Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00288
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: July 21, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00288
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Publisher's Note: In the 1980s the Apalachicola Area His-
torical Society published a 12-page booklet with informa-
tion researched by George Chapel on the land and people
of the area. In the booklet Chapel condensed mudh land-
scape and memory in a tightly woven narrative. Chapel
tells about occupation by the Indians, Spanish, French,
English, Scottish and how the United States came to own
the area. He tells about the settlements, the Civil War,
cypress milling, World War II, and the development of the
commercial seafood industry. George Chapel died in 2001.
He was proud of his chosen home on the Apalachicola
Bay and was an active member of the Apalachicola Area
Historical Society. One of the more visible of his activities
include his founding of the Ilse Newell Concert Series, now
in its 21st year. The following is a compilation-by Chapel
of how Apalachicola came to be the place it is today.


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Franklin 51





Chronicle


Volume 15, Number 15 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER July 21 August 3, 2006


A Brief History of the

Apalachicola Area


By George L. Chapel
THE INDIANS: The Port of Apalachicola did not exist until
President James Monroe appointed a port collector in 1822.
Before that time the area around the mouth of the Apalachicola
River had been occupied by Indians for some 10,000 years.
The Indians came to eat oysters. There are Indian mounds
west of town at "11 Mile," back of town in the Magnolia cem-
etery area, and in Eastpoint. The shell mounds served as reli-
gious and burial sites. Indian mounds may also be found up
the Mississippi River and throughout the Southeastern United
States. The primary reason why there was no settlement at
the river's mouth until 1821-1822 was because the lands at
the mouth of the river were isolated from the hinterland by a
large network of bayous and swamps. The river also empties
into a shallow bay.
The Apalachicola River Indians probably came into contact
with the first European expedition to reach the general vicin-
ity of the river: the ill-fated Narvaes expedition of 1528 into
Apalachee country. Apalachee country was east of Apalachicola
River country. The members of the Narvaes expedition killed
their horses at a place called the Bay of Horses and used the
skins for water bottles before building small boats and sailing
toward the Southwest. The account of the DeSoto expedition
tells of finding remnants of the Narvaes expedition on the coast.
The Bay of Horses was probably somewhere around the St.
Marks and Ochlockonee Bay area, near the head of
Apalachicola Bay.
The name "Apalachicola" comes from the Indians and appar-
ently described a ridge of earth produced by sweeping the
ground in preparation for a council or peace fire. Such an
area might be translated as an area of peaceful people or people
on the other side. "Land of the friendly people" might be taken
as a broad interpretation of the word. It was spelled with two
"p's" in the Act of the Legislative Council of the Territory of
Florida in 1821 which named the town.


Franklin

County

School

Board-

Regular

Meeting

Thursday, July 6, 2006
Franklin County School
Board Room, Apalachicola
By Tom Loughridge
The meeting was called to or-
der by Chairman Jimmy Gan-
der at 6:30 and a short invo-
cation and the Pledge of Alle-
giance were led by board
member Ms. Teresa Martin.
To begin the agenda, board
attorney, Barbara Sanders
presented a discussion of the
pending agreement with
Eastpoint Water and Sewer
District for the new consoli-
dated school location. Hank
Garrett from Eastpoint Water
and Sewer was also there to
answer questions that might
arise. The discussion centered
around easements, ownership
of infrastructure and ease-
ments, fees, rights-of-way and
permitting questions. Ques-
tions also arose regarding the
location of the wastewater
spray field and whether it was
to be deeded or leased to
Eastpoint Water and Sewer.
Negotiations will continue on
these points and final plans
will be submitted to the Board
in the near future. Negotia-
tions will also continue rela-
tive to the routing of the wa-
ter lines and water line ease-
ments.


A lot of time was spent talk-
ing about and questioning the
Legal and technical aspects of
.A.,,. conveying and using an efflu-
ent spray field. No immediate
decisions were made but once
Again the board encouraged
parties to expedite matters so
projects could be completed in
a timely fashion. Attorney
Sanders was given authority
to negotiate for the best agree-
ments with the Eastpoint Wa-
ter and Sewer Board and re-
-:. -port the results back to the
Board. To this end Attorney
Apalachicola as seen from the John Gorrie Bridge. Sanders will attend the meet-
According to long-time resident Ollie Gunn, crossing ing of the Eastpoint W&S
the river and the bay required twelve hours to cross Board at 4:00 on July 20.
into Apalachicola before the mid-1930's when a In further business, a letter
draw-bridge was constructed, ferry services were was presented to the School
used to connect the communities in Franklin Board from United States
County before bridges were built. senator from Florida, Bill


THE SPANISH: In 1607 several Apalachee Indians sought help
from Spanish missionaries, but 25 years were to pass before
the Franciscan chain of missions would be constructed. The
Spanish mission period began in 1633 when the first priests
reached the Apalachee. Spanish documents of 1655 and 1675
record that there were between nine and eleven missions in
Apalaehee country. These missions stretched in a line from
St. Augustine (1565) on the Atlantic Coast to St. Louis, near
the present city of Tallahassee. The missions were built twenty
miles apart or one day's ride by horse. St. Louis, or San Luis,
was the administrative center for a number of smaller mis-
sions built westward toward the Apalachicola River. The chain
of missions crossed the Apalachicola River near Bloody Bluff
and went on to Port St. Joe.
It must be kept in mind that the entire Spanish Empire was
laid out on a military pattern. The Castle of San Marco at St.
Augustine and the Moro Castle at Havana, Cuba, protected on
two sides the Straits of Florida. Through this passage traveled
the annual treasure fleet from the New World with gold from
Colombia and silver from Potosi, Bolivia. The area around St.
Augustine was expected to act as a granary for the city and
castle in the manner of a Castilian armed city. The missions
were a buffer zone or area of"pacification," both to serve as an
extension of the granary and as an early warning system of
any dangers from the English operating out of Charleston, S.
C. (1670-1672) or Georgia. The fort at St. Marks, Florida (1677),
was intended to protect the mission chain from attacks by
sea.


4- -r


SummerCamp developed by the St. Joe Company
underscores a new emphasis on tourism, supple-
menting the seafood business. This development,
located at the intersection of Highways 319 and 98
in eastern Franklin County is expected to appeal to
at least 400 new vacationing households who would
spend only part of the year in Franklin County.

THE ENGLISH: During the last part of the 17th century, the
Spanish maintained their tenuous hold on Northwest Florida
through the missions and the small fort at St. Marks. When
Indian allies of the English at Charleston, S. C., raided Span-
Continued on Page 4


,Nelson, saying,-in part, "It is
'a great pleasure to commend
you and your staff for the fine
job you've done to make
Franklin County one of the
top ten school districts clos-
ing the achievement gap from
the tenth to the third grade.


Carrabelle City Council Meeting July 6,2006


Comp Plan Leaves The Room

But not without the pain of childbirth


Tax Liens Filed On

Property Owned By Roger

Bybee And Gathana

Parmenas

Must repay over $6629 or lose property
The document from the County Appraiser's office shows that
Gathana Parmenas and Roger Bybee received seven years of
illegal tax exemptions. Ms. Parmenas was elected to the
Carrabelle City Commission in the fall of 2005, and has func-
tioned as. the Finance Commissioner for the City.
Three different addresses in the Carrabelle area were named
on the filing. According to the document, "Pursuant to the
provisions of Sections 196.031, Florida Statutes, homestead
exemption has been allowed on the property described below
and the taxpayer named below received exemptions) for a
homestead in the aggregate amount of $6,629.10 for seven
yearss. In accordance with 196.011(9)(a), 196.161(1)(a), and
193.156 Florida Statutes, notice is hereby given that the
recipients) named below was not legally entitled to receive
said exemptions) or limitation(s)..."
Continued on Page 10

_. / "7


A Sign of the Times. Condominiums and townhous-
es are a relatively new phenomenon in living acco-
modations on St. George Island and other county
communities reflecting a new emphasis on tourism.


Moving it along didn't happen
quite as easily as hoped. Bar-
bara Stokes, who has worked
-for years to prepare and de-
velop two subdivisions of
Carrabelle's west side, needed
an amendment to transmit
with the Comp Plan so that
her construction could legally
continue. The mayor resisted
the addition, arguing that the
amendment could be sent
along afterwards. After Attor-
ney Cox's reminder that the
first amendment could not be
sent for six months and Ms.
Stokes' incredulous and as-
sertive defense of the business
necessity of the action, the
addition was allowed and was
voted to be included.
City Administrator John
Mclnnis reported, in the fis-
cal health portion of his re-
port. that the tax valuation of
Carrabelle property climbed
from $161.574MM in 2005 to
$246,783MM in 2006, a 52%
increase.
The commission approved
contracting with ECT to de-
sign and build the Tillie Miller
Park and Carrabelle Wharf
projects. Final design to be
reviewed in August, then to
bid.
Sonya Mayne received special
zoning conditional approval to
start a tattoo and body pierc-
ing studio, to open in George
Green's old stained glass shop
on Hwy.98.
Several pilots in attendance
participated in discussion of


grants available and opportu-
nities to make use of present
and future hangars and ser-
vice buildings, including a ter-
minal, at the airport. David
Allen stated that the existing
runway could handle a mili-
tary C-130 cargo plane. Pos-
sible future workshops to
commence in August.
Dan Ausley's request for 19
slips on Pickett's Landing wa-
terfront was rejected. Mayor
Kelly maintained that the city
Smay have some claim to part
of the property, and rejected
his request to give the City
time to research the. land
records.
Long Pointe project was also
denied approval of their con-
ceptual plat for Phase II. Jim
Waddell and Michael
Donaldson argued for the de-
veloper, but the decision was
to send the request back to
Planning and Zoning.
In early meeting comments,
the great season success of
our 9-10 yr old boy's baseball
team, and their upcoming
need for $5-10,000 to partici-
pate in the state tournament,
was outlined..Representatives
of the Big Bend Saltwater
Classic immediately pledged
$1500 to the cause. Item #7,
under NEW BUSINESS, was
stricken as written: Approve
/Disapprove for the City to
send a letter to Carrabelle
Boat club regarding parking
Sfor the Big Bend Saltwater
Classic.


By Skip Frink
The plan this evening was just
to transmit the Comprehen-
sive Plan final draft to the DCA
in Tallahassee, and then await
their acceptance or changes.
Mayor Kelly's summation of
the 14 or 15-month process
was that "...by all rights we
have now had a baby".
She continued: "This has
been, and will continue to be
a public document in the City
of Carrabelle...additional
amendments which we are
already beginning to prepare
with our attorney...that is on
a 6-month cycle once the Plan
is approved...those of you who
may have...questions or
concerns...there is a public
comment period... would like
to limit this hearing to a rea-
sonably short time...". Other
comments continued, detail-
ing that Carrabelle is not sub-
ject to County regulations but
that we are independent.
Her introduction continued
on: "...but I don't want you to
feel that you are being
shortchanged...as has been
mentioned to me more than
once, and in a louder tone of
voice than I sometimes like,
we have discussed this plan
and people have had an op-
portunity to comment and in-
put and we, sitting at this
table, know for a fact we have
listened, and we have heeded
and we have made
changes...but it is very impor-
tant for your city...to move it
along to the next step..."

The accomplishment repre-
sents an ongoing recognition
of the hard work and respect
for education you and your
staff have shown for our most
precious resource, our chil-
dren."
Superintendent Jo Ann Gan-
der presented.to the Board the
recognition from the Florida
Association of School Boards
as a "Master Florida School'
Board. Asst. Mikel Clark then
presented individual certifi-
cates of completion of train-
ing for Master Board designa-
tion to Supt. Gander and the
individual Board members.
In further business, travel re-
quests for meetings and
classes were, approved and
other programs and agree-
ments were approved. The
resignation of B.T. Hinson and
the retirements of Sharon
Carlson; Rhonda Norred and
Margaret Oehlert were ap-
proved. Several basic house-
keeping items were approved
or delayed and the Meeting
was adjourned.


By Tom Loughridge
The workshop on the subject
of the new consolidated school
was called to order at 5:15 in
the Franklin County School
Board meeting room at
Chapman Building by board
chairman Jimmy Gander.
Assistant superintendent,
Mikel Clark announced that
there was good news to report
on the progress at the site of
the new school system. The
broad smiles shown by the
board members indicated that
good news was welcome.
Mr. Greg Kelly of the Archi-
tectural firm of Clemons -
Rutherford reported that the
Corps of Engineers had finally
decided where the natural
wetlands were and which
parts of the site were artificial
ponds and wet areas caused
by the excavation over the
years of large quantities of fill
material. The contractors are
now free to clear the non-wet-
land areas and work on clear-
ing and grubbing the region
began last week. Mr. Kelly re-
ported that all the areas on
which buildings and other
construction are to go have
been cleared for work to be-
gin. Mr. Kelly also reported
that the geotechnical engi-
neers have OK'd rolling the fill
as it is laid down and build-
ing the structures on that
base without further pilings or
special foundations. This will
further speed the construc-
tion process.
In order to forward under-
standing of the process, Mr.
Kelly broke the process into
four phases: phase one the
funding phase, is complete,
.phase two the school plan-
ning phase, is 90 percent
done. The third phase local,
state and federal study and
permitting, is an ongoing pro-
cess. The final phase-design
and construction, is also an
ongoing process and one
which is easily tracked, mean-
ing that one can fairly accu-
rately time the process and
tell when each part will be
completed. More details will
be forthcoming as the public
report process continues.
Mr. Kelly said the next step
in the process is to apply for
the Environ-mental Resource
Permit which requires 100%
documentation. Upon Mr.
Kelly stating they are not
there yet with the documen-
tation, Mr. Gander expressed
impatience with the speed ot
the process (not for the last
time this evening). Mr. Gan-
der said, "I have a
problem....Why aren't we


there yet? Why don't we have
the permits...In my opinion,
we've paid up front and we've
done all the waiting that we
ought to do." Mr. Kelly's ex-
planatory attempts were not
met with total acceptance. Mr.
Kelly then spoke of the need
to complete the Water and
Sewer Permit process with
Eastpoint Water and Sewer so
application can be made to
FDEP for the permit. Meetings
have been scheduled to com-
plete the agreement with
Eastpoint Water and Sewer.
Several other permits and
agreements are in process or
are waiting for other informa-
tion to complete.
The rest of the workshop time
was spent with explanations
of specific parts of the project
and much encouragement
from the Board to keep mat-
ters efficiently expedited.
There should be a public dis-
play ready in the very near
future which will show the
progress and what remains to
be done in an easily under-
stood and regularly updated
format. As soon as the display
is available, The Chronicle will
report on it.
Board member Denise Butler
expressed concern about the
availability of construction
insurance and the contractors
were asked to report back as
soon as possible on the insur-
ance question. Chairman
Gander asked them to report
immediately to assistant su-
perintendent Mikel Clark
when the actual fill work
started and expressed a pos-
sible need for a special board
meeting to find out why if the
fill work was not started next
week.
In his report to the Board, Mr.
Charlie Wilkinson, School
Planning Co-ordinator, said
that the community continues
to be very enthusiastic and
supportive of the project.
He told the Board that Jessica
Davis and Tara Klink, 2006
valedictorians from Carrabelle
and Apalachicola, respectively
will chair the County Student
Leadership Team which will
be composed of students in
grades eight through twelve
and will work to identify and
combine the traditions of both
high schools. The team is to
have its first meeting on
Thursday, July 13. He also
reported that instructional
teams composed of teachers
from the Carrabelle and
Apalachicola schools have
begun to meet to address the
consolidation process and ac-
creditation.


. I illifi!ill


I


Do


Franklin County School

Board Workshop
Board Chair Expresses Frustration to Architect Kelly
About Delays in Permitting Process










Page 2 21 July 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED V.WSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle .


Franklin

Briefs

July 5, 2006

Present: Chairperson
Cheryl Sanders;
Commissioner Russell
Crofton; Commissioner
Bevin Putnal;
Commissioner Jimmy
Moscoris and
Commissioner Noah ,
Lockley, Jr.

