Title: Franklin chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00285
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: June 9, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00285
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text




-md4 Nt R44AU &*U DAY


Thph


Volume 15, Number 12
Vu 1




Volume 15, Number 12


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA, FL
32320
PERMIT #8


pi


I- 11 %.



franklin





Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Water Street Hotel & Marina


Breaks New Ground


Breaking ground from left to right-Jimmy Gander: Franklin County School
Board Member, Van Johnson: Apalachicola City Commissioner, Jerry
Thompson: Owner, Curt Blair: Owner, Betty Webb: Apalachicola City Manager,
Frank Cook: Chairman Apalachicola Planning and Zoning Board, Brad Cole:
Superior Bank, and Mike Hettinger: Culpepper Construction.


City of Apalachicola and
Franklin County dignitaries
broke ground 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday, May 31st at the
site of the new Water Street
Hotel & Marina in the historic
,waterfront city. The two acre
piece of land where the three-
story building is being con-
structed lies at the end of
Water Street next to Scipio
Creek and the Apalachicola
River. Each of the 30 guest
units in the Water Street
project will open onto a pri-
vate veranda facing the river.
According to Curt Blair and
Jerry Thompson, partners in
the joint venture, the ground
is not the.only:thing to be bro-
ken in this project. The offi-
cial Apalachicola record track-
ing 'number of construction
pilings under one building' is
about to be toppled. More that
250 concrete pilings rein-
forced by rods of steel will be
driven 50-60 feet into the
ground. Looming above the
work site, a giant crane, used
in this work, can be seen from
Eastpoint.
"Some other new elements in
addition to long pilings are
coming to Apalachicola with


-S-


this construction," says Blair.
"New jobs, new places for
guests to stay, and a new con-
cept in hotel financing all are
part of the Water Street Hotel
& Marina project." He refers
to the idea that each of the 30
units will be individually


owned. "This means that
qualified buyers can share in
the distribution of hotel prof-
its," he explains.
Thompson and Blair say they
wanted to' have an official
groundbreaking to thank of-


ficials and the community for
their hard work and patience
as the project went through,
-months of planning. "We un-
derstand Apalachicola and
Franklin County do not rou-
tinely wrestle with all the
ramifications of a large project
like this," Thompson says. He
.smiles as he adds, "And most
of you want to keep itjust that
way." Blair notes, "We are
pleased the Water Street Ho-
tel & Marina meets or exceeds
all environmental require-
ments."
The 20 transient slips that
adjoin the hotel property will
remain open to the public and
hotel guests, according to Th-
ompson and Blair. The river
edge of the hotel features a
publicly dedicated boardwalk
which the owners have made
available to the city. "This
.coiild be a first step of a pub-
licly accessible river-long
boardwalk for the city," states
Blair. "The views beyond the
marina of the marsh,. Scipio
Creek and the Apalachicola
River are magnificent," he
says.
Nationally renowned architect
Thomas E. Pope of Key West,
Florida has designed a stucco-
over-concrete block structure
that will evoke the architec-
tural styles of the area at the
turn of the 20th century, say
the partners. The property will
include a swimming pool and
conference room/business cen-
ter.


Culpepper Construction Con
pany of Tallahassee, winner i
numerous historic preserve
'tion awards, is-the gener;
contractor. Superior Bank
financing the project. The hc
Steel should be ready for guest
in June of 2007, Thompso
Sadds.
W The site of the new Wate
Street Hotel & Marina is l
cated where the former Dee
Water Marina and Boatyar
stood. The owners say the
are working with Apalachico
city officials to relocate the o
Boatyard to city-owned pro]
erty.


n-


Mission San Luis

Transports You Back
Mission San Luis transports you back in time to the 17th Cen-
tury. Your destination is a community where Apalachee Indi-
ans and Spaniards lived in close proximity drawn together by
religion as well as economic and military purposes. Mission
San Luis has survived in Florida today based on records and
archeological evidence to become the gemstone of American
colonial history second only to St. Augustine, Florida.
Publisher's Note: This is another in the series of travel
profiles concerning noteworthy historic or economic ven-
ues within Franklin County or nearby in adjoining coun-
ties. Profiles have been published on Bald State Park, Cape
San Bias, The John Gorrie Museum and others. These
pieces are not merely "travel guides" but involve archive
research not.readily available, placed in appropriate con-
text.
Mission San Luis has also reached distinction as one of only
four projects in the Nation selected for the prestigious "Pre-
serve America" Award by the President of the United States,
recently awarded to Florida's First Lady Columba Bush and
Mission San Luis Executive Director Bonnie McEwan at the
White House on May 2, 2006.


of In 1959, three National Park Service (NPS) historians coordi-,
a- nated with the. National Park Service's National Survey of His-
al toric Sites and Buildings on the completion of a'theme study
is "on historic sites believed to be of exceptional value in com-
o- memorating or illustrating the history of Spanish exploration
ts and settlement in the United States and its possessions." In
in that publication, San Luis de Apalachee (Talimali), Florida,
was identified as a site of exceptional value as the location of
Spanish Florida's western capital from 1656-1704. Based on
er this theme study and the recommendation of the Secretary of
o- the Interior's Advisory Board, the Secretary of the Interior des-
'P ignated San Luis as a National Historic Landmark (NHL) on
rd October 9, 1960.
ey
la Today Mission San Luis is considered nationally significant
Id under National Historic Landmark Criterion 6 for its demon-
p- strated and potential historic archaeological significance. The
San Luis research project has already produced a remarkable
body of primary data that is widely used and cited by histori-
cal archaeologists and historians, and is recognized as the
m model for similar sites in the Southeast.


Carrabelle City Council Meeting June 1, 2006

Comp Plan Almost Ready

Although last-minute citizen challenges may add to task


By Skip Frink
Following the line-item review
led by David Butler at the last
Comprehensive Plan public
hearing, consultants from
Wilson Miller said that all his
concerns had been answered
or corrected. Mayor Kelly
polled the commission very
carefully on each point before
opening the floor for public
comment. Most commission-
ers had little comment, but
citizens had much.
The evening was to have been
the "bon voyage" session for
the project, to prepare to send
it to the DCA for review in the
process of implementation. A
glitch in the advertising of the
meeting caused a delay in the
send-off until after a special
June 15 meeting and final
approval at a July 6 meeting.
Prime focus of the time spent
reviewing the Plan was use of
property on the harbor.
Speakers emphasized that our
harbor is the center of
Carrabelle's community and
economic life, now and in the
future. Currently, most prop-


erty on the harbor is C-1 Com-
mercial, which does not cur-
rently allow "residence over
business" usage. There seems
to be general agreement that
Mixed-Use would support a
trend toward revitalization of
the business district, beauti-
fication of the harbor and the
downtown area, and help
cause an uptrend in the city.
It is unclear, between the twin
disciplines of Land Use and
Zoning, which change or
changes would best encour-
age positive use of the land.
No final answer was reached
after a bewildering list of im-
pervious surface percentages,
runoff, buffers vs. setbacks,
percentage of residential vs.
commercial, Coastal High
Hazard Area and density per
lot was discussed.
There was little mention, or
use of, the data collected in
2005 by Justice Associates,
the architectural firm which
held public workshops on the
subject on behalf of Grand
Legacy. Their conclusions

Continued on Page 5


Florida Housihg Releases

$100 Million In

Homebuyer Mortgages:

Freddie Mac Helps Lower Mortgage Interest Rate in 13
Florida Counties
Florida Housing Finance Corporation (Florida Housing) is
making $100 million in mortgages available to low- to moder-
ate-income Floridians through the First Time Homebuyer Pro-
gram. This money is available at a 30-year, fixed interest rate
'of 5.75%, but consumers purchasing in one of 13 GO Zone
,counties could be eligible for a 5.50% interest rate, thanks in
part to Freddie Mac.
"The consumer participation in our First Time Homebuyer
Program over the past six months has truly risen," said Florida
Housing's Executive Director Steve Auger. "We're seeing weekly
loan reservations averaging between $6 million and $9 mil-
lion. With rising land, construction and insurance costs, it's
difficult for first-time homebuyers to find affordable housing.
Our program opens the door to affordable homeownership for
low to moderate-income Floridians by offering below-market
rates and up to $25,000 in down payment assistance in high
cost areas."
First Time Homebuyer Requirement Waived in GO
Zone Counties-Lower Interest Rate Available
Florida Housing's First Time Homebuyer Program has tradi-
tionally made mortgages available to first-time homebuyers
only (except in federally designated targeted areas). But this
requirement has been waivedin 13 counties impacted by re-
cent hurricanes. As a result of Hurricane Wilma, Congress
passed the Gulf Opportunity Zone (GO Zone) Act, which treats
13 Florida counties as targeted areas, waiving the first-time
homebuyer requirement as well as increasing the income and
purchase price limits. The 13 counties are Brevard, Broward,.
Collier, Glades, Hendry, Indian River, Lee, Martin, Miami-Dade,
Monroe, Okeechobee, Palm Beach and St..Lucie.
Freddie Mac Helps Lower Interest Rate in GO Zone
Counties
Florida Housing sells both taxable and tax-exempt single fam-
ily mortgage revenue bonds and uses the proceeds from the
sale of those bonds to provide mortgages for low to moderate
income homebuyers through its First Time Homebuyer Pro-
gram.
Freddie Mac has agreed to purchase $25 million of bonds at
25 basis points through the market, which will subsidize the
mortgage rate for homebuyers in the GO Zone counties. As a
result of Freddie Mac's bond purchase, $25 million (of the $100
million total) is available to homebuyers in the GO Zone coun-
ties at a 30-year fixed interest-rate of 5.50%. Florida Housing
and Freddie Mac officially closed on the bond transaction on
Wednesday, May 24, 2006.

Continued on Page 6


Significance, Peopling Places
Mission Sari Luis de Talimali flourished for almost half a cen-
tury in the dual role of western outpost.of Spanish power in
Florida and as the home for one of Apalachee Province's most
influential villages.' It was the launching point of many Span-
ish and native expeditions to the west, including the search
for Sieur de Rene Robert Cavalier LaSalle's 1682 French settle-
ment. San Luis was also the Spaniards' point of contact with
the Indian peoples living along the Chattahoochee, Tallapoosa,
Coosa, and Alabama Rivers who were the forebears of the Upper
and Lower Creeks and the Seminoles.
With the establishment of Charles Towne in 1670 as the capi-
tal of the British colony of Carolina, the importance of
Apalachee and San Luis was enhanced as a bulwark against
the spread of British influence along the Chattahoochee River
and farther west. San Luis is the only Hispano-Indian site in
Florida (outside of Nombre de Dios in St. Augustine) whose
identity was never lost, and it was home to the ancestors of
the only known descendants of sixteenth and seventeenth cen-
tury native Floridians.
To date, archaeological research at San Luis de Talimali has
had a profound impact on our understanding of missionization,
acculturation, and contact period studies on the whole, and'
much of the site remains to be investigated. After almost two
decades of archaeological research, San Luis is the most thor-
oughly investigated mission site in Spanish Florida, and find-
ings at the site have fundamentally altered the concept of
Florida mission life. It is the only known site in any Spanish-
occupied area that contains sacred and secula elements from
both Indian and Spanish'societies. Thus it offers the unique
opportunity to examine acculturation from, both the Indian
and Spanish perspectives, a very rare circumstance in his-
torical archaeology. For example, the presence of both the
Apalachee council house and Franciscan church on the site
at the same time offer unparalleled opportunities to observe
ritual conservatism and change in both Spanish and Indian
sectors. Research at San Luis is also altering the concept of
"frontier" and redefining the archaeological correlates of fron-
tier society. As such, it is making important contributions to
research methodology, the discipline of historical archaeol-
ogy, and our understanding of colonial societies.
Transformations in Apalachee society that we have been able
to verify from historical records or document archaeologically
at San Luis include the adoption of domesticated plants and
animals in the native diet and economy, intensification of
manual labor (although not on the same level as other Florida
mission Indians), literacy among chiefs for whom reading and
writing was a form of esoteric knowledge, and, for Apalachee
women, integration into Spanish households as servants, con-
cubines, and wives. Native, men received weapons training,
served as sentries, earned military titles, and made up most
of the Spanish-instigated strike forces sent out from San Luis.
The Apalachees probably constituted a formal militia (Harm
and McEwan 1998).
However, the most pervasive and profound change in the lives
of all Apalachees resulted from their religious conversion. The
Apalachees requested friars, accepted the Catholic faith vol-
untarily, and were described as being "thoroughly Christian-
ized." Native burials at San Luis (and other Florida missions)
Continued on Page 4


'S


I.


June 9 22, 2006


I I I


s- I -


r--"


Do








Page 2 9 June 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs

June 6, 2006

Present: Chairperson
Cheryl Sanders;
Commissioner Jimmy
Mosconis; Commissioner
Noah Lockley, Jr.;
Commissioner Russell
Crofton and
Commissioner Bevin
Putnal.

Extension Director
Bill Mahan made the follow-
ing report:
4-H/Tropicana Public Speak-
ing Program: The Countywide
4-H Tropicana Public Speak-
ing, Contest was held on May
10th. The winners were: Carla
Lewis (4th & 5th Grade Divi-
sion Carrabelle Elementary)
and Skylar Stultz (6th Grade
Division ABC School).
Franklin County 4-H Summer
Camp: Franklin County will
be sending at least 8 youth to
Camp Timpoochee next week
(June 12 16) to 4-H County
Camp. Two of our returning
campers will be councilors
this year.
Red Tide Seminar: I attended
a seminar on red tides in
North Florida on May 11lth.
During the program I was able
to speak with red tide re-
searchers at the FL FWC's
Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission about their
work on alternative tests to
the mouse bioassay for test-
ing for red tide toxins. They
said that they are currently
working on two tests which
they hope to have ready to
present to the ISSC in 2007
for their consideration. They
said the two, (methods that
they are currently working on
are a Liquid Chromatogra-
phy/Mass Spectrophotometer
(LC/Mass Spec) and an En-
zyme-Linked Immunosorbent
Assay (ELISA) test. Currently
both have problems with the
toxin extraction methods and
correlating the new test re-
sults to the mouse bioassay.
They explained that the main
difference between these tests
and the mouse bioassay is
that in the mouse test you are
directly testing the toxic ef-
fects of the toxin on a mam-
mal. In the other two tests yMu
are detecting toxin levels and
you need to account for the
24'pe s 3fBrevetoxin and8 the'
14-types of metabolites that
have been isolated.
Apalachicola Watershed
Invasives Working Group
Meeting: I attended the
group's quarterly meeting on
May 23rd. Featured speakers
at the meeting included Dr.
Jim Cuda, from UF/IFAS on
the use of biological controls
for tropical soda apple and
other non-native plant species
and Dr. Vander Meer (USDA)
on imported fire ants control
efforts. Dr. Cuda told me that
Franklin County is now the
northern-most county to have
Brazilian pepper trees grow-
ing in it. This tree has become
a serious "pest" in central and
south FL.
Larra Wasps and Mole Cricket
Control: I am currently work-
ing with Dr. Richard Sprenkel,
UF-IFAS North FL Research &
Education Center-Quincy on
a study to see if Larra wasps,
a mole cricket hunter, have
become established in
Franklin County. Lan-a wasps
were first introduced in south
FL in 1981 for mole cricket
control. In 1993, the wasp was
introduced in the Gainesville
area and began slowly spread-
ing to neighboring counties. In
2002, the wasp was released
in several areas of north
Florida'including Tallahassee
and Panama City. Dr.
Sprenkel has now setup moni-
toring stations in the FL Pan-
handle counties to determine
how well the wasp has become
established.
FL HB 7175/SB 2128 High-
lights: The following becomes
effective July 1, 2006 related
to funding, abandoned or der-
elict vessels afid hurricane
response. Funding Section
1: Amends how fuel tax funds
can be used. They may now
be used for uniform waterway
markers, derelict vessel re-


moval and public boat ramps,
lifts, hoists, marine railways
and other public launching
facilities and activities. Der-
elict Vessels-Sections 7 & 11:
Make it unlawful to "store,
leave or abandon any derelict
vessel as defined in
s.823.11(1) and authorize any
law enforcement officer to re-
move such vessels, with cost
recoverable against the owner
of the vessel. Section 9: De-
fines the term "abandoned
property" to include "derelict
vessels", thus clarifying the
authority of local govern-
ments to deal with them un-
der abandoned property stat-
utes. Section 10: Prohibits
vessel owners who have be-
come liable for removal costs
from registering any vessels or
vehicles. Section 11: Broadly
defines the term "derelict ves-
sels. For example, a vessel
that is left at a dock or
beached without consent is a
"derelict vessel" that may be
removed by law enforcement
or by the private property
owner after 60 days notice
(certified mail). Violators are
subject to criminal and civil
penalties, as well as removal
costs. Hurricane Response:
The derelict vessel provisions
would apply to many vessels
after a hurricane. Section 2:
Provides new authority for
marina contracts to require
owners to remove vessels from
marinas or authorize removal
by the marina and charge a
reasonable fee. Marinas. can
also secure vessels and
charge fees. Liability is lim-
ited.

