Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00287
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: July 7, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00287
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA, FL
32320


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F anklin 51





Chronicle


Inside This Issue
10 Pages

Depleted Uranium 1
Sales Tax Holiday.. 1
Franklin Briefs .. 2, 3
Editorial &
Commentary ..... 3, 4
Second Circuit Court
Report........... 5, 6, 7
Pay the County Bills7
FCAN ................. 8
Business Card
Directory ............. 9
Bookshop ....... 9, 10


Florida
Employment
And
Unemployment

Linda H. South, Director,
Florida Agency for Workforce
Innovation, released Florida's
labor market statistics for May
2006. Based on the latest na-
tionwide data, Florida had the
fastest job growth rate and
lowest unemployment rate of
the ten most populous states.
and added the highest num-
ber of new jobs of all states in
the nation. Florida's unem-
ployment rate continued to
trail the national average.

Florida's Unemployment
(Seasonally Adjusted)
* Florida's May 2006 unem-
ployment rate was 3.2 per-
cent, up marginally from the
3.0 percent recorded in April
2006. The rate was down 0.7
percentage point from 3.9 per-
cent a year ago.
* Out of a civilian labor force
of 8,929,000, there were
8,647,000 employed and
282,000 unemployed Florid-
ians.
* Florida's May 2006 rate was
1.4 percentage points lower
than the national rate of 4.6
percent. Florida's unemploy-
ment rate has been below the
national average since mid-
2002.
Florida's
Nonagricultural
Employment By
Industry (Seasonally
Adjusted)
* In May 2006, Florida's nona-
gricultural employment ex-
panded by 3.5 percent over
the year, totaling
8,044,900 jobs. In compari-
son, nonagricultural employ-
ment grew nationally at a rate
of 1.4 percent.
* Florida added 270,600 jobs
since May 2005. The profes-
sional and business services
and construction industries
accounted for almost 45 per-
cent of the new jobs in the
state over the year.
* Florida's total nonagricul-
tural employment has ex-
panded steadily since Septem-
ber 2002. In May 2006, there
were 8,075,900 nonagricul-
tural jobs, an increase of 3.2
percent (+249,800 jobs) over
the year. All of Florida's ma-
jor industries added jobs over
the year, with the exception of
natural resources and mining,
which remained flat.
* Professional and business
services led Florida's industry
sectors in employment growth
over the year, adding 58,100
jobs (+4.4 percent). Employ-
ment services (+25,200 jobs,
+5.3 percent) continued to
lead job growth in this indus-
try sector.
* The construction industry
continued to exhibit strong
growth over the year (+48,600
jobs, +8.5 percent). Over 75
percent of the over-the-year
job gains in the construction
industry were in specialty
trade contractors (+36,600
jobs, +9.6 percent). Specialty
trade contractors was also the
fastest growing sub sector in
the construction industry,
just edging out the over-the-
year growth rate of the smaller
construction of buildings sub
sector. The job growth rate in
construction of buildings
peaked at over 18 percent in
late 2004, and has slowed to
a still-strong rate of 9.5 per-
cent, reflecting rising interest
rates.


* The trade, transportation,
and utilities sector grew by
41,900 jobs (+2.7 percent)
.over the year. Retail trade
added the most jobs (+24,400
jobs, +2.5 percent) in this in-
dustry sector. The strongest
growth within retail trade was
in clothing and accessory
stores (+8,600jobs, +8.9 per-
cent), followed by building
material and garden supply
stores (+5,700jobs, +6.6 per-
cent), together accounting for
almost 60 percent of the job
gains in retail trade.
Local Area
Unemployment
Statistics (Not
Seasonally Adjusted)
SIn May 2006, Walton County
had the state's lowest unem-
ployment rate (1.9 percent),
followed by Collier, Lee,
Okaloosa, Sarasota, and
Wakulla counties (2.3 percent
each).

* Hendry County, at 5.0 per-
cent, was the only area of the
state with an unemployment
rate above the national aver-
age (4.4 percent) in May 2006.
* The counties having the larg-
est over-the-year declines in
unemployment rates were:
Hendry (-1.5 percentage
points); Calhoun and Madison
(-1.2 percentage points each):
and DeSoto and Okeechobee
(-1.1 percentage points each).
All 67 counties in Florida
showed declines in their un-
employment rates over the
year.
Area Nonagricultural
Employment By
Industry (Not Seasonally
Adjusted)
* The Miami-Ft. Lauderdale-
Miami Beach Metropolitan
Statistical Area (MSA) led the
state in over the-year employ-
ment gains (+63,100 jobs,
+2.6 percent) in May 2006,
followed by the Orlando-
Kissimmee MSA (+39,700
jobs, +3.8 percent) and the
Tampa-St. Petersburg-
Clearwater MSA (+31,200
jobs, +2.4 percent). The com-
bined employment growth in
these three MSAs was
+134,000 jobs, about 54 per-
cent of the total job growth for
the state (+249,800 jobs).


July 7 20, 2006


Scouts Went Canoeing

On Wright's Lake


Franklin

County

School

Board

Special Meeting-June
29, 2006
By Tom Loughridge
The Franklin County School
Board met in special session
Thursday to consider three
items for approval.
1. Travel request. Charles
Wilkinson-SACS CASI Flor-
ida Summer Conference & SIP
Training.
2. Contracts. Architect's Con-
tract-Chapman auditorium
Restoration.
3. Budget Amendments.
2005-06 Budget Amend-
ments-all funds.
The meeting was called to or-
der promptly at 12:00 noon by
chairman, Jimmy Gander.
The agenda was read and ap-
proved and the Board pro-
ceeded to act upon the indi-
vidual causes for action. All
members were present and
voting except Mrs. Denise
Butler of District 1.
The summer training and
travel request was presented
by assistant superintendent
Mikel Clark and approved by
unanimous consent. The
architect's contract for
Chapman auditorium was
likewise approved after Mr. S.
Carnley had answered a ques-
tion from board member
Hinton about the progress of
the project. The final item on
the agenda, 2005-06 Budget
amendments, was largely a
house-keeping item needed to
meet statutory budget re-
quirements. The amendmeifts
were passed without discus-
sion after Mr. Carnley's expla-
nation of their purpose.
The board meeting was closed
by Chairman Gander.


By Richard Williams
Boy Scout Troop/Venture
Crew 22 went to Wright's Lake
to work on canoeing merit
badges. The weather was per-
fect for canoeing except for
one thunderstorm that
brought us off the water. The,
-newer scouts learned to
paddle and steer the canoe
and how to up-right the boat
if you should flip. The water
was nice; so we were able to
swim a lot. We also got to see
some alligators.


Thanks to our leaders Larry
and Patricia Hale we all ate
well! If you are interested or
have a child interested in join-
ing the Boy Scout Troop 22
ages 11-18 or for the girls ages
14-20 Venture Scouts please
contact 927-2395. Meetings
are held on Tuesday night at
the Boy Scout Hut at the 3
crosses on East Hole past the
First Baptist Church on St
George Island.


National Geographic

Features Threats To

Coastal Ecosystems


The July 2006 issue of the
National Geographic maga-
zine explains the growing
threats to coastal ecosystems
in the United States, focusing
on Florida. Especially poi-
gnant are a number of factual
statements that portend dan-
ger to the health of our coasts.
The threats continue to grow
starting with the'realization
that more than half of the U.S.
population now lives in
coastal areas.


More than 1500 new homes
have been permitted for con-
struction along the coasts
each day. The coastal popu-
lation is now increasing by an
average of 3,600 persons per
day. The number of vehicles
in coastal communities from
1980 to 2000 has increased
by 43 percent. The population
'growth in the Gulf coast area
has increased more than 100
percent since 1960.


2006 Sales Tax Holiday

July 22 through July 30, 2006


If you sell books, clothing,
footwear, certain accesso-
ries, or certain school sup-
pliesjin the State of Florida,
the Sales Tax Holiday may
impact your business.
Florida law provides that no
sales tax or discretionary
sales surtax (also known as
local option sales tax) will be
collected on sales of books,
clothing, footwear, and certain
accessories having a selling
price of $50 or less; or on cer-
tain school supplies having a
selling price of $10 or less.
This exemption is effective
from 12:01 a.m., Saturday,


July 22, 2006, through mid-
night, Sunday, July 30,
2006.
The sales tax exemption ap-
plies to each eligible book or
item of clothing selling for
$50 or less, and each eligible
school supply selling for $10
or less. The exemption applies
regardless of how many items
are sold on the same invoice
to a customer. However, the
exemption does not apply to
books or to any item of cloth-
ing selling for more than $50,
or to any school supply item
selling for more than $10.


0*


Depleted Uranium Poses

Risks For Gulf War

Veterans

The Story of Major Doug Rokke, Ph.D.

By Richard E. Noble


Volume 15, Number 14 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


the Department of Defense ... My excretion rate was approxi-
mately 1500 micrograms per day ... They didn't tell me for two
and a half years ... When uranium impacts any type of vehicle
or structure, uranium oxide dust and pieces of uranium ex-
plode all over the place. This can be breathed in or go into a
wound. Once it gets into the body, a portion of this stuff is
soluble, which means it goes into the blood stream and all of
your organs. The insoluble fraction stays-in the lungs, for
example. The radiation damage and the particulates destroy


Continued on Page 8





u;





Writer's Note: The following story is controversial. The
material was gathered from speeches and interviews found
on the internet. There have been hundreds of different
web sites speaking to the issues involved with depleted
uranium. Major Doug Rokke has spoken to governments
and media with his concerns on this subject. His charges
may be of considerable concern to any of our local veter-
ans of the Gulf Wars beginning with Desert Storm when
depleted uranium was first introduced. A parallel could
be drawn with the use of Agent Orange in the Vietnam
conflict, in an era when U. S. military forces were exposed
to a dangerous chemical that was later condemned as ex-
tremely toxic, causing a number of medical problems even-
tually recognized by the U. S. Veterans Administration as
a basis for medical claims. This sad chapter in govern-
ment misrepresentation and denial of those medical claims
is told in HOME TO WAR: A HISTORY OF THE VIETNAM
VETERANS' MOVEMENT by Gerald Nicosia, 2001, Crown
Publishers. This overview of the depleted uranium prob-
lem could serve as an early warning to those Gulf War
veterans who have been exposed and what can be done to
safeguard their health.

I had heard of Depleted Uranium (DU) but I thought that it
was basically harmless. It's uranium but it's "depleted". Sounds
kind of harmless to me. But wait until you hear what Mr.
Rokke has to say about it. It not only doesn't sound harmless,
it sounds catastrophic.
First, what is DU?
Depleted Uranium is a metal. It is made from uranium
hexafluoride which is the by-product of the uranium enrich-
ment process. Uranium hexafluoride is the non-fissionable
residue or by-product of the uranium enrichment process
during which fissionable Uranium 235 and Uranium 234 are
separated from natural uranium.
The fissionable products are used to make nuclear explosives
and as fuel for nuclear power plants-they precipitate a chain
reaction.
The non-fissionable uranium by-product DU is a radioactive
waste material.
Depleted uranium is refined from Uranium Hexafluoride
(UF6)-from radioactive nuclear waste product. The. United
States Department of Energy has so much UF6 stored at vari-
ous sites that any use that increases disposal of this waste
product is welcome.
Natural uranium contains 99.2% by weight U-238 while DU
contains 99.8% by weight U-238. Recent documents released
by the U.S. Department of Energy provide evidence to suggest
that a small proportion of other toxic heavy metals such as
plutohium also may be present.
Plutonium is fissionable and is used in nuclear explosives.
DU is claimed not to be an external hazard (won't burn the
skin etc.). It is an internal hazard and with constant inhala-
tion, ingestion and wound contamination poses significant and
unacceptable risks-the alpha particle emissions (radiation)
are not reduced but proportionally increased. Spent penetrators
or parts of penetrators cannot be touch-ed or picked up with-
out protection.
A penetrator can be a bullet, missile, or a war head. The U.S.
munitions industry produces the following DU munitions
7.62mm, 50cal., 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 105mm, 120mm and
other types.
DU is an ideal metal for use as kinetic energy penetrators (ar-
mor piercing), counterweights, and shielding or armor. High
density and pyrophoric nature are the two most significant
properties that guided its selection for use as a kinetic energy
penetrator. DU is used to manufacture kinetic energy
penetrators.
"DU is an extremely effective weapon," Mr. Rokke explains.
"Each tank round is 10 pounds of solid uranium 238 con-
taminated with plutonium, neptunium, americium. It is pyro-
phoric, generating intense heat on impact, penetrating a tank
because of the heavy weight of its metal. When uranium mu-
nitions hit, it is like a firestorm inside any vehicle or structure
... It is devastating."
Besides the above uses DU has been proposed by the U.S.
Department of Energy as a component of road and structural
materials. All of these current or proposed uses are designed
to reduce the huge U.S. Department of Energy stockpiles left
over from the uranium enrichment process.
Major Doug Rokke
Major Rokke has a Ph.D. in Health Physics and he was trained
as a forensic scientist. He is a Vietnam and a Gulf War vet-
eran. He has been'in the Military Service for over 35 years and
has a box full of awards and medals. Unfortunately he is now
radioactive and dying.
"I was recalled to active duty in the U.S. Army and assigned to
the U.S. Army Chemical School located at Fort McClellan, Ala-
bama as the DU Project Director and tasked with developing
training and management procedures. The project included a
literature review; extensive curriculum development project
involving representatives from all branches of the U.S. De-
partment of Defense and representatives from England,
Canada, Germany and Australia; and basic research at the
Nevada Test Site located northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, to
validate management procedures."
Doug's job during the Gulf War was to prepare soldiers to re-
spond to nuclear, biological and chemical warfare. We all think
of that first Gulf War in much the same light as Andrew
Jackson's encounter at the Battle of New Orleans. We beat the
bloody Iraqis and sent them scattering back into the damn
desert with hardly a blemish on our own side. Of course
there were 760 immediate casualties with 294 dead and over
400 wounded but that's not bad for a War. And Saddam
didn't blow off any nuclear or chemical or biological weapons,
so everybody was safe. Right?
Wrong.
'The U.S. Military decided to blow up Saddam's Chemical, and
radiological stockpiles in place," explained Major Rokke, "which
released the contamination back on the US troops and on ev-
erybody in the whole region. The chemical agent detectors and
radiological monitors were going off all over the place. We had
all the various nerve agents. We think there were biological
agents, and there were destroyed nuclear reactor facilities. It
was a toxic wasteland. And we had DU added to the whole
mess ... When we first got assigned to clean up the DU and
arrived in northern Saudi Arabia, we started getting sick within
72 hours ... It doesn't take a long time ... We didn't know any-
thing about DU when the Gulf War started.
"As a warrior, you're listening to your leaders, and they're say-
ing there are no health effects from DU. But, as we started to
study this, to go back to what we learned in physics and our
engineering-I was a professor of environmental science and
engineering-you learn rapidly that what they are telling you
doesn't agree with what you know and observe ... In June of
1991, when I got back to the States, I was sick ... They didn't
do tests on me or my team members ... Any excretion level in
the urine above 15 micrograms of uranium per day should
result in immediate medical testing ... when you get up to 250
micrograms ... you're supposed to be under continuous medi-
cal care ... I was director of the Depleted Uranium Project for


'-. j'- '- liy~~










Page 2 7 July 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs

June 20, 2006
By Richard E. Noble

Van Johnson-Solid
Waste Director
Amidst the usual and sundry,
Solid Waste Director, Van
Johnson, exposed to the
Board a new and interesting
problem. It seems that scav-
enging has increased in recent
weeks at our city dump. If you
are like me, you are probably
unaware that scavenging had
ever been permitted at our
local dump. But it seems that
a decision of a past Board al-
lowed a limited amount of
scavenging via a permitting
process. Of course, I am of
that age group who can re-
member when "dump picking"
Provided many an individual
in the poorer neighborhoods
an added part-time income. I
had a childhood friend whose
dad actually made a living at
it. He would gather up dis-
carded bobbins deposited at
the city dump from the area
textile mills and burn them in
his backyard. He would then
wander over the ashes with a
very large magnet and gather
up the brass rings that were
contained in the bobbins. He
collected other varieties of
metals also.
If you remember it was not too
long ago that copper had es-
calated in price and folks were
actually stripping the copper
wire from existing telephone
poles and melting down pen-
nies (against the law). Since
my brother was a chemist at
a local smelting plant, I was
always kept abreast of the
price of scrap metals and the
"dump" and junk business in
general. Today the metals in
demand are once again cop-
per and, in addition, alumi-
num. The copper arid alumi-
num that is causing our cur-
rent dump problem is con-
tained in old air-conditioners
and refrigerators.
This problem was brought up
inadvertently. There was a
short discussion about a let-
ter and the re-issuing of a
permit to scavenge. Mr.
Johnson informed the Board
that he had solved the prob-
lem when Commissioner:
Crofton spoke up. "Now wait
a minute ... wait a minute
here. Is this a good idea? I'm
not putting you on the spot
Mr. Johnson..."
"Thank you."
"Let me ask Mr. Shuler. Is this
a good idea? Do you know that
we have people-people who
are authorized-who are go-
ing into the landfill and scav-
enging?"
"No sir, this is news to me."
"This was done a couple of
years back," offered Mr.
Putnal (I would imagine that
a couple of years in Mr.