Solid Waste Director
Mr. Van Johnson made the
following report:
POSTING OF SIGNS AT
COUNTY-OPERATED BOAT
RAMPS
On June 20, I received an
email from the Florida Mu-
seum of Natural History re-
questing permission to post
educational signage concern-
ing the smalltooth sawfish at
county-operated boat ramps.
The request is a joint grant-
funded project between the
Museum and the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Commission. The
content of the signage will
educate the public on the con-.
servation status of the saw-
fish and how to safely release
one if it is accidentally caught.
The purchase and placement
of the signs will be at no cost
to the county.'The Board ap-
proved.
DIXIE YOUTH ALL-STAR
TEAM
The AAA Dixie Youth All-Star
Baseball Team has qualified
for participation in the Dixie
Youth Baseball State tourna-
ment to be held in Mulberry,
Florida. starting July 15. Per
Board policy adopted Febru-
ary 3, 2003, the Parks & Rec-
reation Program has given the
team $2,500, from the Parks
& Recreation Youth Program
Support Line item budget.
Mrs. Rhonda Newell, with the
team is here this morning to
address the Board and make
an appeal to the public for
additional support.
IFAS Extension
Bill Mahan made the follow-
ing report:
Fishery Update: The com-
mercial fishery for deep-water
grouper in federal' and state,


Letters of Support for New Red
Tide Testing Methods: I have
prepared "draft" letters of sup-
port for the development of
the new red tide toxicity test-
ing protocols, for your review
and approval. The letters are
written to Gil Me Rea, Direc-
tor of the FL FWRI, Ken
Moore, Executive Director of
the ISSC and Charles
Bronson, Commissioner of
the FL DACS.

Director of
Administrative Services
Mr. Alan Pierce made the fol-
lowing report:
Board action for Chairman to
sign FRDAP grant for
$200,000 for additional work
at Kendrick Recreational
Complex in Carrabelle. The
Board approved.
The Board was informed that
Mr. Dan Rothwell, County
Engineer, expects to start
work July 17. He has bought
a house in Franklin County,
and is in the process of mov-
ing.
The Board waived the Board
bid policy and -award C.W.
Roberts a contract for
$110,000 for the purchase
and placement of milled as-
phalt at Abercombie Boat
Landing. C.W. Roberts is the
only contractor with milled
asphalt in the area that can
be obtained within the time
line of the grant. The money
is coming out of the Bluff
Road Boat Ramp grant.
The Board was provided cop-
ies of notice on bid openings
for Alligator Point. The bids
will be opened on Aug 1.
FEMA has finally authorized
emergency sand berms for a.
section of Alligator Point, but
they have established pre-
construction conditions that
must be reviewed. I have sent
the conditions to Preble-Rish
for evaluation. One of the con-
ditions involves a survey of
the site for the presence of
nesting piping plover habitat.
Gave .Board copy of FEMA
conditions.
The Planning Office is to write
a letter to the Department of
Transportation (DOT) seeking
future funding for a bike path
on North Bayshore Drive from
Sportsman's Lodge to the Es-
tuarine Research Reserve
building.
Rep. Boyd has announced
that his next Healthcare
Council meeting will take
place on Aug 1, from 10 to 3.
I .have called aMr. Bobby
',Pickels and said that is'a


waters closed on -June /t-m county commission meeting
and will'remain-ctesedul .. .al yaii'n 1i suspect "i' is for
the end of the year. The Na- many other counties also. I
tional Marine Fisheries Ser- have asked Mr. Pickels if he
vice has determined this fish- wants to reschedule, and I am
ery which includes misty, waiting a response.
snowy, vellowedge, & Warsaw


groupers and speckled hind
has reached its annual har-
vest quota of 1.02 million
pounds. The fishery will re-
open at 12:01 a.m. local time
on January 1, 2007.
Measuring Saltwater Fish
Gets Easier: Effective July
1st, the FL FWC implemented
a series of rules approved last
year to clarify and standard-
ize how to measure the total
length of saltwater fish. Salt-
water fish are divided into two
categories. Fish with "flat" or
irregularly shaped tails are
measured by "total length."
Fish with forked or angled
tails are measured by "fork
length." The new rule states
fish regulated by total length
(e.g. snapper, grouper, red &
black drum, snook, spotted
seatrout, weakfish, tripletail,
bonefish. sheepshead, floun-
der, etc. must be measured by
determining the straight-line
distance from the most for-
ward point of the head with
the mouth closed, to the far-
thest tip of the tail with the
tail compressed or squeezed
together, while the fish is ly-
ing on its side.. No change was
made to "fork length" fish (e.g.
amberjacks. rudderfish, hog-
fish, dolphin, cobia, mullet,
bluefish, king & Spanish
mackerel, permit, pompano
and grey triggerfish). They are
still measured to the rear cen-
ter-edge, or "V," of the tail.


The Board appointed commit-
tee of Mark Curenton, Erin
Griffin, and Michael Moron,
reviewed applications for
CDBG grant writer and CDBG
grant administrator. The
Committee ranked Ms.
Belcher first and recommends
the Board direct myself and
Mr. Shuler to review a pro-
posed contract and make a
recommendation to the
Board. Ms. Belcher was the
only applicant, and the fees
associated with her work are
set by the CDBG program so
there is not a lot of negotia-
tion.
Mr. Dave McClain reported on
his trip to North Carolina on
behalf of the Seafood Indus-
try Task Force.
At the direction of the Board
over the past few months, the
county Planning Office and
Preble-Rish Engineers have
submitted grant applications
to DOT for two projects. One,
widening and resurfacing of
CR 67 from Carrabelle to Lib-
erty County on a 50-50 match
program under the DOT
County Incentive Program.
The engineer's estimated cost
of the project is $2.8 million
so the county match is $1.4
million. The county has re-
quested the match require-
ment be waived, and if it is the
project will be scaled to meet
the state funds available.


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The second project is the wld Beach Renourishment project
ening and resurfacing Alliga" has submitted a proposal. The
tor Point Road from US 9~6 proposal, at'a cost of $15,000
the end of the pavement on which could be paid for out of
the Point, on a 75-25 match the Bald Point Trust Fund,
under a DOT Small County will analyze funding alterna-
Outreach Program. The tivesofMSBU, MSTU, andTIF
engineer's& estimated cost for -Tax Increment Financing.
that project is $4.8 Million,


with the county share at $1.2
M.
The DOT then announced,
that small counties could sub-,
mit a second Small County
Outreach Grant. In order ,to
minimize ,the amount. of
county money allocated to-
wards these large projects,
Preble-Rish recommended the
Board re-submit CR 67 for
funding under the Small
County program, so that the
match would drop from 50%
county funds to 25% county
funds. The county did re-sub-
mit for CR 67, but then DOT
disallowed changing grant
programs after the application
has been submitted. This is
not a'great loss as the Engi-
neers can 're-design the
project so it is completed with
the state share only, but that
might mean that the road is
not widened. To be protect the
Board's options, the Board
should set aside the county
match in.the upcoming bud-
get year. Board action to sign
the CR 67 grant with DOT,
and to direct the Clerk to set
aside money in next budget
for the county's match re-
quirements. If the match is
not needed, the money would
then be available for general
road paving.
When the Alligator Point grant
is awarded by DOT, the Board
will be faced with making the
same decision, which will be
to sign the DOT grant and
budget the county's share,
and if the money is not used
on the project the money will
be available for general road
paving around the county.
The county did set aside $1
Million dollars for Alligator
Point this year but the funds
were diverted to subsidize the
Hospital. However, if the DOT
grant is awarded it will turn
out to be a much bigger
project for essentially the
same amount of county funds
that had been set aside.
The Legislature provided two
funding sources for the Alli-
gator Point Beach
renourishment project.
One, DEP recommended
funding for the standard 50-
50 matching program called
Florida Beach Management
Funding Assistance Program.
There are now enough funds
in that program for the state
to match whatever level of
funding the county wishes to
put up for Alligator Point
Beach renourishment.
Two, in a special appropria-
tion specifically for Alligator
Point, the Legislature has pro-
vided $1 Million dollars "to
expedite the implementation
of the proposed beach resto-
ration project....These funds
were a special appropriation
that, unlike our regular pro-
gram funding, requires no lo-
cal match" (DEP notification
letter).
Mike Dombrowski is currently
working on the design and
permitting for a'beach resto-
ration project that would
cover the maximum area rec-
ognized by DEP as being a
project. This is under contract
with funds already made
available by DEP. This is
known locally as Option #4,
and it is approximately a
16,000 feet of beachfront. I
have, spoken to Mr.
Dombrowski and if the Board
at a later date decides to
shrink the project down be-
cause it does not have its
matching funds, Mr.
Dombrowski says it is always
easier cut a project down as
opposed to increase it.
The consultant for GSG (Gov-
ernment Services Group), Ms.
Camille Tharpe, who dis-
cussed providing a funding
analysis for the Alligator Point


As the Board'may recall, the
proposal to hire this consult-
ant was well received and sup-
ported by APTA at.the June 6
commission meeting. This
consultant came recom-
mended by the FAC, and is
used by Small County Tech-
nical Assistance Program
when they are providing this
service. The Chairman is
seeking a subsidy from the
Small County Technical As-
sistance to pay for part of this
consultant. Board action to
hire GSG and pay for it out of
the Bald Point Trust Fund
whatever portion the Small
County Technical Assistance
does not pay for. The Board
approved. '
Alligator Point Taxpayers As-
sociation (APTA) took a poll of
its members at a June meet-
ing and the APTA executive
meeting recommends the
county commission move for-
ward with Option #4 for beach
.renourishm'ent. The county
has received comments from
Alligator Point residents who
do not support Option #4. At
this time, the Board does not
need to action an\ option, and
should probably wait until the
funding analysis is completed
by GSG. GSG has a timetable
for delivering the final prod-
uct in September.
I was asked to, attend a meet-
ing with DEP Secretary
Castille on'Thursday, June 31
to discuss the South Shoal
project. Present at the meet-
ing was the Secretary, Mr.
Mike Sole, Chief of Staff, other
senior DEP staff people, and
several representatives from
South Shoal and their finan-
cial backers. The issue of con-
cern was the failure of South
Shoal to receive a DEP per-
mit for construction of infra-
structure seaward of the
CCCL Line. Without the DEP
permit, the development is
stalled.
As Sec. Castille explained,
DEP believes that the county
built revetment does not cur-
rently meet DEP standards for
stopping erosion, so therefore
DEP is imposing a large set-
back on the South Shoal front
lots. South Shoal was pre-
sented with two options: ei-
ther apply for and receive a
DEP permit with restrictions
and limitations on the location
of development on some of the
front lots, or somebody re-
build the revetment so that it
meets DEP standards for
stopping erosion and then
DEP would lift the restrictions
on the front lots.
The situation is extremely
complicated. South Shoal is
interested in maintaining the
revetment, but the revetment
was built by the county, and
is on county property, and at
this time the county would
have to be the applicant for
any repairs to the revetment.
The county is interested in
relocating the road, and not
in rebuilding the revetment.
FEMA is interested and sup-
ports the relocation of the
road. South Shoal still owns
a section of the right-of-way
that the county needs in or-
der to relocate the road. The
county and South Shoal both
want to avoid a condemnation
proceeding for the needed
right-of-way. South Shoal
needs county 'cooperation on
the revetment and the county
needs South Shoal coopera-
tion on the road relocation.
After a two hour discussion,
with not all issues fully de-
bated, the meeting concluded
with this as my understand-
ing of what would happen
next:
South Shoal will contemplate
revising its CCCL permit so
that it will place restrictions
on development on some of


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the lots consistent with DEP
policies, which will allow it to
begin construction, and South
"Shoal will consult with Mike
:Dombrowski on the costs as-
sociated with repairing the
;existing revetment to bring it
up to DEP standards. When
the costs are known, South
Shoal will determine whether
.they will ask the county to
submit a DEP permit for re-
pairs to the revetment that
South Shoal will fund. If the
costs are too high, South
Shoal and the county will have
to negotiate some settlement
on the issues of road reloca-
tion and revetment repair.
Unfortunately, beach
renourishment does not pro-
vide the same reduction of
DEP setbacks as rebuilding
the revetment, so by state
rules, the developer is forced
to consider rebuilding the re-
vetment first over beach
renourishment.
The County wants'the road
moved and no revetments.
I have submitted to DCA a let-
ter regarding the EAR
(Franklin County Evaluation
and Appraisal Report) update.
Even though the County is
still in litigation over its comp
plan, there is a statutory
deadline for the county to
complete an Evaluation and
Appraisal Report of its comp
plan. The Plan is not yet ef-
fective, yet we are having to
evaluate it.
The letter, in part:
Marlene Conaway, Chief
Division of Community
Planning
Florida Department of.
Community Affairs ,
2555 Shumard Oak Blvd..
Tallahassee, Florida 32399
June 29, 2006
Re: Evaluation and Appraisal
Report (EAR) Letter of Under-
standing
Dear Ms. Conaway:
Allow this letter to serve as a
summary of last week's meet-
ing between representatives of
Franklin County and the
Florida Department of Com-
munity Affairs relating to the
Franklin County Evaluation
and Appraisal Report (EAR)
process. As discussed,
Franklin County intends that
this letter and the attached
list of major issues will serve
as the basis for the Letter of
Understanding between the
Department of Community
Affairs and Franklin County.
The attached list of major is-
sues incorporates those top-
ics discussed with the Depart-
ment and will serve as the fo-
cus of the Franklin County
EAR. The EAR will also ad-
dress the required subjects
listed in Section 163.3191(2),
Florida Statutes.
As a reminder, the most re-
cent EAR-based amendments
for Franklin County were
adopted in 2005. The plan
amendments reflect the evalu-
ation that was performed in
1997 and substantially up-
dated through April 5, 2005.
Statutory requirements state
that the EAR should cover the
time period beginning when
the last EAR ends. The last
plan update covers from 1997
to April 5, 2005. June 1, 2006
was chosen as the cut-off date
for the period the next EAR
will cover. Therefore, the EAR
should cover April 5. 2005 to
June 1, 2006.

Franklin County
Evaluation and
Appraisal Report

Major Issues
1. Water Access


As a county whose employ-
ment depends heavily. on
tourism and commercial and
sport fishing, water access is
important to maintaining .a
viable economic base.'In.ad-
dition, preserving the cultural
heritage of the fishing indus'-
try is an important objective
o the County. One of the
main threats to the local fish-
ing industry is access to the
water. This major issue is ad-
dressed partially by Chapter'
2005-157, Laws of Florida
(House Bill 955) which revises
the requirements of. Section
163.3177 and 163.3178, F.S.
to include recreational water-;
ways and strategies to be in-.
cluded within the Coastal.
Management Element that',
protect recreational and' com-
mercial working waterfronts.
Due to the fact that Water ac-
cess is an important issue for
the County's economic future,
this issue is elevated to a ma-
jor issue to provide.a morein-'
depth examination.
2. Affordable Housing ,
Historically, Franklin County,
has had a high percentage of:
low and very-low income resi-
dents, Whenr compared to the
State as a whole. Census data
shows that the'value of hous-
ing within Franklin County is
increasing. This is due in part
to the County's transition
from an agriculture and fish-
ing-based economy to one
that is more tourism-based.
As larger, more expensive va-
cation homes are built, many
jobs being 'created are in the
lower-paying service sector.
This, coupled with the
County's historic need for
lower-income housing, cre-
ates a need for the County to
examine closely the ways in
which it can encourage the
development of affordable
housing.
3. Integration of the Local
Mitigation Strategy into the
Comprehensive Plan
With Florida's increasingly.
active hurricane seasons, it is
important to have recovery
plan in place in case disaster
strikes. To this end, local gov-
ernimentls'-in Florida'are' re-
quired to have a mitigation
strategy in place. 'To achieve
maximum effeCtiveness, this
plan should be integrated into
the comprehensive plan. The
EAR will focus on the use of
comprehensive planning and
land use strategies to reduce
future damage to property
and public facilities, provide
for adequate public shelters,
and maintain adopted hurri-
cane clearance times.



