivers and borders the southwest boundary
of the Apalachicola National Forest. The Forest covers 144,508
acres in Franklin County and 11,367 acres in southern Lib-
erty County. 5 sulphur springs; dwarf cypress stands; car-
nivorous plants; 25 primitive campsites; Tate's Hell Wildlife
Management Area (Womack Creek Unit); 21 canoe access points
and 25 primitive camp sites along Deep Creek, Doyle Creek,
Whiskey George Creek, New River, and Ochlockonee River); 3
boat landings (Ochlockonee River, New River and Deep Creek).
Hunting, fishing, primitive camping, canoeing, boating, wild-
life viewing and nature study.
Contact the Division office for a map identifying the locations
of facilities: Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services; Division of Forestry; 1621 Highway 98 East;
Carrabelle, FL 32322; (850) 697-3734, www.fl-dof. com.


Ashley Enters

Commission Race,

Pooser Withdraws


Don Ashley, internationally
acclaimed fish and wildlife
expert committed to conser-
vation and sustainable.use,
filed as an Independent can-
didate for the County Com-
mission seat currently held by
Cheryl Sanders, Democrat.
Ashley is known throughout
Franklin County for raising
objections to the Comp Plan
approved by Sanders and a
majority of her fellow Com-
missioners which set in mo-
tion St. Joe's massive devel-
opment plans in the eastern
part of the county.
Ashley's entry into the race
prompted Ned Pooser, Repub-
lican, to withdraw. Pooser
said Sanders' support for the
explosive development plans
by St. Joe, and her failure to
address the many concerns of
the citizens in the county in
the Visioning process, were
the main reasons he initially
filed.


St. George Island Realty
235 E. Gulf Beach Dr.
St. George Island, FL 32328

LAND FOR SALE:
UNOBSTRUCTABLE BAY
VIEW! Dry lot on St. George
Island with 1,00 ft road frontage
just across from State land that
backs up to The Bay. Wonderful
location for your Island home.
MLS# 200796 $385,000
GREAT ONE ACRE BAY
FRONT LOT Rare white sandy
beach on the St George Sound.
Fantastic view! Privacy on a quiet
street in East End- (Watkins Cove)
with nice homes nearby.
MLS# 108381 $850,000
BAY VIEW CORNER LOT
Located in quiet area with views
across canal to Apalachicola Bay.
Nicely wooded with uplands for
building site. Comer lot measures
100 x 170 MLS# 109837 $356,000


I -


The number one issue in this
race is massive, explosive
growth (favored by Sanders),
and limited, controlled growth
favored by both Don and me.
Since Don is an Independent,
the race would boil down to
the 3-person face-off in the
November general election.
Don and I would essentially
split the pro-preservation.
pro-cultural heritage vote in
the District. This would en-
sure Cheryl's reelection. This
race is too important. The fu-
ture of the county is at stake.
Are we going to maintain our
cultural heritage? Will be able
to preserve this national trea-
'sure we call "Franklin
County"? Or, will we become
another stressed-out county
of wall-to-wall condos? Seri-
ous questions need to be
asked. What is the carrying
capacity of the'county? How
much growth can we sustain?
Where does the potable water
to furnish these massive de-
velopments come from? More
importantly, where "does the
waste water from all these
developments go to? Does the
development pay for itself, or
is it left for the rest of us to
pick up the tab? When you go
to the sink to get a drink of
water, at some point you have
to turn off the tap. Have we
reached that point With re-
gards to development? These,
and many other questions,
have never been addressed by
Cheryl or the majority of the
i,


Board even though these
questions were part of the Vi-
sioning process.
Pooser said Ashley's commit-
ment to preserving the dis-
tinctive cultural heritage of
the county, along with his
name recognition, broad voter
appeal, and credibility was the
deciding factor in withdraw-
ing from the race. "This isn't
about me or a political party",
.said Pooser, "It's about the
future of Franklin County,
and preserving its unique
character as a national trea-
sure for our children and their
children. If I stayed in the
race, Don and I would split the
limited-growth vote in the Dis-
trict, and I will not be a
'spoiler', I will not be a 'Ross
Perot'." Pooser said all con-
tributions to his campaign
would be returned.


Health

Center To

Hold Health

Fair For

National

Health

Center Week

Eastpoint Medical Center will
hold a free health fair per-
forming medical screenings
for all patients on Tuesday,
August 8, 2006, from 2 to 5
p.m. We wish to underscore
the vital role of Community,
Migrant and Homeless Health
Centers all over the country,
which are in their 40th year
of caring for the nation's medi-
cally underserved and unin-
sured. The event is part of a
weeklong celebration of Na-
tional Health Center Week
2006 (August 6 12) to rec-
ognize the achievements of
health centers who fill the role
of family doctor to 15 million
people in more than 3600
communities,across the na-
tion.
Eastpoint Medical Center is
one of eight service sites of
North Florida Medical Cen-
ters, Inc., in the communities
of Eastpoint, Panacea, Wewa-
hitchka, Quincy, Mayo, Cross
City, Greenville, and Perry.
Eastpoint Medical Center
served approximately 2500
patients last year with ap-
proximately 7,000 patient vis-
its. Most of these patients rely
on Medic-ad. Medicareor have
inofhsurafce at l .. .
A proclamation h 'nnor r ig Na-
tional Community Health
Center Week from the
Franklin County Board of
County Commissioners will be
presented by Alan Pierce.
County Administrator to Dr.
Lionel Catlin and Mrs. Sylvia
Adkison, Center Manager.