Putnal's mind could encom-
pass some distance in the
past). "These people signed'a
statement that they would go
in there at their own risk and
scavenge-get stuff that they
can use. I would rather see
somebody use it than it be
burned up-if they can use
it."
"How big a deal is this?" asked
Mr. Mosconis.
"Well, let me tell you Commis-
sioner, the price of copper and
the price of aluminum has
been sky high. And I'm trying
to keep the employees straight
as well as others. It is a major
distraction."
"Well, let's not issue any more
permits allowing people to
come in there," suggested Mr.
Crofton.
"This was agreed on several
years ago, to issue these per-
mits," Mr. Johnson offered.
"Unless you tell me otherwise
... I issue these permit under
certain guidelines."
"My thinking on this is," said
Mr. Crofton. "It is very diffi-
cult to write a "hold harmless"
agreement. If somebody goes
out there and gets killed, I
guarantee you that the
County will be stuck with his
next of kin coming and filing
a lawsuit against the County.
Even if somebody goes out
there and gets cut or some-
thing-the County will have to
pay medical expenses. We'll be
legal and responsible for it ...
They have to be licensed to
deal with that Freon; and all
these people who are going
back there are not licensed.
So if they get caught and the
EPA says,hey; You're letting
Freon go and he says; Yeah,
well the County is letting me
do it ... we will be libel there
too. I don't think that this is a
good idea. I don't want, the
County to be involved in a law-
suit. If Michael will say; Hey,
there is nothing wrong ... well

"Ah, I'm afraid I can not give
that guarantee corfmis-
sioner," said Mr. Shuler.
Mr. Johnson was then asked
to make a recommendation.
"I would rather not make any
recommendation, Mr. Com-
missioner," Johnson replied.
"I would rather you guys ad-
dress that. I issued a memo
to my employees and they are
all aware of it-They will lose
their jobs."
"Do you feel that you have
addressed ,this problem?" Ms.
Sanders asked.
"I feel that I have," Mr.
Johnson said affirmatively.
"Yes, but we don't have insur-
ance to cover this," offered Mr.
Crofton.
"Yes, but what I am saying,"
repeated Mr. Johnson, "is that
the Board made the decision
to do that (issue permit to
scavenge) some years ago."
"I understand that. But that
is what the problem is."
Mr. Mosconis then expressed
the notion that if this copper
and aluminum was so valu-


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able why didn't the County
recycle it. Mr. Johnson ex-
plained that he didn't have the
staff oy the facilities to be en-
gaging in such an operation.
He also suggested that the
amouAt of labor involved (if
the County actually paid
people to do it) outweighed
any profits that could be gar-
nered.
I remeniber when my wife and
I were traveling around the
country picking fruits and
vegetables this same problem
existed in that business. Tons
of food were being left in the
fields to rot-until Second
Harvest came along with an
idea on how to harvest all this
waste and do some good for
the poor at the same time. As
I understand it there are now
several different groups com-
peting for the excess produce
today. Maybe someone out
there might have a similar
Idea in this case. It does seem
a shame that money gets bur-
ied in a landfill while people
go without. In some areas
around the United States
landfills are actually becom-
ing mini-factories. Every type
of salvage process is in'
place-even to the point of
manufacturing methane gas
to fuel converted County
owned equipment. Landfills
are becoming profit making
commercial enterprises as op-
posed to a County expense.
"Right now," explained Mr.
Johnson emphatically. "I am
in charge of servicing Franklin
County and picking up the
trash and I don't have the re-
sources to be engaging in the
salvaging of Copper no mat-
ter how high it goes (in price).
Vaybe if it gets to be the price
>f gold, I could do it."
I'm worried about the Freon,
explained Mr. Crofton.
Mr. Mosconis then made a
motion that Mr. Johnson get
together with the County At-
torney and come back with
some sort of recommendation
for the Board. The motion was
seconded and passed.

Ruth Williams-County
Financial Officer
Ms. Williams asked first that
moneys collected via the TDC
(Tourist Development Coun-
cil) be made available to the
County by a motion of the
Board. She also added the
County Commissioners' sug-
gestion of past weeks that a
portion of these funds from
the TDC be allocated to "in-
frastructure"-specifically
this would include the pur-
chasing of available and af-
fordable beachfront locations
for boat launching and beach
access sites.
Mr. Blair of the TDC then
steppe forward to explain
that tffis was more or less a
matter of shuffling collected
funds to conform to the
Board's suggestions. It was
simply a matter of making
moneys available to the
County for future allocations
or proposals.
The motion was then ap-
proved.
An emergency motion was
then approved to handle a
situation involving the servic-
ing and continued perfor-
mance of the 911 service.

Curt Blair-TDC
Mr. Blair submitted to the
Board the operating proce-
dures of the TDC for the
Board's approval and scru-,


tiny. He suggested that the
Board review the materials
and discuss and approve
them at a future meeting. Mr.
Shuler requested that he be
allowed to send these materi-
als to the County's labor at-
torney for her approval. The
Board accepted both sugges-
tions.

Coach Hayes-Boys and
Girls Clubs
Coach Hayes spoke to a bud-
get review of a $75,000 re-
quest that was made to the
County on behalf of the Boys
and Girls clubs. Various mem-
ber of the Board explained
that the County could not
meet that request. Ms. Sand-
ers read from a note left to the
Board by the County Clerk
which suggested that it was
not the usual practice of
counties in general to support
financially the Boys and Girls
clubs. Mr. Mosconis qualified
the Board's denial of the re-
quested $75,000 by assuring
that the Board would allocate
some money to the cause and
praised Coach Hayes for his
past efforts.

Mark Curenton-County
Planner
Mark Curenton spoke to the
Board on behalf ofAlan Pierce
who was on Vacation.
Charlie W. "Billy" Moses was
given special recognition for
his 18 years of dedicated ser-
vice to Franklin County as
grounds keeper for the Court-
house. A statement of this
recognition was read into the
record by Mr. Curenton and
Mr. Moses received a round
of applause from the listeners.

Airport Runway
A bid to refurbish the runway
project from Poleronus Con-
struction Company was then
opened. The bid was for
$482,962 and it was the sole
bid. Mr. Mosconis made a
motion that the bid be re-
viewed by the authorities in-
volved and that the Board wait
on their recommendation.
This motion was approved.
After the bid was reviewed it
was recommended that
Poleronus be awarded the bid
pending FDOT and URS funds
approved the project. This was
added to assure that the
County would not be required
to provide any of the funding.
The Board then approved the
recommendation.

Airport Hangar
A request was made to adver-
tise for bids to build an Air-
port Hangar at the
Apalachicola Airport. A Grant
from the State for $636,000
for an Airport Hangar will pay
for the Hangar.

Alligator Point Road
A request was made to adver-
tise for emergency repairs to
portions of the Alligator Point
Road and other projects as
required by FEMA. A motion
was made to approve the re-
quest and the motion was
passed.

Zoning Violation-
Carrabelle
A request was made to enforce
a zoning violation in
Carrabelle. It was reported
that a Mr. Sheradan is oper-
Sating a business (auto repair)
from his home which is zoned
residential. There have been
several complaints over the
years and the situation ap-


peared to be well known to
Board members from the
area. Mr. Sheradan has obvi-
ously been in business for
many years. Mr. Crofton made
a motion that the violation be
investigated by the County
Attorney. The motion failed for
lack of a second with Mr.
Putnal abstaining on the
grounds that Mr. Sheradan is
married to his niece. The
Board, other than Mr.
Crofton, was reluctant to get
involved in neighborhood
squabbles. Mr. Mosconis
asked if there were not some
other remedy'to a situation
such as this. The County At-
torney ran through various
scenarios. Mr. Crofton then
proceeded to give his now
usual, customary, and ex-
pected speech with regards to
law and order, rules and regu-
lations and the development
of Civilization in general. Fi-
nally after much soul search-
ing Ms. Sanders rephrased
Mr. Crofton's motion and a
motion was passed asking Mr.
Shuler to provide some "infi-
nite wisdom" to the situation.
Mr. Shuler agreed to apply his
wisdom but deferred on the
possibility of its "infinite" na-
ture.

CDBG Projects-Judy
Bulcher
"It is time to apply for another
Grant-if you would like to,"
informed Ms. Bulcher. "The
cycle is open now and closes
on July 21." She explained
that Eastpoint Water and
Sewer was in need of some
funds to expand their vacuum
capacity so that more people
could be hooked up to sewer
facilities in Eastpoint. "I do
need to let the public know
that there are several things
that you can do with CDBG
funds. This is one of them
(Eastpoint sewer). There are
four types of categories-
neighborhood being one,
housing being another (repair
and maintenance-not con-
struction), economic develop-
ment (assistance to business
entrepreneurship and aid to
struggling enterprises), and
the forth category is commer-
cial revitalization (applies to
cities). The information that I
have been provided with thus
far indicates that the neigh-
borhood revitalization might
be your best category for now.
The only project that I am
aware of right now that might
be fundable is the Eastpoint
Water and Sewer. The major-
ity of the people benefiting
from the project have to be in
the low to moderate income
category (Eastpoint qualifies).",,
Ms. Bulcher went on to ex-
plain where Franklin County'
had it best options with the
CDBG grant program and ex-
plained some of the problems
while answering Board Mem-
ber questions. "The amount
that you can apply for is
$750,000 and it is in theory a
no-match grant-in reality
they have so many points as-
sociated with the approving of
the funds that you wouldn't
get funding (without match-
ing). I don't want to give you
any unreasonable expecta-
tions on this. The County's
score is not great and it is go-
ing to be going down because
we already got a grant and this
year DCA changed the rules.
It adds 100 points to districts
who have not had a grant in
the past five years. So you
won't be getting those points.


So we mayjust have to try and
try and maybe eventually get
funded but I can tell you if I
am hired to do this I will get
you every point that is pos-
sible but, I just wanted to let
you know about that. One
other thing; we do need to
appoint a citizens advisory
task force. We are required to
have one meeting before any
grant goes in. You might want
to officially appoint them be-
fore July 15." Mr. Mosconis
suggested that the Planning
and Zoning Board be ap-
pointed as the new task force.
Mr. Mosconis' motion was
carried.

Fair Housing
A very quick public fair hous-
ing meeting was then con-
ducted. Ms. Bulcher gave
pamphlets to the Board ex-
plaining the. Fair Housing re-
quirements. These were the
standard rules relating to the
prohibition of discrimination
of one type or another. "It is
essentially illegal to discrimi-
nate in the financing or the
sale or the rental of housing
if the discrimination is based
on race or color or national
origin; religion, sex, familial
status, or disability. There is
a HUD toll free number that
you can call if you feel that
you have been discriminated
against and the Florida Hu-
man- Relations Commission
-deals with housing discrimi-
nation complaints."

New Road Names
A request was then made to
rename a road in Carrabelle -
a portion of Beacon Street at
Carrabelle Beach was re-
named Cape Street. A petition
from the residents was sub-
mitted asking for the change.
Another request was made to
name a road in the National
Forest the Randy L. Sapp
Road. It would be the first
road south, before Gadston
Creek. This request was also
approved.

Overall House Height
A recommendation had been
suggested concerning house
height and ground clearance.'
This got very involved. Mr.
Crofton was concerned that
the height of any potential
structure should not be in-
creased under any new reform
or recommendation. The rea-
son for the new recommenda-
tion had to do with the poten-
tial home owners flood insur-
ance. Naturally the higher the
structure is from the ground
the greater reduction a home
owner can receive on his flood
insurahnce'.But. of course, if,
the over-all height of the'
building in question is not
correspondingly increased the
owner or builder will be forced
to lower the size (interior
height) of the 'various floors
above the base floor of the
structure. This presents a
problem for some depending
on how high from ground level
the first floor is to begin.
This discussion and debate
went on and on. I can remem-
ber when the discussion was
whether to build these type
structures-now the discus-
sion is about how high these
structures will be. I imagine
these type debates will con-
tinue for a few more years and

Continued on Page 3


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


7 July 2006 Page 3


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


Briefs from Page 2
then they will also disappear.
But for the moment the
heated debates go on.
There were moments in this
Discussion when four and five
;people were all talking at the
same time-some to the per-
son next to them; some ad-
dressing the audience; and
others, among themselves.
Most of the Board members
seemed to be concerned with
the homeowners flood insur-
ance rates. Commissioner
Crofton, though commiserat-
ing with the home owners,
was adamantly concerned
with any rule that would in-
crease the overall height of the
building. He saw no reason to
change anything.
"I want you to be able to save
on your insurance," Mr.
Crofton said to a concerned
member of the audience. "I
want everybody-if they need
to-to save on their insurance
....but I don't think somebody
!saving $200 on their insur-
ance is worth allowing people
to go to 46 feet. That is not a
Good trade off. This (change)
is not going to benefit the
people who already live here.
It is for the benefit of those
who intend to build in the fu-
ture. So this is another point;
I would say that 99% of the
people presently living here
are not going to benefit from
S this (change) and they are the
ones who vote and pay the
taxes. Everybody that I have
asked is not in favor of this -
of course there are people who
I didn't ask who have given me
their opinion to the contrary
but ..."
Well, as the old saying goes;
When all is said and done,
more will usually be said than
done. Nothing was decided or
recommended on this issue.
So we can presume that ev-
erything remains as it was -
at least for the time being.
A motion was made by Mr.
Lockley to look for moneys to
provide for a grant writer and
some sort of code enforcement
agent. His motion was ap-
proved.