Continued on Page 3


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER.


21 July 2006 Page 3


Briefs from Page 2

By Richard E. Noble

St George Lighthouse
"As everyone knows the light-
house fell last October 21st,"
reported a spokesman for the
St. George Lighthouse Com-
mittee. "We were able to ob-
tain some federal and state
money to salvage the light-
house. It is now sitting in
Eastpoint (in pieces) at a stor-
age site. We are ready to ob--
tain architectural plans to re-
'build the lighthouse. Before
we expend that money we
thought we needed to have a
place to put it." A site had
been suggested at the en-
trance of the Island where
Franklin Blvd. splits. "It be-
longs to the state highway
dept. We approached DOT and
did not receive a really favor-
:able response. We probably
should have come to the
County Commission first, but
we are here now. We would
Like your support."
S"What are you going to do ...
Make a museum type area out
there?" asked Mr. Putnal.
"Yes. Franklin County is in
sort of a unique situation.
Within less than an hour's
drive from any direction from
here. there are four light-
houses. You have Cape San
Bias, our lighthouse, Crooked
River, and St. Marks. This is
something that will draw a lot
of tourism-people coming
here to see it. So there are a
lot of benefits to the County
besides the historical nature
of it. Any support that you can
give us to help obtain the use
of that property, would be ap-
preciated."
A motion was then made by
Mr. Putnal to support the
Lighthouse Committee by
sending a letter to the DOT
voicing their agreement with
the suggested plan. The mo-
tion was seconded and ap-
proved.

Dave McLain-Seafood
Mr. David McLain along with
members of the Seafood In-
dustrial Park Research Com-
mittee had visited two areas
in the United States that are
also involved in similar
projects. One area was in Vir-
ginia and the other was in
North Carolina. This research
is being done as a part of a
feasibility study. This was a
'first impressions" report all
the data had not yet been ana-
lyzed.
"The purpose of this field trip
was to look at these two SIPS
(Seafood Industrial Park
Sites), interview the managers
and tenants and identify the
lessons learned in each loca-
tion: to document the chal-
lenges and opportunities and
to begin to apply these lessons
to the Franklin County situa-
tion. The issues that we were
looking at: Who owns the
land; How is that SIP man-
aged; Are they challenged by
development; Are they re-
ferred tenants; Are Co-ops
involved: Where are they in
relation to the highway infra-
structure-so you can get
your product to market.
"The first was owned by the
North Carolina Department of


?'~ ".3


EDITORIAL & MOMENTARY


While it appears most of the St. George Island
Lighthouse has been recovered, the pile of rem-
anants still represents a challenging puzzle, if the
lighthouse is ever to be reassembled. The larger
pieces might be more easily fit into a recreated
structure, most likely however, incapable of sup-
porting the weight of the tall tower. Reconstructing
the lighthouse with heavy-duty steel frame first,
using the original materials in a more-or-less cos-
metic way for the exterior, would add new strength
to the structure, and preserve its authenticity.


Commerce. It was approxi-
mately forty acres. It was not
easily accessible by road it
was rather remote. We were
running down little County
roads in order to.get there ...
It has evolved from a Seafood
Park to a boat building and
related trades (center). So far
the increase of jobs has out-
weighed the (demands oi) de-
velopment. They are seeking
to expand into other locations.
They have everything there
from factory trained mechan-
ics to these giant boat frames.
"The Newport News Virginia
was owned by the City. It was
approximately 35 acres plus
fifteen under water. It was
served by the major interstate
highway. It has retained Com-
mercial Seafood as its core


fx POST OFFICE BOX 590
C R I' EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
S 850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
Facsimile 850-670-1685
@'; e-mail: hoffer531@gtcom.net

THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.
Vol. 15, No. 15 .July 21, 2006
Publisher ................. ;..Tom W. Hoffer
Director of Operations. ..........Andy Dyal
Contributors .. .. . .. . ..... Skip Frink
Geri Moore
Carol Noble
Richard Noble
Dawn Radford
Photographers ............. ....Diane Beauvais Dyal
Geri Moore
Advertising Design and
Production Artist ............. Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate ...........Jerry Weber
Production Associate ......... ..Richard Williams

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein ... : ............. .Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis ............... .Apalachicola
Skip Frink ................. . .Carrabelle
David Butler .................. .Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung ......... Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins ...... .Eastpoint
Barbara Revell .... ........... Lanark Village
Richard Harper. ..... . :........ St. George Island

Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue
would cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the
Chronicle for price quotes if you seek several different
or similar issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96
including tax. Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26
including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.

All contents Copyright 2006
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


,business,1t.,is lully built out.
The number of jobs created
has far outweighed other al-
'ternatives for the city land
use. So Newport News is es-
sentially a Seafood proposi-
tion. 4
"(Our concerns) Why move
seafood processing inland?
"We had this problem with
Dennis last year; we lost busi-
nesses: we have businesses
now that are either
underinsured or not insured
who are looking for ways to
protect themselves so that
they have some motivation to
try to move their processing
portions inland. But at the
same time we've got to have
some way to secure launch
and recover locations-
whether it. be for oysters or
shrimp or finlish-we have got
to be able to get that product
ashore.
fWho should own such a Sea-
food Park and manage it and
so forth? There are other
questions associated with it.
But what we are just begin-
ning to do is try to take what
we learn on a field trip a go


froin there.
'We have other places that we
wish to visit. There are a
co-uple of areashere in
Fl6rida. They aren't SIPS but
they have a different approach
to the same issue. We want to
know what would be the ad-
vahtages of a SIP here and
What would be the disadvan-
tages of one. We'want to be
sure that we advise you (Corn-
rrnssion) and contritie to give
you updates as we ar-e able to
make progress on It (this fea-
sibility study)."
The conversation then turned
to the river and its long going
problem with Atlanta aind it
reservoir and constant drain
on the flow oftheApalachicola
River. For those of you who
may not be aware-i-the
Apalachicola RiVer, its flow,
and level or quantity of water,
are the life blood of the Bay.
As the river gets lower from
water being drained off up
stream the Bay becomes
saltier. As the fresh water de-'
creases the salt water in-
creases. If the. trend contin-
ues eventually you no longer
have a Bay and an estuary but
a sea. The entire.ecology of the
Bay changes. Creatures' and
things that once constituted
the Bay die and disappear and'
things and creatures that
once populated the Gulf of
Mexico become.'the new in-
habitants of the encroaching
sea.
The riparian rights issue as to
who is entitled to how much
of a river's waters;and.re-
sources; what are the respon-
sibilities of those up stream
to those downstream etc.,
have been .a, continuing
source of agitation and provo-
cation for as long-as I have
lived here. Georgia. Florida
and Alabama have been in-
volved in what appears to be
a.never ending litigation. The
litigation and the argumenta-
tion have been heavy while the
legislation, compromises and
solutions have been light.

Shuler Report
"The ordinance for revising
animal control: Van (Johnson)
submitted to you a recom-
mendation to amend the or-
dinance to lower (he cost ol
rabies vaccinations in the
County. The County should
be having a Public hearing on
that ordinance at the first
meeting in August.
"You had asked ne Io look
Into the issue of private sal-
vaging-at the landfill.: have
checked with other counties
in the area and around the
state. We are the only county
that allows private sector sal-
vaging ... Every single one of
them surroundingg counties)
have said at one point or an-
other ... no: it should not be
done. So I think that it would
be a good idea to reconsider
your policy of allowing private
salvaging at the landfill."
"If the Board chose to allow
private salvaging what would
be your recommendation to be
sure that the Board is pro-
tected?" asked Ms. Sanders.
"I'm not sure that there is a
great deal of protection that
can be provided ... Potentially
there is a lot of liability for the
County involved.-The safest
course of action is to not al-
low the salvage. As far as try-
ing to mitigate that risk, I
would suggest that you'try to
bid it out to a company who
does this-who is licensed
and insured and has the
training or the County would
have to buy additional cover-
age for that risk.:'


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STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION
NOTICE OF APPLICATION

The Department announcesi!receipt of an application
for permit from Jordan Bay&: Partners, LLC,.File No
19-0266120-001-DF, to impact approximately 0.14
acres of wetlands for the relocation and widening of
the existing road crossing to accommodate vehicle traf-
fic. This proposed project is0to be located on-West of
U.S. Highway 98, South of Airport Road in Carrabelle,
Sections 30, 25, Township 0,2-South, Range 5-West, in
Franklin County.

This application is being p essed and is available for
public inspection during not'al business hours, 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal
holidays; at the Northwest District Office at 160
Governmental Center, Pensbtola, Florida, 32502.
:2 .


Mr. Croftop then suggested
that those who were salvag-
ing copper were releasing
Freon into the atmosphere -
which was a violation of the
federal law. If we consider Mr.
Crofton's point valid then
whether we have scavengers
or not this hazardous gas re-
mains in potential violation at
the County dump and the
County is in violation of the
federal law. The County
should be required to remove
this gas because it is danger-
ous to the environment
weather it is released by a
scavenger or a County bull-
dozer.
The liability issue remains
valid nonetheless.
'No other County is allowing
private' salvaging at there
landfills," Mr. Shuler reiter-
ated.
"I make a motion that we not
allow scavenging in the land-
fill." said Mr. Crofton. "It ab-
solutely does not make any
sense. So I make the motion
that we not allow it."
Mr. Crofton's motion clied be-
cause of the lack of a second.
Mr. Mosconis had excused
himself earlier, Since this
motion involved a change in
policy it wassuggested that
Mr. Crofton's motion not be
consider at this time. And this
was the course of action that
was eventually decided upon.
"Okay. I'm going to go apply
for one of, those permits.",
warned Mr. Crofton. "And
watch and see if l don't get cut
out there. And then we will see
what happens. If you allow
people to do this the County
has to give them training. It
is costing the County money
to let people go in there. And
ultimately it will cost the
County a lot of money in a
judgment. That is all I have to
say.
Mr. Shuler then informed the
board that he had looked into
several other problems as he
had been advised to do. One
related to improper turtle
lighting at a beach home on
the Island. He had contacted
the ownei and the owner had
agreed to check into the prob-
lem; the Dove hunting issue
on St George Island had not
yet been heard or resolved;


the Stewart White zoning is-
sue in Eastpoint is still pend-'
ing; the County TV program-
ming is still being looked into
to be sure there is no loss of
money to the County-it was
further explained that this will
be a government channel ...
it will not include advertising;
a,public hearing to abandon
a road at a subdivision south
of the Apalachicola airport
was requested. A motion to
approve the request was
granted; enforcement of a zon-
ing violation in Carrabelle -
John Sheradon-was updated
but not resolved.
Ms. Tony Toronto then
stepped to the podium. She
was once again concerned
about the zoning issue that
has been her concern for the
last two years.
"Who is going to appear be-
fore the Planning and Zoning
Board to bring this matter
up?" The "matter" being, a
clarification of the R-4 zoning
classification. Ms. Toronto
has hired a lawyer and the
lawyer has requested the
County to revise or somehow
clarify the R-4 status. "I have
been here for two years re-
garding this issue." explained
Ms. Toronto. "And there are
otherpeople in the County
who have similar issues.
Some of them are.being re-
solved through attorneys.
Mine has not: it has always
been put off."
It was then explained to Ms.
Toronto that the reason the
issue that she is concerned
with is going before the Plan-
ning and Zoning Commission
is primarily because her law-
yer had made that request.
"It seems to me that this,is
just being put under the rug.
I do want you to know that our
attorney will go full forward
ahead with this issue."
It did seen that understand-
ing of Ms. Toronto's concerns
was .not lacking. but
acknowledgement that her
concerns were relevant or (hat
something should be done or
could be done was not admit-
ted. It does seem obvious that
Ms. Toronto will have to pur-
sue this issue independently.


St. Vincent National

Wildlife Refuge Sea

Turtle Nesting Already

Above Last Year

Volunteers and staff at St. Vincent NWR have already reported
more sea turtle nests this season than all of last year. We are
mid-way through the season and as of early July over 25 nests
have been laid by loggerhead sea turtles. Last year only 20
nests were laid on the beaches of the refuge.
Sea turtle hests on the refuge are caged to prevent predators
from destroying the nests, but sometimes the predators de-
stroy the nests before volunteers and staff can protect them
each morning. Feral hogs are the number one predator to sea
turtle nests on the refuge and have already destroyed four of
the nests this year. Staff removed one large hog from the beach
in one area where nests were destroyed. No more losses have
occurred in that area.
Endangered species conservation is an important mission of
the refuge and we hope for a successful sea turtle nesting
season this yearr. .
For more information, please contact the Refuge Manager, Ms.
Monica Harris at (850) 653-8808.
"Our mission is working with others to conserve, protect, and
enhance fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the
continuing benefit of the America people.".









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Page 4 21 July 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


History of Apalach from Page '1
ish territory, Indian allies of the Spanish deserted eastern
Georgia in favor of the Chattahoochee' River. Df.. Henry Wood-
ward, a soldier of fortune, led the English .activities in this
contest for the Indian trade. The Spanish tried to control their
Indian allies by building a fort near the junction of the
Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers known as Santa Cruz. de
Sabacola. This lasted only a few years (1689-1691) because
the Indians, incensed at the Spanish.fort in their-territory and
preferring English trade goods, began moving closer to En-
glish settlements. '
The Seven Years' War, or French and Indian War, and the Treaty
of Paris (1763) marked the end of French power in the New
World, and because Spain had assisted France after 1761,
transferred the Floridas to Great.Britain in retiuri for British
evacuation of Havana. The War of the Anmerican..Revolution
(1776-1783) of the British North American colonies brought
many refugees or Loyalists to Florida. As Spain was allied with
France and the British North American colonies in 1781, the
Spanish Governor of New Orleans captured Pensacdla, and',
although the British trading houses remained, most of the
British left. By the Treaty of Paris in 1.783, the Spanish once
again occupied Florida.
SCOTTISH TRADERS: In 1784, Alexander McGillivray was
named the Spanish representative among the Creek Indians.
The son of a Loyalist Scotsman Lachian McGillivray and the
half-French, half-Creek Sehoy Marchand, he cared out 'a large.
plantation near the Coosa River in Central Alabama. He re-
garded himself as Emperor of the' Creeks. William Panton was
a close family friend. When the 'British evacuated Pensacola,
McGillivray turned to Spain to stop tl'e advance of the Geor-
gians into Creek country ard urged that the Scottish' firm of
Panton, Leslie and Company, later known as Joh ri, orbes and
Company, continue the lucrative Indian trade in Spanish ter-
ritory. Operating near the Flint-Chattahoochee junction, a li-
cense was issued to the firm in 1783. Another store was soon
opened at St. Marks with headquarters iii Pensacola.'
William Augustus Bowles, a bohemian Loyalist and: soldier of
fortune who had lived among the Creeks, was sent into Florida
in 1788 to make contact with McGillivray in an effort to bieak
the monopoly of Panton, Leslie and Company in the Creek
trade on behalf of the trading house of Miller, Bonnamy and
Company and their associate, John Murray, British Governor
of the Bahamas. Concerned that the Spanish, through Panton,
Leslie and Company, would no longer supply him,with arms
and ammunition, McGillivray received .Bowles. BWyles suc-
ceeded in attacking the store of Panton, Leslie and Company
at St. Marks on his second try, and the alarmed.Spanish con-
tinued to supply McGillivray through Panton, Leslie and Com-
pany. Spain also paid Panton, Leslie and Company for the
damage done to their store by granting land. These land claims,
later known as the Forbes Purchase, were recognized,as legal
by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1835 and In-
cluded the site of the future town of Apalachicola. Bowles was
captured by the Spanish but escaped in Sierra Leone while
being transported to Spain from the Philippines. He made his
way to London and again gained support for his adventures in
Florida. In 1799, he was shipwrecked on the east end of St.
George Island. He made his way to the Ochlockonee River and
moved inland to organize the State of Muskogee. This State
defied both Spain and the United States. A Spanish force de-
stroyed the camp, and Bowles once again captured St. Marks.
Benjamin Hawkins, the Indian Agent for the United States,


1SUtJCOAST REALTY'


These signs advertising new housing developments
are typical of the massive changes occurring in
Franklin County as tourism is added to the mix in
the local economy. While real estate sales are down,
the development in housing is not without potential
problems. An influx of population can place strains
on the environmental and local resources.