Cook ce91
insurance
AG E N CY
A Gulf State Community Bank Company
www.cookinsuranceagency.com
(800) 822-7530
73 Avenue E 205 NW Avenue A
Apalachicola, FL Carrabcllc, FL
(850) 653-9310 (850) 697-3473
SERVING THE COAST SINCE 1913


Consumers

Advised To

Avoid Raw

Oysters

From The

Pacific

Northwest

.The Food and Drug Adminis-.
tration is advising consumers
to avoid eating raw oysters
harvested in the Pacific North-
west as a result of increased
reports of illnesses associated
with the naturally occurring
bacteria Vibrio parahae-'
molyticus (Vp) in oysters har-
vested from the area. Oysters
harvested from this region
have been reported to cause
gastrointestinal illness.
Until the threat of Vp from'
oysters harvested in the Pa-
cific Northwest has passed,,
consumers are advised to
thoroughly cook oysters har-
vested from that area before
eating. They also should thor-
oughly cook oysters if they are
not certain of the oysters' ori-
gin, or if they wish to further,
reduce their risk of infection
from bacteria that may be
found in raw oysters.
In recent months, there has
been an unusual increase in
bacterial illness associated
with eating raw oysters from
the Pacific Northwest. The ill-
nesses are associated with the.
naturally occurring bacterium
Vp, which is most prevalent
during summer months when
water temperatures in the
Pacific Northwest are most
favorable for its growth. While
Vp can cause mild gas-
trointestinal disorders in
healthy individuals, older peri
sons and those with weak
immune systems are at
greater risk for serious more
illness, such as septicemia
(infection of the blood system).
Pacific Northwest oysters are
distributed nationally. Al'
though to date most of the ill-
nesses reported have oc-
curred in the Pacific North-
west, some have been re-
ported in New York state as
well.
In Washington state, shellfish
control authorities are iden-
tifying and closing areas,
where people have become
sick from eating oysters
WasHington state has nitiateq
''a recall of all shell stock oys{
ters (oysters in the shell) hara
vested from areas closed
within the state. Because of
the potential for nationwide
distribution, consumers ar4.
advised to follow recall inr
structions and return associl
ated shell stock oysters to the
retailer from which they were
purchased.
Cooking destroys the bacteria;
eliminating the risk of illness
for both healthy and immuno-
compromised individuals. The
majority of illnesses that oc-
cur from the consumption of
raw oysters are not life-threat-
ening to the general popula-
tion and commonly range
from mild intestinal disorders
of short duration to acute gas-h
troenteritis. The symptoms
are watery diarrhea, often
with abdominal cramping,
nausea, vomiting, fever and|
chills. Usually these symp-
toms occur within 24 hours
of ingestion and last no more,
than three days. Severe dis-P
ease is rare and occurs most
commonly in persons with
weakened immune systems.
Persons with weakened im-:
mune systems, including'
those affected by AIDS; and'
persons with chronic alcohol'
abuse, liver, stomach or blood.
disorders, cancer; diabetes, or
kidney disease should avoid'
raw oyster consumption alto-:
gether, regardless of. where:
the oysters are harvested.
Consumers can continue to.
enjoy oysters in many cooked:
preparations.


ll- ^-^-- ^ -- -- A, A


w













Page 8 4 August 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


SFl6rida Classified


AN I Adv rising Network



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INTERESTED IN A POSTAl.IO11 Ilarning S57K/yr
Avg Minimum Pay? Our services can lelp you prepare for
the Postal Batlery Exam. Find Out Ilow! Call Today For
More Information. (800)584-1775 RefCode iP5799.


Truck Drivers: CII. training. Up to $20,000 honus.
Acceletnte yrurr carleei ; a Soldlier. I)n u ve lt erinisi tby
keeping the Army Nlaona.l (tiiiGrd sipiplied. .-:IQB-(i(iQ:
GLUARDI>colrock h


MECH(ANICS: lip to S20l,000 honus. Keep the Army
National Guard Rolling. 'Fix:H umaes. Strvkers, etc,
Expandyourskills through career raining, Beasoldcr. I-
800-GO-GUARD comimechanic tmil.

Instruction

IIEAVY EQUIPMENTOPERATORTRAININ; FOR
EMPLOYMENT: Bulldozers. Backhoes. Loaders. Dump
'rucks,G raiders Scrapers, rxcavalors National Cenilica-
tion. Joh Placement Assistance; Associated Training Ser-
vices (800)251-3274 s aw.cauirnmnt-schoqLEM.g

Manufacturedllonles

PALM IIARBOR IHOMESFactory Model Center I.ARG-
EST in Americal Modular, Mobile and Stilt Ilones. Call
for FREE Color Brochures! (800)622-2832.


JFrankln ChroLicle&Is
ow isriutd n Fanli, akll, ad ul Cunie


JOHN'S Licensed & Inst
RG0050763
S CONSTRUCTION RC0051706

Quality Craftsmanship For Over 40 Years
SERVING FRANKLIN COUNTY SINCE 1982
Specializing in Custom Homes-Remodeling
Additions Repairs Vinyl Siding


850-697-2376
Fax: 697-4680


ured


P.O. Drawer JJ Carrabelle, FL 32322


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of his Notice 07/17/06 Invoice No 11259
Description of Vehicle: Make Plymouth Model4 Door Color Red
TagNo.NoTag Year 1991 Slate FL in No. 1G2NG14V4MC644467

To Owner. Heather Mayhan To Lien Holder
1044 Rosemont Road
Apalachicola, FL 32320



You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 07/12/06 at the request of FHP that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 244.50 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you arc hereby notified that on 08/15/06 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219
4


Medical Supplies

FREE DIABETIC SUPPLIES! MEDICARE PA-
TIENTS! Call Us Toll Free (866)294-3476 and receive a.
FREEi MErTER! Am-Mcd Quality Diabetic Supplics.


Miscellaneous


DIVORCES275-S350*COVERS childrcnctc. Only one
signature required! "Excludes govt. rccsi Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, cxt.600. (8am-6pm) Alta Divorce, I.C.C.
Established 1977.

ATE'ND COLLEGE ONLINE from I lomc. 'Medcal,'
"Business, Paralegal, 'Computers 'Criminal Justice. Job .
pltacementassistance. Computerprovided FinancialAidif
qualified. Call (866)858-212,1
twvw onliinTidcwatcrTcch com.

WOLFF TANNING BEDS Buy Direct and Save! Full
Body units from 22 a month! FREEColor Catalog CAI..
TODAY' (8001842-1305 vww.nm .cYls n.lm.

AIRLINE MECHlANIC- Rapid training Ibr high paying
Aviation Career. FAA predicts severe shortage. Financial
aid if qualify Job placement assistance. CALL AIM
(888)349-5387.