T. Michael Shuler
"The paper work on 'the land
swap with Mr. Levins is in
process. It has some techni-
cal defects but it's no big deal.
I hope to have something on
this for you by next meeting.
"You asked me to look at a
school Board memorandum
concerning hurricane evacu-
ation. That has been done and
there is.a recommendation for
approval.
"We also need a motion autho-
rizing the Chairman signature
on the transportation memo-
randum-with Crooms Trans-
portation. I have received
word from emergency man-
agement that they have re-
viewed that and approved that
contract. It does have a maxi-
mum cap of $25,000. With
that limitation I am comfort-
able in recommending that
you authorize the Chair to so
move. A motion was approved


"I need a motion authorizing
advertising to construct the
workshop over on highway 65
at the landfill. A motion to
approve was offered and ap-
proved over the negative vote
of Mr. Mosconis.
"I need some guidance from
the Board on a zoning mat-
ter. We have gotten a letter
from an attorney asking that
the Board take some action
relative to his R-4 zoning.
Long story short, they believe
that the R-4 zoning is too lax
and too open and they want
the Board to take some action
to button up those loopholes.
I don't really have any bill
from the Board on how to pro-
ceed with that. I would like to
get some direction from the
Board on that issue. R-4, if
you will remember, is your
residential zoning that allows
limited -amount of non-resi-
dential use. I would like you
all to think about that and we
can have a more detailed dis-
cussion at the next meeting.
This R-4 has been prevalent
for a long time with few com-
plaints, but recently some
people have been complain-
ing-one here in Apalachicola
and another over in the
Eastpoint area."
Ms. Tony Toronto, an
Apalachicola Resident, in the
audience then spoke to this
issue. Ms. Toronto has had
what has been termed by her
sister-in-law Denise Roux an
on going family feud on the
interpretation of this R-4 zon-
ing. It seems that Ms. Toronto
has procured a lawyer and is
involved in a lawsuit against
her sister-in-law. She is
claiming that her sister-in-law
is engaging in the construc-
tion of a commercial enter-
rise in a residentially zoned
(R-4) area. "The'reason the
Commission is reluctant to do
anything about this is be-
cause everybody on the Com-
mission knows somebody who
has done this," offered Ms.
Toronto. "And as Mr. Crofton
said, you need to protect the
public. These things (infrac-
tions) never get enforced.
Nowadays you are going to
have to see that these things
get enforced. In our case a
motel is being built in a resi-
dential area and there is no
primary residence there.
These people (her sister-in-
law) were just handed a per-
mit and we object to that. And
this, is why we have an attor-
ney who will argue for us.
Thank-you very much."
A motion to research the R-4
zoning was made and passed.
"Employee leasing?" Mr.
Shuler continued. "I have spo-
ken to Lucy Turner several
times about the leasing of the
hospital employees to a leas-
ing company. A part of that
process was to have the pro-
posed leasing contract ap-
proved by State Retirement.
We have a verbal O.K. Lucy
Turner is trying to get a writ-
ten O.K. As of late this after-
noon she has not received a
written approval, but we are
comfortable moving forward
with that leasing contract. The
cost of this contract would be
five percent of the payroll. She


~,Vi Mj POST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
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,o e-mail: hoffer531 @gtcom.net

THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.
Vol. 15, No. 14 July 7, 2006
Publisher ......................Tom W. Hoffer
Director of Operations ...........Andy Dyal
Contributors .................Skip Frink
Geri Moore
Carol Noble
Richard Noble
Dawn Radford
Photographers .................Diane Beauvais Dyal
Geri Moore
Advertising Design and
Production Artist ..............Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate ...........Jerry Weber
Production Associate ...........Richard Williams

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein .................. Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis ............... Apalachicola
Skip Frink ..... ................ .Carrabelle
David Butler ............ .........Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung ........... Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins .......Eastpoint
Barbara Revell .................. Lanark Village
Richard Harper ................. St. George Island

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All contents Copyright 2006
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


has also informed me that
once we turn this hospital
over to another contractor we
can terminate this lease with-
out penalty. These are the key
terms as far as I was con-
cerned. What I would recom-
mend that you do is authorize
the Chairman's signature on
that leasing company's con-
tract." A motion was made to
approve Mr. Shuler recom-
mendation. The motion was
passed.
A request for a public hearing
was then made concerning a
lot adjacent to Live Oak Street
in Eastpoint. Live Oak Street
is an unopened road right off
of Bay Shore. The property
owner involved in this request
is named Randal Scott. The
motion to have a Public Hear-
ing on this issue was ap-
proved.
'The Little St. George hunting
issue that you asked me to
look into ... has not been
dropped. I am still looking into
that issue."
The Lexus suit concerning
property rights on St. George
Island is still in contention.
Attorney Shuler asked the
Board to reject the most re-
sent proposal submitted on
the street ending issue. The
Board approved Mr. Shuler's
request.
Mr. Shuler then gave an up-
date on the billing issues for
the Hospital. Mr. Shuler
seemed optimistic and com-
mended Medicaid for their co-
operation. He also stated that
the GE issue should be com-
ing to a head very shortly.
It was also stated that over
$100,000 has been paid to the
County over the last two
months via Blackhawk and
the Hospital.
Planning And Zoning
The Planning and Zoning Sec-
retary, Amy Ham reviewed the
following Critical Shoreline
Applications on May 24, 2006
and submitted this consent
agenda for the following rec-
ommendations:
1 Meets all requirements ac-
cording to the Dock Ordi-
nance: to construct a Single
Family Private Dock at 778
Mill Road, Carrabelle,
Franklin County, Florida. Re-
quest submitted by GEA, Inc,
agent for Jane Bledsoe, appli-
cant.


2 Meets all requirements ac-
cording to the Dock Ordi-
nance: to construct a Single
Family Private Dock on Lot 2
Heron Bay Village, 2105 Blue
Heron Trail, St. George Island,
Franklin County, Florida. Re-
quest submitted by Charlie's
Dock's, agent for Bill and Patti
_McCartney, applicant.
3 Meets all requirements ac-
cording to the Dock Ordi-
nance: to construct a Single'
Family Private Dock on Lot 16
Bay Palm Village, 1415 Evodia
Court, St. George Island,
Franklin County, Florida. Re-
quest submitted by GEA, Inc,
agent for Rick Klewein and
Leonard and Pamelia Moniz,
applicants.
4 Meets all requirements ac-
cording to the Dock Ordi-
nance: to construct a Single
Family Private Dock on Lot 14
Driftwood, 2732 U.S. Highway
98 West, Carrabelle, Franklin
County, Florida. Request sub-
mitted by GEA, Inc, agent for
Chester Krawczuk, applicant.
5 Meets all requirements ac-
cording to the Dock Ordi-
nance: to construct a Multi-
Family Private Dock on Lots
3A and 4A Doe's Seashores,
2130 & 2132 U.S. Highway 98
West, Carrabelle Beach,
Franklin County, Florida. Re-
quest submitted by GEA, Inc,
agent for Equity Trust Co, c/
o Debbie Savoca, applicant.
The Commissioners approved
all of the foregoing items #1 -
5.

Advisory Board of
Adjustment
1 Approve request from Lee
Benoit, representing Daniel
and Sharen Lawrence to con-
struct an open deck 12 feet
into the Critical Habitat Zone
on Lots 68 and 69, Block C,
Unit 3, St. James Island Park.
2 Approve requestfor a vari-
ance to construct a boardwalk
and observation platform
within the Critical Habitat
Zone and Special Exception to
cluster four lots on 4.05 acres
as requested by Garlick Envi-
ronmental Associates, Inc.,
agent for Dennett Rainey.
The Commissioners approved
items #1 & 2.


From The Southeastern

Fisheries Association, Inc.

Fishing for Freedom will be cooking and serving seafood from
Key West to Tallahassee this October in an effort to express
the concern of many fishermen as it pertains to DUE PRO-
CESS in the way rules are enacted into law by the Florida Fish
& Wildlife Commission.
Southeastern Fisheries Association has repeatedly expressed
the same concern about DUE PROCESS every since the Con-
stitutional Revision Commission established the FWC concept
and the voters approved it. The same folks who passed the Net
Ban are the same folks who persuaded the Revision Commis-
sion to establish the FAWCC. The FAWCC wasn't established
by those pushing it for conservation but for a way to get more
of the fish for themselves. They won and now it is the law we
have to obey. But we still have inalienable rights given to all of
us as stated in our U.S. Constitution.
No person in this nation, including commercial fishermen,
should have to live without DUE PROCESS and EQUAL PRO-
TECTION UNDER THE RULE OF LAW.
The FAWCC policymakers have been reluctant to implement
DUE PROCESS. It seems there are those who think any over-
sight or equal protection rule would diminish the autonomy of
the agency. That is the only conclusion we can draw because
all we are demanding are our rights as citizens of our country.
Fishing for Freedom is going to focus on DUE PROCESS dur-
ing this event across Florida and remove all the smoke and
mirrors that cloud the issue.



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citizen who is regulated by a government agency.
Southeastern Fisheries Association will support Fishing for
Freedom on the issue of DUE PROCESS and EQUAL TREAT-
MENT, but will not get into personalities.
Southeastern Fisheries hopes the huge amount of effort going
into this event will concentrate on the issues and not indi-
viduals. After all, issues can be resolved and held in place
long after the jpdividuals currently involved have moved on to
other things.
Southeastern Fisheries Association calls on all its members
to support this effort by working men and women who are
trying to get equal protection for all of us.
Sincerely,
Bob Jones, Executive Director
Southeastern Fisheries Association


Library. Happenings

By Judi Rundel
Franklin County Public Library's Summer Reading has begun.
Registration is ongoing throughout the program. This year
the program for children in grades K-6 is being held every-
Friday and Saturday through July 29th. Registration forms
are available at the Eastpoint and Carrabelle branches of the
library and at the Apalachicola Program Center (148 8th Street).
Call 670-8151, 697-2366, or 653-2784 for all the information.
New Summer hours at the Eastpoint branch are as follows:
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 10:00-6:00; Friday -
10:00-7:00, and Saturday- 10:00-2:00.
Upcoming special events at the Carrabelle branch include a
Jazz Workshop with FSU's Leon Anderson on Tuesday, July
18th, from 3:30-5:30pm, a performance of Wind in the Wil-
lows on Saturday, July 22nd, at 10:30 a.m. performed by the
Atlantic Coast Theater for Youth, and a Jazz concert with Leon
Anderson on Sunday, July 23rd, at 3:30 pm.

Ongoing activities include:
Every Monday and Thursday, 4:30 5:30 p.m.: Yoga class
at the Carrabelle branch, hosted by the FROG Family Learn-
ing Program. Call Marlene at 697-2091 for information.
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 2:30 5:00 p.m.: Tu-
tor Time for students is available at the Carrabelle Branch
with Marlene. Adult education in literacy, computer instruc-
tion, pre-GED work and GED preparation can also be obtained
by calling 697-2091 for more information and to make an ap-
pointment.
Wednesday, 2:30 3:00 p.m.: Members of the young adult
book club, The Book House, are reading and talking about
their favorite books. It is a great way to find out what every-
one is reading. Call Ms. Tonia or Ms. Michelle at 697-2366 for
the scoop.
Every Thursday: "Read To Me"-reading to pre-school chil-
dren is held at the Eastpoint branch from 11:00 11:30 a.m.
Ms. Tonia delights young children and their caregivers with
one half hour of stories from the many books in the library's
collection. For further information, cll Tonia at 670-4423.
Thursday, 3:00 3:30 p.m.: Teen Book Club at Eastpoint
with Ms. Tonia.
Every Friday, 9:30 a.m.: Baby Book Club with Ms. Marlene
at Carrabelle
Friday, 3:00 4:00 p.m.: Chair exercise-realistic and help-
ful for persons of varying degrees of ability, gentle movements
are all done while sitting in a chair. This program is at the
Carrabelle branch. Call Ms. Marlene for more information,
697-2091
The Franklin County Public Library's programs-FROG, WITH-
IT! and TIGERS-are offered at no cost to participants. Regis-
tration however is required. For information'about the Li-
brary and any of its programs, please call 697-2366, 670-8151,
or 653-2784 or view the Library's website located at
www.franklin.lib.fl.us.










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EDrrITOR & COMMENTARY


The Clerk Of

SThe Circuit
SCourt

Your Public Trustee
*: Q. What determines the issuance of an
injunction?
A. There are several types of injunc-
MARCIA JOHNSON tions but the two most prevalent are
an injunction for domestic violence and
an injunction for repeat violence. Domestic Violence Injunc-
tions involve a spouse, former spouse, person related by blood
or marriage, a person who is presently residing together with
you as if a family or who has resided in the past as if a family
member,and a person who has a child in common with you.
Repeat Violence Injunctions can be filed if you have encoun-
tered two incidents, one of which must have been within 6
months of the filing of the petition, by someone other than
those listed above. This would apply if you have been a victim
of battery, assault, or sexual violence. Assault is defined as an
intentional, unlawful threat by word or act to do violence to
the person of another, coupled with an apparent ability to do
so, and doing some act which creates a well-founded fear that
violence is imminent. Battery is defined as actually and inten-
tionally touching or striking a person against the person's will.
The Clerk's Office has forms available for your use; however,
in order for the Court to determine whether or not to grant the
injunction, your petition must include specifics including dates
and facts which convince the Judge that an immediate and
present danger exists.
The Clerk's Office forwards the file to a Judge for review. The
Judge's decision is based solely on what is contained in, the
written petition from that party. If granted, a temporary in-
junction is entered and a hearing is scheduled within 15 days
to afford both sides an opportunity to be heard. An injunction
is an Order on paper signed by a Judge but it is not in effect
until the other person is served. At the final hearing, a Judge
will decide whether or not to issue a permanent injunction.
An injunction case becomes a public record in the Clerk's Of-
fice unless a juvenile is involved or unless seated by a Judge.
A copy of the injunction file is forwarded to the State Attorney's
Office. Often times, people are sent to the Clerk's Office to
apply for the issuance of an injunction.
Only a Judge can issue the actual injunction. Another option
that can, be pursued is to file a criminal complaint with a law
enforcement officer if an assault, battery, or other crime has
been committed. As a condition of pretrial release, a Judge
can require a defendant to stay away from you or certain places.
Another option is to request a "no trespassing" agreement be
issued by a law enforcement officer. If that agreement is vio-
lated, criminal charges may also be pursued. If you have any
questions or comments about this column, please forward them
to: Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market St., Suite
203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320.