THE UNITED STATES: Pressure by citizens of the United States
desiring land was confining the Indians to the Chattahoochee
River valley '0f Alabama and Qforgia. The once rich fur trade
could not be replaced by a rici cotton trade until farmers re-
placed the nomadic Indians along the fertile lands of the river.
The Creeks finally went into open war against the United States
and were defeated by General)Andrew Jackson at Horseshoe
Bend in Alabama. The Treaty df Ft. Jackson (1814), signed by
the Creeks, ceded a large tract of land in southern Alabama
and Gebtgia' to the United States. At the close of the War of
1812, the British representatives in the area argued by letter
with Benjamin. Hawkins that! the Treaty of Fort Jackson'was
not, valid because the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the "Seven
Years War" called for the status quo ante bellum, i.e., that
things were to'go back as they were before the war. Hawkins
argued that the Treaty of Fort Jackson antedated the Treaty
of Ghent. The Creeks preferred the British position.

4 .w2,..


Popular -Landmark Restaurant Gone. 'Hurricane
Dennis destroyed the popular Hut Restaurant that
reposed in the. vicinity of the lone pole..in this pic-
ture. Apparently, there are no plans to rebuild. The
land has been sold for a housing development.

Louisiana;.ceded to Spain in 1763 and retro ceded to France
by a servile Spain in 1800, was sold in 1803 by'Napoleon to'
the United States. The insistence of the United States upon
trading with France hampered the efforts of the British and
*allied powers in.their war against Napoleon (1797-1815), and
,the British made Florida a center of operations during the War
of 1812. The British prepared to take formal possession at
Pensacola but were repulsed by General Jackson in 1814. The
British also landed supplies at St. George Island preparatory
to fortifying the area of the future Ft. Gadsden, but, by land-
ing and removing the same troops repeatedly, they created the
impression of a force much larger. British agents also evacu-
ated Pensacola with Indian allies and captured slaves of the
Spanish and of the Forbes Company and fortified what was to
become Ft. Gadsden. Damage to Forbes property by British
forces was the basis for another request for a land grant. No-
tice was sent, however, from the British fleet under Admiral
Alexander Cochrane-noted for his role in the Latin American
wars of independence-that the British were to withdraw. Af-
ter 1814, the area of the future Ft. Gadsden was armed by the
British ard used by.Indians and runaway Negroes to harass
United States settlers. A United States force under General
Gaines from the Mississippi Territory and Commander Daniel
Patterson, U.S.N., destroyed the fort. A single hot shot hit the
magazine and the fort exploded.
The Seminoles, seceders from the Creeks, who occupied
Apalachee territory, also fought the United States bitterly in
1817-1818. British trading activities continued in.the area.
The Indians ignored the Treaty of Fort Jackson, and General
Andrew Jackson went to the area of Ft. Gadsden and built the
fort, naming itfor its designer. Ft. Gadsden was manned from
1818 to 1821-1822. General Jackson then proceeded to the
Suwanee River, and failing to capture the Seminoles, contin-
ued to St. Marks, where he hung two British subjects for in-
citing the Indians against U.S. citizens. When he received in-
formation that hostile Indians were in Pensacola, he took
'Pensacola on the grounds that the Splnish were encouraging
the Seminoles. Pensacola and St. Marks were temporarily re-
turned to the Spanish, but John Calhoun, Secretary of War,
advised General Gaines that U. S. troops were to stay at Ft.
Gadsden. In 1821, Florida was transferred to the United States
with Jackson as Governor of Florida.
THE SETTLEMENTS: The period 1814-1818 had been costly
for Forbes and Company, and it passed into the hands of Colin
Mitchel of Havana, Cuba, and others. They reorganized it, af-
ter the Forbes Spanish land grant was declared legal in1835,
as the Apalachicola Land Company.
The Indians no longer occupied the area of Apalachicola Bay
nor the ceded lands of the Forbes purchase. Some seventy
chiefs met at Moultrie Creek near St. Augustine, and having
elected Neo Mathia their spokesman; negotiated a treaty with
the commissioners from the U.S. War Department and Gover-
nor.William Duval of Florida. Small reservations were given to


"



John Gorrie Historical Monument and Museum in
Apalachicola is an.important landmark in local his-
tory, preserving the Gorrie legacy. Gorrie's grave
site is located just to the left in this picture.


six chiefs'near the Apalachicola River. In 1833, under pres-
sure from settlers, attacks by other Indians, floods and dis-
ease, and with their annuity cancelled and no government
protection, they sold these reservations to Florida and agreed
to leave. They were gone by 1838.
In 1802, the U. S. promised the State of Georgia to relocate
the Indians in that state elsewhere within a reasonable time.
The Treaty of Fort Jackson opened for settlement all lands in
the southern part of the state. Two additional grants in 1818
and the.Treaty of Indian Springs in 1821 left the Creeks con-
centrated between the Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers.'At Bro-
ken Arrow in 1824, the Lower Creeks' seemed willing to move
west of the Mississippi, but the Upper Creeks did not want to
consider another land grant. At Indian Springs in 1825, the
Lower Creeks named William McIntosh their spokesman and
sold their land for five million dollars and an equal area west
of the Mississippi. The Lower Creeks later objected, and Will-
iam McIntosh was subsequently killed. The Council for the
entire Creek Nation repudiated this treaty. The Lower Creeks
under Chilly McIntosh, son of the murdered chief, went to
Washington, as did a delegation from the Upper Creeks. The
Treaty of Washington (1827) resulted. By this treaty, the Creeks
in Georgia were moved west of the Mississippi.'
In Alabama, farmers encroached on Creek territory, and the
Treaty of Cusseta (1832) resulted. Land was to be obtained by
the Indians, sold, and the Indians,were then to move west,.
-Itruders flooded the area, and atinne;point Francis Scott Key.
was sent to Alabama to stop encroachments. Frauds were wide-
spread, however, and speculators started an Indian warto
prevent an investigation. The Creek War (1836-1837) resulted
in the Creeks moving west. General Winfield Scott, from the
Seminole Wars, his force augmented by some 1800 Creeks,
fought some 1500 hostiles. In 1837, some Creeks paid their
debts by joining the U.S. forces in the Florida wars. While
there were some remaining incidents, the Indians were gone
by 1843. The departure of the Indians saw the farmers and
the planters move in. On the river, Columbus, Georgia, was
started in 1828, Eufaula in 1833 and Albany by 1836.
APALACHICOLA: Cotton was initially shipped down the
Apalachicola River on flatboats. Two hundred sixty-six bales
were shipped in 1822. The first steamboat sailed on the rivef
in 1828. That same year, "cotton town" was named West Point
by the Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida. It was
incorporated in 1829 with an Intendant and four councilmen.
It was finally named "Apalachicola" in 1831, and in 1882 be-
came the county seat.
The Port of St. Joseph was established in 1836 to escape the'
control of the Apalachicola Land Company. The Lake Wimico
and St. Joseph Canal Company was formed to build what be-

Continued on Page 6


The three


succeeded in capturing Bowles in 1803. Williams Bowles died
three years later in a Spanish prison. Panton, Leslie and Com-
pany sought arid received compensation for losses sustained
in defending Spanish territory and in payment of the debt owed
to it b\ the Creeks through grants of land from the Creeks. In
return. Panton. Leslie and Company, which had been reorga-'
nized as John Forbes and Company, agreed to odpe a store at'
Prospect Bluffs, eighteen miles up the Apalachicola River at
what is.now Fort Gadsden. The Lower Creeks later granted
the firm Forbes Island opposite Prospect Bluffs as payment
for some more bad accounts. In all, the lands granted to the
firm came to 1,200,000 acres.


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I:F YOU D O

@2006 The St. Joe Company. "JOE,"
property. The developer reserves the
facilities described herein will be prdj
does not guarantee the obligations j
or access to any clubs owned or op
'on):tSrules, which are subject to ch
property is required. Equal Housing
Obtain the Property
merits or value, if any


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it. Joe, "SummerCamp" and the "SummerCamp" and "Taking Flight" designs are service marks of The St. Joe Company. Scenes may be of locations or activities not on the
tht to modify the plans, materials, features and amenities described and depicted herein at any time without notice. No guarantee is made that the features, amenities and
ded, or if provided, will be of the same type, size or nature as depicted or described. All home sites may be subject to setbacks, easements and other restrictions. St. Joe
unaffiliated builders who may build and sell homes in the SummerCamp community. Ownership of a residence Ip the SummerCamp community does not grant any use of J E
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ige. Void where prohibited by law. This does not constitute an offer to sell real property in any jurisdiction where prior registration or other advance qualification of real
iportunlty. Broker participation welcome.
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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWN~S~INEWSPAPER


21 July 2006 Page 5


Second Circuit

Court Report

July 11, 2006
PRE-TRIAL CONFERENCE
DANIELS, JAMES IVAN JR: Charged February 3, 2005 with flagrant
violation of net law. Defendant was released on own recognizance.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Pre-trial Conference continued to August 15, 2006.
GUELTZOW, WILLIAM S:. Charged' October 1, 2005 with felony DUI,
driving while license suspended (felony) arid refusalto' submit to bal-
ance test. Bond was $15,000.00. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered aplea of no contest and
was adjudicated guilty. The.defendant was sentenced, to 60 days in
jail with 21 days credit foritime served; '24 months prbbation; sub-
stance abuse evaluation and treatment; DUI 'School; -driver license
permanently revoked; $710.00 court costs and fees.
SMITH, WILLIE LEE: Charged March 1, 2005 with resisting officer
with violence. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was repre-
sented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Pi.e-trial Confer-
ence continued to August 15, 2006.
STRONG, WILLIAM A: Charged November ,15, 2005 with saleofcrack
cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender.Kevin Steiger. Pre-trial Conference con-
tinued to August 15, 2006. .. .
ARRAIGNMENT
BROWN, KEVIN LEE: Charged April 19. 2006 1ith sale/possession
of coritrolled substance with intent to sell within 1.000 feet of a church.
Defendant was incarcerated.'The defendant was present in court % ith
Public Defender Keviri Steiger Pre-trial Conference set for August 15.,
2006. .
CROSBY, HERBERT A: Charged May 27, 2006 with maridlaughter.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in'court and
entered a plea or not guilty A public defender was appointied.,Case
management continued to August 15, 2006. '.
FLOWERS, RICHARD STACY: Charged May 19, 2006 wtth sale of
controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
presenif in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way and entereida plea
of not guilty. Case Management continued to August 15, 20,06.'.
JONES, ANTHONY ALLEN: Charged May 4, 2006 with'sale of con-
trolled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented In court by Public Defender Kevin Steigeriwholentered a
plea of not guilty. Case Management continued to September'12.,2006.
MENDEZ, JORGE: Charged '3 times on April 27, 2004With, sale/
possession of controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000
feet of a church; Charged 2 times on April 27, 2006 with trafficking in
controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Attorney Adam. Ruiz who entered 'a written
plea of not guilty dated May 11, 2006. Case Management continued
to September 12, 2006.
PARRAMORE, FLOYD B: Charged April 29, 2006 with battery. De-
fendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by
Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not guilty. Case
Management continued to September 12, 2006.
PETERSON, JAMES EARL: Charged May 4, 2006 with sale of con-
trolled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with.Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a
plea of not guilty. Case Management continued to August 15,: 2006.
SPENCER, DARSHAWN: Charged April 23, 2006 with aggravated
assault with a deadly weapon, criminal mischief (3rd degree felony).
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not guilty.
Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
WHITE, KARL ZACHARY: Charged May 27, 2006 with manslaugh-
ter. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
and entered a plea of not guilty. A public defender was appointed.
Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
VIOLATION OF PROBATION ARRAIGNMENT
AHRENT, SANTANA K: Charged March 5, 2006 with sale of con-
trolled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public'Defender Kevin Steiger. Probation re-
instated and modified to include 20 days'in jail dith 20 days creditTfor
time-served.


ALTMAN, VICTOR J: Charged October 1, 2005 with possession of
controlled substance cocaine. De fndant was incarcerated. The de-
fendant was present in court witl public Defender Kein Stdiger, ad-
mitted being inflation and was -und in violation of piobltion. Pro-
bation revoked.,"The defendant was sentenced to 18 moitths in prison
(suspended); 31 days in jail with 31 days credit for time served; 24
months probation. Any previous conditions re-imposed.
AMISON, JAMES STEWART: Charged May 17, 2005,w th battery..
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was prese6pt ri court with
Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. Hearirlg set for August 15, 2006.
BROWN, SONJA TAMARA: Charged;January 29, 2006 with'posses-
sion of controlled: substance cocaine~ possession of controlled sub-
stance without prescription. Defendmnt was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Putlic Defender Kevin,Steiger. Proba-
tion modified to include 37 days in jail with 37 days credit,for time
served; 18 months probation; 1 yer community control. Any condi-
tions not met; re-imposed. ^..
CHEWNING, HAROLD LEE II: Charged October 16, 2002 with pos-
session of controlled substance; charged with possession of contra-
band at county detention facility. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger
who entered a plea of denial. Case Management contiruqd to ugust
15, 2006. .
COGBURN, JOSEPH C: Charged 2 times with burglary of dwelling; 4
times with dealing in stolen property. Defendant was released on own
recognizance. The defendant was present in court and entered a plea
of denial. A public defender was appointed. Case Management con-
tinued to September 12, 2006.
CRUM, SAMlIE ,DONAVAN: Charged June 22. 2003 iith trespass
to occupied itrltture, battery, violation injunction',protection. bat-
tery. Defendaht rl'eeased on own recognizance. The detendinL was
present in couIrt Probation reinstated and must complete anger man-
agement., ,' '.,
GORSKI, TH9MAS A: Charged February 16, 2005w-ith sale of con-
trolled substance and possession of controlled substance w"iti Intent
to sell'or deliver., Defendant was incarcerated The defendant was
represented in court by Public-Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a
plea of denial. Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
GRIGGS, QUINNELLA: Charged August 21, 2003 with sale of con-
trolled substance, sale of substance in lieu of cocaine. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial. Case Management
continued to August 15, 2006.
HATCHER, MARYLYN J: Charged July 3, 2002 wit-h ,14 counts ut-
tering (passing .worthless document). Defendant ,was. incarcerated.
The defendant "was represented in court by Publiti'Defender Kevin
Steiger who enitered-a plea of denial.'Case ManagerhentI continued to
August,15, 2006.:-
HENDELS, GEORGE DEWAYNE: Charged March 6, 2005 with pos-
session of controlled substance cocaine. Defendant released on own
recognizance. The defendant was present in court and entered a plea
of denial. A public defender was appointed. Case Management con-
tinued to,August 15, 2006.
KEITH, JASON DERRICK: Charged December 22, 20Q0 with felony
DUI. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was'represerted in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a p'la of denial.'
Case Management continued to August 15, 2006. '
MORROW, SHANNON LEE: Charged July 21, 2005 with. sale or pos-
session of controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of
a school. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Probation modified to in-
clude 29 days in jail with 29 days credit for time served. Any condi-
tions not met, re-imposed.
RAY, KEITH: 'Charged January 26,, 2005 with sale of controlled sub-
stance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation
and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The de-
fendant was sentenced to 30 days in jail with 25 days credit for time
served; probation reinstated. Any conditions not met, re-imposed.
ROBINSON, BRANDON DEMAR: Charged February 12, 2005'with
armed robbery with deadly weapon, aggravated battery with deadly
weapon, grand theft motor vehicle. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court and entered a plea of denial. A public
defender was appointed. Case Management continued to August 15,
2006.
SLOAN, DOUGLAS D: Charged January 26, 2006 with dealing in
stolen property; Charged April 6, 2006 with grand theft motor ve-
hicle. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
with. Public Defender Kevin Sfeiger,i admitted being in violation and
was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defen-I
dant was sentenced to 13 days in jail with 13 days ,credit for time,
served: probation reinstated. Any conditions not met, re-imposed.