Solid Waste Director
Van Johnson made the follow-
ing report to the Board:,

Recovered Materials
Annual Certification
FOR BOARD ACTION: I have
for the Boards approval and
the Chairman's signature, the
annual Application for Recov-
ered Materials Certification
and Reporting Form. Florida
Statutes requires agencies or
companies handling more
than 600 tons of recovered
materials to provide certifica-
tion to the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection
annually. During the year
2005, the recycling program,
recycled approximately 870
tons of solid waste, which rep-
resents an increase of 130
tons from last year. The an-
nual cost for this certification
s $50.00. The Board ap-
proved.

Consolidated Solid
Waste Grant Application
FOR BOARD ACTION: I also
have for the Boards approval
* and, the Chairman's signature
the completed Consolidated
Solid Waste Management
Grant application for ,Fiscal
Year 06/07. Franklin
County's portion will roughly
be the same as last years
$191,176. The application is
due back to the State by July
1st.

Animal Control Officers
Taser Use Policy
FOR BOARD ACTION: I have
attached for Board review and
adoption a policy governing
the use of the Taser by Ani-
mal Control Officers. The of-
ficers have received training
from the Sheriff Department
and have been issued a Taser.
The units remain out of ser-
vice until your review and
adoption of the attached
policy.

Public Works
Maintenance Facility
FOR BOARD ACTION: Over
the past two months I have
been working with Sperry &
Associates out of Tallahassee
to obtain a quote to construct
the new Public Works main-
tenance facility. I have been
quoted the price of $257,672,
to construct a 6,400 square
foot steel building. The quote
includes the design, concrete
slab, the steel, the rail for the
crane lift and the erection of
the building. The County will
be responsible for the permit-
ting and site prep. Therefore,
I'm requesting Board approval
to move forward with the con-
struction and to utilize the
services of Sperry & Associ-
ates to build the facility.
The Board approved the
project in a close 3:2 vote with
some expression of concern
whether the new facility was
needed at the present time.


Doris Pendleton
The County Tax Appraiser
appeared before the Board to
ask for legal fees of
$14,578.64 in litigation in-
volving her office and
Carrabelle Properties Limited.

Haskell Company
Ms. Tanmd Ray of the Haskell
Company appeared before the
Board to ask the Board to ap-
ply for a feasibility study of
water needs in the County.
Jimmy Mosconis expressed
the concern that the new en-
gineer reviews this proposal
and that advanced by Camile
Tharpe. No formal action was
taken on the proposal ad-
vanced by Ms. Ray.

Government Services
Group, Inc.
Camille Tharpe appeared be-
fore the Board to explain her
proposal for funding beach
renourishment, of particular
relevance to Alligator Point.
Director of
Administrative Services,
Alan Pierce made the follow-
ing report to the Board:
Inform Board that I inter-
,viewed a number of candi-
dates for Courthouse Mainte-
nance position, and have of-
fered the job to Mr. Frankie
Crosby. He will start June 16,
2006.
Mr. Dan Rothwell, candidate
for County Engineer, is here
to be interviewed by the
Board. Mr. Rothwell will be
working directly for the Board
so I believe it appropriate that
the Board make a decision to
hire him, but I recommend
him, and Preble-Rish recom-
mends him. The compensa-
tion package that I have of-
fered Mr. Rothwell is a salary
of $78,000, with Senior Man-.
agement retirement benefits.
The Board approved the hire.
Mr. Pierce provided the Board
with copy of letter to Mr. Steve
Harris, St. George Island Civic
Club president, supporting a
second grant for additional
dune restoration on St.
George Island. This grant is
also being written by Ms.
Bruce Hall. on behalf of STAR.
Board action to extend the
FWC Bluff Road Boat Ramp
grant till Sept. 30, 2006 to
provide time for the parking
area to be finished. The Board
approved the extension.
Clarification of grant award.
For the past several months
the county and the Northwest
Florida Water Management.
District have been.workine or,
two, sets ,Of draftrant. docu-,
ments. One was for
stormwater improvements in
Eastpoint. and the other for
stormwater improvements on
Sawyer Street on St. George
Island. Both of these were the
results of grants written by
the county. On May 16, 2006,
I recommended the Board,
sign an agreement between
the Northwest Florida Water
Management District and the
county for the installation of
stormwater treatment facili-
ties in Eastpoint. The docu-'
ments the District actually
sent down were for
stormwater improvements on
Sawyer Street on St. George
Island. I need to have the
record corrected to indicate
that on May 16, 2006, the
Board signed a grant agree-
ment between the District and
the county for $366,000 grant
for stormwater improvements.'
and shoreline stabilization on
Sawyer Street. Board action.
And a second motion to ap-
prove the signing of the agree-
ments that have just been re-
ceived for the $251,000 worth
of stormwater treatment fa-
cilities in Eastpoint. The
Board approved.


Board action to sign Commu-
;:nity Rating System form for
iFranklin County to continue
':in the CRS program, which
provides a reduction in flood
insurance premiums. The
Board approved.
Mr. Pierce provided the Board
with copy of petition, as of yet
unsigned, by citizens inter-
ested in adopting a one year
moratorium on condos in C-1
zoning. At this time condos,
or any residential uses, are
not allowed in C-1 zoning, but
a blank petition has been sub-
mitted to the Planning Office.
Mr. Pierce informed the Board
that the past Legislative ses-
sion passed several bills re-
lated to affordable housing,
and at least one bill has fund-
ing associated with it. While
there has been some effort by
the community to develop
some affordable housing
strategies, Michael Moron and
I recommend the county com-
mission take an active role in
investigating what funds
might be available to the
county. In July Michael Mo-
ron and I will be asking the
Board to appoint an Afford-
able Housing Board made up
of 5 members, one from each
county commission district.
The Board will investigate the
state funding and work with
any large property owners on
developing a land trust.
Board action to sign contracts
with architect for courthouse
renovations. Mr. Shuler has
reviewed the documents. The
Board approved.
Mr. Mike Rundel, Emergency
Management, is here to
present to the Board an agree-
ment between the county and
the school board for the use
of school buses and drivers in
the event the county has to
order a mandatory evacuation
of the county. The school
board has already signed the
agreement. The state of
Florida is requiring these
agreements be in place. The
agreement does not stipulate
the number of buses and driv-
ers to be available but the
understanding between the
county emergency manage-
ment office and the school
board is that 8 bus drivers
have volunteered to drive 8
buses out of the county to a
designated shelter if a man-
datory evacuation is ordered.
At this time, two buses would
go to each of the following lo-
cations: Chapman Elemen-
tary, Brown Elementary,
Carrabelle High School, and
Chilas Hall in Lanark Village.
These buses would make as
many trips as possible, but it
is certainly possible only one
trip can be made from each
location: The buses' will''be
going to shelters in Tallahas-
see. Expenses would be kept
by the school board and then
submitted to. the county.
FEMA would reimburse the
county for expenses. The
Board approved.
The Board was informed that
the Bureau of Emergency
Medical Services approved an
EMS grant of $32,662 for im-
provements to the ambulance
service.
Provide Board copy of letter
Chairman Sanders wrote to
DOT regarding the protection
of water access while DOT
builds the US 98 shoreline
stabilization project.
The Board was provided a
copy of grant application to
,the Florida Fish and Wildlife
for the construction of the St.
George Island Boat Ramp. The
grant request is for $877,000,
which is approximately 'A of
all the FWC boat money.state
wide for boat ramps, so it will
be very competitive if we get:
the full funding.
Mr. Pierce informed the Board
,it is time for the county to


advertise for proposals to
write and administer the
county's CDBG grant applica-
tion. The Board has to go
through a formal process to
select a CDBG grant writer
and administrator consultant.
For the past several CDBG
projects, Ms. Debbie Belcher
has been the county's CDBG
grant writer and administra-
tor. but she, as well as any-
body else who is interested,
must re-apply. If no grant is
awarded, then no compensa-
tion is paid. The position re-
quires specific knowledge of
federal CDBG rules in order
to be successful. This year the
county is eligible for approxi-
mately $700,000 in CDBG
funds for improvements to
areas that have the required
level of low and moderate in-
come families. Unfortunately,
most of Franklin County no
longer has the required num-
ber of low and moderate in-
come residents in any one
area, .so there are very few
places in the county which are
eligible for CDBG funds. Part
of Eastpoint is still eligible,
and that is most likely the
area that the County's CDBG
grant writer will recommend
or a project. The Eastpoint
Sewer and Water District has
an interest in replacing and
extending sewer lines in the
Ridge and Wilderness Road
areas, but the actual project
will be developed after a grant
Writer and administrator has
been selected. Mark Curenton
and I recommend that Board
advertise for a CDBG grant
writer and administrator, and
have the Board appoint a
committee to open the propos-
als and rank them prior to the
July 5th meeting. We are rec-
ommending this be done be-
cause the time for submitting
a CDBG grant application is
the end of July and we need
to have our consultant se-
lected as soon as possible,
Board action to advertise for
a CDBG grant writer and ad-
ministrator and to appoint a
committee of Mark Curenton,
Michael Moron, and Erin
Griffith from the Finance Of-
fice, to rank these CDBG pro-
posals.
Board action to direct the
County Attorney to negotiate
a trade of property in the lot
directly across the street from
the Annex between the county
and Mr. Grady Leavins. The
county owns five lots in the
block but'they are not all in a
row, and Mr. Leavins owns
two lots, which are also not
together. One of Mr. Leavins
lots is between the county
lots. In order for Mr. Leavins
and the county to maximize
the use -f each others prop-
erty I recommend the Board
offer to swap the appropriate
lots so that the county has five
lots in a row., and Mr. Leavins
has two lots in a row. While
'Mr. Leavins paid more for his
last lot than the county paid
for its lots, Mr. Leavins has
agreed to a straight swap with
no money changing hands.
The Board approved the land
swap.
By Richard E. Noble

Rick Marcum-
Opportunity Florida
Rick Marcum representing
"Opportunity Florida" was a
refreshing optimistic light in
the midst of the usual infinite
dark cloud of perpetual prob-
lems facing our local govern-
ment representatives at these
semi-monthly meetings. He
began talking about a large
federal grant to his organiza-
tion and holding up an old


fashioned mason jar contain
ing the secret concoction for
homemade cranberry muf-
fins. "Good morning commis-
sioners. As you might know
Opportunity Florida got a ...
grant for $135,000 for a fea-
sibility study to see if we could
get total coverage throughout
all of our areas. As a result
we started working with a pri-
vate sector fund who just re-
ceived a USDA-RUS grant for
33.8 million dollars to bring
broad band service in our re-
gion and other regions as well.
One of the things that we
identified as needing for com-
munity benefit was to start
developing e-commerce ...
evoking for people to sell prod-
uct out of their house for in-
come. I brought a sample of
how this really pays off..." he
then held up his mason jar
full of ingredients-flour,
dried cranberries and what-
ever. "This is nothing more
than the ingredients to cran-
berry muffins.. These people
started selling out of their
house as extra income. Even-
tually they quit their normal
jobs and this product was
purchased by Wal-Mart. So
growing businesses is some-
times what we are about. We
give seminars and set people
up to do their own web sites;
and they don't have to be com-
puter literate. It is going to be
real easy and we're going to
be. working with the libraries
so that they can do all that on
less than seventy-five dollars
a year ... Recently in working
with the tourism department
we got a CD. It is (demon-
strates) the most current of all
grants and programs that are
out there for municipalities,
counties, etc. There is a lot of
money being left on the
table...
Also in conjunction with
Progress Energy we are still
trying to work out $500,000
for the oyster test Lab. We feel
that we have made some good
progress. Senator Nelson is
helping to champion that
along with Congressman Allen
Boyd ... (shortly) we should
have our tax free status and
at that time we should be able
to initiate our land trust, our
community development cor-
porations. This is in conjunc-
tion with the group 'that St.
Joe has been working with.
The land can be donated; we
hold the land in perpetuity
and in that way when people
need affordable housing they
won't have to overcome the
land cost. At some 'point in
time they earn the right (to the
property) and we just deed it
over to them. We don't want
people coming in here and
taking these houses and just
turning them,ovyeppn aspecu-.
lati e ba~is n, ,.
There was then an inter-
change between the Board
members and Mr. Marcum
with regards to the nitty-gritty
of this Affordable Housing
Land Grant procedure. There
was a good deal of talk about
infrastructure, leveraging, tax
incentives, work-force hous-
ing, entities and accesses fol-
lowed by several howeverrs.
It is this reporter's opinion
that it would take the coop-
erative efforts of John Ken-
neth Galbraith, Milton
Freidman and Alan
Greenspan to explain all the
actual economics involved in
this program. Unfortunately
Professor Galbraith is dead,
Mr. Freidman is hanging on
an edge in his mid-nineties,
and Aan Greenspan has re-
tired; so I guess that it will be

Continued on Page 3


GENERAL CONTRACTORS
RG0055056







Tractor Work Foundation Pilir


* Aerobic Sewage Treatment Systems
Marine Construction
Septics Coastal Hauling


ngs


Commercial Construction
Utility Work-Public &
Private








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


9 ue20. -Pan- 3


Briefs from Page 2

more or less an act of blind
faith in goodness, truth, and
the American Way. "If we can
go in and prove to them (the
State)," Mr. Marcum went on,
"that we have a need for af-
fordable housing (under
$200,000) the State can do-
S nate or put the land into the
trust for that use as well."
"Are you serious about the
State giving land?" asked
Commissioner Mosconis.
"Yes, that is a fact, Sir."
"Do you know how must land
the State owns in this
County?"
"Yes Sir, I do."
"Over 80%. Who can lobby the
SState (on this issue)?"
"I will be ready to say let's do'
business. I will have my en-
tity in place. I've got my Board;
I've got representation from all
the Counties. We want to go
over there and say; Here's our
needs; we have identified that
we're short X number of units
in Franklin County or Liberty
County and
Mr. Mosconis then inter-
rupted to point out to Mr.
Marcum that the State has
basically confiscated land
which it then uses for it own
development and he wanted to
know why-if they were al-
lowed to- do that-they
couldn't also help the County
out with some of that State
land when the County is suf-
fering in an emergency situa-
tion.
"It is my understanding that
they can do just that."
"Well, how do we go about
doing that? This is the first
time that I have ever heard
anybody say that (that the
State would provide land to
the County)."
'The first time that I have ever
heard such a thing either,"
offered Mr. Putnal.
"It is one of those things-you
have got to prove your point.
You've got to go in there and
have allyour ducks in a row.
You have got to be ready to
take advantage. You don't
want to drop the ball when
you are prepared, to move. But
I was advised and consulted
that that is a possibility. If we
go up there with a good plan,
I have been told that the State
will cooperate."
Mr. Marcum then went on to
explain that Opportunity


Letter To The Editor I


EE
Florida has already created
over 3,000 jobs in the eight
Florida Counties where they
are active te but they are lack-
ing in places for this newly
created workforce to live. His
contention being that the
County's argument is a viable
one and that he saw no rea-
son why it would not be ap-
proved by the State if it were
presented properly.
Mr. Marcum ended his ses-
sion by requesting that the
county reserve space on any
new towers for community
and public use. He submitted
a sample ordinance.

Mechanical Oyster
Harvesting
Linda Raffield spoke on behalf
of the Seafood Workers Asso-
ciation president, John
Richards, with regards to re-
cent discussions-and requests
for the mechanical harvesting
of oysters in Apalachicola Bay.
"On behalf of the Franklin
County Seafood Workers As-
sociation we want to put on
public record that we do not
now or will we ever support
dredging of public places in
the bay. We do not want his-
tory to repeat itself. In the
1920's this industry was dev-
astated when dredges over-
harvested our bay. The Indus-
try has enough to battle with
dealing with natural disasters
and other obstacles without
having to deal with persons
who have been entrusted to
make decisions and recom-
mendations on behalf of the
Seafood Industry. We respect-
fully request your attention to
this matter and your support
,against this dredging issue."
The Board unanimously sup-
ported the' Seafood Workers
Association in their request to
oppose any dredging of oys-
ters in Apalachicola Bay.
Gary Shiver spoke again to the
issue of the poor and dis-
placed residents of Franklin
County. Mr. Shiver said that'
he had been informed that
FEMA has trailer homes avail-
able upon request that could
be used for the purposes that
he has been suggesting for
over a year. Ms. Sanders said
that she would meet with Mr.
Shiver in the morning and
present his notion to Mr.
Butch Baker and others in the
emergency management.
Other County commissioners
offered to assist in finding out
if Mr. Shiver's information is
reliable and/supportable. :


Who is Florida's Clean-

Water Governor?