Veterans' Financial

Security

By Congressman Allen Boyd
Congressman Allen Boyd (D-North Florida), a member of the
Military Quality of Life and Veterans Affairs Subcommittee,
today called on Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Secretary
Jim Nicholson to heed past reports of computer security prob-
lems and improve the VA's information technology 'security.
Secretary Nicholson testified before the Military Quality of Life
and Veterans Affairs Subcommittee in response to thelrecent
VA data security breach that resulted in the stolen personal
data of approximately 26.5 million veterans.
Since 2000, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) and
the VA Inspector General have issued multiple reports about
VA cyber-security problems and the need to upgrade VA infor-
mation technology security. Also, in four of the past five years,
the VA has received an "F" grade on an annual cyber-security
review by the House Government Reform Committee. How-
ever, the VA neglected to act on these disturbing findings, and
Congress failed to call on the VA to improve its data security
measures.
:'Past reports by the House Government Reform Committee,
the GAO, and the VA Inspector General all show that the VA
had plenty of warning that their computer security was injeop-
ardy," said Congressman Boyd. "Had the VA paid attention to
any of these findings, the recent data security breach may
have been prevented. Congress needs to step up and hold our
federal agencies accountable for all types of mismanagement,
instead of turning a blind eye like we've been doing the past
six years."
Last month, Secretary Nicholson announced that sensitive data
collected by the government for millions of veterans and their
spouses was stolen from the home of a VA official who had
removed this data from the VA. The stolen information included


names, Social Security numbers, dates of birth, and some dis-
ability ratings. In response to the security breach, the VA has
sent out notification letters to the affected veterans and will
provide free credit monitoring to those veterans who seek it.
Today's hearing is the second time in two years that the VA
has come before Congress to explain mistakes and negligence.
In 2005, the VA revealed that it had underestimated veterans'
healthcare costs by nearly $3 billion over the previous two
fiscal years. In response, Congress provided $2.7 billion in
emergency funds to fix the,funding shortfall.
"Congress must stop shirking from its oversight responsibility
and return accountability to our government," Boyd stated.
"What's most troubling is that many of the VA's problems might
not have occurred if appropriate and timely action had been
taken. Our veterans and their families deserve better."


Franklin County Health

Council Minutes


June 15 2006
Members Present:
Dr. Tamara Marsh, Chair
Dana Holton
Anne Wilson
Tammi Hardy
Wesley Tice
Katrena Plumblee
Susan Ficklin
Skip Chromicle
Dr. David Pierce
Dr. Lionel Catlin for Eastpoint
Med. Ctr.
New Business
A. Hospital Board Update--
Tammi Hardy announced that
the Hospital Board's opinion
on the Sales Tax would'be to
hold off on placing it on the
November ballot until the spe-
cifics of the tax can be devel-
oped more before being pre-
sented to the public and that
public education needs to be
initiated. She also stated that
the Hospital Board is still
waiting on data concerning
the hospital, i.e. admissions,
patient population, etc., to be
given to them by Blackhawk
and Mr. Wolfe. She an-
nounced that the Board is
starting its search for a CEO
as Mr. Wolfe will be leaving
after September.
A discussion arose concern-
ing the contract with
Blackhawk. It was understood
by the members of the Health,
Council that the original in-
tention of the yearly contract
between Franklin County and
Blackhawk was to allow the
county, time to look at other'
options and put out RFPs. .
This does not seem to be the.
current position of the county.
The Health Council decided tot'
discuss with each commis'-'
sioner their; concerns 'with;
this position. Dana Holton of-
fered to ask his contact at
AHCA to come and speak to
the NlIth Council on Rural
Hospitals.
B. County Commission Up-'
dates-aSales Tax Issue-Su-'
san Ficklin stated that the;
Health Council needed to be
involved in the education of
the public, possibly in a "town
meeting" forum.
Feasibility Study-Dixon-
Hughes, a consulting firm,
will be performing the feasi-
bility study starting in mid-
July, and will be completed in
60-90 days. The Office of Ru-
ral Health will be funding the
study.
Budget Review-Dr. Marsh
requested input on how the
Health Council had benefited


the county to be presented
with the budget request for
the upcoming fiscal year.
C. Future Leadership-Dr.
Marsh announced that no one
has stepped forward ret to
take over as Chair qf the
Council. She stated that a
definite selection needed to be
made by the next meeting.
Other Business
Dr. Pierce announced that Dr.
Sanaullah would like to be
more involved with the Coun-
cil. He will invite Dr.
Sanaullah to the next meet-
ing. Dr. Catlin announced
that National Community
Health Center Week is August
6 12 and that Eastpoint
Medical Center will be host-
ing its second annual health
fair on Tuesday, August 8 at
the clinic.
The next meeting will be on
July 20, 2006 in Apalachicola.
Respectfully Submitted, Becky
Gibson, RN.

Water

Supply Plan

Initiated

For Franklin

And Gulf

Counties

Action taken this week will
help secure future water
needs for Franklin and Gulf
counties. The Northwest
Florida Water lManagement
District Governing Board on
SThursday initiated aRegional


Water Supply Plan that will
help the two counties access
funds and employ plans for
meeting projected drinking
water demands. The plan will
permit the District to initiate
alternative water supply and
water resource development
projects, funded through the
state legislature's Water Pro-
tection and Sustainability Pro-
gram.
"Our concern is increased sa-
linity in coastal public supply
wells, due to continued and
increased withdrawals from
the Floridan Aquifer," said
Ron Bartel, Director of the
Division of Resource Manage-
ment. "Plan implementation
will ensure that potable wa-
ter is available for generations
to come.
The District has already as-
sisted the City of Port St. Joe
with buying the Gulf County
Water Supply Canal as a pub-
lic surface water source. The
canal is an existing diversion
that served a now defunct
pulp mill. The District also
drilled test wells in Franklin
County to assess whether in-
land wells could be used to
serve the coastal area.
"Within three years, we hope
to develop a sustainable and
cost effective water supply
that will meet regional needs
at least through 2025," said
Joyce Estes, District Govern-
ing Board Vice Chair. "The is-
sue is that, as you approach
the Gulf of Mexico less fresh
water is available, reducing
the long term viability of pub-
lic wells for water supply."
Population for Region V of the
District's seven water supply
planning regions, is projected
to increase from under 20,000
to almost 30,000 between
2005 and 2025. This would
require' developing an addi-
tional 2.35 million gallons a
day for this area of special
concern.
The plan will identify preferred,
alternative water sources
based on quality, cost, feasi-
bility and resource protection.
Statutory responsibilities re-
quire the District to develop
water resources, including a
regional perspective and over-
sight. The plan will also as-
sist local governments and
utilities in arranging for wa-
ter supply, including infra-
Structure construction and'
facility operate ons for distribu-
tion.


The Franklin Chronicle


'Thus far, the District has con-
ducted workshops with water
supply utilities and other in-
terested parties in Franklin
ICounty and plans to hold ad-
ditional workshops later.
Stakeholders will receive ad-
vance drafts of the Regional
Water Supply Plan, and at
least one public meeting will
be conducted with the Gov-
erning Board before approval.
Also, the plan will be distrib-
uted via the District's website,
www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/, by
staff and at public meetings.


St. Vincent

National

Wildlife

Refuge

Presents

Payment To

Franklin

County

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Southeastern Regional Direc-
tor, Sam Hamilton, an-
nounced that St. Vincent Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge (NWR)
will bring a larger revenue
sharing check to Franklin
County officials than ever be-
fore. This year, Refuge Man-
ager Monica Harris presented
to Franklin County Commis-
sioners a payment of
$304,592 which is an increase
of 12.9% from last year. The
money may be used for any
governmental purpose.
Under the Refuge Revenue
Sharing Act, counties receive
annual Refuge Revenue Shar-
ing Payments as a result of
lands acquired in fee by the
Fish and Wildlife Service
which are removed from the
tax rolls. These payments are
based on the number of fee-
owned acres, their value, and
the amount of funds available
in the refuge fund, plus any
congressional appropriations.
The 12,358-acre barrier is-
land located just offshore
from the mouth of the
Apalachicola River was pur-
chased by the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service for $2.5 mil-
lion in 1968. Recent land ap-
:praisals now put the island's
*value:at over $87'inillion.


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I


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


7 July 2006 Page 5


Second Circuit

Court Report

June 13, 2006

All persons listed below are
innocent until proven otherwise
in a court of law.


PRE-TRIAL CONFERENCE
CUMMINGS, LARRY: Charged May 17, 2005 with aggravated bat-
tery with deadly weapon. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Robert Culpepper II. Case Manage-
ment continued to July 11, 2006.
DANIELS, JAMES IVAN JR: Charged February 3, 2005 with flagrant
violation of net law. Defendant on conditional release. The defendant
was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Pre-trial
Conference continued to July 11, 2006.
LAMBERSON, KYLE C JR: Charged December 1, 2004 with sexual
battery upon a child under 12, lewd lascivious act on minor. The
defendant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way.
Trial set for June 14, 2006.
MAXWELL, JOSH EDWARD: Charged April 7, 2005 with fraudulent
use of credit card; grand theft (third degree). Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The
defendant was sentenced to 190 days in jail with 190 days credit for
time served; 48 months probation; restitution to victims; $410.00 court
costs and fees.
MAXWELL, SAMUEL EDWARD: Charged April 7, 2006 with criminal
use of personal identification information. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The
defendant was sentenced to 190 days in jail with 190 days credit for
time served; 48 months probation; $410.00 court costs and fees.
RUCKER, KENNETH R: Charged September 1, 2005 with purchase
controlled substance (cocaine); fleeing attempting to elude police of-
ficer. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, entered a plea of no contest and
was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 30 months
in prison (suspended); 155 days in jail with 155 days credit for time
served; 24 months probation; $510.00 court costs and fees.
SANDERS, ANTHONY: Charged August 10, 2004 with 3 counts de-
livery of controlled substance; 3 counts false report to law enforce-
ment officer. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present
in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, entered a plea of no con-
test and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 365
days in jail for giving false report to law enforcement officer, with 365
days credit for time served; 30 months in prison (suspended); 477
days in jail with 477 days credit for time served; 24 months admin.
probation; for 3 counts delivery of controlled substance. Costs re-
duced to civil judgment.
SHIVER, JAMIE L: Charged June 9, 2005 with possession with in-
tent to sell cannabis. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was present
in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way and entered a plea of no
contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentenced to 1
day in jail with 1 day credit for time served; 24 months probation;
$410.00 court costs and fees.
STRONG, WILLIAM A: Charged November 15, 2005 with sale of crack
cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Pre-trial Conference con-
tinued to July 11, 2006.

ARRAIGNMENT,
FEDD, JERMAINE: Charged January 21, 2006; March 30, 2006;
April 19, 2006 with sale/possession of controlled substance with in-
tent to sell within 1,000 feet of a church. The defendant was present
in court with Attorney Gregory Cummings, entered a plea of no con-
test and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 36
months in prison with credit for time served. All counts, cases and
Bay County cases run concurrent.
HINSON, MICHELLE NICOLE: Charged April 27, 2006 with battery
on inmate; resisting officer with violence. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan An-
drew Waywhb entered a plea, of not guilty. Case Management conti-
ued to September 12, 2006.
JONES, ANTHONY ALLEN: Charged January 21, 2006 with sale of
controlled substance; Charged March 29, 2006 with sale/possession
of controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a church.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendantwas represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not guilty.
Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
JONES, TRAVIS N: Charged March 30, 2006 with sale of controlled
substance. Bond was $15,000.00. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of not guilty.
Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
LANGLEY, MICHAEL SHAWN: Charged April 6, 2006 with 1 count
uttering (passing worthless document); May 17, 2006 with 4 counts
uttering; Charged April 11, 2006 with 1 count uttering. Defendant
was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not guilty. Case Man-
agement continued to July 11, 2006.
NELSON, ED: Charged March 31, 2006 with sale of controlled sub-
stance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest
and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 75 days
in jail with 75 days credit for time served; 30 months probation (no
alcohol or illegal drugs); substance abuse evaluation and treatment;
$510.00 court costs and fees.


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ROSS, EMORY R: Charged February 7, 2005 with burglary of con-
veyance. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender
Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of not guilty. Case Management con-
tinued to August 15, 2006.
SCHOELLES, SONYA: Charged April 21, 2006 with granr theft;
Charged April 21, 2006 with uttering (passing worthless document);
May 17, 2006 with 1 count uttering, 2 counts grand theft. Total bond
was $10,000.00. The defendant was present in court and eAtered a
plea of not guilty. A public defender was appointed. Case Manage-
ment continued to August 15, 2006.
TUCKER, LINDA JOYCE: Charged March 18, 2006 with aggravated
battery with deadly weapon. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way and entered a plea
of not guilty. Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
TURNEY, APRIL LYNN: Charged April 27, 2006 with battery on in-
mate; resisting officer with violence. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.
TURRELL, JARVIS B: Charged with sale of controlled substance.
Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was present in court and en-
tered a plea of not guilty. Case Management continued to July 11,
2006.
VINSON, WAYNE A: Charged April 6, 2006 with 1 count forgery, May
30, 2006 with 8 counts forgery. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant
was represented in court by Attorney Kathy Garner who entered a
written plea of not guilty dated April 17, 2006. Case Management
continued to August 15, 2006.
WARD, TIMOTHY SHAWN: Charged May 8, 2006 with 4 counts bat-
tery. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Stelger, entered a plea of no contest to 3
counts of battery and was adjudicated guilty. The State Attorney's
Office dropped 4th count. The defendant was sentenced to 28 months
in prison (suspended); 36 days in jail with 36 days credit for time
served; 24 months probation; must complete batterers intervention
program; $762.00 court costs and fees.
WILLIAMS, JAMES: Charged March 31, 2006 with sale of controlled
substance. The defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of
no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced
to 75 days in jail with 75 days credit for time served; 24 months pro-
bation; random tests for illegal drugs; $410.00 court costs and fees.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION ARRAIGNMENT
CREAMER, HEATHER: Charged February 20, 2006 with possession
of controlled substance cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
admitted being in violation ard was found in violation of probation.
Probation revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 15 months in
prison (suspended); 30 days in jail with 30 days credit for time served;
6 months community control, followed by 24 months probation. Any
conditions not met, re-imposed.
CREAMER, JAMES D: Charged July 15, 2005 with grand theft mo-
tor vehicle. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present
in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in viola-
tion and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The
defendant was sentenced to 18 months in prison (suspended); 106
days in jail with 106 days credit for time served; 24 months proba-
tion. Any condition not met, re-imposed.
FACER, CRAIG A: Charged November 2, 2004 with corruption by
threat against public servant; November 3, 2004 with felony fleeing
or attempting to elude officer; felony DUI; driving while license sus-
pended (felony). Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was rep-
resented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a
plea of denial. Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.
FAULK, SHEDRICK R: Charged January 15, 2006 with driving while
license suspended (felony). Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court, admitted being in violation and was found
in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 16 days in jail with 16 days credit for time served; 24 months '
probation with any conditions not met, re-imposed.
GRIFFISS, SCREVEN BOND: Charged February 6, 2004 with bur-
glary of a structure. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a
plea of denial. Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.
HARRIS, FELICIA V: Charged December 9, 2004 with battery. De-
fendant released on own recognizance. The defendant was present in
court admitted being in violation and was found in violation of proba-
tion. Probation revoked and terminated.
1ORRISON,'CRISTA: Charged January 17, 2005.with issuing worth-
less check. Defendant'was incarcerated. The defendant was present
in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in viola-
tion and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The
defendant was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 57 days credit for
time served. Probation terminated., ,
SI
RAULERSON, MARTY: Charged October 29, 2004 with aggravated
battery with deadly weapon. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admit-
ted being in violation and was found in violation of probatiorl. Proba-
tion revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 30 months in prison
(suspended); 60 days in jail with 60 days credit for time served; 24
months probation with any condition not met, re-imposed.
ROBERTS, JAMES LEEHASKELL: Charged October 24, 2004 with
flagrant violation of net law. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, admit-
ted being in violation and was found in violation of probation. Proba-
tion revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 18 months in prison
(suspended); 40 days in jail with 40 days credit for time served; pro-
bation reinstated with any conditions not met, re-imposed.
SCHOELLES, KEVIN MORRIS: Charged March 26, 2004 with bur-
glary of conveyance; grand theft (third degree); possession with in-
tent to sell cannabis. Charged June 21, 2005 with robbery (second
degree, no weapon); possession drug paraphernalia. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney
Ethan Andrew Way who entered a plea of denial. Case Management
continued to September 12, 2006.