STRINGER, MARK: Charged December 15, 1994 with grand theft
auto. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
.with Public Defender Kevin,-Steiger, admitted being in violation and
was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defen-
dant was senteticed to 12 months probation (stipulated). Any condi-
tions not met, re-imposed.
WHITE, NATHANIEL JR: Charged January, 21, 2005 with grapd
theft; Charged May 29, 2005 with aggravated battery great bodily harm.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by' Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial. Case
Management continued to August 15, 2006.
DISPOSITION
BARRACK, HARVEY S: Charged April 9, 2005 with sale of controlled
substance, possession of controlled, substance. 'Thedefendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger Disposition con-
tinued to September 12, 2006.
NOWLING, JENNY: Charged June 9,. 2005 with possession with in-
tent to sell cannabis; Charged June 24, 2005 with sale of controlled
substance. Total bond was $35,000.00. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of no
contest on March 14, 2006. Adjudication withheld. The defendant
was sentenced to 4 days in jail with 4 days credit for time served; 24
months pitobation (concurrent); substance abuse evaluation and treat-
ment; random testing for alcohol and illegal drugs; $820.00 court
costs and fees.
SANDERS, DELANTA LIONEL:: Charged August 10, 2000 with bur-
glary of structure while armed; Charged October 1, 2004' with sale/
possession of controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000
feet of a store x 3; felony fleeing or attempting to elude officer. The
defendant was represented in court by Attorney Richard W. Reno.
Disposition continued to September 12; 2006.
CASE MANAGEMENT
ASH, CRAIG: Charged December 27, 2005 with resisting officer with
violence, possession of cocaine with intent to sell. Defendant was in-
carcerated. The defendant,was present in court with Public Defender
Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty.
The defendant was sentenced 'to 24 months in prison (suspended);
196 days in jail with 196'days credit for time served; 24 months pro-
bation;'substance abuse evaluation and treatment; random testing
for alcohol and illegal drugs; $410.00 court costs and fees.
BAUCHAM,. WILLIE FRED: Charged November 8, 2005 with grand
theft (thid' degree) and resisting officer with violence; Charged Feb-
ruary, 14,.2006 with dealing in stolen property. Defendant was incar-
cerated. The defendant was present in court. Case Management con-
tinued to August 15, 2006.
BENTLEY., FRANKLIN J: Charged June 15, 2004 with burglary of a
dwelling and grand theft of a' firearm. Defendant released on own
recognizance. The defendant was represented,in court by Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
B1ROWN, KEVIN LEE:i Charged Aughst, 11, 2b01 with aggravated
battery witl deadly weapon. Defendant was incarcerated. The 'defen-
dant.was present in cofrt ivith Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case
Management continued to August 15, 2006.
BURSTEIN, LARRY D: Charged March 25,, 2006 with possession
controlled substance (marijuana over 20 grams); possession drug para-
phernalia; possession alcohol by person under 21, display another's
driver's license. Bond was $1,500.00. The defendant was presenting
court with Pullic Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of no
contest to the lesser charge of possession of controlled substance
(under 20 grams). The State Attorney's Office dropped counts 3 and
4. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentenced. to 2 days in
jail with 2 days credit for time served; 6 months probation (counts 1
& 2 concurrent); random testing for no alcohol or illegal drugs; $835.00
court costs and fees.
CAMPBELL, ERIE LEO: Charged November.26, 2005 with attempted
burglary of'a dwelling; Charged November 29, 2005 with sale of con-
trolled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of
no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced
to 24 months in prison (suspended); 224 days in jail with 224 days
credit for time served; 24 months probation (concurrent); random test-
ing or drugs and alcohol; $820.00 court costs and fees.
CARMICHAEL, JAMES L: Charged with driving while license re-
voked (felony), possession of cannabis and possession of parapher-
nalia. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger. Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
CRYDERMAN, VICKIE DEE: Charged March 19. 2006 with posses-
sonr of controlled substance and resisting officer v.iLh violence De-
fendanit was incarcerated. The defendant was present n court u nh
Continued on Page 6


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Court Report from Page 5
Public Delender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and being
in violation of probation. Defendant was found in violation of proba-
tion and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 1
year and 1 day in prison; 114 days in jail with 114 days credit for time'
served. Costs reduced to civil judgment.
CUMMINGS, LARRY: Charged May 17, 2005 with aggravated bat-
Stery with deadly weapon. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was
'present in court with Attorney Roblert Culpepper II. Pre-trial Confer-
ence set for August 15, 2006.
DANIELS,,ADRIAN L: Charged May 20, 2005 with sale of controlled
substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present
'in court with Attorney Rachel Chesnut, entered a plea of no contest
and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 30 months
in prison (suspended); 138 days in jail with 138 days credit for time
served; 30 months probation; no alcohol or drugs (random testing).
The defendant'was sentenced to 136 days in jail with 136 days credit
for time served in another case; $470.00 court costs and fees.
DAUGHTRY, HARVEY T JR: Charged March 30, 2006 with sale of a
controlled substance. Bond was $10.000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a
plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 3 days in jail with 3 days credit for time served; 6 months
community control, followed by 24 months probation; no drugs or
alcohol; $510.00 court costs and fees.
DAVIS, DON L: Charged August 25, 2005 with purchase controlled
substance cocaine; Charged October 30, 2005 with flagrant violation
of net law, possession net larger than 2 inch stretch and possession
undersized red fish. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was present
in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management con-
tinued to August 15. 2006.
ERBAN, NICHOLAS R: Charged with possession of more than 20
grams of cannabis, possession of paraphernalia, possession of alco-
hol by person under 21 years of age and unlawful display of driver's
license. Bond was $1,500.00. The defendant was represented in court
by Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. Case Management continued to Sep-
tember 12, 2006.
EMSWILER, AMY LEE: Charged December 1, 2005 with possession
Sof controlled substance, driving while license suspended or revoked;
charged December 2, 2005 with possession of controlled substance.
Bond was $25,205.00. The defendant was present in court with Pub-
lic Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to Septem-
ber 12,.2006.
PACER, CRAIG A: Charged November 2, 2004 with corruption by
threat against public servant: Charged November 3, 2004 with felony
fleeing or attempting to elude officer, felony DUI, driving while license
suspended (felony) and property damage. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
qteiger. admitted being in violation and was found in violation of pro-
bation. Probation revoked and terminated. The defendant was sen-
(nced to 24 months in prison with 255 days credit for time served.
GORDON,'WARDELL C: Charged July 1, 2005 with sale of controlled
,substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was represented in
court by Attorney Gregory Cummings. Case Management, continued
t& August 15. 2006.
GRIFFISS, SCREVEN BOND: Charged February 6, 2004 with bur-
glary of a structure. Defendant was incarcerated. Attorney Ethan
Andrew Way was not present. Case Management continued to-August
15': 2006.:
HILL, TRAVIS:WALKER: Charged February 14, 2006 with 2 counts
'lorn fleeing or attempt to elude; driving while license suspended
(felony): willful wanton.reckless driving. Bond was $15,000.00. The
defendant was present .in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
lase Management continued to August 15, 2006.
JACOBS, DANIEL ROY: Charged May 27. 2005 with grand theft.
S defendant was incarcerated. The attorney was not present. Case Man-
agement continued to August 15, 2006.
AMES, LARRY A: Charged December 24, 2005 with arson. The
defendant was present in court with' Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
lase Management continued to September 12, 2006.
KILGORE, JIMMY DEAN: Charged with fishing with suspended salt-
jater license. The defendant was represented in court by Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
iANGLEY, MICHAEL SHAWN Charged No e-mb.-r 23, 2004 with ob-
PGian or attempt to obtain controlled Lub-jtaine bh\ IrauLd; Charged April
SSI. 2006 Ma\ I 1. 201)6 wit-h 5 cc'urns Littlierln Ipa-.inti worthless.docu-
S ient). Charged April 11. 2006 .i.t'i urttenn Ipasiins o rhie ,s docr-
~en. 1Deriehrd w as incarcerated The delerdanrt ,.'ia pr-s nrt tin
ir .-;tlr Piblic Defender Ku% n St5 i er -ntere-d a pla-i onri.-, on t,-
.ttldicated guil.v.,The del'eod.ant-admiltted .ind .i ound.
. II iIolatlln of probation. Prob.aiior re\ .: 'kd T1,_- d-fendant was sen-
;tienced to 24 months in prison (suspended); 36 months probation with
creditt for time already served (all cases concurrent); no alcohol (ran-
dom testing); restitution to victims; $820.00 court costs and fees.
4ny conditions not met, re-imposed.
bEE, RONALD WAYNE: Charged March 14, 2006 with possession of
nntrolled substance cocaine, possession drug paraphernalia. Bond
was $10.000.00. The defendant was present in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to September 12,
o006.
VOLLEY, ROBERT EARL JR: Charged March 30, 2006 with sale of
controlled substance cannabis. Bond was $10.000.00. The defendant
*as present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Man-
4gement continued to September 12, 2006.
lIICKINLEY, ISIS F: Charged February 22, 2006 with driving while
license suspended (felony). The defendant was present in court with
public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to Sep-
Cember 12. 2006.


MIXON, JERMYi JOSEPH: Ch ed October 19, 2008 with augra-
vated batteryilvth deadly weapo Bond was $10,000.00. The deen-
dant did riot'slidw up for court a a capias (warrant -fr arrest) was
issued. Bonid was forfeited.
MOORE, KATIE NICOLE: Charged 'March 2, 2005' with 3 counts
possession of controlled substance with intent to sell di'd'eliver. Bond
was $2.500,.00. The defendant was ~resent in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to September 12,
2006.
OQUIN, WILLIE:, Charged with Mscape. The defendant was repre-
sented in court by Public Defender levin Steiger. Case Management
continued to Autgst 15, 2006.
PARMELE, CHRISTOPHER DWAYNE: Charged March 10, 2006 with
cultivation of cannabis, possession of paraphernalia. Bond was
S$.15000.00. The defendant was present in court with' Public Defender
Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to September 12, 2006.
SPATERSON, TIMOTHY WADE: Charged November i5, 2005 with
Sale of controlled, substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant
was present in, court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger.,Case Man-
agement continued to September 12, 2006.
PORCHE, EDWARD: Charged December 23, 2005 with grand theft.
Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to September
12, 2006.
PROVANZANO, MICHELE D: Charged 2 times with aggravated child:
abuse with deadly weapon and 1 time with sale of crack cocaine.,
Bond was:$25,000.00. The defendant was present incourt with Pub-
lic Defender eevih'Steiger. Case Management continued to October
10, 2006.1 '. ..;
RIVERA, RICARDO J: Charged March 17, 2006 withpossession of
controlled substance marijuana over 20 grams and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond was $1,500.00. The defendantwas present in,
Court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. Case Management continued
to September'12; 2006.
ROGERS, MICHAEL SHEA: Charged December 2. 2005 with felony
fleeing or attempting to elude officer. Bond was $500.00.iThe defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case
Management continued to August 15, 2006.
SCOTT, RAMAH'TULANE: Charged December 9, 2005 'ith posses-
sion of cannabis more than 20 grams. Bond was $5,000.00. Case
Management continued to August 15, 2006 by court'oider.
SMITH, JESSE G.,JR: Charged February 16, 2005 and January 11,
2006 with possession of controlled substance cocaine. Defendant re-
leased on own recognizance. The defendant was present in court with
,Public Defender Keviri Steiger. Case Management continued to Au-
gust 15, 2006.
TRAIL, SHELTON WILLIAM: Charged with sale of controlled.sub-
stance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was present in cottrt
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to
September 12. 2006.
TURNEY, APRIL LYNN: Charged February 21, 2006 with sale of con-
Strolled substance; Charged February 24, 2006 with tampering with
witness; Charged April 27, 2006 with battery on inmate, resisting
officer with'violen'ce. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Gregory Cummings and entered a plea
of no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentenced to
294 days in jail with 294 days credit for time served: 36 months pro-
Sbation (concurrent);.substance abuse evaluation and treatment; no
alcohol or drugs (random testing); all court costs and fees.
TURRELL, JARVIS B: Charged April 4. 2006 with sale of controlled
substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was present in court
With Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to
. September 12. 2006.
WALKER, DANIEL WILLIAM: Charged October 24, 2004 with fla-
Sgrant violation of net law and possession of net larger than 2 inch
* stretch. Bond was $1,000.00. The defendant was present in court
i with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to
SSeptember 12, 2006.
WALLACE, KENNETH L: Charged 2 times on June 5, 2001 with sale
of controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was present in court with Attorney Sherrie J. Barnes, admitted being
;in violation and was found in violation of probation. Probation re-
Svoked and terminated.
SWALLACE, KENNETH L: Charged August 10, 2004 with aggravated
battery on pregnant victim: Charged March 30, 2005 with battery by
i inmate. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present, in
'court with Attorney Sherrie J. Barriers, admitted being in violation
I fendant was sentenced to 72 months in prison (suspended); 176 days
Sin jail with 176 days credit for time served; 36 months probation (con-
current): any condition not met, re imposed.
SZACKERY, REGINOLD T: Charged November 3, 2005 with felony
! fleeing or attempting to elude officer; Charged January 30, 2006 with
driving while license suspended (felony) and property damage. Bond
was $1,500.00. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney
Gregory Cummings. Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.

HEARINGS
IAMISON, JAMES STEWART: Continued to August 15, 2006
LOLLEY, ROBERT EARL JR: Continued to September 12, 2006
WILLIAMS, MARTALIUS DEMETRIUS: Disposition set for August
15. 2006.


mNOW-

is thetime t


History of Apalach from Page 4
came a railroad (1839) from lola to St. Joseph to draw the
cotton trade from the Apalachicola River. This was Florida's
first railroad. Florida's Constitutional Convention was held in
St. Joseph in 1838. St. Joseph was not able to compete with
Apalachicola, however, and major storms in 1837, 1839, and
1844, along with a yellow fever epidemic in 1841, destroyed
the town. Except for turpentine operations, St. Joseph was
abandoned until the 1900's. The area did not recover until the
coming of the Port St. Joe Paper Company. A number ofhomes
moved by barge from St. Joseph in 1844 are still standing in
Apalachicola.
It is estimated that 150 people lived in West Point in 1828 and
2,000 in 1838. However, the population would fluctuate ac-
cording to trade and yellow fever conditions. In 1835, during
the fever months, August 1 to November 1, the Apalachicola
Advertiser estimated that there were no more than seventy
people in tdwn. Cotton was shipped from December through
June, with most of it shipped from January through March.
In 1836, 50,000 bales of cotton were shipped from Apalachicola.
It became the third largest cotton port on the Gulf Coast, rank-
"a^^aaBe^ BSasffih- g Raik -aa^


The Raney House, pictured here, is another
Apalachicola museum that commemorates local his-
tory especially the days in which cotton was a pri-
mary industry in the area.
Continued on Page 8


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNSb NEWSPAPER


21 July 2006 Page 7 .


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


Boyd Report

Protecting Our Voting
Rights

Congress renews landmark Voting Rights Act
By Congressman Allen Boyd (D-FL)
This week, Congress voted to reauthorize the historic Voting
Rights Act of 1965. One of the most significant pieces of legis-
lation enacted during the 20th century, the Voting Rights Act
helped guarantee one of our most fundamental rights-the
right of every citizen to participate in the political process.
The right to choose one's representatives in the voting booth
is the basis of a free, democratic society. Without a meaning-
ful vote, there. can be no equality before the law, no equal
access. and no equal' opportunity. Yet, for a hundred years
after the Civil War, millions of Africani-Americans were-denied
this fundamental right, despite the 4'f5h Amendment to the
Constitution that prohibited the denial ol the right to vote on
the basis of race or color. Poll taxes, literacy tests, and even
physical violence were used to.deny African-Americans their
legal right to vote.
Signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson on August 6,
1965. the Voting Rights Act provides extensive protection to
minority communities by ensuring that the right t' 'vote is
fully protected. The success of the Voting Rights Act has led to
significant political achievement and greater minority,repre-
sentation at all levels of government. The reauthorization of
this landmark bill demonstrates our continued determination
to remove all voting obstacles and safeguard the rights of all
Americans.
Since 1965, the Voting Rights Act has been extended five times,
firstin 1970, then in 1975, 1982, 1992, and now 2006. Changes
have included the requirement of bilingual ballots* and voting
assistance. thereby increasing the act's scope to cover non-
English speaking.minorities. In 1982; the Voting Rights Act
was amended to protect the rights of voters \\ilh disabilities
The most recent exte sion this year realthorned lor 25 \ears
key provisions of" the Voting Riht- Act that were set to expire
in.2007. These prot:sions pre\ ent discrininatorv" \vbtin! prac-
tices and.require bilingnaltballots for those with limited En-
glishiproficiency. Our nation's historyis 'one ofe expanding
rights, and it is imperative that we adjust our laws'to reflect
that.'
The Voting Rights Act was one of the nation's most crucial
civil rights victories and memorializes those who marched,
strungled. and died to secure the right to vote for all Ameri-
cans. -While substantial progress has been made in the area of
-voting rights over the last 40 years, we must continue to cre-
ate a more just, fair, and equal society. This week's vote shows
our commitment to this goal. I am proud that Congress agreed
to reauthorize important provisions of the Voting Rights Act
so that this act can continue to protect the most fundamental
expression of equality in our democracy: the right to vote.