Pools

Demo Ilomnsites Wanted Now! In selected areas! For the
New Kayak Pool The above ground pool with inground
features. Save S with this unique opportunity. Free Esti.
mates I FAST INSTALLATION / EZ Financing. Call
(866)348-7560.

RIeal Estate

MIll.ION DOI.IARt VISTAS will cool mountain
brheees high atop the Smokies between prestigious INigh.
lands.Franklin/Dillard. Exclusive, Private,Secluded. I luge
homesites from S175.000 (800)679-797(6
wwvw hihllandsrass com

Gulf front 1Its S595k. lomes starting mid S300k. Neir
master planned ocean front community on beautiful Mus-
tang Island, near Corpus Christi, TX.
U3mw innamonshorc corn (866)891-5163,

East lennessee- Norris Lake 5.6 acre wooded
IAKhTEFIrONT let- 56.500 5.1 acre v.odcd VIEW lot.
S28,900 Call Lakeside Really ilt (423)626-5820 Or visit
\'www.a1ke.sridcrall-ln.gtld .

MIIRPIIY. NORTH CAROLINA AAII COOL SUM-
MnERS MILD WINTERS Aflfrdable I lames & Mountain
Cabins. Land CALL FOR FRE li ROCI 11tRE (877)837-
2288 EXIT REALITY MOUNTAIN VIEW PROPER-.
TIES w .mcxiur hn '.clo

IAKE LAND SALE! 5.5 Acres. Subdivideable With
Foal Slip. Only $29.900! Direct Access to 33,000-acre
mountain lake in Tennessec. Available 8/26! (800)770-
9311, exl.830.


GEORGIA/ NORTH CAROLINA Capllniatli in un-
lan views, takes, rivers,watert"ills I lomrnsiesstarting rit
$39.9,00. Log home kits (@ $39,901)0 Imited availaililt
Call (888)389-3504 X700

IAKEFRONT PREDEVEl.OPMENT OPPl'ORTTi-
NlTY! www grandcharbor info All vatcr-access bomesiles-
direct from the developer. Most amcnilics already in Far
S below market value, Irom S79.900 P'ossible IS nlo NO
PAYMENTS' Call Now! i88S)PIY-LAKIES

Western New M eico Private 62 Acre Ranch S 129.990 MI.
views, teces. rolling hills. pasiureland. borders HI.M
1930's sione homcslead and barn ruins. Ilirschack riding.
hiking, hunting Perfect family ranch. electrilcIOy 100%
financing. NA.C (866)365-2825

LAKE ESCAPE at The Ridges Resort & Cluh. lied &
Ireakfalst at Our Beautiful L.akeside Mountain Rcslr l i i
Iliawassee GA. S99-wcckday to 5139)
tl_[c.Pidjge.RlW rsLtae. (888)S34-44091

DtIRECT OCEAN ACCESS 'PROPEIRTilES! .STAl'I-
ING AT ONI.Y S79,900! Properties up to 31 Acile
available! One Day Only Sale! August 12th. CallTod;yltiir
Reservation! (866)950-5263 Ext 1105


Real Estate


BEAUTIFUL N. CAROLINA. ESCAPE TO BEAUTI-
FUl. WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS. FREE COLOR
BROCI IURE & INFORMATION. MOUNTAIN PROP-
ERTIES W' SPECTACULAR VIEWS HOMES. CAB-
INS, CREEKS & INVESTMENT ACREAGE. Cherokee
MountlairGMAC Real Estate. chcrokcemuulain ralty com
(800)841.5868.

North Carolina Cool Mountain Air, Views & Streams,
I lomcs,Cabin.s& Acreage. FREEBROCHIURE(800)642-
5333. Realty OfMurphy 317 Peachtree St. Murphy. N.C.
28906. Now rellvormurphy coin


KY-IV.AKE Cl(tIMI Ell.ANI) ,IMITllI.AND.NA1.1E
- 111p h, $10,000t OFF 1 all swcariii rliclse t'lisels with
generous 120' fronlage are being discounted oIr a lir1iied
time, Awesome amlcnlties! (866)462-81 98.

NEW LOG I1OME PACKAGE! 6 Acres with autl Slip
Only S89,900! Direct access to 33.000 acre imounaiin lake
in 'enlnessee. Available 8K26! ($0017710-9311, I. lt.35

(Rtnld community 2 hours from Atlalla & thle Colnsl
1/2to 3 acre parcels irom the S40's. Incredible sunsets &
sumnmerbrcezcs! Private location. amenities. Call(8661882-
1107.

KY I.AKEFRONTIACREAGE Iritate. atcd.,lakclroni
community. Walerlront parcels with-generursn 120' Froml-
agcfioiothlee70('s Spaciousont'waterparcls l oiri tie 30i'f
fixceptional planned amenities. Owner(866)462-8198

KY I'N LAKE OVERVIEW PARCEL 2.16 acre high
ground I rchl olrerssoniortilhciesi views uplund dollnt l.;rkc
nltiklty. 9 mllln lI Nilshville Vr ry clI e I n I iuid Itetl\vCeen
the .Lukis lec.r arcl S162.)000i (8OblS)33l-1..lllfl

I.OOKING TO OWN lAND? Invest jn rural acreage
throughoutiAmerica; coastal. mountain. waterfront proper-
ties, 20 to 200 acres. For FREE Special Land Icports
insn.lanodb rsoiuidcenom/t.I

NC MOUNTAIN ACREAGE Near Asheville. NC I lo
8 acre parcels. Gated community with amenities. 4 mile
orriverfront! Just 5 minutes to lown ort lot Springs Phase
II opens Fall 06. (866)292-5762.

TN 50 MILE VIEW PARCEI. 3 acres wil incredible "
blur views! Central to Chattanooga & Nashville. Mature
hardwoods. Close to state park. 15 area golfcourses. Gated.
clubhouse, fitness center. nature trails S189.900. Call
(866)292-5769.