SMITH, JESSE G. JR: Charged February 16, 2005 with possession
of controlled substance cocaine; Charged January 11, 2006 with pos-
session of controlled substance cocaine. Defendant was released on
own recognizance. The defendant was present in court and entered a
plea of denial. A public defender was appointed. Case Management
continued to July 11, 2006.
STEPHENS, MELVIN BERNARD: Charg-d November 15, 2005 with
sale of crack cocaine. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Stelger, admitted
being in violation and was found in violation of probation. Probation
revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 151 days in jail with 151
days credit for time served; probation reinstated with any condition
not met, re-imposed.
WARD, TIMOTHY SHAWN: Charged March 11, 2004 with throwing
deadly missile. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being
In violation and.was found in violation of probation. Probation re-
voked. The defendant was sentenced to 28 months in prison (sus-
pended); 239 days in jail with 239 days credit for time served: 24
months probation with any conditions not met, re-imposed.

DISPOSITION
AMISON, JAMES STEWART: Charged May 17, 2005 with felony bat-
tery; criminal mischief. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was.present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler, entered a plea
of no contest to lesser charge of simple battery and was adjudicated
guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 54 days in jail with 54 days
credit for time served; 1 year probation; $542.00 court costs and fees.
RUSS, TYRONE: 'Charged 2 times February 21 ,2006 with sale of
controlled substance. Defendant did not show up for court. Capias
issued (warrant for arrest).

CASE MANAGEMENT
APONTE, CARLOS E: Charged January 17, 2006 with driving while
license suspended (felony). The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to Au-
gust 15, 2006.
ASH, CRAIG: Charged December 27, 2005 with resisting officer with
violence; possession of cocaine with intent to sell. Defendant was in-
carcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.
BAUCHAM, ROBERT T: Charged November 8, 2005 with battery on
law enforcement officer; resist officer without violence. Bond was
$500.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Robert
Culpepper II. Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
BAUCHAM, WILLIE FRED: Charged November 8, 2005 with grand
theft (3rd degree), resisting officer with violence; Charged February
14, 2006 with dealing in stolen property. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was present in court. Case Management contin-
ued to July 11, 2006.
BENTLY, FRANKLIN J: Charged June 15, 2004 with burglary of a
dwelling; grand theft of a firearm. Defendant released on own recog-
nizance. The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender
Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.
BRADLEY, SAMUEL J: Charged with felony DUI; felony fleeing or
attempt to elude; driving whilelicense suspended (felony). Defendant
was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation. The defendant
was sentenced to 147 days in jail with 147 days credit for time served;
probation reinstated, any conditions not met, re-imposed; defendant
to be taken to NPI.
BROWN, KEVIN LEE: Charged with aggravated battery with deadly
weapon. Defendant incarcerated. The defendant was represented in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued
to July 11, 2006.
BURSTEIN, LARRY D: Charged March 25, 2006 with possession
controlled substance (marijuana over 20 grams); possession drug para-
phernalia; possession alcohol by person under 21; display another's
driver's license. The defendant was present in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.
CAMPBELL, ERIE LEO: Charged November 26, 2005 with attempted
burglary of a structure; sale of controlled substance. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.
CARGILL, GEORGE FREDERICK: Charged with 3 counts posses-
sion of controlled substance with intent to dell or deliver and posses-
sion of firearm by convicted felon on March 2, 2005; Charged with
driving,while license suspended (felony) on.May 21, 2005; Charged
with 3 counts sale/possession of controlled substance with intent to
sellwithin 1,000 feet of a church and trafficking in controlled sub-
stance MDMA on January 20, 2006. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was represented in court by Attorney Gregory Cummings.
Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
CARGILL, STEPHON EUGENE JR: Charged with driving while li-
cense suspended (felony); resisting officer without violence; refusal to
sign summons on September 2, 2005. Charged with driving while
license suspended (felony) on January 7, 2006. Charged with driving
while license suspended (felony) on December 20, 2005. Charged with
3 counts sale or possession of.controlled substance with intent to sell
within 1,000 feet of a church and trafficking in controlled substance
MDMA on January 21, 2006. Charged with sale of controlled sub-
stance on January 20, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Attorney Nancy J. Gaglio. Case Man-
agement continued to August 15, 2006.
CARMICHAEL, JAMES LEE: Charged March 30, 2006 with driving'
while license suspended (felony); April 13, 2006 with drug possession
(marijuana under 20 grams); drug paraphernalia use or possession.
Bond was $5,800.00. Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.
CROOM, DERRICK B: Charged September 12, 2005 with burglary of
structure; grand theft (third degree); Charged November 7, 2005 with
sale of controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger entered
a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was
sentenced to 48 months in prison (suspended); 84 days in jail with 84
days credit for time served; 48 months probation (concurrent); $410.00
court costs and fees.
CRYDERMAN, VICKIE DEE: Charged January 8, 2003 with posses-
sion of controlled substance; March 19, 2006 with resisting officer
with violence. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was repre-
sented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management
continued to July 11, 2006.
DALTON, BILLY DANIEL: Charged December 20, 2004 with grand
theft; Charged June 27, 2005 with driving while license suspended
(felony); Charged February 11, 2006 with child neglect without great
harm. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger entered a plea of no contest
and being in violation of probation. Defendant was found in violation
of probation and adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to
Continued on Page 6









Page 6 7 July 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Court Report from Page 5
36 months in prison (suspended), time in jail with equal credit for
Time served: 36 months probation; attend & complete parenting class;
substance abuse evaluation and treatment. All cases concurrent.
BANIELS, ADRIAN L: Charged May 20, 2005 with sale of controlled
Substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was represented in
court by Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. Case Management continued to
duly 11, 2006.
DANIELS, LOREAL L: Charged with forgery. Defendant released on
own recognizance. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and was found in
violation of probation. Probation revoked, adjudicated guilty and pro-
bation reinstated. Any conditions not met, re-imposed.
DAUGHTRY, HARVEY T. JR: Charged March 30, 2006 with sale of
controlled substance. Bond was $10,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Manage-
ment continued to July 11, 2006.
DEAN, CHARELS WESLEY: Charged March 28, 2006 with DUI (seri-
ous injuries); hit and run with serious bodily injuries; driving while
license suspended or revoked. Defendant was incarcerated. The de-
fendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way and
entered a plea of not guilty. Case Management continued to August
15, 2006.
EBY, GEORGE W: Charged September 23, 2005 with DUI manslaugh-
ter. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was represented in court by
Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. Case Management continued to August
15, 2006.
ELLIOTT, ALYSSA J: Charged March 6, 2006 with possession con-
trolled substance with intent to deliver; delivery of controlled sub-
stance. Defendant on conditional release. The defendant was present
in court-with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. Case Management contin-
ued to August 15, 2006.
EVANS, JOHN E: Charged December 10, 2005 with sale of controlled
substance. Case Management continued to August 15, 2006 (per at-
torney).
FICHERA, TILDEN LEE: Charged January 9, 2005 with aggravated
assault with firearm; Charged March 4, 2005 with attempted first
degree murder, kidnapping to inflict bodily harm/terrorize, aggravated
battery with firearm, aggravated battery with deadly weapon, aggra-
vated assault on law enforcement officer, resisting officer with vio-
lence, possession of controlled substance, criminal mischief 200 to
'1,000 dollars, violation injunction protection, possession of firearm
by convicted felon. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
,represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Manage-
irlent continued to August 15, 2006.
9LOWERS, RICHARD STACY: Charged August 21, 2003 with traf-
icking in controlled substance; Charged August 7. 2004 with posses-
0ton of controlled substance; DUI. Defendant was incarcerated. The
i4efendant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way.
Pase Management continued to August 15, 2006.
0OREHAND, SHEENA LEANN: Charged September 27, 2002 with
3ewd or lascivious battery. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The State Attorney's office to drop all
]charges.
GORDON, WARDELL C: Charged July 1, 2005 with sale of controlled
substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was represented in
'eourt by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management continued
to July 11, 2006.
GUELTZOW, WILLIAM S: Charged October 1, 2005 with felony DUI,
driving while license suspended (felony) and refusal to submit to bal-
ance test. Bond was $15,000.00. The defendant was represented in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Pre-trial Conference set for
July 11, 2006.
HINSON, MICHELLE NICOLE: Charged 2 times November 15, 2005
with sale of crack cocaine; Charged March 26, 2006 with possession
of controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney
Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management continued to September 12,
2006.
IVEY, ANTHONY: Charged May 29, 2004 with driving while license
suspended (felony). Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being
in violation and was found in violation of probation. Probation re-
yoked. The defendant was'sentenced to 24 months in prison (sus-
pended); 169 days in jail with 169 days credit for time served; 24
months probation (concurrent). Any conditions not met, re-imposed.



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JACKS, TERRY LEE: Charged December 6, 2003 with grand theft
(third degree). Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present
in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in viola-
tion and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The
defendant was sentenced to 288 days in jail with 288 days credit for
time served; 22 months probation (concurrent).
JACOBS, DANIEL ROY: Charged May 27, 2005 with grand theft.
Defendant was incarcerated. Case Management continued to July
11,2006.
JONES, BOBBY C. JR: Charged February 8, 2006 with possession of
controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver; no valid driver li-
cense. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was present in court
with Attorney Barbara Hobbs. Pre-trial Conference set for August 15,
2006.
JOYNER, AMY M:' Charged October 16, 2005 with dealing in stolen
property. Bond was $2,000.00. The defendant was present in court
with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management continued to
August 15, 2006.
KEITH, JASON DERRICK: Charged December 22, 2003 with felony
DUI. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and
was found in violation. Community control revoked. The defendant
was sentenced to 36 months in prison (suspended); 501 days in jail
with 501 days credit for time served; any conditions not met, re-im-
posed (except DUI school).
KILGORE, JIMMY DEAN: Charged September 12, 2004 with fishing
with suspended saltwater license. Defendant released on own recog-
nizance. The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender
Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.
KORNEGAY, ALBERT: Charged August 25, 2005 with grand theft
(third degree). Defendant on conditional release. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Barbara Sanders. Case Management
continued to September 12, 2006.
LANGLEY, MICHAEL SHAWN: Charged November 23, 2004 with ob-
tain or attempt to obtain controlled substance by fraud. Defepxdant
was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.
LAWRENCE, NATHAN E: Charged March 20, 2003 with 2 counts
uttering (passing worthless document). Defendant was incarcerated.
The de endant was present.in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
admitted being in violation and was found in violation of probation.
Probation revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 24 months in
prison (suspended); 186 days in jail with 186 days credit for time
served; 24 months probation. Any condition not met, re-imposed.
LEE, WESLEY BUCK: Charged with possession of controlled sub-
stance; Charged May 2, 2005 with burglary of a structure and grand
theft (third degree). Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being
in violation of probation and was found in violation of probation. Pro-
bation revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 36 month in prison
(suspended); 286 days in jail with 286 days credit for time served; 24
months probation; substance abuse evaluation and treatment; 50
hours community service & DUI school.
LITTLES, KENYATTA R: Charged November 23, 2005 with posses-
sion of controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver; possession
with intent to sell cannabis. Bond was $10,000.00. The defendant
was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, entered a
plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was
sentenced to 24 months in prison (suspended); 2 days in jail with 2
days credit for time served; 12 months community control; 12 months
probation; $410.00 court costs and fees.
MATHES, GEORGE D: Charged October 18, 2005 with dealing in
stolen property. Bond was $2,000.00. The defendant was represented
in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management contin-
ued to August 15, 2006.
MCDANIEL, LISA ELAINE: Charged December 8, 2004 with aggra-
vated child abuse by malicious punishment. Defendant on conditional
release. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender
Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
MILLER, DEMETRIUS PAUL: Charged March 30, 2006 with sale of
controlled substance. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Robert Culpepper II. Case Manage-
ment continued to August 15, 2006.
MIXON, JERMY JOSEPH: Charged October 19, 2005 with aggra-
vated battery with deadly weapon. Bond was $10,000.00. The defen-
dant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case
Management continued to July 11, 2006.


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MOODY, MARK A: Charged September 1, 2005 with sale of sub-
stance in lieu of cocaine; Charged December 14, 2005 with burglary
of a dwelling; grand theft (3rd degree); resisting officer without vio-
lence; possession drug paraphernalia. Defendant was incarcerated.
The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin
Steiger. Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
MYERS, MICHELLE RENEE: Charged 2 times November 15, 2005
with sale of controlled substance. Total bond was $75,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way.
Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.
NEEL, KIMBERLY JANENE: Charged January 9, 2006 with bur-
glary of dwelling while armed. Bond was $15,000.00. The defendant
was present in court with Attorney Dean R. Leboeuf, entered a plea of
no contest to lesser charge of 2nd degree burglary of a dwelling and
was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 5 days in Jail
with 5 days credit for time served; 36 months probation; substance
abuse evaluation and treatment through NPI; no contact with victim;
$370.00 court costs and fees.
OQUIN, WILLIE: Charged April 13, 2005 with escape. Case Manage-
ment continued to July 11, 2006.
PARRAMORE, FLOYD BS Charged July 18, 2005 with felony battery.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to
August 15, 2006.
PETERSON, JAMES EARL: Charged March 30, 2006 with sale of
controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Manage-
ment continued to August 15, 2006.
POOL, JUSTIN M: Charged March 29, 2005 with possession con-
trolled substance; reckless driving reduced from DUI. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Kathy
Garner, admitted being in violation and was found in violation of pro-
bation. Probation revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 49 days
in jail with 49 days credit for time served; 24 months new probation;
, pled in absentia to misdemeanor cases; $256.60 fees and restitution.
Any conditions not met, re-imposed.
PROVENZANO, MICHELE D: Charged 2 times with aggravated child
abuse with deadly weapon; Charged November 15, 2005 with sale of
crack cocaine. Defendant on conditional release. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Manage-
ment continued to July 11, 2006.
RANDOLPH, MANUEL JR: Charged January 13, 2005 with grand
theft. Bond was $7,125.00. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to Au-
gust .15, 2006.
RHODES, QUINNALAND J JR: Charged December 1, 2005 with
throwing deadly missile; Charged February 16, 2006 with possession
contraband at county detention facility and possession of cannabis;
Charged March 20, 2006 with possession of controlled substance.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management continued to Au-
gust 15, 2006.
RICHARDSON, TEELIAH: Charged January 5, 2006 with aggravated
battery with deadly weapon. Bond was $10,000.00. The defendant
was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered
a plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 36 months probation; random tests for no illegal drugs; no
contact with victim; restitution reserved on. $40.00 court costs.
ROGERS, MICHAEL SHEA: Charged December 5, 2005 with felony
fleeing or attempting to elude officer. Bond was $500.00. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case
Management continued to July 11, 2006.
RUCKER, KENNETH R: Charged January 4, 2006 with grand theft.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. The State Attorney's office is to drop all
charges.
RUSS, JEROME D: Charged December 22, 2001 with sale of con-
trolled substance; Charged October 7, 2002 with sale of controlled
substance; Charged February 4, 2006 with aggravated assault with
deadly weapon. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was rep-
resented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management
continued to August .15, 2006.
SAWYER, TONI M: Charged February 21, 2006 with possession con-
trolled substance with intent to deliver. Bond was $50,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way,
entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defen-
dant was sentenced to 18 months in prison (suspended); 4 days in
jail with 4 days credit for time served; 36 months probation; $410.00
court costs and fees. .