Southeastern Fisheries
Association
July 14, 2006
Dr. William Hogarth, Administrator
NOAA Fisheries
Silver Spring, Maryland
Dear Dr. Hogarth:
Many people involved in the Gulf of Mexicd fishing industry
recently received a copy of a letter sent to Admiral Lautenbacher
from Bob Zales, a Panama City, Florida charter boat operator.
Copies of the letter were sent to Secretary of Commerce
Guiterrez condemning you, Dr. Crabtree, the Gulf of Mexico
Fishery Management Council and NMFS/NOAA and commer-
cial fishing.
Freedom of Speech is one of the most sacred constitutional
rights available to all of us. When words are written and widely
distributed as part of public dialogue, they are subject to re-
sponse from anyone who does not agree with what is presented.
Because there is so much in the Zales letter that is missing we
are obliged to offer you our perspective on sore of the sub-'
jects mentioned.
The Spanish mackerel fishery, for instance was singled out
as the only federally managed fishery that can be claimed
as a full success, but then a caveat was inserted stating
the Florida net ban was the real reason for success. This is
a totally flawed statement.
There never was a fishery crisis with Spanish mackerel har-
vest in the Gulf of Mexico and any over fishing that might
have occurred for even a short period of time on the East Coast
of Florida in the 1980s was corrected by the Florida legisla-
ture with the assistance of the industry by modifying length of
nets and mesh sizes. Florida has been producing millions of
pounds of mullet and Spanish mackerel since federal records
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were started in 1895. They arp robust fisheries even though in
the case of mullet many of theirprime estuaries and wetlands
have been dredged and filled to house the ever burgeoning
population., .* ,r ,
The letter didn't mention the redfish fishery even though most
of the over fishing always occhfrted in state waters when tons
of puppy 'reds were caught 'i'various tournaments around
the Gulf.
The redfish fishery has been @losed to harvest for commercial
consumption,purposes for decades and will never open in the
Gulf because of political reasons, not scientific ones. That ex-
clusive angler fishery was not mentioned in the, letter.
The-letter didn't acknowledge that of all the fisheries in the
Gulf only a handful (four I believe) are overfished or undergo-
ing overfishing. Goliath grouper is still considered overfished
and closed to all harvest but experienced divers know there
are great schools of goliath grouper in the Gulf that are eating
tons of red and gag grouper every day.
The letter didn't mention the targeted harvest of all the big
king mackerel.during the "Big Money" fishing tournaments.
We have no objection to tournaments but we vehemently ob-
ject to angler harvested large king mackerel being sold to con-
sumers. Actually, recreationally caught fish should never be
sold or bartered, especially large fish containing heavy con-
centrations of mercury.
The letter spent a great deal of anger concerning the' fact Mr.
Zales sold his commercial permits (his personal choice) and
yet he got a letter from your agency saying one of his vessels
had been selected to carry an observer. It seems'all he had to
do was send you an e-mail saying he no longer possessed com-
mercial permits so no observer is required.
On page 3 of the Zales letter is where his real issue begins.
The letter says the commercial sector is allocated 51% of the
fishery. Mr. Zales neglects to indicate that the non-boating
consumers are the ones who have only been allocated 51% of
red snapper'and the rest were set aside for pleasure fishing.
The Magnuionr-Stevens Act says the reason for federal fishery
management programs is to provide seafood AND for recre-
ational purposes. Providing seafood from domestic fisheries
was one of the prime reasons for Magnuson being created al-
though the, driving force was to remove all foreign fishing in
the US fishing zone. The Act was not created by Congress to
allocate most of the fish for recreation, it was created to sup-
ply seafood AND allow recreational fishing.
The non-boiatilng consumers of the United States are only allo-
cated 4.65 million pounds of red snapper. This translates into
maybe 3 million pounds of edible protein, which is really not
enough. Unlike militant angler groups and individuals who
are trying to stop commercial fishing, the commercial sector
never demands ALL the fish, only a fair share to provide to
non-boaters.
The letter says only 88 fishermen OWN the red snapper fish-
ery when in fact they only own an Individual Fishing Quota
certificate as permitted by the United States government.
These 88 fishermen are the ones who were identified under
numerous scenarios as the fishermen most involved in com-
mercial red snapper fishing or they would not have met the
criteria for an IFQ permit.
The letter also uses the "Voodoo economic comparison for-
mula" by asserting the red snapper harvested for consumers
and restaurants is only worth $15 million dollars but the en-
tire saltwater recreational sector in the Gulf is worth $8 BIL-
LION. Follow me close on this Dr. Hogarth and let me reiterate
how this voodoo formula works.
First, angler groups take the consumer's allocation (commer-
cial fishing) an'd multiply it by the dock value which in this
case they used a little over $3.00 per pound for the whole fish.
By slowly manipulating the voodoo doll the unsuspecting reader
can be led to believe that $15 million is the total economic
value. However, that $3.00 fish at the dock is really worth
about $35 to $45 per pound at seafood restaurants and this
doesn't even include the aesthetic value of being able to enjoy
fresh Gulf red snapper at your favorite restaurant.
Second, if you believe the $8 BILLION figure used in the letter
is what the ENTIRE recreational fishery in the Gulf is worth,
that is fine. However, the $8 Billion doesn't break out the value
of red snapper so making an honest comparison is not pos-
sible using the numbers stated in the letter. The letter uses
ONE commercial fishery and compares that to ALL recreational
fishing.
Bottom line on this portion of the Zales letter is just the usual
attempt to make the pleasure fishing industry very valuable
and our food producing industry irrelevant. That just won't
work under the Magnuson Act and Rule of Law.
The letter refers to an unidentified number of red snapper
fishermen as :fish criminals". The letter also refers to fisher-
men having "hidden compartments" and fish house owners
and red snapper owners who will "continue the illegal black
market and illegal harvest of fish."
These are maior charges aimed ai both the gobd and the bad.
Were I a fish house owner or red snapper boat owneil would
Shave to obtain a deposition from Mr. Zales to either prove I
was a fish criminal" or give me a very sincere publictapology
and commitment to cease any further defamation of riy char-
acter.
The letter also talks about the'Orange Beach FishingAssocia-
tion wanting to volunteer to buy all the red snapper for an-.







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glers. What a draconian idea to even consider allowing the
wealthy fishermen to devise a scam to buy our commonly owned.
natural resources for their pleasure.
Captain Ariderson's Restaurant and thousands of others de--
serve access to genuine Gulf of Mexico red snapper for their
customers. This fish, or any species of fish, should ever be the'
exclusive property of recreational fishermen. That is not what
Magnuson-Sfevens is all about.
The letter concludes with an analogy about NMFS being a boat,
about to sink with no working lifeboats and very few life jack-
ets. If we had to use an analogy we might say NMFS is like a,
boat with lots of responsibilities but not enough crew working
in the right places. We certainly would not say it is about to
sink.
We too will be contacting members of Congress, not to ask for
an investigation, but to make it clear to everyone that provid-
ing seafood is one of the main reasons for having the Magnuson-;
Stevens Act now and in the future.
There are numerous "gatekeepers" in any federal agency so
the chances of the Admiral seeing this letter might be remote
but if there is any way you can push it up the chain of com-,
mand I ask you to do so. We would hate for the Admiral and'
the Secretary to think the comments made in the Zales letter
reflects our views and the views of thousands of others who,
are impacted by federal fishing regulations.
Sincerely yours,
Bob Jones
Executive Director, Southeastern Fisheries Association and
President, Seafood Restaurant Coalition
1118-B Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
850-224-0612



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Family Res Lauraant

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Highway 98 in Carrabelle
Open 11:oo a.m. til 9:o0 p.m.
SC.osiE MONDAY


I Ik


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Page 8 21 July 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


T Fr a nkli_ nChr. ni.l.


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the FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-1687, fax: 850-670-1685.
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Announcements

I Str% HRlining Your Relationships7 Bouy and Read
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DIVORCE$S27.-350'*COAERS children, etc. Only one
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Real Estate
Cool Western NC Mounlains-escape he heal,Ihurricanes
andligl prices. I laocs, cabins, lois acreage, investments.
Prudentidl Great Smokys Really, Downtown Bryson City,
Call (877)476-6597.
SBEAITI 111:. N. CARlOIONA. ESCAPE' 10 BEAU'rTI-
FUL. WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS, FREE COI.OR
HIROCI HIRE & INFORMATION. MOUNTAIN I'ROP-
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INS, CRI:EIKS & INVESTMENT ACREAGEI Cherokee
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(800)1841-5.168.
NEW TO (MARKET! IA'KEIRONT & EQUES-
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I Acres-Drccl l.akefron -S269.9002i Acres Ilomcsilc-
SI 19,900 .Located minutes fromn downllowl Jacksonville.
II.L IPrilveGaledComnuntlly. Miles colridlcTraiils.Rec.
Area. Fishing & lloaling. Call: (877)JIC-I.AND lonrida
I.and & Ranches, I.I.C. "
(ulf front lots 5595k. Homes starling mid S300k. Newv
master planned ocean front community on bcauliful Mus.
tang Island. near Corpus Clhristi, TX
wwva cv namionshore c-m (8S6)91-5163.
Iluyers lMrkel Constal Norlh Carolina o5.100) I.TV
I:inancilng Call CCI Inc. Realty (800)682-9951.
IAKE I.ANN SAI.E! 3 Acles with oat Slip -Only
S29.9'0! Direct Access to 33,000-acre mountain lake in
Tennessee with boat s1p. Available 8/26' (800)770-9311.

NEW LOG HOME I'ACKAGE! 3 Acres witl Boat Slip
Only $89.9001 Direct access o 33,000 acre mountain lake
in Tennessec. Available 8/26! (800)776-9311, Ext.821.
I.ALAAMA WATERFIIONTACREAGE 2 hours 'rom
Atlanta & the Coast. Gated wcilh excplllinal aImenells.
including hoatslips. 12 o 3 acies firomn he S40's. Near great
historic toln. Call (866)882.-1"117
AS111V11.. .E,~NC( A1EAr< A(.11s(, "o iacrc parcel,
ai llIod noll ll y6nlll 2 14414 l lcr i l tl rr bl .iiilltd)
nillcniilIt 'Xcplcnic acil illt lilanc l ill si lii\eriP cc 'iCcll,
'iPhat) o nHt! I(66)292-5762


KY DEEP WATER PARCEl. 1.38 acres overlooking
L.ake Barklcy. 90 inin to Na.shvill. miinuts tIo l.nd
Ielotwecl the Lakes. JusM $47.001) WVii las! ()n'lr
S(66)3339-4 6
I.()OKIN(; TO OW\N IANI)D Ivtsl inl illral acreage
l cihlughoiil A r l t ciac. toasc l.l, i lllouiiilll4 \.ilcl lOllllt ltt)).iI -
4li0es, 20 Io 2)0 ncres lFor FRIl'1 Sipceal LaIn.d Inutis
L sosgiyt f:vo -sgti 4I
TN ACREAGEI \W/ VIEWS! I Ion 5 a1c ircls willth
Incredible vlcws 1800'clevato.Cion scio allCr ckI alls.
SOners' clubhouse, nature trails. From Ihe S40's! Call
(866)292-5769.
VA MOUNTAINS 5 aicrs wllh Irontage on wvcy large
:, prstine creek, very private. scellc ii nsllng. canoeing.
good access, near New RiverTrail Slite Pa'rk, $39.500.
SOwner(i866)789-8535 \wwvwmoUtLnlnslilVA joni.
. ,.,... \1,, .. \ i , i ., s. l hI.. ,l .I ''. I .

S~lslatlcmagaine~iC a k Ia snsrOciJg lan)icctiIcs,cil .li ,.
land, rcntals. "Besl invcstmcnl area in U S.A." saysF Iorhc
Magazine Updalcd iontllhly
GCEORG;IA- BIAIIRSVII.LE NORTI (GEORGIA
1MOUNTAINS. Land, I loes,CnConmtcrcial&lnvcstuncii
"TVrVRYTIIING WE TOUCII TURNS TO SO.D- Jane
oacr Realty. (70()745-2261., (800)820-7829
M n Cillt(1Barcal .i c jancbhacr'illlll net
lMAINE OCEANFRONT BARGAIN 4 -Acres 220'
waterfront only $149.900 5' accrs, !ocean acccssc oll)
S34,900. I.njoyvs lctacular4 acrcn.-caltrotll parcel \,'\ ,c
220' ol' pmate shoreline Or relas on )our 5- acre occan
access lotw deecdccdaccess, Iogargeous pnva sand 'cbeaclh
Surveycd. soil tested aved rd in gaeod cillcniu)nlt)y (ire
,owner fnaincancn Call I.&S eall( 424)7)7RI-'34.

LAKEFRONT I'DIIEI)EVEI.OI'MENT OPIPORTI:-
Nl'rTv! cIY-soC gnIschiroS. A II waler- access honeioltcs
direct liom tlc developer. Mscl alcnilies already icn, ';ar
below ilarket value, lionl S79.90). POSMbleo IS 14ni NO)
PAYMElITS! Call No\s (80s)11V !.AKI'S
East T'incnessec- Norris .ake 5,6 ;acle wooded
SI-AKE lRONT lot- S66.500 5 I iictI \ooded VIEW lii-
S23.900 Call Lakeside canll) i. t 423)126-521) or V\-a
om a_ j u1aid t y--eitns.coo
W.cstern New Mexico Prilvate 74 Aerc allch $121).'90and
20 Picluresquc Acres S54.99cI. Scenic region will naunira.ln
views tall Irccs. rolling hills, meadows, wildhlilr ll:)y
hcrsces. hiiiinlilg,.likii, ATV's I'cd'ct lohuildc ocurfaillly
raclli orretealrea ilrenetl or second ccIne w ith clctricilv.
100%, financing. NAI.C 186(0365-2825
MIlRP'IIV NORTH' CAROI.INA AAlt C001), SM:M-
MIKRS MilI.) WINTERS A fnlrdabll I Iines & Mountain
Cabins. l.and CAI.. FiOR FRlEl BROCI IUR1I:4S77)837-
2238 EXIT REAI.'TY MOUNTAIN \'VIEW\V 'PROP1lR-

Steel Buildings

II.'l.DING SAIE! "MAN II:ACT| 1 )1132 'l CTS nte
1980I" stlcnesive range ofl %4lr'iltodels I4aillpl
40',)100'.\16'-3 4I,'sq Ii Ends oplimn cl. 3-wek dechvery'
25's40'12' S39O0 (I.IM1TID QT Y) P oneer (800t668-
5422.