VA MOUIN FAINS 5 acres with fronlage on very large
pristine creek. very,pnrivate excellent fishing. canoing.
good access, ncea New River Trail State Paik, $39.5001
SOwncr(8661789-8535 ~lw.vol ninuIoyglVA anl

New, PrI-Co nastrucliunG(olfC('nninunily-Coas;all(eor-
gia Large lots \w/deeplater, marsh, goll, nature ec\is
Gated, Goll, Friness Center. Tennis. Trails Oak Park.
Docks. S70k's- S300k (877)2r6-7376

COASTAL NORTII CAROILINA Waterfront Conmu-
nily The Preserveal RiverSca DevelotperCloscouts From
$129,900. Incredible location. Farbelow market value I1
monlthno payment plan.(866)213-6315 Broker. Neighllbor-
. hood Properties, LLC.

Services

PokeRliytbhlns...tlcy can't.rix stutidi .hui lthcv ian li
:, 1 1 ," il: l i ^ .. ^1 n l l' .. .. n a,
everything'

Steel Buildings

Arch Slecl lBuildings. Ilurricane Raledi l 1'MA grade
Widths o' 25, 310. 40 & 51). OarageWorkslhop Storae
StcelMastert.v lruildings. factory direct' Call 1800)341-
701)7 wvi.SnlcIMacUJ-ikcr ntA

IIlIl.,DING(SAI.I! "MANIINFACTIURlII D)RI Cl'Since
19S0!" t[xtensive range ot srics/mtodels. lixamprle
40'sxI0'xl6'"3 48isq ft. Ends optional 3-wecck dclhcr
25'x40'12' S3990 (IIMl TED QTY). Pioneer (800)668-
5422.


Air-Con of Wakulla, LLC

HEATING AND COOLING
850-926-5592

Installation

Service

Repair

Gary Limbaugh, owner Lic # CAC1814304
Serving Franklin and Wakulla Counties since 1988




CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Dale ofthisNotice 07/12/06 Invoice No. 11231
Description oi'Vehicle: Make Chevy Model Color Red
TagNo.Al7 10X Year 1999 State FL VinNo. 2C1MR2265X6702091

To Owner Betty Jo Clcghom To Lien Holder,
1441 Highway 76
Carrabcllc, FL 32322



You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 07/03/06 at the request of Property Owner that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 343.50 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you are hereby notified that on 08/07/06 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 H6uston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


GovDeals is Hosting at Online Auction the Surplus
Assets of Florida County, City, Law Enforcement and
Educational Agencies
Police/Sheriff Vehicles & Confiscated Property Heavy
Equipment Pickup Trucks Cars Buses Computers
Furniture Specialty Assets Scrap Metal
New Items Added Dally Register Online to Bid Now!

1http://FL.govdeals.com
Register online to bid. Call 800-613-0156 or. t- tp/ ov ealscom
e-mail info@govdeals.com for more Information GovDea is.com


OtPENINtG Tills FALI.

THE
OF DAYTONA BEACH.
The Ultra-Luxurious Oceanfront
Condominium with Concierge Services
and Golf & Spa Privileges.

. Oceanfront Pool with Sun Terraces
and Lush Gardens

Ultra-Luxury 2 and 3 Bedroom
residences with Fireplace, Panoramic
View Balconies, Gourmet Kitchens
and Designer Baths.


Call today 1-866-741-8317
www.oceanvistasdaytona.cvm/nys


As seen


FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V. I

ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS


(800) 79447310

JG. Wentworth means CASH NOW

for Structured Settlements!


I -- Only one weekend each
year do the world's finest
knifemakers meet!

I This is THAT Weekend In I
Orlando! August 4, 5, 6
Hour: 12.5Fr. 10-6 Sa 10-4 un.


KNIFE SHOW
I Buena Vista Palace Resort,Orlando ~FRENCE
Fri., Sat. & Sun. Aug. 4, 5, 6, 2006 ADMITA I
The World's Finest Knives and Knifemakers. th this Ad




CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Dale o this.Notice 07/18/06 Invoice N. 11269
Description of Vehicle: Make Kawasaki Model Motorcycle Color Green
Tag No.No Tag Year 2001 State FL Vin No. JKAKLMGI IlA024867

To Owner' Laura Register or To Lien Holder
Ginger Hattficld
P.O. Box 1018
Eastpoint, FL 32328

You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 07/14/06 at the request of FHP that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 244.50 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you are hereby notified that on 08/17/06 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal indcntification, driver's'licensc and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219
r


We're Worth

The Drive!
ONLY 1.6 MILES FROM CAUTION
LIGHT IN DOWNTOWN APALACHICOLA


Everyday low prices on items you use

everyday! Great selection of

organic and natural products Friendly

associates, great customer service Full

service deli with premium meats &

cheeses Black Angus beef ...hand cut in

our store! Everyday low price on beer!

Great wine selection *

Open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday to Friday
Open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday & Sunday
Beer available 7 days a week
WE HAVE WESTERN UNION AND MONEY ORDERS AND
ACCEPT MASTERCARD, VISA, DISCOVER, EBT & DEBIT













The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


4 August 2006 Page 9


X A 1,A'.


RENTAL



3/2 1600 sq.ft. doublewide, secluded on

3+ acres. Includes central A/C, utility

room, Jacuzzi bathtub and dishwasher.

Call 954-816-7004.

07-21/08-04






Joe's Lawn Care

Lawn Maintenance Debris and Junk Removal
Tree Service and Removal
Hurricane Clean-Up Trim Palm Trees
Planting and Sod Laying


Let Joe take care of all your yard care needs.
Call Joe at 670-5478 (home) or 370-6911 (cell)
08-04/08-18




Mike Marshall: 850-899-5319 Office: 850-697-3428
Michael Marshall: 850-528-6200 Michael Mann: 850-899-5323
(Truck Driver)


Marshall Marine
Fiberglass & Transport, LLC

Boat Repair Fiberglass Fabrication & Supplies
Full Service Boat Yard Custom Boxes
Over-the-Road Boat Transport Meter Covers

Shipping: 1205 SE Ave. B Licensed & Insured |
Mailing: P.O. Box 879 MMarsh3139@aol.com ^
Carrabelle, FL 32322 www.boattransport.net g






Injured? Do you have a lawsuit but

need money now?


Victory Funding 'A

provides cash to individuals with
pending personal injury lawsuits


Call today: 888-544-2881

www.victoryfunds.net,


Victory Funding


Want to purchase minerals


and other oil/gas interests.