S. ,; Continued on Page 7



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-^^00


I












The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER..


7 July 2006 Page 7


Court Report from Page 6


SCOTT, RAMAH TULANE: Charged December 9, 2005 with posses-
sion of cannabis more than 20 grams. Bond was $5,000.00. Case
Management continued to July 11, 2006.

SHIVER, KENDALL W: Charged September 8, 1993 with aggravated
battery. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation
and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The de-
fendant was sentenced to 200 months in prison (suspended); 73 days
in jail with 73 days credit for time served; 5 years probation. Any
conditions not met, re-imposed.

SMITH, PRESTON WAYNE: Charged November 22, 2005 with deal-
ing stolen property. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was repre-
sented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management
continued to August 15, 2006.

SUDDETH, GLENN L. JR: Charged June 3, 2001 with possession of
controlled substance cocaine; resisting officer without violence;
Charged December 7, 2005 with dealing in stolen property; Charged
February 21, 2006 with possession controlled substance with intent
to deliver; sale of controlled substance. Defendant was incarcerated.
The defendant was present in court with Attorney Nancy Jones Gaglio,
entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defen-
dant was sentenced to 30 months in prison (suspended); 113 days in
.jail with 113 days credit for time served; 36 months probation;
$1,480.00 court costs and fees. All cases concurrent.

TURNEY, APRIL LYNN: Charged February 21, 2006 with sale of con-
trolled substance; Charged February 24, 2006 with tampering with
witness. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented
in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management contin-
ued to July 11, 2006.

WALKER, DANIEL WILLIAM: Charged October 24, 2004 with fla-
grant violation of net law; possession net larger than 2 inch stretch.
Bond was $1,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.

WALLACE, KENNETH L: Charged 2 times June 5, 2001 with sale of
controlled substance; Charged August 10, 2004 with aggravated bat-
tery on pregnant victim; Charged March 30, 2005 with battery by
inmate. Defendant was incarcerated. Case Management continued to
July 11, 2006.

WARD, GEORGE WEEMS JR: Charged November 29, 2005 with driv-
ing whilt license suspended (felony); DUI, refusal to submit to bal-
ance test. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was present.in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of no contest.
Adjudication withheld count 1. Adjudicated guilty count 2 and 3. The
defendant was sentenced to 2 days in jail with 2 days credit for time
served and 24 months probation count 1; substance abuse evalua-
tion and treatment, 50 hours community service, driver's license sus-
pended, dui school, vehicle impound and 1 year plus 6 months pro-
bation count 2 and 3. (All running concurrent). $410.00 court costs
and fees.

WESTMORELAND, PEARLIE B: Charged June 29, 2005 with exploi-
tation of elderly, money laundering and aggravated white collar crime.
Bond was $40,000.00. The defendant was represented in court by
Attorney Barbara Sanders. Pre-trial Conference set for September 12,
2006.

WILLIAMS, ALBERT HI: Charged August 25, 2005 with possession
cocaine with intent to sell MFG deliver. Bond was $25,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Case Management continued to August 15, 2006.

WILLIAMS, MARTALIUS DEMETRIUS: Charged August 15, 2005
with possession of controlled substance cocaine, possession of can-
nabis not more than 20 grams. Defendant was incarcerated. The de-
fendant was present in court with Attorney Dennis E. Boothe. Hear-
ing set for July 11, 2006.
WILLIAMS, NORMAN B. JR: Charged January 11, 2005 with sexual
battery upon a child under 12; March 29, 2005 with sexual battery
upon a child under 12. Defendant was incarcerated. Case Manage-
ment continued to August 15, 2006.

YOUNG, FREDERICK J: Charged November 3, 2005 with posses-
sion of controlled substance; driving while license suspended (felony).
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and was
adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 17 days in jail
with 17 days credit for time served; 24 months probation (concur-
rent); $410.00 court costs and fees.

ZACKERY, REGINOLD T: Charged November 3, 2005 with felony
fleeing or attempting to elude officer; Charged January 30, 2006 with
driving while license suspended (felony). Bond was $1,500.00. The
defendant was.represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way.
Case Management continued to July 11, 2006.

HEARINGS

BAUCHAM, WILLIE FRED: Motion for State Attorney's Office to set
depositions for defendant. Sheriff to give access to legal materials.

HILL, CANDACE: Motion for pre-trial release or reasonable bail. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defen-
dant was sentenced to 19 days in jail with 19 days credit for time
served; 36 months probation; substance abuse evaluation & treat-
ment; random testing for no alcohol or illegal drugs; $1,840.00 court
costs and fees. All cases concurrent.

DEAN, CHARLES WESLEY: Motion to reduce bond. Motion denied.

WASHINGTON, RICK: Motion for pre-trial release or reasonable bail.
Motion granted. Bond $10,000.00, no contact with victim.

EBY, GEORGE W: Motion to compel additional discovery. Manslaugh-
ter by driving under the influence.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION HEARING

RHODES, QUINNALAND J JR: Charged September 14, 2004 with
sale of controlled substance; aggravated battery with deadly weapon.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management continued to Au-
gust 15, 2006.







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WRITING:

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and Other Lines of Insurance

See us for your insurance needs at:
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Pay The County Bills


The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of
$758,240.01 at their June 20, 2006 meeting. The bills are listed
as follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Of-
fice. ,
ACS OVT INANIAL YSTE


ACS GOV'T FINANCIAL SYSTEM
06/19/2006 14:
BANK VENDOR
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT


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.04294
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002103
000439
002194
002493
001972
002394
001051
000168
001739
002494
001942
000642
002463
001981
002600
000132
001642
002573
002186
002424
001851
000870
001366
001812
.04291
.04282
002215
001725
002396
002450


AADCO MEDICAL INC
ADVANCED COMPUTER
AGENCY FOR HEALTH
AIROAS SOUTH
ALLTEL
ALSCO
AMERICAN SYSTEM T
ANTHONY J CROOM J
APALACHEE CENTER,
APALACHEE ELECTRO
APALACHICOLA ACE
APALACHICOLA ACE
APALACHICOLA BAY
ARAMARK
ARMORY BOARD, STA
AT&T
B BRAUN MEDICAL
BAKER AND TAYLOR
BAXTER HEALTHCARE
BAYMEDICAL DIV OF
BCC ROAD AND BRIDE
BECKMAN COULTER I
BLACKHAWK APALACH
BRIGGS CORPORATION
C & W FOOD SERVICE
CABOT LODGE
CALHOUN LIBERTY H
CAPITAL TRUCK, IN
CARDINAL HEALTH
CARR, RIGGS & ING
CARRABELLE CHAMBER
CHRISTOPHER GAME
CITY OF APALACHIC
CITY OF CARRABELL
CITY OF CARRABELL
CLARK-MUNROE TRAC
CLERK OPERATIONAL
COLLEGIATE PACIFIC
COMMERCIAL SUPPLY
COMP USA, INC.
CONE INSTRUMENTS
CREAMER/MARK
DADE BEARING
DEMCO, INC
DEPT OF MANAGEMENT
DIXIE THEATRE
EASTPOINT WATER &
ELAN FINANCIAL SE
ELECTION SYSTEMS
ENVIROMED OF BAY
FISHER HEALTHCARE
FLEET SUPPLY
FLORIDA ENGINEER
FLORIDA MEDICAID-
FLORIDA MUNICIPAL
FLORIDA RRSEARCII,
FONDA DAVIS
FOUR TOWNES EMBRO
GANDER AUTO PARTS
GANDER'S GULF SUP
GEORGE THOMPSON H
GT COM
GT COMMUNICATIONS
GULF COAST AGGREG
GULF STATE CHEMIC
GULFSIDE I.G.A. (
GULFSIDE IGA
HARBOR MEDICAL CE
HILL MANUFACTURING
HOLLEY, INC.
HUMPHREY/WILLIAM
INSTRUMENTATION L
ISLAND DRIVE PROP
IVERS MD/VINCENT
J. V. GANDER DIST
J.H.DOWLING, INC.
JACKIE WALLACE &
JACKSON AUTO PART
JANT PHARMACAL CO
JUST-IN-CASE UNLI
JUST-IN-CASE UNLI
JUST-IN-CASE UNLI
JUST-IN-CASE-UNLI
KING CONSTRUCTION
KING CONSTRUCTION
KING CONSTRUCTION
LEVY LAW FIRM
LIBERTY COMMUNICA
LOCKLEY JR/NOAH
MARCO ISLAND
MARPAN SUPPLY CO.
MCKESSON
MCKESSON MEDICAL
MEDIACOM
MEDQUIST
MORON, MICHAEL
NEECE TIRE & AUTO
NEXTEL PARTNERS I
OFFICE BUSINESS S
OFFICE DEPOT
OSBURN CONSTRUCT
OSCEOLA SUPPLY IN
PAUL'S PEST CONTR
PIERCE DO/DAVID
PLAY IT AGAIN SPO
POLYMEDCO INC
POSTMASTER
POUNCEY/PAULA
PREBLE-RISH, INC.
PROGRESS ENERGY F
QUALITY PLUS COMM
, QUALITY WATER SUP
REDDY ICE-ALBANY
RELIABLE CORPORATE
RING POWER CORPOR
SANDERS/CHERYL
SAUL MD/STEVEN J
SEVEN TRENT LABOR
SHADE TREE TOWING
SHAM K MANGALVED
SHESHUNOFF INFORM
SORRELL INSURANCE
SPIRIT SERVICES C
ST.JOE RENT-ALL,
STATE COLLECTION
SUWANNEE RIVER SU
SWITZER/LORI
TERMINIX
THE FRANKLIN CO C
THE NEWS HERALD
TRACTOR & EQUIPME
UNITED PARCEL SER
UNIVERSITY OF FLO
WARD INTERNATIONAL
WASTE MANAGEMENT
WILLSON'S PORTABLE
WOLFF/RONALD


GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
FUND RECAP:
FUND DESCRIPTION

001 GENERAL FUND
120 FINE AND FORFEITURE
130 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT FUND
137 FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC LIBRARY
139 BALD POINT TRUST FUND
140 ROAD AND BRIDGE
142 MOSQUITO CONTROL
163 ENHANCED 911 FUND
170 AIRPORT FUND
180 AFFORD.HOUSING ASSIST TRUST
201 GEORGE E WEEMS HOSPITAL FUND
TOTAL ALL FUNDS




THE

EPISCOPAL CHURCH

WELCOMES YOU




















'850-653-9550

Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836

SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


Check Register GL540R
CHECK# DATE

35919 06/20/06
RESOUR 35920 06/20/06
CARE A 35921 06/20/06
35922 06/20/06
35923 06/20/06
35924 06/20/06
ECHNOLO 35925 06/20/06
R 35926 06/20/06
INC 35927 06/20/06
NICS 35928 06/20/06
HARDWAR 35929 06/20/06
HDWR 35930 06/20/06
CHAMBER 35931 06/20/06
35932 06/20/06
TE OF F 35933 06/20/06
35934 06/20/06
35935 06/20/06
35936 06/20/06
CORP 35937 06/20/06
SAZIMUT 35938 06/20/06
3GE FUND 35939 06/20/06
NC 35940 06/20/06
;ICOLA L 35941 06/20/06
IN 35942 06/20/06
:E INC 35943 06/20/06
35944 06/20/06
OSPITAL 35945 06/20/06
4C. 35946 06/20/06
35947 06/20/06
3RAM LLC 35948 06/20/06
ER OF CO 35949 06/20/06
ETTA 35950 06/20/06
:OLA 35951 06/20/06
E 35952 06/20/06
hE 35953 06/20/06
:TOR CO 35954 06/20/06
ACCOUN 35955 06/20/06
C 35956 06/20/06
35957 06/20/06
Ar 35958 06/20/06
INC 35959 06/20/06
35960 06/20/06
35961 06/20/06
35962 06/20/06
T SERVI 35963 06/20/06
35964 06/20/06
SEWER 35965 06/20/06
ERVICES 35966 06/20/06
& SOFTW 35967 06/20/06
COUNTY 35968 06/20/06
35969 06/20/06
35970 06/20/06
NG SOCI 35971 06/20/06
COUNTY .35972 06/20/06
.INSURA 35973 06/20/06
INC. 35974 06/20/06
35975 06/20/06
IDERY 35976 06/20/06
35977 06/20/06
PLY HAR 35978 06/20/06
D COACH 35979 06/20/06
35980 06/20/06
35981 06/20/06
ATES LL 35982 06/20/06
AL & 35983 06/20/06
APALACH 35984 06/20/06
35985 06/20/06
NTER 35986 06/20/06
G COMPA 35987 06/20/06
35988 06/20/06
35989 06/20/06
ABORATO 35990 06/20/06
ERTIES 35991 06/20/06
35992 06/20/06
RIBUTOR 35993 06/20/06,
35994 06/20/06
35995 06/20/06
S & ACE 35996 06/20/06
RPORATI 35997 06/20/06
MITED 35998 06/20/06
MITED 35999 06/20/06
MITED I 36000 06/20/06
MITED 36001 06/20/06
LLC 36002 06/20/06
LLC 36003 06/20/06
LLC 36004 06/20/06
36005 06/20/06
.TIONS 36006 06/20/06
36007 06/20/06
36008 06/20/06
,INC. 36009 06/20/06
36010 06/20/06
SURGICA 36011 06/20/06
36012 06/20/06
36013 06/20/06
36014 06/20/06
SERVIC. 36015 06/20/06
NC 36016 06/20/06
YSTEMS 36017'06/20/06
36018 06/20/06
ON 36019 06/20/06
C 36020 06/20/06
OL 36021 06/20/06
36022 06/20/06
RTS 36023 06/20/06
36024 06/20/06
36025 06/20/06
36026 06/20/06
36027 06/20/06
FLORIDA, 36028 06/20/06
IUNICATI 36029 06/20/06
?PLY 36030 06/20/06
36031 06/20/06
'ION 36032 06/20/06
ATION 36033 06/20/06
36034 06/20/06
36035 06/20/06
IRATORIE 36036 06/20/06
36037 06/20/06
IKAR 36038 06/20/06
LATION S 36039 ,06/20/06
* GROUP 36040 '06/20/06
ROMPANY 3601. 06/20/06
INC. -36042 06/20/06
SERVICE 3604306/20/06
IPPLY, I '36044 06/20/06
36045 06/20/06
36046.06/20/06
7HRONICL 36047 06/20/06
36048 06/20/06
ENT COMP 36049 06/20/06
RVICE 36050 06/20/06
aRIDA 36051 06/20/06
IL TRUCK 36052'06/20/06
OF PC 36053 06/20/06
LE TOILE 36054 06/20/06
36055 06/20/06