By Linda Young
Director, Clean, Water Network of Florida
The Florida governor's race is heading into crunch time. Po-
litical ads and headlines will start heating up this summer,
just like the water that fuels hurricanes and algae blooms.
Many issues are in play in the campaigns. But think about it:
What's more important than clean water?
Blue waves, clear lakes, springs and rivers are the geese that
lay Florida's golden eggs; the reason we're the top tourist des-
tination in the world; and the gift that makes our cash regis-
ters ring. Without clean water, we're nothing.
We need a governor who will stand up for clean water not


pPOST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
Facsimile 850-670-1685
,IIo e-mail: hoffer531 @gtcom.net
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.
Vol. 15, No. 12 June 9,2006
Publisher ..................T.om W. Hoffer.
Director of Operations .. .......Andy Dyal
Contributors ...... ........... Skip Frink
Geri Moore
Carol Noble
Richard Noble
Dawn Radford
Photographers ................ Diane Beauvais Dyal
Geri Moore
Advertising Design and
Production Artist ............... Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate .......... .Jerry Weber
Production Associate ...........Richard Williams

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein .................. ..Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis ................ Apalachicola
Skip Frink ............. ......... Carrabelle
David Butler .. ................. .. Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung ...........Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins .......Eastpoint
Barbara Revell .................. .Lanark Village
Richard Harper ...... ............ St. George Island

Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, th single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue
would cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the
Chronicle for price quotes if you seek several different
or similar issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96
including tax. Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26
including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2006
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


)rroRIL .& Co
someone who will repay big-bucks corporate campaign con-
tributors by letting.them use our public waters as a private
sewer.
This election, we have a chance to elect a "clean water" gover-
nor. Who is it? We don't know yet. That's why our grassroots
group, Clean Water Network of Florida, is giving Floridians an
opportunity to take a simple step to pin down each candidate's
position, on water policy. Everyone can participate for the cost
of five postcard stamps. Floridians are sending postcards to
each of the top four candidates: Jim Davis and Rod Smith on
the Democratic ticket; and Charlie Crist and Tom Gallagher
on the Republican ticket.
The cards ask the candidates to commit, in writing, whether
they will do four specific things to clean up our waters:
1. Work diligently to reduce and eliminate mercury and dioxin
releases that end up in the fish we eat;
2. Support a moratorium on any permits to add nutrients in
polluted waters;
3. Champion a movement to stop destroying the wetlands that
protect us from storm surges;
4. Abandon the flawed Impaired Waters Rule-which the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency ruled illegal-and that the
state is using to avoid making polluters clean up.
Over 4,000 cards have already been printed for the candidates.
Smith, Crist, Gallagher, and Davis are supposed to send the
card back to you; if they don't, you'll know which candidates
don't share your concerns. As the candidates receive thou-
sands of cards, they'll see that this is atop issue for all of us.
You send Clean Water Network a card, too, so we can keep
track and inform voters.
Clean water isn't a partisan issue. I travel throughout the state,
talking to citizens of all kinds who are blindsided by the rapid
decline of their local waters: algae blooms, dead fish, mana-
tees, dolphins and sea turtles washing ashore, dead zones on
the ocean floor, blighted reefs, sick lakes, and cloudy springs.
These people-from airboat clubs to schoolchildren; from
League of Women Voters chapters to Scuba and fishing clubs-
are desperate.for environmental leadership out of Tallahas-
see.
Stories about gross water pollution will hit the news right about
the time that people head to the water for summer vacation.
Just like last summer, they'll be confronted with slimy algae
and closed beaches due to sewage bacteria. It happened last
year, and it will happen this year.
Look around: Polluted Lake Okeechobee water is flowing out
of the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie Rivers, choking estuaries
on both coasts that were clean and full of fish 15 years ago.
The St. John's River, a Florida treasure, is already getting al-
gae blooms, which is very early in the year for that to be hap-
pening. These aren't inevitable events: they are the result of
lax regulation in Tallahassee.
In the case of the St. John's, citizens watching the slimy algae
bloom form are outraged because an agency of the governor -
the Department of Environmental Protection-has just an-
nounced weaker standards that will allow a million more
pounds of nitrogen to go into the river every.year. A million
pounds! Why? The DEP is pushing for weak standards for our
waters all over the state, and they have until January-when
the new governor comes in-to further weaken water quality
rules.
How can the state be weakening standards at a time like this?
What can we do about it? Help us find our "clean water" gov-
ernor-and then vote for change.
Linda Young is the director of the Clean Water Network of
Florida, a non-profit organization with 155 member groups
across the state dedicated to protecting Florida's waters
and assuring citizens of the right to participate in govern-
ment decision-making that affects their communities. She'
can be reached at llyoung2@earthlinknet. To get'post-
cards to send to the, candidates, call 850-222-8701 or log
onto www.cwn-se.org.


Library Happenings

By Judi Rundel
The Friends of the Franklin County Public Library will meet
on Wednesday, June 14th, at 5:30 p.m. at the Eastpoint
Branch. The public is invited to attend. For informatidh, call
670-8151.
The Library's after-school youth programs and FROG Family
Learning Program will enjoy the sights and sounds of the Afri-
can-Caribbean Dance Theater on Saturday, June 10th. Infor-
mation about this field trip to Tallahassee can be obtained by
calling Ms. Marlene at 697-2091 or one of the youth program
coordinators who can be contacted at 653-2784, 670-5250,
and 697-9216.
Summer Reading is about to begin. In order to be in on all the
fun, register your children (grades K 6) at one of the library
branches or at the Apalachicola Program site on 8th Street.
This year the program will be held on Fridays and Saturdays:
10:00 11:30 for grades K-3 and 1:00 2:30 for grades 4-6,
beginning June 16th and running through July 29th. Regis-
tration forms are available'at the Eastpoint and Carrabelle
branches of the library and at the Apalachicola Program Cen-
ter (148 8th Street). For information and registration, call 670-
8151, 697-2366, or 653-2784.
Carrabelle's Baby Book Club story time will be held at a new'
time-right before Summer Reading, at 9:30 a.m. Call Ms.
Marlene at 697-2091 for information.


Cook s ,,.
Insurance
AGE N C Y
A Gulf State Community Bank Company
www.cookinsuranceagency.com
(800) 82-7530
73 Avenue,'E 205 NW Avenue A
4palachicola, FL ( Carrabelle, FL
W850) 653-9310 (850) 697-3473
S SER VING THE CAST SINCE 1913




I 4.t


Lanark Village WH
Townhouse, 110169.
Renovated 3BR/1BA
apartment close to -.:'."
community center golf course and post office. Screened in
front porch makes for the enjoyment of the sea breezes
and the cool evenings. Freshly repainted and ready for you
to move in. Call today for your preview. Asking $149,900.


Office: (850) 697-9000
Toll-Free: (800) 613-5962
Cell: (850) 899-0582


314 St. James Street
Carrabelle, FL 32322
Fax: (850) 697-4311


Email: allynj@florida-beach.com
-',


MOMENTARYY


The TIGERS after-school youth program is sponsoring the
popular Teen Pregnancy Prevention day on Friday, June 16th,
at the Eastpoint Firehouse. This all day event will feature break-
fast, a panel discussion by representatives of our local com-
munity, a BBQ lunch, a poster contest, concurrent workshops,
lots of prizes, and lots of fun. Call 670-8151 for information.
Every Monday and Thursday, 4:30 5:30 p.m. Yoga class at
the Carrabelle branch, hosted by the FROG Family Learning
Program. Call Marlene at 697-2091 for information.
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 2:30 5:00 p.m.: Tu-
tor Time for students is available at the Carrabelle Branch
with Marlene. Adult education in literacy, computer instruc-
tion, pre-GED work and GED preparation can also be obtained
by calling 697-2091 for more information and to make an ap-
pointment.
Wednesday, 2:30 3:00 p.m.: Members of the young adult
book club, The Book House, are reading and talking about
their favorite books. It is a great way to find out what everyone
is reading. Call Ms. Tonia or Ms. Michelle at 697-2366 for the
scoop.
Every Thursday: "Read To Me": Reading to pre-school chil-
dren is held at the Eastpoint branch from 11:00 11:30 a.m.
Ms. Tonia delights young children and their caregivers with
one half hour of stories from the many books in the library's
collection. For further information, call Tonia at 670-4423.
Friday, 3:00 4:00 p.m.: Chair exercise-realistic and help-
ful for persons of varying degrees of ability, gentle movements
are all done while sitting in a chair. This program is at the
Carrabelle branch. Call Ms. Marlene for more information, 697--
2091
The Franklin County Public Library's programs-FROG, WITH-
IT! and TIGERS-are offered at no cost to participants. Regis-
tration however is required. For information about the Library
and any of its programs, please call 697-2366, 670-8151, or
653-2784 or view the Library's website located at
www.franklin.lib.fl.us.


Boyd Report

On This

-Memorial

Day

By Congressman
Allen Boyd
Memorial Dayis a wonderful
time to gather with family and
friends, but more importantly,
it is the time to reflect on the
blessings we have as Americans
and honor the men and women
who made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom. As we pay trib-
ute to those who courageously served our country in times of
war and peace, we also must take this opportunity to renew
bur efforts for our troops, our veterans and their families. Those
of us who serve in Congress should thank veterans by rolling
up our sleeves and addressing the critical unmet needs of our
veterans' population.
One of my top priorities has always been to honor the commit-
ment this country has made to our veterans, and in Congress,
this is accomplished through meaningful action and tangible
assistance. For this reason, I have been working to enact a
new GI Bill of Rights for the 21st Century. In 1944, we hon-
ored the Greatest Ceneralion through a Bill of Rights' and' 1n'
each major military conflict since, we have honored the ser-
vice,of,o,ur, soldiers, through.,a new GI Bill. This bill would,
strengthen benefits for our men and women in uniform today
and provide long overdue benefits for the veterans and mili-
tary retirees who have already served. The new GI Bill focuses
on improving veterans' healthcare, including mental healthcare,
to meet the needs of our returning troops.
The bill also would end the Disabled Veterans' Tax, which pre-
vents disabled veterans from receiving military retiree and
veterans' disability benefits concurrently. At this time. over
41,000 Florida retirees are forced to pay this tax and give up
one dollar of their pension for every dollar of disability pay
they receive. I have worked with my colleagues in Congress to
score a partial repeal of this tax, but the remaining disabled
military retirees should be allowed to receive all of their prom-
ised benefits.
In addition to improving benefits, we also must make healthcare
more accessible and timely to our veterans. In 2003, the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs developed the Capital Asset Re-
alignment for Enhanced Services (CARES) Commission to meet
the increased demand for veterans' healthcare services over
the next 20 years. The CARES Commission made several rec-
ommendations for improved access to veterans' healthcare
through Community-Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs), spe-
cifically to address the healthcare needs in rural areas.
In 2004. the Commission stated their intent to build 156
CBOCs throughout the country by 2012, including one in
Marianna, Florida. Currently, veterans in Jackson County and
surrounding areas must travel to Panama City, Tallahassee
and even farther for their healthcare needs, causing overcrowd-
ing in these facilities and inconvenience and difficulties for
many veterans in North Florida. With 22 new CBOCs opened
in 2005 and 68 more in the works for the next, two years, I am
confident these facilities will greatly improve access to veter-
ans' healthcare nationwide. The CBOC in Marianna is still in
the planning phase, and I will continue to work in Congress to
ensure that the healthcare needs of our North Florida veter-
ans are met.
Strengthening veterans' benefits and providing more accessi-
bility to veterans' healthcare are two major ways that the fed-
eral government can plan and provide for the needs of our
veterans. With over 21,000 Floridians currently serving in Iraq
and Afghanistan, we must all be reminded of the true mean-
ing of this holiday and show our overwhelming gratitude and
respect for our troops and our veterans. Those who have fought
and defended our country can be proud of the job they have
done, and for this. Congress must deliver on our promises
an'd responsibilities now and in the future.


Flamingos!
A full-service Restaurant and Bar
at Juice & Java
Hours:
Mon. Tues. Wed: 8A-2P
Thurs. Fri.: 8A-9P I l
Sat.: 8A-10P IWH
Live Music Sat. 6-9P Y


49 W. PINE AVENUE ST. GEORGE ISLAND
PHONE: 850-927-3925


"A Ifl I Ch


* Gated Community Fleetwood, NC Preview Property
* Mountain Lots with Views ofNC, VA, TN on June 4, 10, I1,
* 90% Fnancing- On Spot 17 8 18ti
.- ,_,_ ., ,1


T .r a


Robet M.Smih Aution& Ralty NC#341


I


9 June 2006 Pag~e 3








Page 4 9 June 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


San L-is from Page 1

demonstrate that converts not only chose to be buried in Catho-
lic churches, but in an almost purely Christian fashion. Docu-
ments reveal that when the missions were attacked by invad-
ing Anglo-Creek forces in 1704, a number of Apalachee men
were captured and tortured on the Stations of the Cross.
Throughout their ordeal, two of San Luis's native leaders, An-
tonio Enija and Antonio Cuipa, continued to profess their faith.
The King of Spain was so impressed with their devotion that
he recommended to the Vatican that they be considered. for
canonization as martyrs. Today, the descendants of those
Apalachees who migrated from San Luis are still practicing
Catholics. They have traced their lineage through parish
records and have used much of the research conducted at
San Luis to support their application for federal recognition.
Spaniards living at San Luis are believed to have enjoyed a
prosperous lifestyle dominated by agricultural endeavors that
supported vigorous trade. Their diet, material life, and archi-
tecture were highly Iberian in nature, although they did adapt
to local conditions, including the replacement of wheat with
corn as a dietary staple. Colonial Spanish culture at San Luis
was most profoundly affected by mestizaje (intermarriage and
interbreeding). This is a pattern found throughout the His-
panic New World since intermarriage was encouraged by the
Church and Crown as a means of civilizing the native popula-
tion (Deagan 1983; McEwan 1991b, 1993). Native women be-
came the cultural brokers who interacted most closely with
Spaniards in their homes, while Indian men generally oper-
ated on the fringes of Spanish colonial society as laborers.
Spanish-Indian children were mestizos and, as such, were
exempt from manual labor. Consequently, it is believed that
Apalachee women accepted marriage to Spaniards as a form
of upward mobility for themselves and their children.
The'popular belief that the missions of La Florida were primi-
tive outposts, and that their residents were impoverished, long-
suffering victims is no longer accepted. Rather, research at
San Luis has demonstrated that a complex mix of social and
material adjustments were made by both Spaniards and
Apalachees as coping strategies that resulted in a dynamic
colonial society.
Site
San Luis de Talimali was the western capital of Spanish Florida
from 1656 to 1704. Among its more than 1400 residents were
a Spanish deputy governor and one of the Apalachee IndianS'


. f 'T.


: ,- .. .. .. _.- .C ... -
-- -LZ
.
A portion of the Church complex.
most powerful chiefs. The seventeenth century town center of
the original San Luis settlement was designated a National
Historic Landmark on October 9, 1960, under the name,San
Luis de Apalache. Historically, 'San Luis de Talimali included
a large central plaza, Apalachee council house, chiefs house,
a Spanish village, a Franciscan religious complex (church, fri-
ary and detached kitchen) and a Spanish fort, all of Iwlhich
have been revealed through archaeology and historical re-
search. In keeping with their traditional pattern of living in
dispersed hamlets and farmsteads, most of the Apalachees
living under the jurisdiction of San Luis resided near their
fields in the low-lying countryside around the town center.
They would have been able to hear the church bells through-
out the day and see the hilltop town with its magnificent build-
ings in the distance, giving them a sense of community. Virtu-
ally all of this land has been lost to development over the years
and presently underlies the Florida State University campus,
residential neighborhoods, and commercial enterprises. To-
day the archaeological remains of San Luis de Talimali are in
a park-like setting with reconstructions of the seventeenth-
century buildings, as well as buildings from the 1930s and
1940s that have been renovated to serve as a Visitor Center,
public restrooms, and storage facilities.
u-~~r~lrnt~~" ;, ..[.. .,~P


Long view of the Council House.
Environmental Setting
San Luis de Talimali is located on one of the highest ridge tops
in the Tallahassee Red Hills, just over 200 feet above sea level.
The 50-acre site is characterized by prime agricultural
Orangeburg soils and seep springs that run year-round. To-
day approximately half of the property is landscaped from its
many years as an agricultural and private estate; it is this
portion of the site where the vast majority of intact archaeo-
logical remains are situated. The other half is upland forest
with predominantly long-leaf pine and oak.



Penelope's Pet Stop


'PROFESSIONAL
PET GROOMING
AND PET SITTING


FURMINATOR
SHED-LESS
TREATMENT


wt dr


215 S. FMANIrLIN ST. CPT1'0INT, FL 32-32S
B50-610p-226 B50--32-3-0036
penelopespetstop.com


t-EB g g aiH sg
MEXICAN FOOD
S Breakfast: 6 a.m. 11 a.m.
Lunch: 11 a.m. 3 p.m.
Dinner: 3 p.m. 9 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. Dinner: 3 p.m. 10 p.m.