Send details to:


P.O. Box 13557


Denver, Colorado 80201










2x2 Rates 2x4 Rates
Statewide $1200 Statewide $2400
Regional or National Regional Placement
Placement also available also available
Regions: North, South, Central Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million Total Circulation: 2.2 Million











CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Dae ofthisNotice 07/12/06 Invoice No 11251
Description o Vehicle: Make Pontiac Model 4 Door Color Silver
TagNo. NoTag Year 1986 Slate FL VinNo. 2G2GN69A8G2208350

To Owner Mary Creamer To Lien Holder'
P.O. Box 292
Eastpoint, FL 32328



You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 07/08/06 at the request of FCSO that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 244.50 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78


You and each of you arc hereby notified that on 08/11/06 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction *
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL'32328
(850) 670-8219


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle
pages is an efficient way to promote your business to
the public and save money at the same time. These
ads are strictly business cards magnified to 2 columns
by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two
insertions. Send your business card or copy to:
Franklin Chronicle, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL
32328 or fax 850-670-1685. Your check for $15.00 will
guarantee position in the next issue.





Fast Eddie's Detailing

Autos






Eddie Fields

Located at Pearl Car Wash in Eastpoint

850-899-5105 08-04/08-18





Beach Bike Rentals, Inc.

We Rent Only Premium, Quality Bikes

Hourly Daily Weekly Rentals

Body Boards Skim Boards

Free Delivery Available

139 E. Gorrie Drive, St. George Island
Phone: 850-927-3993 08-04/08





Pay The County Bills


The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of
$445,704.11 at their July 18, 2006 meeting. The bills are listed
as follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Of-
fice.


ACS GOVT FINANCIAL SYSTEM
07/17/2006 15:


BANK


Check Register


VENDOR


FRANKLIN COUNTY
GL540R-V06.71 PAGE 1


CHECK D DATE


AMOUNT


BANK GENERAL RANK ACCOUNT


000239
001757
002157
000307
001670
002550
002467
002483
002469
000214
000255
002172
.04320-
.000302
002281
000104
.04319
002521
002535
000321
000320
002470
002565
002495
000965
001989
002448
002497
001181
000305
000230
001097
.04321
000192
000869
001716
000593
000540
002563
002610
002457
002453
.04328
000834
000872
002585
002110
002385
0019'52
000.103
002402
002346
002473
000292
002427
000586
.001488
.04329
000267
002122
001053
002284
001830
002429
002409
002502
002454
.04322
001900
002462
000138
.04323
002267
001358
002452
000395
000626
002460
000368
000211
001838
002608
002475
000308
002392
002351
000429
001503
002536
.04324
002330
002406
002556
002561
002343
002174
002554
000286
002531
002479
001278
002160.
000648
001976
002507
001566
000852
002575
.04326
002103
000439
002194
002528
001972
002611
.04325
002394
000168
002410
000642
002463
002612
002591
000132
000304
001642
002424
001995
000175
000205
001269
001812
.04327
001470
002490
002377
001725
001993
002450


A.I.P. PRODUCTS INC.
ACS
AIRGAS SOUTH
ALLIGATOR POINT VOL. FIR
ALLTEL
ALPHA SOURCE INC
ALSO
AMERICAN SYSTEM TECHNOLO
AMERIFILE
AMERIGAS
APALACHEE CENTER, INC
APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE
-APALACHICOLA ACE HDWR
., :APAACHICOLA VOLUNTEER F
ARAMARK
HARD'SS FINA
ATI.ANTIC COAST THEATRE
11 IRAIIN MIK:DICAI.
BAXTER IIEALTHCARE CORP
BCC FINE AND FORFEITURE
BCC ROAD AND BRIDGE FOND
.BECKMAN COULTER INC
BLACKHAWK APALACHICOLA L
BRIGGS CORPORATION
BRINKLEY/ROBIN .
BUTLER/CONNIE J.
C & W FOOD SERVICE INC
CALHOUN LIBERTY HOSPITAL
CAROLINA SOFTWARE
CARRABELLE VOLUNTEER FIR
CARSON & ADKINS
CHAMPION CHEVROLET
CITY OF APALACHICOLA
CITY OF APALACHICOLA
CITY OF CARRABELLE
CLERK MODERNIZATION ACCT
CLERK OPERATIONAL ACCOUNT
CLERKS TRUST ACCOUNT
COAST2COAST PRINTING
CORPORATE EXPRESS IMAGINE
DADE BEARING
DAIRYLAND HEALTHCARE SOL
DAVID MCLAIN
DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS
DEPT OF MANAGEMENT SERVI
DIAGNOSTIC PARTS EXCHANGE
DIRT BUSTERS
DISASTERS STRATEGIES AND
i)OrlIFORMS 1. lI.
1)0(i 'IN .ANIJ VOI. II'' I U II'T
EASTPUINTH VOLUNTEER FIkRE
:A;'!TPOINT WATl)HH 1. HlWEHR
EDUCATION WEEK
ELAN FINANCIAL SERVICES
ENVIROMED OF BAY COUNTY
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUPPLY,
FILING SOURCE INC
FLORIDA RESEARCH, INC.
FLORIDA 4-H FOUNDATION
FRANKLIN CO CLERK
FRANKLIN COUNTY HEALTH D
FRANKLIN COUNTY MINISTER
FULMER,DVM/HOBSON F.
G&N PAINTING
GANDER AUTO PARTS
GIBSON/REBECCA D
GORDON TRACTOR INC
GRANGER/LATONIA
GRAYLINK WIRELESS
GT COM
GT COMMUNICATIONS
GULF STATE CHEMICAL &
GULFSIDE I.G.A. (APALACH
GULFSIDE IGA
HAM'S LANDSCAPING, SPRIN
HARBOR ELECTRIC SUPPLY,
HARBOR MEDICAL CENTER
HOLLEY, INC.
ISLAND DRIVE PROPERTIES
IVERS MD/VINCENT
J.D. SWEARINGTON EQUIPME
KETCHUM, WOOD & BURGERT
KONE INC.
KYLE GRIFFIN PHYSICAL
LAKE/NANCY K
LANARK VILLAGE / ST. JAM
LANARK VILLAGE WATER &
LEGAL SERVICES OF N FLA
LEITZ OFFICE PRODUCTS
LIBERTY COMMUNICATIONS
MCKESSON
MCKESSON MEDICAL SURGICAL
MOCK/MIKE
MORON, MICHAEL
MORTAN INC
NEECE TIRE & AUTO SERVICE
NEXTEL PARTNERS INC
NORTHERN SAFETY CO INC
OFFICE DEPOT
OFFICE OF THE STATE ATTO
OFFICEMAX CONTRACT INC
OSCEOLA SUPPLY INC
PARKER SERVICES, INC.
PAUL'S PEST CONTROL, INC
PEAVY & SON CONSTRUCTION
PETERSEN INDUSTRIES, INC
PIERCE DO/DAVID
PIERCE LLC/ANTHONY
POLOUS/JAMES DEWITT
POPULAR LEASING USA INC
POSTMASTER
POUNCEY/PAULA
PREBLE-RISH, INC.
PROGRESS ENERGY FLORIDA,
QA REAL TIME SYSTEMS LLC.
QUALITY WATER SUPPLY
QUEST DIAGNOSTICS
REBECCA HENDERSON
REDDY ICE-ALBANY
RING POWER CORPORATION
RUNDEL/MICHAEL
SHADE TREE TOWING
SHAM K MANGALVEDKAR
SOMA TECHNOLOGY INC
SOUTHERN PETROLEUM SYSTEM
SPIRIT SERVICES COMPANY
ST.GEORGE ISLAND VOL.FIR
ST.JOE RENT-ALL, INC.
SWITZER/LORI
TAX COLLECTOR, FRANKLIN
TAYLOR'S BUILDING SUPPLY
THE APALACHICOLA TIMES
TIRE DISPOSAL SERVICES
TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT COMP
UNITED PARCEL SERVICE
VORTECH PHARMACEUTICALS,
WARD/JESSICA SMITH
WARD/LAURA
WASTE MANAGEMENT OF PC
WATER MANAGEMENT SERVICE
WOLFF/RONALD