FRANKLIN COUNTY
-V06.71 PAGE 1
AMOUNT

186.73
S1,061.00
716,115.00
98.61
1,056.87
1,664.64
1,480.25
12.48
2,033.33
525.10
304.20
74.81
35,750.00
401.15
1.00
71.09
883.00
2,410.99
671.59
53.13
17,881.11
832.60
25,000.00
301.02
781.06
192.00
3,306.00
465.72
99.56
9,935.00
35,750.00
750.00
69,500.00
35,900.00
35.04
204.48
36,607.01
77.05
601.57
385.69
48.67
60.00
6,612.99
347.52
175.21
22,390.30
1,301.15
2,778.47
38,195.44
165.00
71.09
719.32
230.25
1,210.00
172,664.00
59.00
328.69
50.96
25.79
127.50
500.00
2,160.94
6,535.93
25,941.86
2,230.00
109.69
64.39
4,146.00
178.46
245.15
149.85
2,153.94
1,065.56
7,140.00
16,064.44
993.06
10,000.00
258.85
494.25
1,616.66
1,616.66
2,000.00
5,000.00
1,500.00
3,211.66
3,211.68
14,578.64
622.39
561.65
804.00
120.74
4,725.61
2,605.66
'495.23
902.00
500.00
417.96
54.28
45.00
114.94
1,915.00
781.95
65.00
4,440.00
135.53
39.00
180.00
17,706.00
4,117.55
29.95
249.75
183.70
67.38
4,560.03
551.58.
600.00'
17,333.54
187.10
7,680.00
8469.95
2,276.00
.. 390.74
.389.66
89.0,986.81
9' 360.36
1,833.33
1,860.00 .
102.77
53.75
S677.17
33 12.15
1, 475.00
7, 4 63.36
859.62
576.00
741.95
58,240.01

DISBURSEMENTS

173,130.45
160,976.84
199,290.30
7,111.64
13,174.00
31,314.42
2,015.31
470.86
913.71
,33,154.99
136,687.49
758,240.01


i'sot $3apfWt Chwec&


St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257

R. Michael Whaley, Pastor

Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!


Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.


Sunday Night
Wed. "Power Hour"


7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.


"Walking in Christ"


Evr .dymoeredrsar urin o6h


Prnki ChronicleJ ~Tt~ !

No di strbte*nFrnln,6klad ufConis


Daytona Beach

OCEANFRONT

___ Starting at Rates Valid
July 3-Aug 20
Sun-Thur
S< Fri & Sat add $10 p/day
'8 9 Excluding Holidays
H2 night min. & Special Events
S for special rate 1 night sightly higher
1615 S AtlanticAve ,
Daytona Beach, FL 32118

Free Cont. Breakfast .
Free newspaper
Fitness center '


Putting Green
Shuffleboard
Microwaves
Refrigerator


.866-872-3606 www.innonthebeach.com


OPENING NOVEMBER 2006.

THE

OF DAYTONA BEACH.
The Ultra-Luxurious Oceanfront
Condominium with Concierge Services
and Golf & Spa Privileges.

Oceanfront Pool with Sun Terraces
and Lush Gardens
., 9
Ultra-Luxury 2 and 3 Bedroom
residences with Fireplace, Panoramic
View Balconies, Gourmet Kitchens
and, Designer Baths.


OCEAN VISTAS
DAYTONA BEACH SHORES

Call today 1-866-741-8317
www.oceanvistasdaytona.com
u-


HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR:

TRAINING FOR EMPLOYMENT


~/i/ Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders, Dump .
-- Trucks, Graders, Scrapers, Excavators','

-National Certification
-Job Placement Assistance


800-405-5833

Associated Training Services www.equipment-school.corn


JOHN'S

... CONSTRUCTION


Licensed & Insured
RG0050'63
RC005C106


Quality Craftsmanship For Over 40 Years,
SERVING FRANKLIN COUNTY SINCE 1982

Specializing in Custom Homes- Remodeling

Additions -Repairs -Vinyl Siding


850-697-2376

Fax: 697-4680


P.O. Drawer JJ Carrabelle, FL 32322


Wind Your Way To The Grill!

FOR THE BEST SEAFOOD A.ND STEAKS
()ON THE F-'._TTEN C"-'.T ,Avow&


_ro.okrd 1t.h.r Iardl t: nh- .n:.
,',11r .:- I',.lrillr ,D w. I C,, I
rid el. r i i.. h r r .. hr.. -.J .



thing to please even the most discrumnatng tastes. Located in the
beautiful St. James Bay Golf Community you can dine indoors or enjoy a
relaxing meal on our patio. A beautiful gazebo and full banquet facilities
make this the perfect setting for that special occasion.

Daily Breakfast from 7:00am-10:00pm & Lunch from 11:00am-3:00pm.
Open Thursday Sunday for Dinner from 5:00pm-9:30pm.

SBreakfast Lunch Dinner Banquet Facilities
Reservations 850.697.5050 *


CROOKED RIVER GRILL
at ST. JAME.S BAY

LOCATED IN THE ST.JAMES BAY GOLF AND RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY
6 MILES EAST OF PICTURESQUE CARRABELLE ON HwiV 98 WWWSTJAMESBAY.COM





St. George Island

United Methodist Church


You ARE INVITED To

SUNDAY WORSHIP 9:30A.M.



201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org Pastor: Ray Hughes


I~O


large 6al6larc,0



Deapi arl


Want to purchase minerals


and other oil/gas interests.


Send details to:


P.O. Box 13557


Denver, Colorado 80201


---- ~ U I


A


The

Franklin


Chronicle


Now distributed in
Franklin, Wakulla
and Gulf Counties










Palye 8 7 July 2006 5


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Florida Classified



FCA vAdvertising Network


Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience of

1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!


The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper with

the FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-1687, fax: 850-670-1685.


Announcements

Is Stress Ruining Your Relationships? Buy and Read
DIANFTICS by I.. Ron Ilubhard Call (813)872-0722 or
scnd I8 0ol o)iancllcs.302 N ahana Ac..rampaFI.
S1601)7

Auctions

"I.A ) Atl('IION 2111 Pruop Musa lie .Sold!"
I.ow I)Down/7!-Z Financing Free (:Calog (1101)937-1603
WWW I ANDAUCTION COM N.R.I..L. Fast, .I.C
Auction Business .icensc:AB2509. Mark Buleziuk Auc-
tioneer l.lcensc'A13448. Jeffrey Johnston Auctioneer
l.lcense'A13449. Slaccy Mauck Auclioneer
I.cense AU3447.

BuildingMaterials

METAI. ROOFING SAVE SS Buy Direct From Manu-
laclurer. 20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick turn
around! Deliver Availahle Toll Free (888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

A.I.CASII CANY ROIITE Doyouearm $800/day? 30
Macinllsn. Fre (Candy All Ibr SQ.'1)5. (88)629.996-'
It )711|0lll 3 CAL.' 1US We will nol li uindcrsold'

S479.97 Per Day!! Simply Rcllurning Phlone Calls. No
Selling No Explaling For FRITT Inrlboration Call
|866)737-9959.

Iroafssional Vending Route: All drinks, si/es, and
brands. Great cquipment.greatsupport! Financing available
Witl $6K down. Tom: (954)971-9301. 1B02002-037.

Financial

IIuomrcOvaers! BAD CRF)IT PEIASE APPI.Y K's.
lae no mrgage payments, Fico sores to 475! 24-hour
approvals. NO Payments until July Ist Fl. Licensed
Mortgage Broker. Meridian Capital (8001424-0888.
*... FRIA (CASII (RANTS! S25,0110++ *"2111006!
NIEVER REPAY!V Pcrsonal/Medical Bills. Business,
Schlool/l louse. AlmostElveryoncqualliecs! I.ve Operators!
Avoid Deadlincs! Listings. Call (800)681-5732 lxt 231.

IelpWanted

.Driver- IIOME WEEKENDS. Flatbed Drivers can car
5950'Week at PGT: Great Benefits & Equipiencl. Stu-
dents \ilh CDI-A vclcome. Call 1866)838-3584.

All tle tiles you can Iclally handle!'! Comie drive ror
All American Xpress! .alc Model i:quipinlenl No Touch
Freighl,. No last Coas. 2yrs verifiable experience. Good
driving record. (800)282-1911 xII 5

AMERICA'S DRIVING ACADI)EMY Start yourdriving
career loday! OlTrtig courses in CDI. A. One Tullian lee!
Many, payment options! NO Registration lee! (888)808-
5947 in o nrolnericasdraivingacadeny comn

DATA ENTRY! Work From Anywhere. Flesxibl Hours
Personal Computer Required iEcellent Career Opportu-
nity. Serious Inquiries Only (800)344-9636 Ext. 700.

INTERESTEl) IN A POSTAl. JOBI Eatnling S57K/yr
A\ I Mininmum Pay? Our services can help youprepare ror
lic Posil lattIery laii.m, Find Out I lowl Call loday For
More Inorination... (800)584.1775 Ref Code 11'5799.

A COO. TRAVE.lJob. Now firing (18-24 positions).
Guys/Gals to work and travel entire USA. Paid training.
transportation, lodging furnished. Call today. Start today.
(877)646-5050.
Driver- A IOMrETOWN Carrier For IIOME"TOWN
Driver- Knight Trinsplrtulion- Ask a!out 7 cuLr7 ihome!
Daly & Wcckly Pay. *2700niiles/week 2005;06 Volvos
|811(0)734-8169.

NanilrialCl rriers is a nroain IlrertoTerung, Rcgional &
)I'R, Eiccellenl Ienclils, Weekend I lmclimc. Outstand-
ng Pay Package & Lease Purchase Options. CDI-A
Requirecd(888)707-7729 wwwr notionalcarricrs corn


HelpWanted
Ow nrOlperalors: Did you averageS t.8 in your.Tractor
or $1.41 in your Straight Truck last week? Our Owncr
Operators did' Tri-State Expedited (888)320-5424

DIriver- IRING OUAI.IFIED DRIVERS for Central
iloridai locall & National OTR positions. Food grade
banker, no harmat, no pumps, great benefits, competitive
pay &ewcequipmen. Need years experience. Call Bynun
Transport for your opportunity loday. (800)741-7950.

CAR l IIAU.ING. Southeast Region. $1',l(iO/WEEK!
(ireat lo incTInc! Company Paiud cnefils! PAIDTRAIN-
ING FOR DRIVERS WITH MINIMUM I YEAR OTR
t-XPeIRINCE! (912)571-9668 OR (866)413-3074.

ADVER RISING COMPANY NEEDS Sales Reps. &/or
SalesManagers rorrestaurant placeddisplay ads. Up to50%
commission, gas/cell allowance. Quality telemarketing
leads provided Some travel. (800)752-4309.
DRIVERS: Expanding Fledl olTering Regional/OTR
runir.l cellenli cncfits.Wokrnd I lometimic.OuLstalding
Pay Package. Lease Purchase on '07 Pctcrhblls CDI-A
Required. NATIONAl, CARRIERS (888)707-7729
Sww\ rationalcarriers comn
MarineDredging Contractorsecksexpricnccd8-12 inch
Dredge Operators. Operator trainees & deckhands. Fax
resume to (904)992-0871 or e-mail:
dredging85ebcllsouth.nct.

We're ramiing pay ifr Florila regional drivers! Illoni
every Icckeind I hI)ricduring tic week Sulid weekly miles!
95%nolouchl! Preplanned ireiglil! $.43 pernile,hrometinme.
nioncy& more I IEARTLANDEXPRF.S(800)441.4953
\v.l!eartlandcxgagsom.

0/0 Drivcr'Ite F/S is iigherliere! cZro down lease/low
payments. SIll Avg. $2,000 sign-on $2,600 Referral
Bonus. Base Plate provided. FFE (800)569-9298.

Sales

55,5011 Weekly Goal Potential If sonmone did it, so can
you! 2-3 confirmed appointments daily! Benefits Avail-
able... CallCatherine McFarland (888)563-3188.

Instruction

IIEAVYEQIII'MENTOPERATORTRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT: Bulldozers, Backhocs, Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders, Scrapers, Excavators; National Ccrtifica-
lion. Job Placement Assistance; Associated Training Ser-
vices (8001)251-3274 0 ,culmopna1llE~a Lcm .

Ilcavy Eqtuipmenrt Operatnr CERTIFIEI). IHands on
Truinig. Job PlacementtAssislance.CallTollFree(866)933. -
1575.-ASSOCIATED TRAINING SERVICES, 5.177
Ilomosassa Trail. I.ccanlo, Florida, 34461.
waw.atsnoridacom.


LandForSale


15 ACRE FLORIDA RANCIIESTATE.OnlyS69,900!
Short Drive to the GulfofMexico Just Minutes from 1-10.
Won't last! Call Now! (866)950-5263 Ext 650.

Itenl state for Sale. I houses. Land, Water-froil. National
Forest Frontage, Piednont of NC. Iron Itorse Properties,
(800)997-2248 -vaw ironhorscauction comn NCAI.13936.

Legal Services

ARRESTED? ACCUSED? ACCIDENT VICTIM?
IIURT? Talk to a lawycr Now. Call 24 lours. Personal
Injury and Criminal Defense. A-A-A Attorney Referral
Service (888)733-5342. Protect Your Rights.

Miscellaneous

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE riom home. *Medical.
*Business, *Paralegal. *Computers Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Computlc provided. Financial Aidif
qualified Call (866)858-2121
www.OlllinmTidcwaIcrTcch.com.

WOL.FF TANNING BEDS Buy Direct and Save! Full
Body units fromS22 amonh! FREE Color Catalog CALL
TODAY! (800)942-1305 suwv.np.etstan.coml.


Cook s"-c

Insurance
AG E N CY

A Gulf State Community Bank Company

www.cookinsuranceagency.com
(800) 822-7530
73 Avenue E 205 NW Avenue A
Apalachicola, FL Carrabelle, FL
(850) 653-931.0 (850) 697-3473
SERVING THE COAST SINCE 1913




lB g B ^B S D g Mexican Restaurant

MEXICAN FOOD 65 W. Gorrie Drive
Breakfast: 6 a.m. 11 a.m. St. George Island 32328
Lunch: 11 a.m. 3 p.m. Phone: 850-927-3496
Dinner: 3 p.m. 9 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. Dinner: 3 p.m. 10 p.m.

Authentic lavor of Old Mexico ..


'ell


Unforgettable Golf Course!

Golfers of any skill level will enjoy the challenge this beautiful
18-hole championship course presents. St.James Bay offers:

+Full driving range +Two putting greens
+Complete pro shop SJME
+Resident teaching PGA Golf ProJAME
BAY
+Uplink GPS equipped golf carts .... ..