Authentic Flavor of Old Mexico
5)


Mexican Restaurant
65 W. Gorrie Drive
St. George Island 32328
Phone: 850-927-3496


I~ ,.r ~


MaoRue nt-alhse
77~


Historical Background
The ancestor village of the Apalachee settlement that became
the San Luis mission in the 1630s, Anhaica Apalache, first
appeared in the, historical record a century earlier in the de
Soto chronicles (see Ewen and Hann 1998 for a detailed dis-
cus ion of investigations at this site). Members of the Hernando
de oto expedition chose this settlement fortheir encamp-
me t during the winter of 1539-1540, during which time it
wa variously referred to as Anhaica Apalache, Iviachica,
Yn~hico, and the pueblo of Apalache.
Th Gentleman from Elvas, one of the chroniclers of the de
S o expedition, described Anhaica Apalache as "where the
lo d of all that land and province lived." Anhaica Apalache's
r e as the paramount center for the province during de Soto's
i cursion was probably a consequence of its position as the
head war town which gave it preeminence when the province
was threatened or at war. The name Anhaica resurfaced as
Inihayca in 1608 when the Apalachees took the initiative to
establish friendly relations with the Spaniards. It was Anhaica's
chief who journeyed to St. Augustine that year to render the
province's obedience to the Spanish Crown (Ewen and Hann
1998:122: Ore 1936:114). When Spaniards finally began the
formal missionization of Apalachee Province in 1633, Anhaica
undoubtedly was among the first to be proselytized. The choice
of San Luis as the village's mission name was likely a tribute
to the then governor of Florida, Luis Horruytiner. Although
the village of San Luis was moved to its present day location in
1656, the village's de Soto-era name of Anhaica was still re-
flected as late as 1657.
The mission's more familiar name of San Luis de Talimali was
first mentioned in 1675 in the records that survive. Todate;-:
no explanation has surfaced for the emergence of the name
Talimali.
Most of the Florida missions were pre-existing native villages
with a principal chief and a resident friar (doctrinas); others
were subordinate outstations visited by a nearby missionary
visitsas. Mission San Luis was different. Its location was se-
lected for strategic purposes by Spanish authorities in 1656
as the site of their western capital. One of the Apalachees"
most powerful chiefs was persuaded to move his village to be
near tile Spaniards. San Luis was among the largest and most
important missions in Spanish Florida. The importance of the
mission and its chief is reflected in the size of its population,
the enormity of its council house (which was most closely as-
sociated withthe chief), and the fact that it had four satellite
villages and chiefs, who were under the jurisdiction of San
Luis's chief. While the size of most other Apalachee missions
declined sharply over the years, the population of San Luis
increased.
From the Spanish perspective, Mission San Luis was a social,
administrative, religious and military capital. It was the only
settlement beyond St. Augustine with a significant Spanish
population-including a deputy governor, soldiers, friars, and
civilians-many of whom were related by blood or marriage to
families in St. Augustine. By 1675, both San Luis and St. Au-
gustine had more than 1500 residents. It is believed that there
were at least several hundred Spaniards living at San Luis
based on the fact that during British Carolina Governor Moore's
1702 siege on St. Augustine, almost 90 Spanish men from
San Luis capable of bearing arms went to their aid. Others
undoubtedly remained at home to guard the blockhouse in
defense of their own village and its families.
Beginning in 1701, the War of Spanish Succession allied Spain
and France and prompted open hostility with the British. Be-








TWO CRACKED POTS PLANT NURSERY
0 Sagos 0 Camellias 0 Century Pla ts
0 Bulbs 0 Custom Pots


tween 1702 and 1704, Moore launched a series of attacks
against Spanish Florida. During the cataclysmic, first seven
months of 1704, most ofApalachee's missions were destroyed
and most,of its native population was killed, enslaved, left
with the attackers as free people, or fled into exile in various
directions. San Luis itself did not come under attack, no doubt
because of the strength of its defenses as the capital. How-
ever, in July 1704, Spanish authorities made the decision to
abandon what was left of Apalachee Province. The native lead-
ers of San Luis led a caravan of about 800 on an overland trek
westward toward Pensacola, driving their cattle before them.
This group of Apalachee 6migres consisted mostly of the re-
maining population of San Luis, part of the population of Mis-
sion Escambe, the remaining Chacatos living in Apalachee,
and a few non-Christians from a refugee Yamasee village. With
the 6migres was a Frenchman from Mobile who had brought
an invitation from Jean Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville to settle
near that recently established outpost. In 1763, when Mobile
was ceded to the British, the descendants of the Mobile-area
Apalachees moved farther west to Spanish Louisiana. Today,
some of their descendants identify themselves as Apalachees,
and their tribal identity can be traced through baptismal
records in Mobile and Louisiana.
San Luis de Talimali is used in this documentation update as
the proper name of the mission. It is not known why the ge-
neric name "San Luis de Apalache" was used on the original
designation. This name (San Luis de Apalache) appears on a
1655 list of missions and their distances from St. Augustine.
The author of this list apparently did not know the full or proper
names of any of the Apalachee missions as they all have the
"de Apalache" suffix. As noted in the narrative, the proper name
'6f San Luis vas changed' throdtgh'~tii froffi i'an;~iT"de
Xinayaca (or Nixaxipa) to San Luis de Talimali sometime be-
fore 1675 and remained so until the mission was destroyed in
1704.
To be continued in the June 23rd issue of the Franklin Chronicle.







850-926-6181
IrTy/#'IA4da PERFORMANCE SPRAY-ON BED LINERS
WREC ECKTMi FULL LINE OF
S.AUTO ACCESSORIES
WWW.MIKESPAINTANDBODY.COM 3140 COASTAL HWY.
VISIT US AT WAKULLA.COM CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327


Commercial


Residential


ALTERNATIVE

ELECTR!. C ..LLC

850.921 4i\0




Swww.alterfnative-eectric.oom


DISCOUNTS ON PRE-ORDERS!
LANDSCAPE SERVICES AVAILABLE!
Located corner of
1st St. & Ave. A, Eastpoint, FL


OOOOooo000000000000000000000000000



MARKS INSURANCE

AGENCY, INC.





WRITING:
Home, Auto, Life, Business, Marine, Bonds
and Other Lines of Insurance
See us for your insurance needs at:
61 Avenue E
Apalachicola, Florida 32320
850-653-2161* 800-586-1415


Unforgettable Golf Course!

Golfers of any skill level will enjoy the challenge this beautiful
18-hole championship course presents. St.James Bay offers:
+Full driving range +Two putting greens
+Complete pro shop S .
+Resident teaching PGA Golf ProT.J
+Uplink' GPS equipped golf carts

Get ready for an unforgettable golfing experience!


FO TEE T i CLI80.9.906 w w IjmsBYI o


~fFs







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


9 June 2006 Page 5


MISSION SAN LUIS


Mission San Luis Receives

Prestigious "Preserve

America" Presidential

Award

Florida's First Lady and Mission San Luis Executive
Director accept 2006 "Preserve America" Presidential
Award at the White House
Florida's' First Lady Columba Bush and Mission San Luis Ex-
ecutive Director Bonnie McEwan accepted a 2006 "Preserve
America" Presidential Award on behalf of Mission San Luis at
the White House this morning. Mission San Luis, located in
Tallahassee, was one of only four projects in the nation
selected for this prestigious recognition.
"I'm truly honored this recognition has been bestowed upon
Mission San Luis," said First Lady Columba Bush. "It has given
me great pleasure to be involved with the important work be-
ing done there. The educational components and extraordi-
nary research are a blessing to those of us seeking to expand
our knowledge of our state's diverse heritage."
Mission San Luis was the western capital of Spanish Florida
from 1656 to 1704. In addition to more than 1400 Apalachee
residents, Sah Luis was home to several hundred Spaniards,
including friars, soldiers, and civilians. The 17th century settle-
ment was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960
and purchased by the State of Florida in 1983. Since that time,
the site has been managed by the Florida Department of State's
Division of Historical Resources.
Over the past twenty years, Mission San Luis has become the
most thoroughly investigated mission in the Southeast. The
Mission has become a model program for investigating His-
panic-American cultural development in our country, and is
the'premier source of education on the Florida missions for
our state's schools, visitors and residents.
The results of the site's archaeological and historical research
programs have been distributed to broad professional audi-
ences through numerous publications and presentations. It
has also shaped the Mission's public programming which in-
cludes living history interpretation, hands-on exhibits, and
ongoing archaeological demonstrations. San Luis also offers
education programs and special events throughout the year.
Today, the town center of Mission San Luis is reconstructed
to provide visitors of all ages and from all walks of life with a
powerful experience reflecting cultural change in the 17th cen-
tury. It is the only reconstructed mission of the more than 100
such settlements established in Spanish Florida during the
16th and 17th centuries.
"Preserve America" is a White House initiative that was an-
nounced by First Lady Laura Bush on March 3, 2003. It was
developed in cooperation with a number of Federal agency
partners to encourage and support community efforts for the
preservation and enjoyment of our priceless cultural and natu-
ral heritage. The "Preserve America" Presidential Award hon-
ors organizations, businesses, government entities, arid indi-
viduals for sustaining and preserving cultural and natural
heritage assets while integrating them into contemporary com-
m unit life.' : .
,v '. ,,. c : :I.


From Tennrse, Street


Carrabelle City from Page 1


Interior of the Museum.


i ,m ., ,


CARRABELLE REALTY, INC.

P.O. Drawer 708 1526 Highway 67 in Carrabelle, FL
www.carrabellerealty.net


1 (850) 697-2181


* 1 (800) 530-1473


We are a small, independently owned agency. YOU, the customer, are
our most important asset whether you are BUYING or SELLING, we
go the extra mile to make sure you receive excellent service. If you
don't want to get lost in the crowd, stop by and get personal attention!


House 002: Country home in a private set-
ting, 3BR/2BA, enclosed garage, separate
workshop, fireplace, on 1 acre. Come take
a look and make an offer!


2003: 32'x64' double-wide on 1.96 acres on
Harbor Rd., 3BR/2BA, large pond, beautiful
property $249,500.

NEW LISTINGS

* Beach lot in private area, 50'x100',
$895,000.
* 50'x150' MH lot, Lanark, $165,000.
Reduced to $150,000.
* (2) Five-acre tracts on Hwy. 67, $195,000
each.
* One acre on Harbor Rd., high & dry,
$109,500.
* Walk to Lake Talquin, 32'x64' Redman
DW, 3BR/2BA, great room on 1 acre at end
of cul-de-sac, $118,500.
* Weekend Retreat, 2BR Mobile Home
on Corner Lot. $103,500.


Golf Course: Prestigious lot on the 9th tee,
corner lot, $365,000 owner/agent.


-: 9-----. 0

e, ,i -
Krisy: New 16x80 mobile home on 1 acre,
3BR/2BA, partially fenced backyard, back
deck, Great weekend place or starter home
for new family. $125,000.


Kathy's: immaculate 3BR/2BA home on two
and one half lots, spacious master bedroom
with private entrance, fenced yard, large
workshop, call for all the details, $350,000.
Owner says make offer!


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU









J 4

J'ditn

850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836

SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30A.M.


cited free pedestrian flow (not
possible in a purely Commer-
cial area), boardwalks, water
views and retail shops along
the water.
The Carrabelle Area Chamber
of Commerce recently enlisted
the services of Paul Johnson,
environmental and develop-
mental consultant, to assist
Wilson Miller complete their
Comp Plan production in its
last stage. Motivation for the
Chamber's move is to improve
the "economic future" part of
this planning. Mayor Kelly
expressed her disappointment
in the "late date" of the citi-
zen concern and the
Chamber's, offer of help in the
project.





--. ^


S.i9 t 'Xaptit efuwch

St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!

Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise I 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 7:00 p.m.
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


St. George Island
United Methodist Church

YOU ARE INVITED TO
SUNDAY WORSHIP 9:30A.M.


201 E. 'Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org Pastor: Ray Hughes


The commission voted to hire,
for a percentage of the result,
Fred Fox to secure a CDBG
grant of up to $650,000 for
several possible things. All
are in the area of benefiting
citizens in areas such as
neighborhood revitalization,
economic development, infra-
structure, home and business
rehabilitation, energy conser-
vation.
Carrabelle is one of the first
municipalities to show con-
cern for the problem of hav-,
ing black bears in our residen-
tial areas. We are applying for
a grant so that every residence
and business will have a bear-
proof trash container. This to
follow the enactment of a city
ordinance requiring trash
pickup at every address.
ECT, marine designers,
showed their second version
of a plan for the Carrabelle"
Wharf project. Phase 1, to be
approximately $750,000, is as
yet unfunded.


7 -- SM
BAR-B-Q
Hickory-smoked the old-fashioned
way with all the fixns prepared from
our own recipes.
NOW OPEN IN CARRABELLE
LUNCH BUFFET
Sunday-Friday
HOBO'S ICE CREAM
1593 West Highway 98-Carrabelle
697-2776
"Worth Driving 100 Miles For."
Open 6 days 11:00 a.m. 9:00 p.m.
Closed Tuesday
Thank you for letting us serve you!


Whether you're looking for the perfect place to unwind for a weekend or a lifetime,
our associates can help find your place.







Ron Bloodworth Ben Bloodworth Kay Barnett Sam Gilbert BJ Neshat Billie Grey Jan Grey
Realtor, Realtor, Realtor. Realtor, Realtor. Rental Manager Reservations Agent
Sales Associate Sales Associate Sales Associate Business Manager Sales Associate


Call or stop by our offices at
224 Franklin Boulevard, St. George Island
800-341-2021 850-927-2282
www.uncommonflorida.com


t
* ;* ,'
' '


I -r








Page 6 9 June 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


lTh Franklin.Chronic l


Weems

Hospital

Update

County Administrator Alan
Pierce provided updating in-
fprmation to the Board of
County Commissioners at
their meeting on Tuesday,
June 6, 2006.
A. Timing of sales tax refer-
endum: Based upon the pub-
licity of the workshop between
the county commission and
the county Health Council, 1
have received several emails
prompted by an email blast
that Ms. Gail Rigelmayer did
to residents asking the resi-
dents contact me about their
opposition to moving forward
with a sales tax referendum
without adequate informa-
tion.
Based upon the direction I
received at the workshop, and
the expected public comments
that not enough is known to
authorize a referendum at this
time, Ms. Becky Gibson,
Health Council, and I partici-
pated in a teleconference with
a group recommended by Mr.
Bob Pannell of the Office of
Rural Health. This group,
called Build Smart-Integrated
Solutions for Capital Improve-
ments, has national experi-
ence in developing the finan-
cial feasibility of building ru-


ral hospitals. The group is
comprised of: Mr. Tommy
Barnhart, Dixon Hughes,
CPA; Baston Architects; and
PNC Multi-Family Capital, a
finance group. Both I and the
Health Council recommend
the Board complete the feasi-
bility study before proceeding
to a referendum.
Mr. Pannell has funds avail-
able to hire this group to pro-
vide Franklin County with a
financial feasibility study for
a medical facility somewhere
in the county. The group is
developing a draft letter of
agreement on the scope of
their proposal that I will re-
view and then submit to Mr.
Pannell for his consideration.
If he approves he will then
provide the Board with the
funds. It will probably take 30
days to firm up the scope of
work, and then 60 to 90 days
to actually do the study. The
study will then be presented
to the Board, the Health
Council, and the public. Con-
sidering a realistic time'frame,
this study will probably not
get started until July 151h,
and not be completed until
Oct. 1, and presented some
time after that. This is well af-
ter the deadline of Sept. 1 for
putting something on the No-
vember ballot.
The financial feasibility study
will include participation by
the BlackHawk group, as well
as investigation with what


Housing Releases from Page 1
Freddie Mac is a stockholder-owned company established by
Congress in 1970 to support homeownership and rental hous-
ing. Freddie Mac fulfills its mission by purchasing residential
mortgages and mortgage-related securities, which it finances
primarily by issuing mortgage-related securities and debt in-
struments in the capital markets. Over the years, Freddie Mac
has made home possible for one in six homebuyers and more
than four million renters in America. www.FreddieMac.com
Florida Housing's First Time Homebuyer Program offers a
steady stream of continuous lending year-round for eligible
consumers. Teachers, firefighters, healthcare workers, veter-
ans and people with disabilities could also be eligible for lower
rates. Down payment and closing costs assistance is also avail-
able and includes zero percent, non-amortizing second mort-
gages.
In 2005, the program provided over 1,100 mortgages state-
wide totaling close to $119 million. In that same year, over
S15.9 million was provided in down payment and closing costs
assistance. For more information on Florida Housing's First
Time Homebuyer Program, visit us online at
www.floridahousing.org. To request a brochure, call us toll
free at (888) 447-2977.