36188 07/18/06
36189 07/18/06
36190 07/18/06
36191 07/18/06
36192 07/18/06
36193 07/18/06
36194 07/18/06
36195 07/18/06
36196 07/18/06
36197 07/18/06
36198 07/18/06
36199 07/18/06
36200 07/18/06
36201 07/18/06
36202 07/18/06
36203 07/18/06
36204 07/18/06
36205 07/18/06
36206 07/18/06
36207 07/18/06
36208 07/18/06
36209 07/18/06
36210 07/18/06
36211 07/18/06
36212 07/18/06
36213 07/18/06
36214 07/18/06
36215 07/18/06
36216 07/18/06
36217 07/18/06
36218 07/18/06
36219 07/18/06
36220 07/18/06
36221 07/18/06
36222 07/18/06
36223 07/18/06
36224 07/18/06
36225 07/18/06
36226 07/18/06
36227 07/18/06
36228 07 18/06
36229 07 18/06
36230 07 18/06
36231 07/18/06
36232 07 18/06
36233 07 18/06
36234 07/18/06
36235 07 18/06
16216 07/1 /06
36,2.31 07 1/O06
36231 07/18/06
162.19 07/18/06
36240 07/18/06
36241 07/18/06
36242 07/18/06
36243 07/18/06
36244 07/18/06
36245 07/18/06
36246 07/18/06
36247 07/18/06
36248 07/18/06
36249 07/18/06
36250 07/18/06
36251 07/18/06
36252 07/18/06
36253 07/18/06
36254 07/18/06
36255 07/18/06
36256 07/18/06
36257 07/18/06
36258 07/18/06
36259 07/18/06
36260 07/18/06
36261 07/18/06
36262 07/18/06
36263 07/18/06
36264 07/18/06
36265 07/18/06
36266 07/18/06
36267 07/18/06
36268 07/18/06
36269 07/18/06
36270 07/18/06
36271 07/18/06
36272 07/18/06
36273 07/18/06
36274 07/18/06
36275 07/18/06
36276 07/18/06
36277 07/18/06
36278 07/18/06
36279 07/18/06
36280 07/18/06
36281 07/18/06
36282 07/18/06
36283 07/18/06
36284 07/18/06
36285 07/18/06
36286 07/18/06
36287 07/18/06
36288 07/18/06
36289 07/18/06
36290 07/18/06
36291 07/18/06
36292 07/18/06
36293 07/18/06
36294 07/18/06
36295 07/18/06
36296 07/18/06
36297 07/18/06
36298 07/18/06
36300 07/18/06
36301 07/18/06
36302 07/18/06
36303 07/18/06
36304 07/18/06
36305 07/18/06
36306 07/18/06
36307 07/18/06
36308 07/18/06
36309 07/18/06
36310 07/18/06
36311 07/18/06
36312 07/18/06
36313 07/18/06
36314 07/18/06
36315 07/18/06
36316 07/ 18/06
36317 07/ 18/06
36318 07/ 18/06
36319 07/18/06
36320 07/18/06
36321 07/18/06
36322 07/18/06
36323 07/18/06
36324 07/18/06
36325 07/18/06
36326 07/18/06
36327 07/18/06
36328 07/18/06


GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT

FUND RECAP:
FUND DESCRIPTION

001 GENERAL FUND
120 FINE AND FORFEITURE
137 FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC LIBRARY
139 BALD POINT TRUST FUND
140 ROAD AND BRIDGE
141 LOOT ROAD PAVING
142 MOSQUITO CONTROL
160 M. S. B. U. FIRE DIST.
163 ENHANCED 911 FUND
170 AIRPORT FUND
100 AFFORD.HOUSING ASSIST TRUST
201 GEORGE E WEEMS HOSPITAL FUND
TOTAL ALL FUNDS