Get readyfor an unforgettable golfing experience!


aO EETms -CALL 5069.906* wwsiA m sBAYc om


Miscellaneous

DIVORCES275-S350COVERS children. etc Only one
signature required! *Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, et.600. (8am-6pm) Alia Divorce, LI.C.
Estalliished 1977.

Mountain Property

Tennessee, N. Georgia. Superb living opportunities/
investments. Beautiful mountain. valley, lake: homes,
cabins, retreats, lots, estates, views, boulders, streams.
Walldorf&Co.Rcallors.Chattanocoa. Sewane.(800)489-
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Date:


Rokke from Page 1


the lungs ... As the director of the Depleted Uranium Project, I
developed a 40 hour block training. All that curriculum has
been shelved. They turned what I wrote into a 20-minute pro-
gram that's full of distortions ... The equipment is defective.
The General Accounting Office verified that the gas masks leak.
Unbelievably, Defense Department officials recently said the
defects can be fixed with duct tape.

"The U.S. Army made me their expert. I went into the project
with the total intent to ensure they could use uranium muni-
tions in war, because I'm a warrior. What I saw as director of
the project doing the research and working with my own medi-
cal conditions and everybody else's, led me to one conclusion:
uranium munitions must be banned from the planet, for eter-
nity, and medical care must be provided for everyone, notjust
the U.S. or the Canadians or the British or the Germans, or
the French but for the Americans of Vieques (testing site for
DU weapons), for the residents of Iraq, of Okinawa, of Scot-
land, of India, of Maryland, and now Afghanistan and Kosovo.

"If you're going to be sent into a toxic wasteland, and you know
you are going to wear gas masks that leak and chemical pro-
tective suits that leak, and you're not going to get any medical
care after you're exposed to all of these things, would you go?
Suppose they gave a war and nobody came? You've got to start
peace sometime...

"Religions say; 'And a child will lead us to peace.' But if we
contaminate the environment, where will the child come from?
The children won't be there. War has become obsolete, be-
cause we can't deal with the consequences on our warriors
or the environment, but more important, on the noncom-
batants. When you reach a point in war when the contami-
nation and the health effects of war can't be cleaned up
because of the weapons you use, and medical care can't be
given to the soldiers who participated in the war on either
side or to the civilians affected, then it is time for peace."

Since the end of that "easy" victory, a couple of more Gulf War
causalities have signed in at the office of Veteran Affairs. It
seems that 221,000 soldiers have been awarded disability ac-
cording to a report released on September 10, 2002. The cau-
sality rate for Gulf War #1 is now calculated at 30%, And Ma-
jor Rokke says that his military ordered investigation has led
him to the conclusion that anyone who may have been down-
wind of any uranium dust, or working around uranium con-
tamination or within a vehicle, structure, or building that was
struck with uranium munitions should be seeking care.

The problem is two fold. Not only did we blow up any building
or storehouse in which the enemy might have stored some-
thing hazardous, we used our own uranium missiles and
bombs to blow them up. So if you were a soldier anywhere in
the vicinity' of any such explosion; or even if you were as-
signed to clean up after such an explosion you may be in store
or already suffering from any of the following: Reactive airway
disease, Neurological abnormalities, Kidney stones and chronic
kidney pain, Rashes, Vision degradation and night vision
losses, Gum tissue problems, Lymphoma, Various forms of
skin and organ cancer, Neuro-psychological disorders, Ura-
nium, in semen, Sexual dysfunction and birth defects in off-
spring.

For those not in the military it is interesting to note that ad-
verse health effects of this nature have been documented in
employees of and residents living near Puducah, Kentucky;
Portsmouth, Ohio; Los Alamos, New Mexico; Oak Ridge, Ten-
nessee; and Hanford, Washington. Also employees at uranium
manufacturing or processing facilities in New York, Tennes-
see and the four corner's area of southwest Colorado have
reported similar health effects.
Despite all these findings the United States and NATO offi-
cials continue to state that there are no known adverse health
effects form DU exposure.

Major Rokke has this to say about that: "If you do not provide
medical assessment for those with verified exposures and
health problems then you can say DU did not cause any ad-
verse health problems. So much foi medical science when a
cover up is directed by politicians to limit liability for non com-
batants, warriors, and others."

As you may readily understand Major Rokke, besides being
one of the untreated walking wounded and infected, is also
persona non-grata in military circles these days. He is at
present urinating and excreting large proportions of radioac-
tive materials. "It is impossible to get proper care and treat-
ment," says Major Rokke. Several of his old buddies who served
with him in his Military mandated DU clean-ups and investi-
gations are already dead.

In the Balkans they are referring to these symptoms as the
"Bosnian Crud".

So far according to major Rokke medical care has not been
provided to all DU casualties; environmental remed-iation has
not been completed; DU contamination and damaged equip-
ment and materials have been recycled to manufacture new
products; DU training and education has only been partially
implemented; DU contamination management procedures have
not been distributed.

What should happen next? Mr. Rokke says that the interna-
tional community and all of the world must raise a unified
voice in opposition to future use of Depleted Uranium muni-
tions and force those nations that have used depleted ura-
nium munitions to recognize the immoral consequences of their
actions and assume responsibility for medical care and thor-
ough environmental remediation. Specifically: Depleted ura-
nium munitions and the use of depleted uranium-must be
banned; all individuals who were exposed or who may have
been exposed to any form of depleted uranium and its various
integral contaminants or other contaminants created during
combat, research, or training activities must receive a thor-
ough physical examination and medical care to alleviate or
cure the physiological consequences caused by inhalation,
ingestion, or uranium wound contamination; all depleted ura-
nium penetrator fragments, depleted uranium contaminated
'equipment, and depleted uranium oxide contamination must
be cleaned up and disposed of at secure sites.

Major Rokke recommends that concerned citizens call their
Congressmen and Senators and ask them what is being done
about depleted uranium munitions, our sick soldiers, and the
hundreds of thousands of innocent victims here in the U.S.
and around the world.


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


7 July 2006 Page 9


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CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date ofthis Notice 06/20/06 Invoice No. 11567
Description of Vehicle: Make Oldsmobile Model Cutlass Color Red
Tag No.S190RC Year 1995 State FL VinNo. 1G3AJ55MOS6301,183
To Owner Richard Brown To Lien Holder
P.O. Box 1069
Eastpoint, FL 32328

You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 06/16/06 at the request of Property Owner that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 244.50 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 07/20/06 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219



CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Datc ofthis Notice 06/23/06 Invoice No 11636
Description of Vehicle: Make Jeep Model Cherokee Color Gold
Tag No.S9UVB Year 1997 State FL Vin No. 1J4GX78Y6VC744991
To Owner' Michael C. Bean To Lien Holder
3909 Reserve Drive #814
Tallahassee, FL 32311

You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 06/19/06 at the request of FCSO that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 244.50 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 07/24/06 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle
pages is an efficient way to promote your business to
the public and save money at the same time. These
ads are strictly business cards magnified to 2 columns
by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two
insertions. Send your business card or copy to:
Franklin Chronicle, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL
32328 or fax 850-670-1685. Your check for $15.00 will
guarantee position in the next issue.


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the I
Chronicle Bookshop

Mail Order Service
P.O. Box 590.* Eastpoint, FL 32328


(321) Rose Cottage Chronicles. The Civil War let-
ters of the Bryant-Stephens families of North Florida
edited by Arch Fredric Blakey, Ann Smith Lainhart
and Winston Stephens, Jr. University of Flbrida
Press, 1998, 390pp. Originally published at $35.00.
Bookshop = $25.00. No longer in circulation. As
fresh and poignant today as when they were writ-
ten, these touching letters and diaries capture the
heart of everyday life during the Civil War. Set both
at home in north Florida and on the front, the let-
ters were written from 1858 to mid-1865 by two
generations of the Bryant and Stephens families,
ordinary Confederate folk whose members included
radical secessionists, moderates, and even a few
Unionists. This is a story without generals.
The domestic letters, written mostly by mothers and
daughters from their homes near Welaka, Florida,
describe their hatred of Yankee invaders, their emo-
tions in dealing with slaves, and their flaming pa-
triotism as well as their fear of being abandoned by
the government. They offer a rare picture of the
expanded roles of women as farm managers; their
naive.hopes for a quick victory; and their yearning
for peace. From the military camps, soldiers and
officers write about Abe Lincoln; "coloured troops";
endless marches; Florida's two best-known battles,
Olustee and Natural Bridge; and all the skirmishes
around Jacksonville and the St. Johns River as well
as distant military events like the Battle of
Gettysburg. For all of the letter writers, death has
become as familiar as Spanish moss.
Especially, though, the letters tell a love story. The
courtship of Winston Stephens and Tivie Bryant was
prolonged, erratic, and stormy; their married life at
Rose Cottage was nearly perfect-and brief. Four
years and three months after their wedding-dur-
ing the final ticks of the Confederate clock-Win-
ston was killed in battle. Days later their only son
was born.
Virtually all of the letters-more than one thousand
exchanged between eight major and four minor cor-
respondents-survive in this family saga, a riveting
human and historical chronicle set in the foreground
of the Civil War.
ARCH FREDRIC BLAKEY, retired military histo-
rian, has written several books and numerous ar-
ticles on the Civil War and Florida history, includ-
ing General John H. Winder, C.S.A. (UPF, 1990), a
History Book Club selection. He lives near Bell,
Florida.
ANN SMITH LAINHART, a descendant of the
Bryant-Stephens families, is a professional gene-
alogist. She lives in Peabody, Massachusetts.
WINSTON BRYANT STEPHENS JR., also a descen-
dant of the Bryant-Stephens families, is a retired
businessman in Jupiter, Florida.


Removal
Aftershock

The Seminoles' Struggles to Survive
in the West, 1836 1866
By Jane F. Lancaster
The University of Tennessee Press/Knox- t
ville, hardcover. 225 pp. 1994.
This book focuses on this hitherto neglected
era in Native American history and places
the Seminoles in their correct historical po-
sition as a Native American tribe. By exam- '
inning the Seminoles' adjustments during
their first decades in the West in light of fed- ""'-
eral Indian policy, It concludes that after
thirty years of struggles, caused largely by the faulted policies of the
federal government, these Indians were a "stricken, divided, and
beggared people scattered over hundreds of miles." For this tribe, the
federal government's program of placing it in a western land away
from white settlers, where it could he nurtured toward civilization
and Christianity, was not only a shortsighted policy but also an illogi-
cal and inhumane one. Without the stubbornness and determination
of these early tribal members, no western Seminole tribe would have
existed in 1990. Truly, the mere survival of the early Seminoles earned
them special distinction as a tribe.
Published by University of Tennessee Press. 1994, 225 pp., Hard-
cover. Sold nationally for $28.95. Bookshop price = $24.00.









Page 10 7 July 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


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Voices -


of the


(321) Voices of the Apalachicola. Compiled & Edited by
Faith Eidse, University of Florida Press, 328 pp, 2006.
One of Florida's most endangered river systems is the
Apalachicola River and Bay basin, and it is not just the
natural areas that are threatened but also the history
and culture of its people. In Voices of the Apalachicola,
veteran storyteller Faith Eidse, together with the staff of
the Northwest Florida Water Management District, has
compiled a remarkable collection of oral histories from
more than 30 individuals who have lived out their entire
lives in this region, including the last steamboat pilot on
the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system,
sharecroppers who escaped servitude, turpentine work-
ers in Tate's Hell, sawyers of "old-as-Christ" cypress,
beekeepers working the last large tupelo stand, and a
Creek chief descended from a 200-year unbroken line of
chiefs.
As developers increase pressure and populations grow
within the basin, this timely collection captures a fasci-
nating and unique moment in history, recalling a resource
that once brimmed with life-bigger oysters, larger stur-
geon, healthier Torreya trees. Already several of Eidse's
subjects have passed away and were it not for Voices of
the Apalachicola; their stories would have disappeared,
as surely as the Apalachicola will dwindle away to a
shadow of its natural glory if its historic flows and envi-
ronmental health are not preserved.
The Apalachicola River system is one of the main re-
sources of water not only for Florida, hut also Alabama
and Georgia. It flows unimpeded for 106 miles from Lake
Seminole where the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers
merge-through the Florida Panhandle into Apalachicola
Bay and finally into the Gulf of Mexico. From emerging
technologies to environmental health, Eidse captures the
battle to preserve and persevere, providing historic and
current photos that show how, the basin has changed.
Habitat maps indicate where our sensitive species live
and land preservation maps illustrate how the state of
Florida is trying to protect them. Bookshop price = $29.95.

















RICHARD E6WARD NOBLE

(306) A Summer With Charlie is a new book by local
author,. Richard Noble of Eastpoint. The book is a trade
paperback, 128 pp, selling for $10.50. Richard'sistory
deals with life, love, morality, sex, death, religion, friend-
ship, boys and girls, growing up, home, neighborhood
and country. It is a trip down memory lane, and despite
the seriousness of the subject matter, it is also a story of
youth and laughter.


(126) Shipwreck and Adventures of Monsieur Pierre
Viaud From 1768, the sensational story of a shipwreck
near Dog Island, and the adventures of Pierre Viaud and
his search for survival. Published by the University of
Florida Press, 139 pp. Hardcover. Sold nationally for
$24.95. Bookshop price = $20.95.








0 t '
The St. Joe Company and theRemaking of Florida's Panhandle


b^ i


f .


(317) Green Empire, The St. Joe Company and the
Remaking of Florida's Panhandle. By Kathryn Ziewitz
and June Wiaz.
Based on hundreds of sources-including company ex-
ecutives, board members, and investors as well as those
outside the company-this factual and objective history
describes the St. Joe Company from the days of its
founders to the workings and dealings of its present-day
heirs. For all readers concerned with land use and growth
management, particularly those with an interest in
Florida's fragile wildlife and natural resources, Green
Empire will generate important debate about an often-
overlooked part of the state and will invite public scru-
tiny of its largest landowner.
University of Florida Press, 2004, 364 pp. Paperback.
Bookshop price = $24.95.


l



(21) Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers. Uni-
versity of Florida Press, Hardcover, 297 pp. In this book,
Rogers traces and documents the economic, social and
political emergence of the Gulf coast port of Apalachicola
and the pristine barrier island, Saint George. From the
earliest times, both the island and Apalachicola have be-
come intertwined. The account of the machinations of con-
troversial developer William Lee Popham is the first phase
of area development, later leading to the controversial
struggles of the 1970s when environmentalists and sea-
food industries fought to determine the ecological and eco-
nomic fate of the Bay area. The Chronicle has obtained
a fresh supply of newly reprinted volumes at an at-
tractive price. Available elsewhere for $35.95 plus ship-
ping and handling. The Chronicle Bookshop price is much
cheaper at $25.00 per volume.


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(318) Home To War, A His-
tory of the Vietnam Vet-
erans' Movement. By
Gerald Nicosia. An epic nar-
rative history that chroni-
cles, for the first time, the
experience of America's
Vietnam veterans who re-
turned home to fight a dif-
ferent kind of war.
Published by Crown, Hard-
cover, 690 pp. Sold nation-
ally for $35.00. Bookshop
price = $30.00. Due to the
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