Wind Your Way To The Grill!
Trnn ITt ,rT. RTCT Crnr\Ts A NT\ CmTT A TA


I ONTr vi-n F


A- N il., '.. ? -".- -^'A




,F ,.
S. rl .


might or might not be happen-
ing in surrounding counties.
While this is going on, I rec-
ommend the Board consider.
two items: clarify its direction
to Mr. Shuler on whether he
is to continue to develop a
ballot issue for the Nov. ref-
erendum at this time, and di-
rect county staff to contact
Apalachicola, Eastpoint and
Carrabelle, regarding their
capacity to provide sewer and
water if a new hospital were
to be built, as the feasibility
study will not include an
analysis of any sites.
B. Status of Revenue: Provide
Board with copy of recorded
loan agreement between the
county and the Office of Tour-
ism, Trade, and Economic De-
velopment for a two part
$600,000 loan to Weems Hos-
pital. Ms Diane Scholz.
Governor's Office, brought the
first $300,000 down on Fri-
day. The second $300,000 will
arrive in July. The county re-
ceived earlier last week
$287,000 in disproportionate
share funds. Together with
some private pay reimburse-
ment arriving, the county has
approximately $890,000 by
mid-July to continue to fund
the hospital until either the
Medicaid reimbursements ar-
rive, or Medicare reimburse-
ments arrive. The current
funding should last 3 months,
by which time Medicaid funds
should have arrived.
C. Status of 2005 Medicare
Cost Report: Provide Board
with copy of 2005 cost report
that was submitted May 31.
With some trepidation, but
with advice of counsel, I
signed the Cost Report. It was
essential the Cost Report be
submitted so that future
Medicare payments not be
withheld.
D. Status of AHCA penalties
and fine repayment: Mr.
Shuler and I have been in con-
tact with AHCA on the reduc-
tion of some of the initial fines
and penalties, but no settle-
ment has been reached.
E. Status of Hospital Em-
ployee Leasing Agreement:


Defer to Mr. Shuler on details
but the attorneys have devel-
oped a path for this to occur.
Upon prompt review by the
proper staff, the transfer
could be effective at the end
of June 9 payroll, or the June
23rd payroll, but it must take
place before June 30. Cost 3%
of payroll.
Excerpts from the Gail
Riegelmayer letter are
republished below:
"Last week I spoke with
Gayle Dodd who chairs
the Hospital Board Com-
mittee which currently
oversees the management
of Weems Hospital. I
called her re: the reports
I've been reading in the
newspapers re: the sales
tax and future plans for a
hospital in Franklin
County, to learn more
about the situation and to
express my concerns and
ideas.
One of the concerns I
have from reading the
papers is that there are
some people involved who
want to go forward with a
referendum in November
to get voters to vote for an
increase in the sales tax
without any kind of a plan
first. In my opinion, there
are many questions that
need to be addressed be-
fore anyone can ask me
as a voter to support any
increase in taxes for the
hospital. Some of my
questions are...
Specifically, what will
the tax money be used
for?
Who will control and de-
cide how this money is
used?
Can Franklin, County
*support a full-blown hos-
pital or do we just need a
scaled down version to
keep the critical access
designation?
Would one or two criti-
cal care clinics be more
prudent since most


I-.

(> '[P, As-seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on TIV. .
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS i

(800) 794.7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


people go to Tallahassee
or Panama City hospitals
for more in-depth care?
Will we build a new hos-
pital or renovate Weems?
What are the costs in-
volved in all of this?
I think most people would
agree that Franklin
County needs to address
and improve its
healthcare facilities and
infrastructure. However,
until we take the neces-
sary time to study, deter-
mine what makes sense
for our rural community
and make some specific
plans, how can we know
what the costs will be to
create and support what
is developed?
Since this is an issue that
needs immediate atten-
tion to decide whether to
place it on the ballot, it
may have come up at the
County Commission
meeting at 9 a.m. on
Tuesday, June 6th!..."

Big Bend
Saltwater

Classic

This year the 18th Annual Big
Bend Saltwater Classic will
occupy its new headquarters
at the Carrabelle Boat Club at
the corner of Highway 98 and
Timber Island Rd. Outlying
weigh stations will be set up
at Marquardt's Marina in
Mexico Beach, and at the
Panacea Harbor Marina in
Panacea. Hundreds of anglers
from all over will attend.
There are some new -ules in
effect this year, but as always
the prizes are fabulous. In the
Masters Division, Cobia has
been removed from the list of
target fish so it can be re-
placed by Red Snapper. This
year's guaranteed payout of
$7500 for the largest Kingfish
could be around ten grand if
enough contestants partici-
pate.


As always, the tournament is
Father's Day weekend which
is June 16-18 this year. There
will be two pre-tournament
captain's meetings. June 14
in Tallahassee at Hooters on
North Monroe, and June 15
at Carrabelle Boat Club. Both
meetings start at 6:00 p.m.
For more information on the
tournament and how to reg-
ister, visit the official website
www.saltwaterclassic.com.
2006 SCHEDULE OF
EVENTS
Thursday, June 1st
Anglers Banquet and Auction
6:00 p.m., North Florida Fair
Grounds-Tallahassee, Lim-
ited seating-call for details
567-FISH (3474).
GAFF Covergirl Finalists
Introduced Catered by Cow-
boy Catering & Grillworks
Wednesday, June 14th
Captain's Meeting 6:00 p.m.
Hooter's, N. Monroe-Talla-
hassee
Thursday, June 15th
Captain's Meeting on the
Coast 6:00 PM, Carrabelle
Boat Club -Carrabelle, Tour-
nament HQ
Friday, June 16th
First Lines in the Water
5:30 a.m.
Weigh in 3:00 p.m. -
7:30 p.m.
3 Weigh Stations
Carrabelle Boat Club-
Carrabelle
Tournament HQ
Marquardt's Marina-Mexico
Beach
Panacea Harbor Marina-
Panacea
Saturday, June 17th
Weigh in 3:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Continued on Page 7


> Land/Lot Purchases No Income Verification
> Second Homes/Condos > No Asset Verification
> Investment Properties 0 First & Second Mortgages

SFirst Choice ONLINE DISCOUNTS AT
'i'R, .i""-,., www.discount-lenders.com
FLORIDA ,I8 LICitSJM


*


thing to please even the most discriminating tastes. Located in the
beautiful St. James Bay Golf Community you can dine indoors or enjoy a
relaxing meal on our patio. A beautiful gazebo and full banquet facilities
make this the perfect setting for that special occasion.
Daily Breakfast from 7:00am-10:00pm & Lunch from ll:00am-3:00pm.
Open Thursday Sunday for Dinner from 5:00pm-9:30pm.
& Breakfast Lunch -Dinner Banquet Facilities
Reservations 850.697.5050 *

CROOKED RIVER GRILL
at ST.JAMES BAY


The helpful place.


1799
Floor Fans
* 20" Kool Operator or
12" High-Velocuiy
3 speed
6102040, 6004964





u 849
pay 8
ets 3.0 imil-iatlte
final 499
inacost 499
Triazlcide Soil &
Turf Insect Killer
10 lb. granules or 32 oz.
concentrate
A replacement for diaznon
Kills grubs and other
lawn-destroying
insects in 24 hr.
7114176,7114168
Limit 2 Rebates Total.


WIL f.'VL.

in ,,u t toc,,s


Nojbto alo


TAKE YOUR PICK


APY*


4*75

6 MONTH CD


5.25APY*

13 MONTH CD


ALTHA 25463 NORTH MAIN STREET 850-762-3417
APALACHICOLA 58 4TH STREET 850-653-9828
BLOUNTSTOWN 20455 CENTRAL AVE. WEST 850-674-5900
BRISTOL 10956 NW STATE ROAD 20 850-643-2221
CARRABELLE 912 NORTHWEST AVENUE A 850-697-5626
MEXICO BEACH 1202 HIGHWAY 98 850-648-5060
PORT ST. JOE 418 CECIL G. COSTIN SR. BLVD. 850-227-1416





SUPERIOR
111 BANKING MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS



LENERMember FDIC www.superiorbank.com

'APY is Annual iPercentage Yield. AP'Ys are accurate as of 5/28/06 and are subject to change at any time without notice. For the 6 and
13 month CD, rite minimum balance to obtain ihe stated APY is 5500 and will require a checking or NOW account such as Superior's
Free Checking or Treasury Checking accounts. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal.


g*rea

gitida

Emrdad


you 99

Is 41mail-in pohle
final 199
cost
Outdoor Ant Killer
* 3 lb. Ant Killer shaker ,. ,
bag or Liquid Ant Baits 3/Pk.
* Kills ants outside before
they get inside RR
7124043, 7147945
Limit 3 Rebates Total.


LOCATED IN THE ST. JAMES BAY GOLF AND RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY
6 MILES EAST OF PICTURESQUE CARRAIBELLE ON Hwy 98 I'WIWRSTJAMESBAY.COM

COE ISTYOR EGHOROO CEHADARJDY


While Supplies Last During June!
JACKSON ACE HARDWARE
Highway 98 Carrabelle, FL
Phone: 850-697-3332
I-


The Franklin Chronicle


,Ir
I







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


9 June 2006 Page 7


REAl G 0 0DS


SOLAR

LIVING

SOURCE


BOOK











YOUR COMPLETE GUIDE
TO RENEWABLE ENERGY
TECHNOLOGIES AND
SUSTAINABLE LIVING

JOHN SCHAEFFER


The Definitive Solar Haldbook
SOLAR ENERGY/NATURAL BUILDING

Solar Living

Sourcebook

Your Complete Guide to Renewable Energy
Technologies and Sustainable Living
This Is Solar Living!
* Do you want to harvest sunlight, wind, or falling water
to power your home?
* Do you want to sell that renewable energy back to
your electric utility and run your electric meter back-
wards?
This is the book that gives you the how, when, what,
and why of solar living. The Real Goods Solar Living
Sourcebook is now in its Twelfth Edition, with more than
half a million books sold since 1982. Fully updated with
brand new sections on finding land, natural building,
and sustainable transportation, this book will be your
most important tool in turning your dream of energy
independence into a delightful daily reality.


SSt. George Islan
.- Rel ty.


2nd TIER GULF 3BR/3BA
Home in gated St. George
Plantation. Tile floors, granite
countertop, screened and open
porches. Built & decorated for
chemical sensitivity. Lovely
tree lined path to Dune
Walkover. Great house with
great views and price!
MLS#108857. $775,000.


d \ Phone: 850-927-4777
S Toll Free: 800-344-7570
www.sgirealty.com

"BOARD-
\\ A L K "
A 3BR 3BA
Beach Front
home Top
ah boardal ltt con-

o aa a otinals
Colorful &
tnlq111 e fur-
n i sh; ngs
ba-ed on
board game
Monopoly. Nice deck and
beach boardwalk. Convenient
Jto restaurants and shopping.
Good rental income producer.
MLS#108850. $1,169,900.


the Chronicle Bookshop

Mail Order Service *

P.O. Box 590
Eastpoint, FL 32328


Inside you will find essential information on creating a
self-reliant lifestyle.
S'"This is a fabulous compendium of hows, whys, and
widgets for making a sensible home under the sun."
-Amory B. Lovins, CEO, Rocky Mountain Institute
S'"The Solar Living Sourcebook is scrupulously honest,
technically flawless, and steeped in experience and prac-
tical wisdom. There is nothing like it in the world"
-Paul Hawken, author of Natural Capitalism and The
Ecology of Commerce
* "John Schaeffer has had as much experience with the
practicalities of sustainable living as anyone on the
planet. With zest and intelligence, this book describes
his vision, his tools, and his pragmatic problem solving
for those of us who expect to follow a parallel path"
-Denis Hayes, Chair of the Earth Day Network
* 'The Solar Living Sourcebook is a critical resource, to
supply both information and inspiration, in this time
when US dependence on foreign oil and the US foreign
policy that supports that thirst, are wreaking havoc
across the globe." -Amy Goodman, Demnocracy Now!,
author of The Exception to the Rulers.
* "Epic in scope, comprehensive in content, hopeful in
spirit, the Real Goods Solar Living Sourcebook might be
the most indispensable book in your library."
-Thom Hartmann, author of The Last Hours of Ancient
Sunlight.
Sold nationally for $35.00. Bookshop price = $35.00.
Please add $8.50 postage due to the weight of this pa-
perback. 564 pp.

Clam


Information
Fair
Thursday, June 15
3:00-7:00 p.m.
Lion's Club
809 6th Street, Cedar Key
Need to talk "face-to-face"
with staff from state or fed-
eral agencies about issues
pertaining to your clam farm-
ing business? Then come by
the Clam Information Fair and
meet individually with repre-
sentatives from the DACS Di-
vision of Aquaculture, DACS
Division of Ag Law Enforce-


St. George Island Realty
235 E. Gulf Beach Dr.
St. George Island, FL 32328

LAND FOR SALE:
Gulf View Commercial Least
expensive lot on St. George
Island! Gulf Beach Dr. location =
maximum exposure for business
and great gulf view. Zoned C-4. 3
adjacent lots available.
MLS#107389. $199,000.
CORNER LOT Large lot across
from the Bay. This property has
an excellent BAY VIEW & fan-
tastic sunsets! Nice quiet neigh-
borhood in the Canal section of
St. George Island. MLS#107081.
$399,000.
PLANTATION HOMESITE
High & dry with tall pines &
beautiful oaks. Convenient
beach access. Community offers
pool, tennis, bike path and
airstrip. Seller financing possible.
MLS#111216. $624,900.


Homesis NowUAvailable


ment, DACS Bureau oI Sea-
food and Aquaculture Market-
ing, USDA Farm Service
Agency and others. Also meet
"one-on-one" with Research
Triangle Institute staff to ad-
vise them on the pilot crop
insurance program. It is also
an opportunity to renew your
annual membership or An-
chor Hole agreement with the
Cedar Key Aquaculture Asso-
ciation, as well as sign-up for
the "derelict" clam bag re-
moval program. The Associa-
tion will serve hamburgers
and hot dogs between 5:30
and 7:00 p.m. for clam farm-
ers and their families. See you
there!


" HAIR
NAILS
PEDICURE SPA
WAXING
FACIALS
BODY WRAPS
TANNING

CONNIE RDEHR
NAIL TECH
ANGELA CREAMER
STYLIST
407 HWY 98
EASTPOINT. FL 32328
850-670-5220
I I a IA '


The three

most important words

in real estate:

Location. Location.


ST JAMES ISLAND, FLORIDA


A walk in the woods or a stroll on the beach? SummerCamp is a coastal vacation and a
camp experience where summer is always in season. Featuring nearly four miles of Gulf
shoreline and 762 acres of woods and tidal marshes, SummerCamp will offer endless opportunities to
experience nature's most dynamic settings. Engage your imagination now. Call 850.402.5200 or
visit JOE.com I Keyword: Inspire.


IF YOU DON'T KNOW JOE, YOU DON'T KNOW FLORIDA. rFSTJOE'

0 2006 The St. Joe Company "JOE,"St. Joe,""SummerCamp" and the 'SummerCamp" and "Taking Right" designs are service marks of The St Joe Company. Scenes maybe of locations oractivities not on the
S property. The developer reserves the right to modify the plans, materials, features and amenities descnbed and depicted herein at any time without notice. No guarantee is made that the features, amenities and
facilities described herein will be provided, or if provided, will be of the same type, size or nature as depicted or described. All home sites may be subject to setbacks, easements and other restrictions. St Joe JOE
oUoR does not guarantee the obligations of unaffiliated builders who may build and sell homes in the SummerCamp community. Ownership of a residence in the SummerCamp community does not grant any use of
or access to any clubs owned or operated by The St. Joe Company or its affiliates, all of which may require the purchase of separate memberships pursuant to each club's rules. Eligibility to join a club depends
on its rules, which are subject to change. Void where prohibited by law. This does not constitute an offer to sell real property in any jurisdiction where prior registration or other advance qualification of real
property is required. Equal Housing Opportunity Broker participation welcome.
Obtain the Property Report required by Federal Law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the
merits or value, if any of this property.