137.37
8,652.00
95.75
9,073.00
559.28
124.22
1,409.19
1,414.15
94.66
634.42
2,033.33
1,408.00
71.54
6,476.00
755.63
28.54
495.00
856.81
767.712
776.00
12,150.35
816.44
25,000.00
896.33
40.00
225.00
789.23
1,292.00
300.00
5,533.00
-11,461.36
100.91
820.81
1,571.14
316.11
: 1,125.20
38,415.85
38.80
372.83
155.01
,5,660.83
2,800.00
428.05
480.00
S134.81
190.00
60.00
14,000.00
9. .r2
1, 45' .00
11,000.00
390.'7/
79.94
2,756.30
233.00
3,481.28
238.00
59.00
1,298.00
82.50
49,053.00
600.00
549.95
3,750.00
404 .99
435.00
200.52
21.81
155.50
1,798.27
8,374.26
2,820.00
40.30
65.59
2,450.00
78.33
6,508.00
630.24
1,166.56
5,100.00
447.35
3,637.00
606.06
275.00
424.30
8,216.00
54.00
2,341.35
1,139.'25
466.20
7,392.21
1,074.93
12.48
500.00
405.08
202.00
260.05
110.57
627.39
91.27
525.29
706.90
4,881.55
60.00
1,734.85
28.01
1,316.00
3,329.90
15.95
914.01

29,596.10
4,943.49
246.00
241.25
9,000.00
190.15
66.00
17,620.01
75.65
191.50
3,458.00
7,746.00
35,635.00
418.09
18,268.00
127.07
1,833.33
405.02
445.44
1,458.50
1,453.00
666.84
22.50
1,097.22
60.75
300.00
858.90
263.34
552.60
445,704.11



DISBURSEMENTS

184,758.02
20,297.84
4, 076 .78
15,963.60
6,205.31
7,719.10
1,405.86
63 903.00
3,255.61
36,530.12
5,745.73
95,843.141
445,704.11


Tom Wieneke, Owner


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Page 10 4 August 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Weems from Page 1

Questions were then asked by various Board members that
were not answered per instruction from the County Attorney
on the grounds that they were under current litigation and
should not be made public.
The discussion then turned to the complications that resulted
by assuming the "provider number" which the County was
forced to do in order to take over the management of the Hos-
pital when DasSee (the previous owner) failed.
"If we were to bill right now, they would just withhold it-they
would withhold it dollar for dollar ..."
The above withholding is for overpayment by Medicare to the
previous owner. It was explained by Mr. Russell that the bill-
ing was being delayed until these back issues have been re-
solved by the pending litigation. The County's lawyer went on
to explain that these issues would be decided either by the
judge or by agreement between the County and GE-issues
that were being discussed presently.
"Blackhawk operates hospitals normally?" asked Mr. Crofton
"Yes, we do."
"Are you all still interested in operating'the hospital?"
"I think we are interested," interjected Mr. Peterman. "But what
we feel needs to happen for Franklin County is that you get
some type of support in place to develop a new hospital. The
physical plant itself needs to be replaced. And there needs to
be a commitment on the County's part to move forward with
that in order for us to have a long term interest here. We like
what is going on at the hospital. It is definitely turning in the
right direction-but it is going to be very difficult to get to the
new facility without some type of support in order to do that."
Mr. Putnal then prompted the need for a one cent sales tax to
provide for a new facility in Franklin County. There is confu-
sion with regards to this proposed one cent tax. It was first
suggested as an adjunct to indigent care debt. Now it is being
suggested as a new hospital funding proposal. It was suggested
at past County Commission meetings by the Health Advisory
Board that exactly where and for what purposes this one cent
tax is being suggested should be laid out in writing and detail
to the Community before this tax is offered to the voters on
the ballot.
Mr. Peterman then suggested a feasibility study to analyze
questions as to how big the facility should be; where it should
be located; and getting some projections on cost and commu-
nity involvement. And in the meantime he suggested that the
operators (whoever they might be) should continue to build
revenues at the hospital.
"Once we build it, what are you going to do manage it?" asked
Mr. Lockley.
"Yes. We would like to own and operate it."
"We ain't in the business to build and develop," suggested Mr.
Lockley.
Mr. Peterman chuckled.
"Well that's ... Let me explain real quick. There are benefits if
you are going to be an owner operator and you are going to
build a new hospital, one of the benefits of being a Critical
Access Hospital is to get that cost base reimbursement on the
depreciation and on the interest expense. And that is why you
need to own and operate it yourself or have land where you
could ground lease to another operator like Blackhawk or some-
one else. That is the best structure that we have found to
really maximize your benefit to being a Critical Access Hospi-
tal." .
"But whatever you do is fine," added Mr. Peterman. "Whatever
you choose to do that is fine (with us)."
The critical access was then brought into question.
"Well, I would guess that the Critical Access is easily 10% of
your bottom line." offered Mr. Peterman. "That is easily
$500,000 or $600,000 thousand every six months. So it is a
significant amount of money. And with a new facility there is
an even bigger impact. It is a big impact and it is very impor-
tant to remain that (Critical Access)."
"So let me get this straight," asked Mr. Crofton. "You want to
operate it but you want to operate a new facility?"
"When you are in a facility that is over fifty years old, it gets
tougher and tougher every year to make a bottom line ... It is
not doable in this facility that it can build upon its own a new
facility."
"Is the only drawback to you operating this hospital, a new,
facility?" asked Mr. Crofton. "In other words will you operate it
as an old facility pending the outcome of a referendum and
then a new facility comes along?"
"I think that we would continue to manage it until the referen-
dum was in place. But there is a lot of analysis that has to be
in place-the feasibility study, cost: is the one cent adequate
... we need more analysis."
"Is the GE litigation holding you back from operating this hos-
pital?"
"It is, right now ... from a cash flow perspective it is obviously
... right now ... the claim that GE has on the hospital license
would obviously have to be cleared up. We can't take on those
losses."
"If you would operate the hospital, maybe the County would
just handle the GE litigation and anything relating to that liti-
gation. If the County did that would that change your think-
ing?" asked Mr. Crofton.
"It could. We all need to sit down and talk. This has been a
tough road for all of us. We all need to decide. I mean by a vote
here in this room and I mean that the people in this commu-
nity have to decide that that is what they would like for us to
be here and accepts us being here. If that is not the case then
it is not going to do it: it is not going to succeed."
"I don't know." admitted Mr. Peterman, "if the community would
respond well to a tax to support a Blackhawk owned hospital.
Maybe they would; maybe they wouldn't. Maybe they would
only support a County owned hospital. That is some of the
analysis that we need to get."
"The County can't operate a hospital," offered Mr. Crofton. "I
don't think that the County can operate a hospital because we
don't have the expertise to do it. You have all been doing it for
umpty-umpty years. You have background in it. The County
doesn't."
"We're getting educated, though," Mr. Putnal said with a
chuckle.
"I think that we need somebody to actually operate the hospi-
tal ... where the license goes into their name; and then ... good
luck," said ,Mr. Crofton. "And personally I would like to see
that happen tomorrow. I don't want to do a whole bunch of
research and surveys and calling and that kind of stuff. We
need to have somebody operate the hospital. It doesn't have to
be in the County's name."
"I think we need to look at some of these options. We really