THE CIVIL WAR: With the outbreak of the War Between the
States (1861-1865), Apalachicola and the surrounding coastal
area assumed a dual role of strategic military importance.
Sheltered by the chain of offshore islands and situated on the
River which provided easy access to military and industrial
centers in the interior, the city and port offered refuge to ves-
sels- carrying much-needed supplies to the Confederacy.
Scarcely less important was the area's ability to maintain a
large number of salt-producing installations which gave the
Confederacy the means of preserving meat and other food sup-
plies. Union operations in the area were concerned with the
blockade of the port and the destruction of the salt-producing
installations. Confederate counter-measures attempted to foil
the Union's achievement of these objectives.

The establishment of a Naval Blockade was accomplished by
Union forces on 11 June, 1861, with the arrival of the U.S.S.
Montgomery. At times, the blockade employed a squadron of
three or more vessels in the area. A landing at Apalachicola
was achieved without resistance on 3 April, 1862. At various
times from this date until the war's end, the city was occupied
briefly by Union or Confederate forces. No conflicts of signal
importance took place.

One incident took place approximately ten miles east of
Apalachicola near the mouth of Crooked River. On 20 May,
1862, a boat, carrying 21 men left the blockading vessel and
approached the shore, probably looking for fresh water. They
were fired upon by a group of Confederates under Capt. H. T.
Blocker of the Beauregard Rangers. Seventeen of the boat's
occupants were either killed or wounded. There were no Con-
federate casualties. The Union forces constantly sought to in-
,crease the effectiveness of the blockade by various expedi-
tions and raids into Confederate territory. In May, 1863, one
of the most successful involved locating and taking the schoo-
ner Fashion at Scott Creek 23 miles above Apalachicola. Union
sailors were able to tow their prize into the river ard back to
the blockading squadron. Several prisoners and fifty bales of
cotton accompanied the captured vessel.

The most important installations in this area were rendered
ineffective later this same year. A force of sixty-five men was
landed at Alligator Bay, where they destroyed 65 salt evapora-
tion vats, nine buildings in four separate areas, as well as
scattering 200 bushels of salt. Salt works at St. Joseph Bay
and St. Marks, to the East and West of Apalachicola respec-
tively, were also destroyed. Smaller raids and expeditions con-
tinued throughout the rest of 1863. At least one salt works
was destroyed and small quantities of cottonconfiscated. Again,
no loss of personnel was reported for either side.

In May, 1864, the crew of the Confederate gunboat,
Chattahoochee, damaged the previous year by a boiler explo-
sion at Blountstown Bar, descended the river to Apalachicola
in small boats with'a plan to raise the blockade. The expedi-
tion met with failure for, betrayed by Apalachicola Unionists,
caught in a storm.on St. George Sound, and pursued by Union
landing parties, they were barely able to escape back up the
river. Activities for the remainder of this year and into 1865
were of a "see-saw" nature, with neither side obtaining an ad-
vantage. Nothing took place which had any major effect on
events in the Southern theatre of the war.


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JOHN'S
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Quality Craftsmanship For Ovt
SERVING FRANKLIN COUNTY SIr
Specializing in Custom Homes-
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As the war ended,a squadron of five Union vessels maintained
the blockade. The city of Apalachicola was formally occupied
by units of the 161st New York Vol. Infantry and 82nd United
States Colored Infantry, commanded by Major General
Alexander Asboth. The Union force assisted in the area's re-
turn to normalcy by collecting and restoring the aids to navi-
gation on the river and in the bay. The port of Apalachicola
thus achieved renewed activity as a clearing house for cotton
and other "booty," shipped from the river system to the Gulf.

Opinions in Apalachicola were divided during the War Between
the States. Dr. John Gorrie, an early pioneer in the artificial
manufacture 'of ice, refrigeration and air conditioning, and a
Southerner, may have wanted some kind of liquidation of the
institution of slavery similar to that which throughout the
British dominions in the 1830's. Dr. Alvin Wentworth
* Chapman, the botanist and author of The Flora of the South-
eastern United States, was a Union man and simply wanted
the institution abolished.

CYPRESS: The decline of Apalachicola came about, not be-
cause of the American Civil War, but because of the railroads.
As railroads re-routed trade east and west, the north and south
river traffic declined. As Savannah grew, Apalachicola declined.
Although 133,079 bales of cotton were shipped in 1860 from
Apalachicola, the decline was in evidence in the percentage of
the upriver cotton crop shipped. The destruction of Southern
railroads during the war and the cypress milling boom of the
1880's were enough to keep steamboats on the river up through
the 1920's. As the Apalachicola River could not float towing
barges year around, the use of the river declined after that.

In 1877, Oliver Hudson Kelley, founder in 1867 of the Patrons
of Husbandry, know as the National Grange, an economic,
political, and social force among Midwest farmers, bought al-
most 2000 acres of land in Franklin County and started the
community of Rio Carrabelle. Kelley, with his wife and four
daughters, lived in his Island House hotel managed by his
niece Carolyn Arabelle Hall, kndwn as Carrie, for whom
Carrabelle was named. The Crooked River lighthouse is often
called the Carrabelle lighthouse. The swamp area northwest
of Carrabelle has the name Tate's Hell from a legendary, fright-
ened, lost traveler of the 1880's, Cebe Tate.

Charles M. Harrison opened a small sawmill in the late 1860's.
Other mill owners including Snow, Richards, and Harris fol-
lowed. In the early 1870's, A. B. Tripler founded the Pennsyl-
vania Tie Company. Renamed the Cypress Lumber Company
in 1882, it had headquarters in Maine and was directed lo-
cally by August S. Mohr. Its lumber mill operations in
Apalachicola were to become the largest in the South. James
N. Coombs from Maine, a Union veteran and a Republican,
came to Apalachicola in 1876. Expanding his local store to
include a sawmill, he went into association with Caleb Emien
from Chester, Pennsylvania, and established a lumbering part-
nership with Seth N. Kimball of Mobile. Purchasing a lumber-
ing operation in recently founded Carrabelle, he obtained an-
other partner in Charles H. Parlin. Maine born Charles Parlin
married Elizabeth Grady, daughter of a ship chandlery family
in Apalachicola, and became owner of the Long Lumber Pine
and Cypress Company. Moving his family 22 miles east to
Carrabelle, Parlin managed -his and Coombs' newly-acquired
Franklin County Lumber Company. In Apalachicola, Coombs
sold out to Kimball in 1888 and set up his own firm, Coombs
and Company, acquiring single control of the Franklin County
Lumber Company. He had become the single most important
business man in Franklin County's lumber industry. Henry
Brash, who had come as a Jewish emigrant from Germany in
1865, entered, over time, the dry goods, lumber, real estate,
and sponge trade and took over Harrison's mill. Brash later
sold the mill to the Cypress Lumber Company.

Hewn logs were exported to Europe and South America, rail-
road ties to Mexico, and sawn pine lumber and shingles were
sent north, while businesses in New Orleans were the major
purchasers of cypress. From 1878 to .1888 lumber was shipped
through West Pass. C. L. Storrs and R. F. Fowler operated a
sawmill in Carrabelle, and by 1890, Carrabelle was also the
center of an expanding naval stores industry. Family turpen-
tine stills could be found about the county until the 1940's.
Although there were exceptions, to teach a Negro to read and
write was either illegal or regarded as unhealthy throughout
most of the South before the American Civil War. However,
school work was successfully undertaken by some of the blacks
with the help of several white children who attended schools
training business clerks. During and after Reconstruction,
several black churches were established, and by 1880, the
blacks ran a number of businesses, including the two leading
hotels in Apalachicola; The Jenkins and The Fuller. A promi-
nent African American of the Day was Emmanuel Smith, who
served as Postmaster, leaving the position on his retirement to
Dr. Chapman.

Eastpoint was established in 1898 as an experimental, coop-
erative colony by a Quaker family named Brown, as a result of
a combined economic, religious, and political effort known as
the Populists. They were joined by Henry Vrooman, a Congre-
gationalist minister and Harvard graduate, and brother of the
founder of Ruskin Hall (a working man's college at Oxford
University, England).

The John Gorrie bridge across Apalachicola Bay between
Eastpoint and Apalachicola was completed in 1935, replacing
a ferry service.

By 1920, the great stands of slow-growing cypress that had
sustained, the area's lumber industry had become significantly
depleted.

WORLD WAR II: Florida served as the temporary home for
nearly 200 military installations during World War II. A major
Army Air Corps airfield in Apalachicola and the Amphibious
Training Center (ATC) of the Army Ground Forces Command,
assisted by the Navy and Marine Corps, at Camp Gordon
Johnston.in Franklin County provided training and housing
for some 30,000 military personnel. Stretching for twenty miles
along the Gulf Coast among St. George Island, Carrabelle, and
Alligator Point, and covering 160,000 acres leased primarily
from the St. Joe Paper Company, Camp Gordon Johnston in-
cluded the villages of Lanark and St. Teresa, as well as Dog
Island, in what was the second largest military installation in
Florida. The eponymous Colonel Gordon Johnston had been a
distinguished cavalry officer of the late 19th and early 20th
century, who had earned a Medal of Honor during the Philip-
pine Insurrection, and who had later fought with the Allied
Expeditionary Force in France during World War I. Four sepa-
rate camps comprised the complex: three for regimental com-
bat teams, and the fourth for the headquarters and support
facilities centered on the Lanark Hotel. Alligator Point served
as an aerial gunnery area, and Dog and St. George Islands
were used for amphibious landings and airdrops. Additional
training areas occupied most of the interior lands north to the
Crooked and Ochlockonee.

The troops trained at the camp conducted several amphibious
landings in the Pacific, including New Guinea and the Philip-
pines (38th Division), and earned a fine non-amphibian record
in the European theatre (28th and 4th Infantry Divisions). The
Second, Third and Fourth Engineer Amphibious Brigades con-
ducted dozens of amphibious landings in the Southwestern
Pacific under General MacArthur. In 1943, the camp was re-
designated as an Army Service Forces (ASF) Training Center,
training harbor craft and amphibian truck companies, as well
as port construction, repair and maintenance units. Whereas,
before the "Landing Craft, Vehicle and Personnel" (LCVP) had
been used stressing tactics and logistics, now the camp pio-
neered with the 1942 Amphibious All-wheel Drive, Dual Rear


Axel Truck (DUWK) which revolutionized amphibious warfare.
German and Italian prisoners were sent to the camp begin-
ning in 1944. After VJ Day (Victory Over Japan) in August
1945, the camp was the scene of a wild, continuous and spon-
taneous celebration. By 1947 the U. S. Army was gone.

SEAFOOD: Commercially sold in Apalachicola as early as 1836.
oysters were not harvested in any quantity until the 1850's.
Intensive efforts to exploit the beds in Apalachicola began in
1870 with John C. Messina and Company, Yent and Alexander,
John Miller and Joseph Segree. John G. Ruge was an impor-
tant figure in the local shellfish industry. Born in Apalachicola
in 1854, the son of Herman Ruge, who had migrated from
Hanover, Germany in the early 1840's, John and his brother
George worked for their father in his machine shop and hard-
ware store until they changed the name of the firm from
Herman Ruge and Sons to the Ruge Brothers Canning Con-
e


Continued on Page 9


History of Apalach from Page 6
ing after New Orleans and Mobile. Some 15 steamboats, on
the average, plied the river to Columbus, Georgia. Cotton would
beishipped down river, compressed at some 43 cotton ware-
houses in town, and taken across the shallow bay by lighter to
th>ree-masted sailing vessels off West Pass between St. Vincent
and St. George 'Islands. These vessels would go to 'New En-
gland, England, France, Belgium, or wherever there were cot-
ton mills or lace manufacturing centers. They tended to sail a
triangular route among Boston or New York, Apalachicola, and
Liyerpool or Le Havre. There' were foreign consulates in
Aglalachicola. Goods were also shipped up river to towns and
plantations. Among the family names of the factors in the city
were Orman, Raney, Porter and Chittenden from the Middle
and New England states. Florida became a.state in 1845.


St. James Bay is a new development and golf course
in eastern Franklin County featuring an attractive
clubhouse and restaurant. For years, numerous
attempts were made to construct such a facility clos-
er to the center of the county but developers were
thwarted from such plans due to growing concerns
over the threat of pollution to Apalachicola Bay and
the seafood industries.


Flamingos!
A full-service Restaurant and Bar
Sat Juice & Java
Hours:
Mon. Tues. Wed: 8A-2P
Thurs. Fri.: 8A-9P
Sat.: 8A-10P A
Live Music Sat. 6-9P
49 W. PINE AVENUE ST. GEORGE ISLAND
PHONE: 850-927-3925









850-926-6181

F7/7777 PERFORMANCE SPRAY-ON BED LINERS
WRE ('I,,(CKTM FULL LINE OF
LC7- AUTO ACCESSORIES
WWW.MIKESPAINTANDBODY.COM 3140 COASTAL HWY.
VISIT US AT WAKULLA.COM CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327


The Franklin Chronicle











The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNEPJ NEWSPAPER


I21IJuly 2006 Pa- -


Espresso Ice Cream
Pastries Soups
Coffee Salads
Sandwiches




Carrabelle Junction

88 Tallahassee Street 697-9550
Across from the Post Office 07-07/07-21-





Stacy's Hair Design


850-670-1772

Hours: Tues-Fri 10-5, after 5 by apt. Sat. 10-until
TAKING CARE OF
Stacy Williams, ALL YOUR HAIR
Stylist CARE,
347 Highway 98 I MANICURES,
P.O. Box 977. PEDICURES &
Eastpoint, FL 32328 ACRYLICS






VACANT LAND

Vacant land for sale by owner. 2.37 acres in

Baywood Estates, Carrabelle, FL.

$179,900-Owner Financing Available.,

Very nice area, no mobile homes. Lot can be

divided and is partially cleared.

CALL 850-210-5882 or 219-313-7988.

04-14/04-28/05-12/05-26








Hell is when you have to listen to
Your children complain about how
old THEY are.

'' 88 Market Street

S" Apalachicola, FL 32320
,- Phone: 850-653-3885
07-07/07-21


RENTAL



3/21600 sq.ft. doublewide, secluded on

3+ acres. Includes central A/C, utility

room, Jacuzzi bathtub and dishwasher.

Call 954-816-7004.

07-21/08-04










U.S. Hwy. 278, Beaufort & Jasper Counties, SC
l^^^FridayB -:-BJuly 8 -: 10:0 am.^^^


Wild Hog Haven Abundant Deer, Turkey & Ducks
* Mitigation Easement Tracts Great for Hunting Minutes To Savannah, Savannah
U.S. Hwy. 278 Frontage National Wildlife Refuge, Pickney Island
* Timberland Tracts National Wildlife Refuge & Tillman
* Tracts From 3 to 81 Acres Sand Ridge National Wildlife Refuge
I Timber Cruise Available I
Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. In Cooperdtion With
D C800-323-8388 ,. 1hris Pracht Auctione
Bill Dunn. CCIM, Auction Conord. 10% Buyer's Premium St 1S77 A R E A LT r R A U C r I


Now is the time to

subscribe to the


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ACiE
APAIACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE

Open7Das,
Monday- Saturday &00- -700

Sunday I00-500

409 West H igwaj 98 Apalachicola, Florida
850-653-1400 07-07/07-21






CLIPPER SHOPPE



Dorothy Cooper, Owner

130 Avenue F

Apalachicola, FL 32320

Phone: 850-653-2255
07-07/07-21






Pay The County Bills

The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of
$1,003,823.94 at their July 4, 2006 meeting. The bills are listed
as follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Of-
fice.