Summer And Fall
Registration At GCCC


Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege campus advising and
registration for summer B
2006 and fall, is as follows:
Summer B
Registration: June 14 to 16
Classes Begin: June 19
Fall
Registration: July 10 21
August 14- 15
Classes Begin: August 16
Registration will occur from
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday
through Thursday and from
7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Fri-
days. Web registration for
summer and fall is available.
In addition, the day fees are
due, campus office hours will
be 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Gulf/Franklin Center regis-
tration will' take place as fol-
lows:


Big Bend from Page 6
3 Weigh Stations
Carrabelle Boat Club-
Carrabelle, Tournament HQ
Marquardt's Marina-
Mexico Beach
Panacea Harbor Marina-
Panacea
Must be in line by 7:30 p.m.,
6:30 p.m. in Mexico Beach
(Mexico Beach is in the Cen-
tral Time Zone 6:30 in Mexico
Beach is 7:30 Carrabelle time)
Be in line on time.
NO EXCEPTIONS. Tourna-
ment Ends
GAFF Covergirl Winner An-
nounced
Sunday, June 18th
Father's Day Awards and
Prizes 9:00 a.m., Carrabelle
Boat Club-Carrabelle, Tour-
nament HQ
Century Boat Raffle Winner
Announced


Boyd
Secures
Funds For
Oyster
Industry
Congressman Allen Boyd (D-
North Florida), a member of
the House Appropriations
Committee, voted in favor of


Summer B
Registration: June 7
Classes Begin: June 19
Tyndall Air Force Base reg-
istration will take place as fol-
lows:
Summer Registration: June 7
Classes Begin: June 19
Late registration and drop/
add for all facilities is as fol-
lows:
Summer B-June 19 20
Please note that these dates
exclude Saturdays, Sundays
and holidays.
For more information, call
(850) 872-3892 for the main
campus, (850) 227-9670 for
the Gulf/Franklin Center
(EST) and (850) 283-4332 and
for Tyndall Air Force Base
Education Office.


the Agriculture Appropria-
tions Act for fiscal year 2007
(HR 5384). In this legislation,
Congressman Boyd secured
$450,000 for research of post
harvest oyster treatment
(PHT). These funds will allow
the University of Florida to
continue research of various
PHTs.
"Already under tremendous
financial constraints, the oys-
ter industry stands to suffer
further economic loss if a na-
tional standard is not recog-
nized for PHT," said Congress-
man Boyd. "This funding will
allow the University of Florida
to continue this crucial re-
search and keep the oyster
industry viable in Florida."
Currently, there is no national
standard for the post harvest
treatment of oysters to pre-
vent Vibrio Vulnificus (VV).
This funding will provide the
much-needed research, eval-
uation and practical applica-
tion of the different PHT meth-
ods, including pasteurization,
pressurization, irradiation
and cryogenics, to help reduce
health risks in oyster process-
ing plants.




NOW


Miss BrPndas's
SFamily Restaurant

Pizza Burgers Steak Seafood

Highway 98 in Carrabelle
Open 11:oo a.m. til 9:oo p.m.
CLosED MONDAY



Kare's Deli
Dine In and Take Out
Boar .: Head Subs
Blue Bell Ice Cream '
Homemade Salads
191 U.S. Highway 98 ,* .
Eastpoint, FL 32328 I(B nd"',,'.
(Behind Car Wash)' .
Phone: 670-8717 i. .



Y'epper's

Me-xica n Gritt & Cantina
TUESDAY: WINE MARGARITAS 2X1
WEDNESDAY: EL TAPATIO $4.99
(4 MINI CHIMICHANGAS)
Open every day 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
75 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 653-8555



*DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.


Field Service Techs


Company provided truck & tools
Paid training-no experience required
Great advancement opportunities
Medical & Dental Insurance
Paid vacations/holidays. .


Positions throughout Florida
For details and to apply online go to:

www.careersatdrs.com


j AAW, jL K "AA-AA-


II ,,









Page 8 9 June 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Florida Cla sified



FCAN Advertising Network


Each of the classified ads in this section reaches gin audience of


1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!


The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper with

the FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-1687, fax: 850-670-1685.
j.


JOHN'S

CONSTRUCTION


Licensed & Insured
RG0050763
RC0051706


Quality Craftsmanship For Over 40 Years
SERVING FRANKLIN COUNTY SINCE 1982
Specializing in Custom Homes-Remodeling
Additions-Repairs-Vinyl Siding


850-697-2376
Fax: 697-4680


P.O. Drawer JJ Carrabelle, FL 32322


Announcements


Is SirIs RIlining Your ltelliinuhilps? buv and Read
DIAN IilC'S Iy I. lrliMtubIard 'all1 (813)872-0722 il
snld S 0 11 Ion lanclies.310C12 N I Inhana Ave .Tailpa Fl.
313107


Auctions


AIC lIlON .Sprectacular Ilnome with Mnunlin ista
SCashiers. NC-6 bedrooms. 6-1/2 halhs. 3 separate levels
with disltlct living areas Auction June 16 at 5PM. Open
Slouse May27,28.1June I0, II and 16fronl I-41'M. Phlons
and detail al ,iyvw.'ol/.cm. Wolt z& Associates. Inc
Brokers & Auctioneers (NCAL #7560)1 Roanoke. VA
(8001551-3588.

City of Miami Surplus Properly 24/7 Online Auctions,
Vehicles. Equipment, City Surplus and more.
www nllamisurplus org or www I oncSlarOnline cont

Estate Auction, 114+/- acres-divideil; Prime Bulloch
County RE. Saturday. June 17. 10 a.m. Great homesiles &
equestrian potential. RowellAuctions. Inc. (800)323-8388
10% BP. GA. AU-C002594 www rowcllauclions comn

.I'NE 10 IAND ACTION AT 11 AM 1400 ACRES.
LAFAY[ETTE CO., Fl. 20 TRACTS FROM 20.150 AC
PRIMEII HUNTING, TIMBERLAND (888)821-0894
JWIIlIl..LAUCLQNS.COM.

Automotive

S500 Police Impounds, Cars from 5500! Tax Repos. US
Marshal and IRS sales! Cars, Trucks. SIlV's. Toyota's.
Ilnnda's. Chevy's and mlorc' For listings Call (800)425-
17310 Ce 2384,

Building Materials

M ETAI. IROOFIN; SAVE $SS Buy Direct From Manu-
Iheurter 20 colors instock wilh all Accessories Quick lurn
around! Delivery Available Toll Free (188)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

Al.I.CASIICANDY 1OIUTEIDoyoucearn S00/lday?330
MachineIe. Free Candy All for $9.995. (888)629-9968
11t)2000133. CALI US: We will not be undersold!

1.OG HOME DEAIF.RS WANTED Great Earning
Potential. Ixccllentl Prolils. Prolecled Territory. I.iletme
Warranly Atnerican Made Honest Value. Call Daniel
Boone Log I lomes (888)443-4140.

AssocialcsWantedal 5 I1)-S100 0Per Day Returning Phone
Calls No Selling Not MI.M. Call Toll Free (877)881.
7395 recorded info

Financial

IlomcOwners! BADCREDIT PLEASE AIPI.Y! BK's.
laic mortgage panyenls. Fico scores to 475! 24-lour
approvals. NO Payments unoil July Ist. FL I.icensed
Mortgage Broker. Meridian Capital (800)424-0888

I lelpWanted

THERAPISTS WANTED- LICENSED SLPS in Mi-
ami-D)adcandllroard counties. Blinguala plus, Perdiemr
& FIT. Illhnguals Inc. Child & Parent Services(866)696.
0999 x 22 \'\vwriiliEgupl !.siti,.

0/0 Driver The F/S is higher here!7.erodown leasellow
payments. $1.11 Avg. 52,000 sign-on S2.60(0 IReferral
Bonus Base Plate provided FFE (800)569-9298.

SOMETIME. MONEY & MORE! Ilome every wcek-
end! IHome during the week' E xcellcnt pay! Solid weekly
miles! 95% no touch! Preplanned right! S.42 per mile,
IIEARI.AND EXPRESS (800)441-4953
wwvh.lall~J iS l.g .rs n

I)IVERS 515011.0011 tIonus every 6 montlls. OTR.
Excellent home time, New Equipment, I year Experience
(Class A with tank & hazmal Call (877)882-6537.

DATA ENTRY! Work From Any\\here. Flexible Hours.
Personal Computer Required. Excellent Career Opportu.
nity. Serious Inquiries Only (800)344-9636 Ext. 700.


Iielp Wanted


LOOKING FOR A BETTER JOB?? Constructionjobs
available in your area! Trades. PM's, superintendents,
estimators, tcc Check out positions on
ss .riirniLrucl ojh~.S.g or email resume to:
salcs'-i)conslrucionjolhs com.

Driver-IIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS for Central
Florida Iocal & National OTR positions. Food grade
tanker. no hazmal,. no pumps, great henelits, competitive
pay&ncwequipment Need2carsexperiencc. Call nynum
Transport or your opportunity today. (800)741-7950.

ESE'feancernhAssistants and Physical, Occulpntional
&. Speech llherapists for Inclusive PRE-K Charter School
Comrpeinie Salary & lenclils Full and Pail-Time/
Summer. lFax (407R852-3301 swyso upi;pdcorj.

AMERICA'S DRIVING; ACA DEMY Start your driving
career! Offering courses in CDI. A One tuition fee! Many
payment options! No registration fce! (838)808-5947
inro(jamcrticcasdrivingacadecmy.comn .

Dri% srs-CDI. A "Honey I'm Ilume...Every Weekend'"
(ireat 'Pay & benefits! Special Orientation Pay or Etxp.
Drivers! Paid Training for School Grads! Cypress Truck
I.ines. Inc. scvwcyprcsstruck corn (888)80S-5846.

WANT HOME MOST WEEKENDS WIT11 MORE
PAY! Run IHartland's Florida Regional! I.42hlmile com-
painydrivers S22forOperators! 12monthOTR required.
HIEARTI.AND EXPRESS (8001441-4953
'\-v. hemallandexpres~ comll

All tIe ililet you can legally handle!!! Come drive for
All American Xprcss! I.ate Model Equipment. No Touch
Freight, No Iast Coast. 2yrs verliahle experience. Good
driving record. (800)282-19 II 15

INTERESTED IN A POSTAL. JOB Earning S57K/yr
Avg Minimum Pay?Ourservicescan help you prepare for
Ihe Postal Battery Exam. Find Out Hlow! Call Today For
More lilioriuatl n. .(H8(1)584-1775 Rel'CildeC 15799

All Ihe mliles y iu cIn legally hIndlc!!! Come drive lir
All Amicllcna Xprcs! I.ntc MIodcl Iiluinplent, No Touchl
FIrciglt. No last ('oa. 2yrs vcriliable experience. Good
Driving record. (800)282-1911 xl 15.

Sales

$40U 110 +/vr illw Good Are You Rtcliring Millini
Maikelter seeks I'WO sales preol'rssionals in Iclcl iny
business to. Top producers currently averaging $30-S40K
per month. PLEASE. serious inquiries only: Goji inll,
.LC. Comnmission/Bonuses (800)605-8675.


Sales


SS,500. W weekly Goal Potential Ifsomconc did it, so can
you' 2-3 confirmed appointments daily' Ilenefits Avail-
able... Call Catherine McFarland (888)563-3188.

hunting

IIlINT EIK, Red Stag, Buffalo, Whitetail, Fallow-
Guaranteed hunting license $5.00; Season 8/25/06-331/
07. We have a No-Game-No Pay policy. Book now! Days
(314)209-9800; Evenings (314)293-0610.

Instruction

IIEAVY EQ I PMENT OPERATORTRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT: Bulldozers. Backhoes. .oaders, Dump
Trucks.Graders, Scrapers. Excavators; National Certiica-
lion. Job Placcment Assistance; Associated Training Ser-
vices (800)251-3274 www ctinnmcnt-school corn

I.egLl erl ices

DIVO RCES27'.-S3~0COVEIRSdlildretn.c tc:'Orilo6il
signature required! *Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, ext.600. (Sani-7pm) Alla Divorce. I.I.C.
Established 1977.

INJURED? IURT? IFRIGIITENEI)? Call Ibr a lawyer
Now! 24 lours Protect yourlegal Righs AA-A- ATTOR-
NEY Referral Service All Accident, Injury & Death
Claims Auto. Bike. Mall. Shopping Centers. Pedestrian,
Children. Elderly (888)733-5342.


HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR

TRAINING FOR EMPLOYMENT

Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders, Dump
,il Trucks, Graders, Scrapers, Excavators

S _. -National Certification
WN I& -Job Placement Assistance


800-405-5833

Associated Training Services www.equipment-school.com





ATTENTION N

SCAPAL ONE CREDI CRD HOLDERS

Was a security deposit charged to your card
when you opened a Capital One Credit
SCard account in 2001 or 2002?

SCall NOWfor information regarding your |
legal rights.


Toll Free


I-866-507-15l 8


James Kaufinan, Cauey Bowman

i Licensed in Florida Camey&j Wlialms


Principal office in Little Rbck, AR 11311 Arcade Drive* Little Rock, AR 7211(
The h;irin of a Ii,.raris n impr.rtant decision that should not be
Dhasecd oll, cr, adreisererrern s B.1 l.re ,,:,u i.detie as. u's o seind
Syu iree p riTien ir.:.rriralton ab:,ul our qualifications and eXperierncr
'A .1


Lots & Acreage North Carolina Cool Mountain Air, Views & Streams,
S I lomesCabins&Acrage. FREEBROCIIURE(800)642-
TI-PR5OPE A N ome333. Realty OfMurphy 317 Peachtree St. Murphy. N.C
lt.TI-PIOPERTY AtICTION Ilnec. l.akncfron 28906.svrcaltvofmurphycom
I lomcsites. ResidentialTracts,.Wooded Honmsilcs.Ranch
.and I lam. Saturdaylune24, HiggcnbothamAuctionecr '
M.E. Illggenbotham CAI FL.Licl AU305/AB158 6.24 Acres! Excellent investment Olpportunity Prop-
Iliww higagnbolham comn (800)257-4161. crty. 1-95 & Hwy 17,Firsl Esit in Florida. Joins 95 Ramp.
S" 15 mlnules JAX International 1.6m obo (904)321-2679.


Manufactured Homes

PALMIIARIBOR IOMES FactorModclCenlerLARG-
EST in America! Modular and Manufaclured LIQUIDA-.
TION SALE' Call for FREE Color Brochures!(0r0)622.
2832.

Miscellaneous

ATFrEND COLLEGE ONIINE from houn.
Medical. *Busincss. *Paralcgal, *Compullers
*Criminal Justice. Jol placement asislancc. Computer
provided. Financial Aid ifqualified. Call (866)858-2121
,vww.OnllincTidcwascrTrlam.c .


'OI.'I- TANNING ItBDIS Iluy Direct and Sae! Full
Body units fi'nrm 22 a monthly! FREEi Color Catalog CAI.I.
TODAYi (800)842-1305 i pnist oiRS9


Real Estate


TENNESSEE GRAND OPENING! Swan Ridge Lake
Resort. a private, gated community with both lake-view
and mounlain-view homesites. Lots starting at S29.900.
CALL. TODAY! (9311243-4871
sww.s swlaanr grdgcdc jlinilenst. co

North Carolina 10 acre Gated Equestrian Community.
with riding trails. Never before ollered with 20% prc-'
devclopment discounts.90% financingcall(828)312-1263
/(828)312-3765.

North Carolina Gated ILakefront Community 1.5 acres
plus. 90 miles ot'shorelin. Neverhelore olfered with 20%
prc-develo|peiiudi.suar. .;.,.0% nOfi ciini. Call(00)709-
5253.


IBEAUTnlil. N. CAROLI.NA. ISCAI'[ ITO BlEAIlTI-.
FUII. WES'IERN NC MOUNTAINS. FRFE COI.OR
BROCHURE & INFORMATION. MOUNTAIN IROP- .
ERTIES Wi SPECTACULAR VIEWS I HOMES. CAB-
INS. CREEKS & INVESTMENT ACREAGE. Cherokee
MountainGMACReal Estate. clcrokceemounlainrcallyS._r
(800)841-5868


Mountain Property! Interested in buying property in the
Blue Ridge Mountains ofNC? Call Active Realty today at
(800)979-5556 or visit our wcbsite at
\wwsv ActlvcRealtvNC coin
MUPIIY, NORTII CAROIINA AAII COOl. SUM-
MERS MILD WINTERS A nlrdabic lom&es a Mounlaion';
Cabins. Iand CAI.l. FOR FRE1' BROCI IURF (877) 37-
2283 EXIT RIlAI.TY MOULINTAIN VIIW PROPI,'-
'I'llS 3 yv'Y.\, l l tiilrplihyS ii]

NORTII ;1GEORG(lIA Nwc onllccs iIIn n (alnl Miiiiai
C o... . J ii a 1 I II, p I I ,


EASTERN TN MOUNTAINS Anmazng rolling \isla
views. I to 5 acre parcels from the S40'l Grandd Opening .
[ivcnt6/2 -64, I'lanncdCdlubliise. iiatuillin ll 1 Inhs Il'roi
Clllattanooga. 2 rs froinNashlivlc Call lrappt (tS66)292-
5769.

NEW ALAllAMA WA'I\ERFRONT 2 liours to Atlania
& the Coast. Waierlront community with incredihlec nios-
draped hardwoods. Planned clubhouse, docks. & nmae,
i/2 to 3 acres from the S40's. Minutes 1to istoric liufulaI
Call owner (866)882-I 107.