need a hospital here," added Mr. Mosconis. "In Liberty County
they are operating a hospital for about half of what you guys
are operating this hospital. It don't hurt to go out and com-
pare. Life is too short to keep trying to re-invent the wheel
here."
"We have no problem with that Jimmy," offered Mr. Russell of
Blackhawk. "We have said it before and we will say it again; if
you believe that we are the right fit for this community and
this is what will result in what is best-we are happy to be
here. If that is not what you believe, that's fine too."
"My big hang-up with you all is the finances," said Mosconis.
"Let's talk about that for a bit ... We need some money coming
in here. I cannot operate my business like you have all been
running this hospital. You've got to collect some money. We
have expended all of our reserve tax money to prop this hospi-
tal up. I've been watching this ... you all know that I have been
asking what's going on over there. I think that I am betting on
a good horse but the bottom line is you have got to make a
priority to get sore money coming in here."


"We have, Jimmy. I understand where you are coming from.
The issues that were raised were unusual things that I had
never run into in my career. It is not an excuse; it is just the
way it is. We got $300,000 dollars in from Medicaid in the last
two weeks. That is continuing. The big issue that you face is
that you are still going to have a cash flow crunch because
Medicare is 60% of your revenue. At some point you are going
to have to confront Medicare ... bill it and see what happens.
The other collections are going fine right now. This is not an
excuse; it is simply the truth. If this was our hospital it would
have been the same for us as it has been for you."
"We need money; we are out of money; we went and borrowed
money," Mr. Mosconis responded. There are other rural hos-
pitals that are doing better; they are being successful. In these
other areas the community has gotten behind their hospital
effort ..:. church groups and other local agencies ... that is
what we want to do. We have got to get this community into
more of abuzz about the success of this hospital."
"That is extremely important. Just imagine what this County
would be like without that hospital?" offered Mr. Peterman.
The interrogation and criticism of the Blackhawk team con-
tinued and came to a head with Ms. Sander's humorous sum-
ming up statement; "What Mr. Lockley and the rest of us are
saying up here is ... show us the money!"
"I completely understand what you are saying and it is now
going in the right direction," defended Mr. Peterman.
The problems with the hospital finances are multiple. The
litigation with GE is holding up the billing of Medicare and
there is also a residue of money owed to Medicare due to an
overpayment to the previous owner. Even the present day bill-
ing has been problematic. It seems that there is a "mystery
man" who goes by the name of Sean MacCauley supposedly
working in the Medicare payment office in Tallahassee. Ac-
cording to the testimony of all those involved in bill collecting
for the hospital this man-if he actually exists-has been a
giant bottleneck. His message machine is full and has been
ull for months. He does not answer any inquires. Other people
who have been cooperative have claimed that they don't know
where he is-or even who he is. No one can get this Mr.
MacCauley on the phone and no one has yet admitted to hav-
ing ever seen the man. This man deals in the electronic billing
system. Because of his "invisible" an inaccessible nature all
Medicare billing has been worked backwards to handwritten
and personal phone conversations with some nice people who
have cooperated with the hospital on their own-and it seems
at their own personal risk. I have their names but have cho-
sen not to mention them for fear that the "invisible" Mr.
McCauley might possibly appear and have them fired.
At the conclusion of this hospital seminar it was agreed that
an expeditionary force would converge on this Tallahassee
Medicare billing office some time in the immediate future and
try to conjure up this Mr. McCauley. After this stance has
been completed we promise to keep you posted on the results-
natural or supernatural.


The St. Joe Company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle


(317) Green Empire, The St. Joe Company and the
Remaking of Florida's Panhandle. By Kathryn Ziewitz
and June Wiaz.
Based on hundreds of sources-including company ex-
ecutives, board members, and investors as well as those
outside the company-this factual and objective history
describes the St. Joe Company from the days of its
founders to the workings and dealings of its present-day
heirs. For all readers concerned with land use and growth
management, particularly those with an interest in
Florida's fragile wildlife and natural resources, Green
Empire will generate important debate about an often-
overlooked part of the state and will invite public scru-
tiny of its largest landowner.


University of Florida Press,
Bookshop price = $24.95.



i .


(318) Home To War, A His-
tory of the Vietnam Vet-
erans' Movement. By
Gerald Nicosia. An epic nar-
rative history that chroni-
cles, for the first time, the
experience of America's
Vietnam veterans who re-
turned home to fight a dif-
ferent kind of war.
Published by Crown, Hard-
cover, 690 pp. Sold nation-
ally for $35.00. Bookshop
price = $30.00. Due to the
weight and length of this
work, please include $6.00
for shioping and handling.


2004, 364 pp. Paperback.


the Chronicle Bookshop


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Books from the mail service of the Chromncl Bookshop are new and used, and are
so-designated in each item description Some title, may he temporarily out of
stock, inl which case a second shipment will be made. normally in 14 days, Books
are shipped in 48 hotars normally Some of our books a.re publishers' closouts.
overstocks, remainders or current titles at special prices. Most are in limited sip-
ply and at thesoprices may sell out last It any hook is sold out \our money \>rII
he ielunded by hank check. To oiler the loIwst possible prices all orders must tIx
prepaid \\e do no billing and do not accept credit rads




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