ACS GOVT FINANCIAL SYSTEM
07/03/2006 14:


BANK


Check Register


VENDOR


CHECKS DATE


FRANKLIN COUNTY
GL540R-VOG.71 PAGE 1


AMOUNT


BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT


002603
002601


000100
002604
001670 ..
002467
00246G.8
.04315,
002172
.04309
000394
002281
002576
002574
002470
001854
002565
000194
000111
002495
001845
002448
001994
001181
002022
002605
001226
001734
002484
002457
002453
002520
.04305
002005
00'0821
001921
002092
001830
000136
002606
000184
001675
001900
002285
000138
.04310
000140
002452
000635
002517
001937
000395
.04311
002500
000273
002607
002460
.04317
002329
002514
.04316
002566
002099,
001805
002447
S002608
000429
002536
.04312
002063
002451
000149
002330
001440
002436
001360
002561
000286
002531
002384
000484
001278
002445
000419
001949
002507
001566
001151
002461
002171
.04313
002194
001972
002394
002602
000168
000217
001991
000642
002463
000729
042535
000312
000132
.043,i18
001929
002513
000770
.04306
.04307
.04308
000175
001851
000838
002456
.04314'
002489
002278
002215
000859
002450
002609
GENERAL


ACORN MEDICAL INC'
ACS IMAGE SOLUTIONS
ACTION FIRE & SAFETY EQU
ALABAMA SCHOOL OF
ALITEi.
'AMERICAN RED-CROSS
ANTIIONY PIERCE ILC
APALACHICOLA ACE'HARDWAR
APALACHICOLA ACE HDWR
APALACHICOLA BAY CHAMBER
ARAMARK
ARNOLD/HARRY
BAYMEDICAL DIV OF AZIMUT
BECKMAN COULTER INC
BIG BEND EQUIPMENT COMPA
BLACKHAWK APALACHICOLA L
BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD O
BONDY'S FORD INT.
BRIGGS CORPORATION
BROWN/JAMES
C & W FOOD SERVICE INC
CAPITAL TRUCK, INC.
CAROLINA SOFTWARE
CARROT-TOP INDUSTRIES
CATERPILLAR ACCESSACCOUN
CIEGA, INC.
COMP USA, INC.
CULLIGAN
DADE BEARING
DAIRYLAND HEALTHCARE SOL
DATA EQUIPMENT INC
DELL FINANCIAL SERVICES
EMERGYSTAT INC
FLORIDA ASSOC OF COUNTIES
FLORIDA COMBINED LIFE IN
FLORIDA LIGHTING SPECIAL
GANDER AUTO PARTS
GANDER'S GULF SUPPLY HAR
GE CAPITAL
GIBBS/DORIS S.
GLOBE CHEMICAL COMPANY,
GT COMMUNICATIONS
GULF COAST AGGREGATES LL
GULFSIDE I.G.A. (APALACH
GULFSIDE IGA
H & B INDUSTRIES, INC.
HARBOR MEDICAL CENTER
HARRIS,JR./JAMES A.
HENDERSON/REBECCA
HILI, MANUFACTURING COMPA
HOLLEY,' INC.
HOME DEPOT SUPPLY
HUMPHREY/WILLIAM
HUNTINSURANCE GROUP
INFOPRO CONCEPTS INC
IVERS MD/VINCENT
JESSE L BRANNAN JR
JOHNSON/MARCIA M.
JONES/MELISSAA
JUST-IN-CASE
JUST-IN-CASE UNLIMITED I
KIMBALL MIDWEST
KING'S PLUMBING
KONICA MINOLTA MEDICAL I
KYLE GRIFFIN PHYSICAL
LANDAUER 'INC
LEITZ OFFICE PRODUCTS
MCKESSON
MCKESSON MEDICAL SUPPLIES
MEDIACOM
MEDIFAX-EDI LLC
MILLER MARINE, INC.
MOCK/MIKE
MOORE'SBACKFLOW TECHNIC
MOSTELLER/TED
MUNICIPAL SUPPLY & SIGN
NEECE TIRE & AUTO SERVICE
OFFICE OF THE STATE ATTO
OFFICEMAX CONTRACT INC
OKALOOSA BD OF CO COMMIS
PANAMA BUSINESS MACHINES
PARKER SERVICES, INC.
PAYROLL SYSTEMS
PEDDIE CHEMICAL COMPANY,
PENDLETON/DORIS B.
PIERCE DO/DAVID
PIERCE LLC/ANTHONY
POSTMASTER EASTPOINT
PREMIUM ASSIGNMENT CORPO
PROFORMA.PRINT SOURCE UN
PROGRESS ENERGY
PROGRESS-:ENERGY FLORIDA,
QUALITY WATER SUPPLY
REDDY ICE-ALBANY
REPLAY SYS'rEMS
RING POWER CORPORATION
SCOTT/WILLIAM E.
SEWAGE TREATMENT SERVICE
SHADE TREE TOWING
SHAM K MANGALVEDKAR
SHULER/THOMAS M.
SONITROtL i
SPARS':SMALL ENGINES & T
SPIRIT SERVICES COMPANY
STACY.. IRVIN HEAD COACH
STANDARD INSURANCE COMPA
STONE/MESANIE R
SWANA
TAYilOR BUILDING SUPPLY
TAYLODOR HOLDINGG SUPPLY
TAYLOR.-BUILDING SUPPLY
TAYLOR'R;BUILDING SUPPLY
TERMINIX
TRUCK EQUIPMENT SALES, I
UMI..LLC
UNITED PARCEL SERVICE
UPS ,
URS .CORPORATION
WARD INTERNATIONAL TRUCK
WARD/RACHEL L.
WOLFF/RONALD
ZEROWET 'INC
BANK ACCOUNT


36061 07/05 06
36062 07/05 06
36063 07/05/06
36064 07/05/06
36065 07/09/06
36066 '07/05/06
36067' 07/05/06
36068 07/05/06
36069 07/05/06
36070 07/0506
36071 07/05 06
36072 07/05 06
36073 07/05/06
36074 07/05/06
36075 07/05/06
36076 07/05/06
36077 07/05/06
36078 07/05/06
36079 07/05/06
36080 07/05/06
36081 07/05/06
36082 07/05/06
36083 07/05/06
36084 07/05/06
36085 07/05/06
36086 07/05/06
36087 07/05/06
36088 07/05/06
36089 07/05/06
36090 07/05/06
36091 07/05/06
36092 07/05/06
36093 07/05/06
36094 07/05/06
36095 07/05/06
36096 07/05/06
36097 07/05/06
36098 07/05/06
36099 07/05/06
36100 07/05/06
36101 07/05/06
36102 07/05/06
36103 07/05/06
36104 07/05/06
36105 07/05/06
36106 07/05/06
36107 07/05/06
36108 07/05 06
36109 07/05/06
36110 07/05/06
36111 07/05/06
36112 07/05/06
36113 07/05/06
36114 07/05/06
36115 07/05/06
36116 07/05/06
36117 07/05/06
36118 07/05/06
36119 07/05/06
36120 07/05/06
36121 07/05/06
,36122 07/05/06
36123 07/05/06
36124'07/05/06
36125 07/05/06
36126 07/05/06
36127 07/05/06
36128 07/05/06
36129 07/05/06
36130 07/05/06
36131 07/05/06
36132 07/05/06
36133 07/05/06
36134 07/05/06
36135 07/05/06
36136 07/05/06
36137 07/05/06
36138 07/05/06
36139 07/05/06
36140 07/05/06
36141 07/05/06
36142 07/05/06
36143 07/05/06
36144 07/05/06
36145 07/05/06
36146 07/05/06
36147 07/05/06
36148 07/05/06
36149 07/05/06
36150 07/05/06
36151 07/05/06.
36152 07/05/06
36153 07/05/06
36154 07/05/06
36155 07/05/06
36156 07/05/06
36157 07/05/06
36158 07/05/06
36159 07/05/06
36160 07/05/06
36161 07/05/06
r 36162 07/05/06
36163 07/05/06'
36164 07/05/06
36165 07/0506
36166 07/05/06
36167 07/05/06
36168 07/05/06
S 36169 07/05/06
S 36170 07/0506
36171 07/05O/06
.) 36172 07o05Z06
36173 07/05/06'
36174 07/05/06
i: 36175 07/05/06
S 36176 07/05/06'
36177 07/05/06
36178 07/05/06
36179 07/05/06
36180 07/05/06
36181 07/05/06
l 36102 07/05/06
36'183 07/05/06


FUND RECAP.: ;
FUND DESCRIPTION
-----. .--------- -- --- -- --
001 GENERAL-ND 0
120 FINE.AND bfFEITURE
130 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT FUND
137 FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC LIBRARY
140 ROAD AND BRIDGE
142 MOSQUITO.-CONTROL
163 ENHANCED 911 FUND
170 AIRPORT.F 6ND
180 AFFORD.HOSING ASSIST TRUST ,)
201 GEORGEE ,WEEMS HOSPITAL FUND --
TOTAI, All, ll,-,. -.


BANK RECAP: '," ,
BANK NAME
-- --.....----------
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
TOTAL ALL BANKS.


8,843.02
760.00
468.50
3,097.50
121.23
1,580.07
248.00
3,329.90.
1,154.64
236.67
11,389.36
229.38
1,200.00
242.18
165.14
227.14
50,000.00
77,483.04
40.29
267.62
600.00
676.49
773.27
395.70
160.91
306.25
163.80
175.01
184.75
7,399.20
7,766.00
53.74
2,509.15
17,000.00
2.737.66
7,227.41
398.50
1,020.14
5.35
950.04
18,457.00
212.61
2,773.69
849.17
349.65
114.53
380.04
4,696.00
41,724.00
51.84
254.00
760.30
72.76
149.85
,1.612.80
432.77
16,120.00
120.71
17,047.00
150.00
5,000.00
1,616.68
284.90
350.00
1,641.70
100.00
873.35
224.57
5,195.10
1,506.57
23.00
96.40
191.52
404,574.00
80.00
177.06
1,222.10
425.02
890.54
457.83
3,182.36
918.42
865.00
380.00
720.09
157,067.00
5.814.00
3,329.90
78.00
1,411.74
67.00
6,859.15
7,226.73
204.80
202.40
16,443.00
1,032.86
144.12
450.00
95.20
5,760.00
5,600.00
1,980.00
549.62
371.17
2,500.00
583.80
150.00
167.00
681.14
34.99
262.28
31.70
271.00
378.96
5,000.00
45.73
13.14
28,613.60
324.05
461.85
639.73
66.30
1,003,823.94


Unique


Nails

& more


P.O. Box 736 347 Highway 98 Eastpoint,

Phone: (850) 670-4000


Florida 32328

07-07/07-21


HOME TOWN BP & DELI

113 ST. JAMES AVENUE, JUST OFF
HIGHWAY 98 IN CARRABELLE 697-5111

Friendly atmosphere and

the best chicken and burgers

in town!

LIVE BAIT FOR SALE
Now serving 7 days a week full breakfast
07-07/07-21




The Southern Magnolia

FULL SERVICE

AV- NX s FLORIST

Jewelry& Gifts
47 Market Street
Apalachicola
SAcross from the.Gibson Inn
." T 'S (850) 6539-8113
v.'lW/.THESOUTHERNMAGNOLIA.COM 9


,je
?t r


Best Western


Apalach Inn

FREE HIGH SPEED INTERNET
FREE FULL HOT BREAKFAST


249 Highway 98 West Apalachicola, FL 32320
Fax: 850-653-9136

For reservations call: 850-653-9131


07-0






CAS 'Si"N, OW As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V.

ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS


(800) 794+7310

J.G, Wentworth means CASH NOW


7/07-21



::

,
LaJ .


for Structured Settlements! Y B,

History of Apalach from Page 8

pany in 1885. Taking advantage of pasteurization, they be-
came Florida's first successful commercial packers (under the
"Alligator" brand). John Ruge was among the first to advocate
planting oyster shells near the natural beds for juvenile oys- '
ters (spat) to settle upon. In 1918, William Popham, a land
promoter in Apalachicola and St. George Island, further advo-
cated the deliberate cultivation of oysters in Apalachicola Bay. '

Stephen Rice and Joseph Messina also helped establish shell-
fish sales. Rice, born in Huntsville, Alabama in 1838, moved:
to Texas, commanded a Confederate infantry unit in the Civil-
War, arid moved to Apalachicola in 1882. He and his two sons,
Stephen, Jr., and Rob Roy, founded a large and successful
oyster packing company. Locally born Joseph Messina gained
control of the Bay City Packing Company in 1896 and mar-
keted a variety of seafood products under the "Pearl" brand.

From the mid-1870's to the early decades of the twentieth cen-
tury Apalachicola was part of Florida's sponge industry. The:..
local sponge trade came to rank third in the state. By 1895,:
between 80 and 100 men were employed in it, and the city had-
two sponge warehouses. Later, as the major Greek sponge"
operations moved down the coast to Carrabelle, Cedar Key
and Tarpon Springs, shrimp and sponge operations contin-
ued in Apalachicola with the Greek sailing fleet and Democritus "
Manglomanus (Demo George).

The Apalachicola Northern Railroad came into Apalachicola in
1907 and ran an "oyster special" to Atlanta with oysters packed
in ice. By 1915, some 400 men manned 117 oyster boats un-
der sail, 250 shuckers worked in various oyster houses, and a
number of other workers worked in two canneries. The Bay
City Packing Company in 1915 was shipping canned shrimp
to Boston and other markets as well as trading in fresh shrimp.
Each spring, large sturgeon appeared in the bay to spawn
upriver. Captain Anderson and his crew would catch as many
as 70 in a 24-hour period to meet the demand for caviar, as
well as general consumption. This process was disrupted in
1935 with the construction of the Jim Woodruff dam. Pole
fishing, of course, was always a local pastime. In the 1980's
and 1990's, habitat incursions, urban development and mar-
ket demands brought severe pressure on the fresh seafood
industry.

Today, Apalachicola is the headquarters of a United Nations
Biosphere Reserve and Estuarine Sanctuary of 196,000 acres.

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Coker, William S., and Thomas D. Watson. Indian Traders of
the Southeastern Spanish Borderlands: Panton, Leslie and
Company and John Forbes and Company 1783-1847.
Pensacola: University of West Florida Press, 1985.
Coles, David J. Hell by the Sea: Florida's Camp Gordon
Johnston in World War II." The Florida Historical Quarterly,
Vol. LXXIIIA No. 1 (July, 1994).

Jahoda, Gloria. The Other Florida. New York: Charles Scribner's
Sons, 1967.


DISBURSEMENTS Mueller, Edward A. Perilous Journeys: A Histortj of
337,706.87 Steamboating on the Chattahoochee, Apalachicola,. and FIintl ri-
442,838.59 ers, 1828-1928. Historic Chattahoochee Commission. 1990.
11 389 36


1 549.40
.18,375.70
83.00
18,988.64
29,040.65
.13.997.71
129,854.02
1,003,823.94


Owens, Harry P. "Apalachicola before 1861." Ph.D. disserta-
tion, Florida State University, 1966.

Rogers, William Warren. Outposts on the Gulf. Pensacola:
University of West Florida Press, 1982.


Sherlock, Vivian M. The Fever Man: A Biography of Dr. John
Gorrie. Tallahassee: Medallion Press, 1982.
.DISBURSEMENTSWakefield, George Norton. A Florida Sandpiper, or. A Fool

1,003,823.94 Rushed in Where Angels Fear to Tread. Gainesville: Storter
1,003.823.94 Publishing Co. 1982.


I


21 July 2006 Page 9









Page 10 21 July 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


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S'"The Solar Living Sourcebook is a critical resource, to
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* "Epic in scope, comprehensive in content, hopeful in
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2004 $21,641 $468.29 $227.00 $105.36 $25,000 0 $7.15 0 $807.80
2005 $23,040 $648.32 $167.08 $100.48 $47,688 0 $157.08 $15.39 81,118.3!

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(321) Voices of the Apalachicola. Compiled & Edited by
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The St. Joe Company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle

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(317) Green Empire, The St. Joe Company and the
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