TI'NNtISSEE/KENTUCICKY LAKEFRONT Private
lake front r VCeW retrlatt Rolhng hills rnkichluclii.ee I
f1, II. 1. 11 .. I I

VA MOIIINTAINS 5 acres with liontagc on \tcv le.rge
pristine creek, very private, excellent islhlng, canncinm.
gond access, near New River Trail Stale Park. S39.500.
Owncr(866))789-8535 s\ .ivvluno ls,oiurfVA _ynm.

NC Mountains. 1.90 Acres w: 75 mile view & hardwouod
trccs.lFinancingavailalleal S59.l10 ,.'tiledo\:n Perlect
fir log cabin. Tirs one won't last. Call loday t 800)0 9-12' I
or wwvrrvcrbctndlaokclirc_,.sc


Mortgage Brokers/ loan offers/ branch nimnagers-
ready to lake the next step in your mortgage career?
kOiviYStyEISttflhECl 'onoi

IEUFAUILA.A ILWATERIRONT I/2 ir3 acrcs fIrom Ihe
40's. Gated wilh Planned clubhouse. docks, and hoal ramp
2 hours from Atlanta &the coast. Rolling lerrain. eautifiul
hardwoods. (866)882- 107.

LAKEFRONT PARCELS FOR SALE Gorgeous
lakclf'ont and view lots, A wesome views. On4 6K acre I ake
Barklcy. 90 min to Nashville. Great for 2nd.'reirement
home. I to40, acres from the S40's. Call (866)339-4966

TN-ClUMBERIAND PLATEAU I to5 acre parcelsfrom
the S40's, Amazingrolling vista views Close to parks &
lakes. Planned clubhouse. nature trails. Call for appt.
(866)292-5769,


Ist V'AIRS PAYMENTS ARE ON liS!* Dockablc
l.nakefronl .ots fro S149.900 li Acie I.ake Access I.ots
fronm,49,900! Giant72,000 acr lakeeonly2 irslrom Alltlana
Next available showing on Saturday. June 24th. Call lor
your aplwinmenl NOW! (877)426-232 X. 1344. *Some
restrictions apply. Qualified buyers only Ralcs and lirmiu
subject to change w/o notice. Offer void where prolhibted
by law.

I.rkefrrnl nnd latkeview IPri-perties Nesllcd in the hills
of Tennesse on the shores of pristine Norris Iake. Call
Lakeside Realty at (423)626-5820 Or visit
www\ akesidereally-tn cont

W: \NC'Mountains3.84Acresewiviewaind hardwvoold Tlcc
Owncr financing ar $65,280 little down This one won't
last call today (800)6910-128I9 or
ww\s riverbendlakelurc Conl


T'ENNESSEE NORRIS LAKE, MOST IIEAUIITIill.
OF TI!NNESSEE I.AKES \sith 800 miles of sltorclne
Waterview aid water frontlios liot Sm49.00(0.1 ona docks
available \vsuvwSlnsnscttal Realty com Suncl bli Realty
(865)278-3980.

C(nnial Solutlheal Geo;rgi:l. Iar ge uodced 'walr access.
marsh, view. lakcronL. and gol forienled Ihoncslcsro lolm ihe
mid 570l's l.ive oak. iol. emnllu.. goll (1771266-7376

IANK FORtECI.OSUREIS! Ilomes .from S10.00lli -3i
bcdroornm available! IHUD. Repos. REO. ctc. These lhoacs
niusl sell! For lhstilgs call 1800)425-162(1 ct 4237


SGEOIRGIA-II.AIRISVIIL,.lINT]IIENOITInI.;GEOR
(IA MOUNTAINS. Iand. Ilolecs.Comncircal& InvesM-
ment. "iVlRYTI IING( WI: TOUC('lI NSTO SO'1 "
Jane hlacr Really. (706)745-2261. (800)820-7829
\vww)lanbacrrealtv corm jancbacr:talllel ncl

SWcstern New Mexico Prlvate74 AcreRanlchS I 29990 Ml
vicws, Irces, rolling hills, pasllrcland,uo \vidlli:. herdcrs
B.M. Piclurcsque honicsieal6.700' clevalio in orschack
riding, hiking, hunting. Perlicl family ranch, elcclricity.
100% financing NAI.C (866)365-2825.


FI. I.AND IIARGAINS. Opportunities o own your ouln
lfarm. ranch woodland or lakeronit homestead Old Ilorda
al its lIst! Still M altrdabilc Call (866).152-2241) 0

BENT TR'EE Golrand Tennis., Gated Cunmuniutiy i the
North Georgia Mounlains will Clubhouse, Pools. Lake.
Stables. I lomes and I.olt available. Crall. IInc. S(00)122
1966I) wwc.rstrLles, tIcnr_
N.C.M luniill Silt No PNyoeps lI Sc.ur' Wesieril NC

McKcough I.and Conpaom (X86()930-5263i. *rCesicliiii
apply

Steel Buildings

ALLr STEEl. BUILDING SAl.F! "Plus [:ree Bonus!"
20Q28 Now $4200. 25x32 55800 30x42 59200 Il0\62
S14.900. EEtensive range of sloes. Fiont end opuonal
Pioncer(SOO)66-S5422.


TH FANKI

CHONCL


I 'U:


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 05/24/06 Invoice No. 11453
Description of Vehicle: Make Mazda Model 4 Door Color Red
TagNo.NoTag Year 1995 State FL VinNo. 1YVGE22C455405782

To Owner Tracy A. Hardman To Lien Holder
865 CC Land Road
Eastpoint, FL 32328



You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 05/19/06 at the request of FCSO that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 244.50 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you are hereby notified that on 06/22/06 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you arc urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present persona) identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.

SHADE TRE TOWING
P.O. B 971
Eastpoiqt, FL 32328
(850).6r8219,


MARINE SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES TRAINED MECHANICS

*YAMAHA


MIKE'S MARINE SUPPLY
P.O. BOX 429 HWY. 98 PANACEA, FL 32346
PHONE: (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693 FAX: (850) 984-5698
www.mikesmarine-panacea.com
HOURS: MON., TUES., THURS., FRI: 8:00 6:00
WED.: 8:00 1:00 SAT.: 8:00 5:00
PRO-LINE GHEENOE BOSTON WHALER
PONTOON BOATS SEA PRO G-3 CENTURY




I


Air-Con of Wakulla, LLC
HEATING AND COOLING
850-926-5592
Installation

Service

Repair

Gary Limbaugh, owner Lic # CAC1814304
Serving Franklin and Wakulla Counties since 1988









The Tallahassee Memorial

Wakulla Family Medicine Clinic





Stella vion Troil, M.D.
S FamrI) PFaiuce, Bo.ird Ceutiied
FIh'-aml, PSchool

,.,. 'im, Cw'riun.v

Tilh;/tah-s& .lhmon/al F,~mil\
7dd ictiv' Rcsicr'flk' FrosT7itl



D/:. 'on 77li/is (i(La eptiL g We11 pflC7enL5.

FanuJ-Centered Medjid Care
M- lo Insuranceies Acepted

15 Council Moore Road-Crawfordville, FL 32327

(850) 926-7105

J.I

Tallahassee MRlcnorial
Family\ Medicine
\%akulla








CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) F'lc No
Date ofthis Noice 05/20/06 Involc No 12002
Description orVehicle. Make Chevy Model Truck Color White
Tag NoNoTa Year 1982 Sate FL VinNo. IGCCW80H3CRIO4062

To Owner' Danny R. Talbert To Lien Holder
215 4th Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320



You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 04/20/06 at the request of FCSO that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 230.00 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you are hereby notified that on 06/15/06 at _12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you arc urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


J


Want to purchase minerals

and other oil/gas interests.

Send details to:

P.O. Box 13557

Denver, Colorado 80201


You too can have an investment

in paradise with the


BEST LOT LOAN ON

THE PLANET

For more details on this, other interest-only
products and Construction Perms, please contact:

Chollet Ramsey, Account Executive

850.927.4812
chollet.ramsey@bankofamerica.com

BankofAmerica.


III


- --r II


.'


i


6











The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


9 June 2006 Page 9


SURFSHOP


& CAFE


Surfboards/T-Shirts/Swimwear


Breakfast Buffet/BBQ/Ice Cream


850-927-3700 139 E. Gorrie Drive St. George Island
(across from the Shot Gun Houses) 05-2606-09






Stacy's Hair Design


850-670-1772


Hours: Tues-Fri 10-5, after 5 by apt. Sat. 10-until
TAKING CARE OF
Stacy Williams, ALL YOUR HAIR
Stylist CARE,
347 Highway 98 MANICURES,
P.O. Box 977 PEDICURES &
astpoint, FL 32328 TV ACRYLICS


SALES & SERVICE

CATERPILAR. DETROIT CUMMINS
TRANSMISSION .GENERATOR



MARINE SYSTEMS


ERIcPEhUFER SHOP: (850)697-2660
TIMBER ISLAND FAX (850) 697-2670

CARRABELL, FL MOBn; (850)524-2239
06-09/06-23


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle

pages is an efficient way to promote your business to

the public and save money at the same time. These

ads are strictly business cards magnified to 2 columns

by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two

insertions. Send your business card or copy to:

Franklin Chronicle, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL

32328 or fax 850-670-1685. Your check for $15.00 will

guarantee position in the next issue.







HOME TOWN BP & DELI

113 ST. JAMES AVENUE, JUST OFF
HIGHWAY 98 IN CARRABELLE 697-5111


Friendly atmosphere and A

the best chicken and burgers

in town!


LIVE BAIT FOR SALE
Now serving 7 days a week full breakfast
06-09/06-23








VACANT LAND

Vacant land for sale by owner. 2.37 acres in

Baywood Estates, Carrabelle, FL.

$179,900-Owner Financing Available.

Very nice area, no-mobile homes-Lot can be

divided and is partially cleared.

CALL 850-210-5882 or 219-313-7988.
05-12/05-26/06-09/06-23


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE

Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 05/25/06 Invoice No. 11468

Description of Vehicle: Make Nissan Model Truck Color Black
TagNo.No Tag Year 1992 State FL VinNo. JNIEB31P2N4117062

To Owner James K. Golden To Lien Holder-
12 Elanor Ave.
Panacea, FL 32346



You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 05/24/06 at the request of FCSO that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 244.50 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of$ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.



NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF, LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78


You and each of you are hereby notified that on 06/29/06 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.


SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219







CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE

Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
SDateof this Notice 05/15/06 Invoice No. 12030

Description of Vehicle: Make Chrysler Model New Yorker Color Silver
TagNo.585-AWZ Year 1989 State GA VinNo. 1C3BC4633KD536286

To Owner John A. Fullmore To Lien Holder-
615 Carlos Ave.
Ashbum, GA 31714



You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 05/12/06 at the request of FCSO that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 230.00 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78


You and each of you are hereby notified that on 06/08/06 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.


SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


Pay. The County Bills


The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of
$988,381.32 at their June 6, 2006 meeting. The bills are listed
as follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Of-
fice.


ACS GOV'T FINANCIAL. SYSTEM
06/05/2006 14:
BANK VENDOR
HIANK t HiNINlAht, IANK ACCOUNT


002395
002577
002582
001670
002467
001104
002481
0024111
)oo2014
002172
.04267
-002281
002576
002521
001247
001000
001536
002535
000209
002574
000318
002401
002400
002565
000194
000111
002495
002448
001595
001721
001994
002496
002581
002472
000230
001226
.04268
000192
000869
000593
.04276
001935'
002559
002583
002088
002484
002457
002584


Check Register


AT&T
AAA 1 TRANSMISSIONS
ALCO SALES & SERVICE CO
ALLTEL
ALSO
AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA
AMERICAN nYSTIrM 'TCI[NOL.O
AMUR T1II .h'
AMEN ILIA:;
APAIACIIICOLA ACE tIIARDWAR
APALACHICOLA ACE HDWR
ARAMARK
ARNOLD/IIARRY
U BRAUN MEDICAL
BADCOCK HOME FURNISHING
BAKER AND TAYLOR
BAKER JR./WILBURN L.
BAXTER HEALTHCARE CORP
BAY MEDICAL CENTER
BAYMEDICAL DIV OF AZIMUT
BCC GENERAL FUND
BEARD EQUIPMENT COMPANY
BECKMAN COULTER INC
BLACKHAWK APALACHICOLA L
BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD 0
BONDY'S FORD INT.
BRIGGS CORPORATION
C & W FOOD SERVICE INC
CALIFORNIA CONTRACTOR SU
CAPITAL HYDRAULICS
CAPITAL TRUCK, INC.
CARDINAL HEALTH
CARR, RIGGS & INGRAM LLC
CARRABELLE MEDICAL PHARM
CARSON & ADKINS
CIEGA, INC.
CITY OF APALACHICQLA
CITY OF APALACHICOLA
CITY OF CARRABELLE
CLERK OPERATIONAL ACCOUNT
CLERK'S.TRUST ACCOUNT
COLLEGIATE PACIFIC
COLSON INC/LARRY JOE
CONE INSTRUMENTS INC
COUCH READY MIX USA
CULLIGAN
DADE BEARING
DAVE DUGGAR ELECTRICAL


FRANKLIN COUNTY
GL540R-V06.71 PAGE 1


CIIECKII DATE


35729 06/0606
35730 06/06/06
35731 06/06/06
35732 06/06/06
35733 06/06/06
35734 06/06/06
357!3 06/06 06
3!,'136 06/06'/06
3J '737 ',/ 0, U/Od
35730 06/06/06
35739 06/06/06
35740 06/06/06
35741 06/06/06
35742 06/06/06
35743 06/06/06
35744 06/06/06
35745 06/06 06
35746 06/06/P6
35747 06/06 06
35748 06/06 06
35749 06/06/06
35750 06/06/06
35751 06/06/06
35752 06/06/06
35753 06/06/06
35754 06/06/06
35755 06/06/06
35756 06/06/06
35757 06/06/06
35758 06/06/06
35759 06/06/06
35760 06/06/06
35761 06/06/06
35762 06/06/06
35763 06/06/06
35764 06/06/06
35765 06/06/06
35766 06/06/06
35767 06/06/06
35768 06/06/06
35769 06/06/06
35770 06/06/06
35771 06/06/06
35772 06/06/06
35773 06/06/06
35774 06/06/06
35775 06/06/06
35776 06/06/06


AMOUNT


131.15
1,385.00
105.74
965.58
2,451.77
35.00
970.39
152.95
tit1, Ii,
'03.60
279.57
812.90
1,200.00
311.10
699.95
20.99
1,234.35
1,328.70
7,085.44
242.35
12,165.36
13,400.00
356.24
50,000.00
77,210.60
208.36.
358.67
745.21
405.60
1,333.81
42.38
53.32
13,500 00
266.73
6,561.68
2,103.80
820.81
1,556.11
154.10
68.19
2,818.50
151.38
2,240.00
50.06
237.25
435.75
4,195.67
527.19


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE

Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of thisNotice 05/31/06 .. .. Invoice No. 11465

Description of Vehicle: Make Nissan Model Maxima Color White
TagNo.NoTag Year 1993 State TN. VinNo. JNLHJO1F4PTO83091

To Owner Dexter P. & Charriet To Lien Holder
Womble
1803 Turfland Road
Murfreesboro, TN 37127


You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was
towed on 05/24/06 at the request of FWC that said
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under-
signed claim a lien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment
by the above date of notice in the amount $ 336.90 plus storage
charges occurring at the rate of$ 22.00 per day from the date
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78


You and each of you are hereby notified that on 06/29/06 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the-charges.


SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


000872
002578
002585
000903
002499
002005
002586
001853
002265
002537
'001259
000432
001921
001071
000226
000832
001659
001830
.04269
000184
002429
002454
002285
000138
.04270
000921
000140
002452
000635
002417
002500
000273
002568
002482
000626
002460
000144
.04277
000143
001502
.04278
002432
002329
002514
.04279
.04280
.04281
002566
00203
.04264
0011211
002099
002592
001805
002447
.04265
002475
.002392
000429
001503
002305
.04262'
002536
.04271
002063
002451
002505
002593
000149
002570
002330
002354
002587
002561
002343
002557
002554
000286
002531
002588
002594
002479
002423
002037
.04272
002160
.002445
000648.
002507
002589
.04273
000439
002461
002171
.04274
002194
002528
001972
'001841
002394
002486
000168
002590
002494
000217
.002463
000729
002591
000312
000132
001642
001929-
002481
002573
002513
002579
001995
000175
000835
001851
000205
001812
002580
.04266
002456
.04275
002278
000177
002215
002377
002291
001993
002396
002450
000329


DEPT OF MANAGEMENT SERVI'
DGG TASER & TACTICAL SUP
DIAGNOSTIC PARTS EXCHANGE
DILLON/DANIEL A.
EMS COMPANY
EMERGYSTAT INC
EVANS JR/GENE O
FAMILY DOLLAR STORE
FIRST CALL TRUCK PARTS I
FISHER HEALTHCARE
FLEET SUPPLY
FLORIDA ASSOC. OF COUNTY
FLORIDA COMBINED LIFE IN
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
FLORIDA MEDICAID-COUNTY
FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC HEALTH
G. WILLIE'S UNIFORMS, IN
GANDER AUTO PARTS
GEORGE E WEEMS HOSPITAL
GIBBS/DORIS S.
GIBSON/REBECCA D
GRAYLINK WIRELESS
GULF COAST AGGREGATES LL
GULFSIDE I.G.A. (APALACH
GULFSIDE IGA
GUNN HEATING AND AIR CON
H & B INDUSTRIES, INC.
HARBORMEDICAL CENTER
HARRIS, JR./JAMES A.
HICKS/SABRINA
HUMPHREY/WILLIAM
HUNT INSURANCE GROUP
INGENIX INC.
INSTRUMENTATION LABORATO
ISLAND DRIVE PROPERTIES
IVERS MD/VINCENT
J. V. GANDER DISTRIBUTOR
JACK FRYE JR
JACKSON AUTO PARTS & ACE
JACKSON-COOK
JENNIFER MARTINA &
JOHN DEERE GOVERNMENT
JOHNSON/MARCIA M.
JONES/MELISSA A
JUST-IN-CASE UNLIMITED
JUST-IN-CASE UNLIMITED
JUST-IN-CASE UNLIMITED
JUST-IN-CASE. UNLIMITED I
KI'LLIIY FUNIRAI. IIOME
KIIY PIPINT'rING OIR:VTC.IC'!
Ku'TIlluM, -WMO I) L 1)iR11.11T
KIMllAAbI MII1DWSIT:
KING CONSTRUCTION LLC
KING'S PLUMBING
KONICA MINOLTA MEDICAL I
LAIMA WAMECKE
LAKE/NANCY K
LANARK VILLAGE WATER &
LEITZ OFFICE PRODUCTS
LIBERTY COMMUNICATIONS
LUBRICATION ENGINEERS IN
MARCO BEACH OCEAN RESORT
MCKESSON
MCKESSON MEDICAL SURGICA
MEDIACOM
MEDIFAX-EDI LLC
MEDQUIST
MILLER HEATING &
MILLER MARINE, INC.
MOBILE INSTRUMENT SERVICE
MOCK/MIKE
NASHTECH INC
NDD MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES
NEECE TIRE & AUTO SERVICE
NEXTEL PARTNERS INC
O'NEAL/LEON E
OFFICE DEPOT
OFFICE OF THE STATE ATTO
OFFICEMAX CONTRACT INC
OLYMPUS AMERICA INC
OSBURN CONSTRUCTION
OSCEOLA SUPPLY INC
PANHANDLE KEY & SAFE
PANHANDLE LIBRARY ACCESS
PAUL'S PEST CONTROL INC
PAUL'S PEST CONTROL, INC
PAYROLL SYSTEMS
PEAVY & SON CONSTRUCTION
PIERCE DO/DAVID
POLYMEDCO INC
POSTMASTER
PREBLE-RISH, INC.
PREMIUM ASSIGNMENT CORPO
PROFORMA PRINT SOURCE UN
PROGRESS ENERGY
PROGRESS ENERGY FLORIDA,
QA REAL TIME SYSTEMS LLC
QUALITY WATER SUPPLY
R GRAY & ASSOCIATES, INC
REDDY ICE-ALBANY
REGISTER/PAMELA
RING POWER CORPORATION
ROSS PRODUCTS
SAUL MD/STEVEN J
SCOTT/WILLIAM E.
SHAM K MANGALVEDKAR
SHULER/THOMAS M.
SOUTHERN PETROLEUM SYSTEM
SPEARS SMALL ENGINES & T
SPIRIT SERVICES COMPANY
ST.JOE RENT-ALL, INC.
STANDARD INSURANCE COMPA
STAPLES BUSINESS ADVANTA
STATE COLLECTION SERVICE
STONE/MELANIE R
SWANK MOTION PICTURES IN
TAX COLLECTOR, FRANKLIN
TAYLOR'S BUILDING SUPPLY
TECH CARE X-RAY
TERMINIX
THE APALACHICOLA TIMES
TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT, COMP
TRINITY MATERIALS LLC
TWO CRACKED POTS
UMI LLC
UNITED PARCEL SERVICE
URS CORPORATION
VULCAN, INC.
SWARD INTERNATIONAL TRUCK
WARD/LAURA-
WARREN EQUIPMENT
WATER MANAGEMENT SERVICE
WILLSON'S PORTABLE TOILE
WOLFF/RONALD
WOYS OYSTER RADIO


35777 06/06/06
35778 06/06/06
35779 06/06/06
35780 06/06/06
35781 06/06/06
35782 06/06/06
35783 06/06/06
35784 06/06/06
35785 06/06/06
35786 06/06/06
35787 06/06/06
35788 06/06/06
.35789 06/06/06
35790 06/06/06
35791 06/06/06
35792 06/06/06
35793 06/06/06
35794 06/06/06
35795 06/06/06
35796 06/06/06
35797 06/06/06
35798 06/06/06
35799 06/06/06
35800 06/06/06
35801 06/06/06
35802 06/06/06
35803 06/06/06
35804 06/06/06
35805 06/06/06
35806 06/06/06
35807 060606
35808 06/06/06
35809 06/06/06
35810 006/06
35811 06/ 06
35812 06/06/06
35813 06/06/06
35814 06/06 06
35815 06/06 06
35816 06/06/06
35817 06/06/06
35818 06/06/06
35819 06/06/06
35820 06/06/06
35821 06/06/06
35822 06/06/06
35823 06/06/06
35824 06/0606
35825 06/06/06
358i267 0/06/06
35821 06/06/06
35829 06/06/06
35830 06/06/06
35831 06/06/06
35832 06/06/06
35833 06/06/06
35834 06/06/06
35835 06/06/06
35836 06/06/06
35837 06/06/06
35838 06/06/06
35839 06/06/06
35840 06/06/06
35841 06/06/06
35842 06/06/06
35843 06/06/06
35844 06/06/06
35845 06 06/06
35846 06/06/06
35847 06/06/06
35848 /00606
35849 06/06/06
35850 06/06/06
3585 06/06/06
3585 06/06/06
358506/06/06
3585 06/06/06
35852 06/06/06
35856 06/06/06
35854 06/06/06
35858 06/06/06
35859 06/06/06
35860 06/06/06
3586 06/06/06
35862 06/06106
35863 06/06/06
35864 06/06/06
35865 06/06/06
35866 06/06/06
35867 06/06/06
35868 06/06/06
35869 06/06/06
35870 06/06/06
35871 06/06/06
35872 06/06/06
35873 06/06/06
35874 06/06/06
35875 06/06/06
35876 06/06/06
35877 06/06/06
35878 06/06/06
35879 06/06/06
35880 06/06/06
35881 06/06/06
35882 06/06/06
35883 06/06/06
35884 06/06/06
35885 06/06/06
35886 06/06/06
35887 06/06/06
35888 06/06/06
35889 06/06/06
35890 06/06/06
35891 06/06/06
35892 06/06/06
35893 06/06/06
35894 06/06/06
35895 06/06/06
35896 06/06/06
35897 06/06/06
35898 06/06/06
35899 06/06/06
35900 06/06/06
35901 06/06/06
35902 06/06/06
35903 06/06/06
35904 06/06/06
35905 06/06/06
35906 06/06/06
35907 06/06/06
35908 06/06/06
35909 06/06/06
35910 06/06/06
35911 06/06/06


GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT


153.41
2,260.26
190.00
1,514.30
229.78
17,000.00
47.37
124.00
161.20
1,659.00
445.11
25.00
7,254.12
50.00
3,356.52
190.00
121.90
887.96
250.28
18,457.00
240.00
150.46
18,188.73
362.11
100.81
3,250.00
264.44
9,172.50
41,724.00
815.11
431.73
2,005.08
332.85
537.80
1,094.80
8,160.00
20,244.11
24.96
243.03
1,323.84
10,000.00
6,141.26
27,047.00
150.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
3,200.00
3,200.00
735.00
201.15
nr0. o0
227.71
3,211.66
1,125.00
675.39
400.00
524.30
54.00
557.69
103.60
89.43
716.00
6,341.45
2,482.12
23.00
109.30
451.00
2,097.00
358.58
331.35
404,574.00
122.50
830.86
475,62
264.30
200.00
134.04
3,736.04
430.88
53.10
1,915.00
313.65
238.35
29.75
65.00
60.00
261.25
1,637.95
7,254.00
55.00
39.00
27,176.65
1,411.74
129.00
6,935.56
9,511.39
246.00
138.70
4,000.00
148.50
204.00
873.26
169.32
600.00
938.84
7,680.00
6,832.00
4,200.00
177.50
761.91
2,957.32
575.85
53.48
8,446.34
225.00
271.00
3.75
3,623.95
730.00
271.00
1,246.00
441.28
879.50
88.00
5,000.00
235.44
12,031.80
69.75
63.62
600.00
1,099.23
143.49
286.00
1,188.69
1,170.00
988,381.32


Run You Ad Statewid


2x2 Rates
Statewide $1200
SRegional or National
Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


2x4 Rates
Statewide $2400
Regional Placement
also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


jl4


-- I


.5444 N6


RTM, 11 MCI, *l Million Readers by calling
The Franklin Cfn7RTru=, 50-670-1687
I pl; .... .... .. t N kif "Al i'Ll-cla" ili'd,


~L I I


Ea


(850) 927-2999 139A West Gorrie Drive
St. George Island, FL 32328

YOUR ONE STOP BEACH SHOP

05-26/06-09





Beach Bike Rentals, Inc.


We Rent Only Premium, Quality Bikes

Hourly Daily Weekly Rentals

Body Boards Skim Boards

Free Delivery Available

139 E. Gorrie Drive, St. George Island

Phone: 850-927-3993
05-26/06-09





WOODED LOT ST. JAMES BAY

Carrabelle, Florida

June 29, 2006 at 10:30 a.m. EST

S-Inspection Drive-Thru

10% BP, Term

For info AbalAuctionCompany.com

850-926-9160 AB2387

Michael Weltman, Lic. Real Estate Broker
06-09106-23








Page 10 -9 June 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


the Chronicle Bookshop


Mail Order Service *

R P.O. Box 590
Eastpoint, FL 32328


Voices


of the


(313) The Northwest Florida Expeditions of Clarence
Bloomfield Moore. The classic studies of Archeologist
Clarence Bloomfield Moore have been republished and
available from the Chronicle Book-shop in very limited
copies. When Clarence Bloomfield Moore cruised the riv-
ers of Florida in search of prehistoric artifacts a century
ago, he laid the groundwork for archaeological investiga-
tions to follow. This volume reflects Moore's fieldwork
along the northwest Florida coast, the most
archaeologically rich area of the state, as well as up the
Apalachicola Rivei to the Chattahoochee and Flint Riv-
ers in Alabama and Georgia. Here readers will share
Moore's first look at the northwest Florida area in 1901 -
1903 and additional observations made in 1918 during
what was to be his last field season. Moore's works re-
veal ceramics, tools, skeletal remains, and exotic arti-
facts excavated fromthe earthen mounds and shell
middens built by native peoples over the last two millen-
nia. In the' introduction to this edition, David S. Brose
and Nancy Marie White place Moore's investigations
within the context of science, natural history, and anti-
quarianism of his day. They document what happened to
the sites he explored, tell how his findings fit into the
body of his research, and explain how those findings
should be interpreted in the context of southeastern cul-
ture history and modern archaeological theory. Univer-
sity of Alabama Press, 1999, 525 pp. This is an oversized
book measuring 10" x 14" requiring postage and han-
dling charges of $8.50. Bookshop price for the volume is
$60.00. Softcover.


Saint Gebil

Pi-
~;,iI,
~* *-' :-
'ie n'


-.- ---












(21) Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers. Uni-
versity of Florida Press, Hardcover, 297 pp. In this book,
Rogers traces and documents the economic, social and
political emergence of the Gulf coast port of Apalachicola
and the pristine barrier island, Saint George. From the
earliest times, both the island and Apalachicola have be-
come intertwined. The account of the machinations of con-
troversial developer William Lee Popham is the first phase
of area development, later leading to the controversial
struggles of the 1970s when environmentalist and sea-
food industries fought to determine the ecological and eco-
nomic fate of the Bay area. The Chronicle has obtained
a fresh supply of newly reprinted volumes at an at-
tractive price. Available elsewhere for $35.95 plus ship-
ping and handling. The Chronicle Bookshop price is much
cheaper at $25.00 per volume.


rge Island & Apalachicola
from Early Exploration
-to \V\okl \V'r I


(321) Voices of the Apalachicola. Compiled & Edited by
Faith Eidse, University of Florida Press, 328 pp, 2006.
One of Florida's most endangered river systems is the
Apalachicola River and Bay basin, and it is not just the
natural areas that are threatened but also the history
and culture of its people. In Voices of the Apalachicola,
veteran storyteller Faith Eidse, together with the staff of
the Northwest Florida Water Management District, has
compiled a remarkable collection of oral histories from
more than 30 individuals who have lived out their entire
lives in this region, including the last steamboat pilot on
the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system,
sharecroppers who escaped servitude, turpentine work-
ers in Tate's Hell, sawyers of "old-as-Christ" cypress,
beekeepers working the last large tupelo stand, and a
Creek chief descended from a 200-year unbroken line of
chiefs.
As developers increase pressure and populations grow
within the basin, this timely collection captures a fasci-
nating and unique moment in history, recalling a resource
that once brimmed with life-bigger oysters, larger stur-
geon, healthier Torreya trees. Already several of Eidse's
subjects have passed away and were it not for Voices of
the Apalachicola; their stories would have disappeared,
as surely as the Apalachicola will dwindle away to a
shadow of its natural glory if its historic flows and envi-
ronmental health are not preserved.
The Apalachicola River systems one of the main -re-
sources of water not only for Florida, hut also Alabama
and Georgia. It flows unimpeded for 106 miles from Lake
Seminole where the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers
merge-through the Florida Panhandle into Apalachicola
Bay and finally into the Gulf of Mexico. From emerging
technologies to environmental health, Eidse captures the
battle to preserve and persevere, providing historic and
current photos that show how the basin has changed.
Habitat maps indicate where our sensitive species live
and land preservation maps illustrate how the state of
Florida is trying to protect them. Bookshop price = $29.95.

Removal .


The Seminoles' Struggles to Survive
in the West, 1836 1866
By Jane F. Lancaster
The University of Tennessee Press/Knox-
ville, hardcover, 225 pp, 1994.
This book focuses on this hitherto neglected
era in Native American history and places
the Seminoles in their correct historical po-
sition as a Native American tribe. By exam-
ining the Seminoles' adjustments during
their first decades in the West in light of fed- '"
eral Indian policy, it concludes that after
thirty years of struggles, caused largely by the, faulted policies of the
federal government, these Indians were a "stricken, divided, and
beggared people scattered over huridreds of miles." For this tribe, the
federal government's program of placing it in a western land away
from white settlers, where it could he nurtured toward civilization
and Christianity, was not only a shortsighted policy but also an illogi-
cal and inhumane one. Without the stubbornness and determination
of these early tribal members, no western Seminole tribe would have
existed in 1990. Truly, the mere survival of the early Seminoles earned
them special distinction as a tribe.
Published by University of Tennessee Press, 1994. 225 pp., Hard-
cover. Sold nationally for $28.95. Bookshop price = $24.00.


r- -----------------
Order Form
Mail Order Dept., Chronicle Bookshop
Please Print:
Name
Address
City State Zip__
ITelephone
Book # Brief Title Cost
I I







Shipping & Handling
1 book $2.50 Total Book Cost_..- -. .. .
2-3 books $3.50 Sales tax +
4-5 books $4.00 (6% in FL)
6-10 books $5.00 S
Shipping & +_
SHandlin
S Bookshop List Of H
09 June 2006 TOTAL a
Amount enclosed by check or money order. Please do not send cash.
IAll book orders must be on this form. When completed, please
mail this form and your check or money order to: Franklin
Chronicle, Post Office Box 590, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Be sure to
add sales tax and shipping charges. Incomplete orders will be
returned.
L--------------_ __--_-------


(126) Shipwreck and Adventures of Monsieur Pierre
Viaud From 1768, the sensational story of a shipwreck
near Dog Island, and the adventures of Pierre Viaud and
his search for survival. Published by the University of
Florida Press, 139 pp. Hardcover. Sold nationally for
$24.95. Bookshop price = $20.95.




Si "-- -

h .. n d t ,i



The St. Joe Company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle
,, I _1_ .I


(317) Green Empire, The St. Joe Company and the
Remaking of Florida's Panhandle. By Kathryn Ziewitz
and June Wiaz.
Based on hundreds of sources-including company ex-
ecutives, board members, and investors as well as those
outside the company-this factual and objective history
describes the St. Joe Company from the days of its
founders to the workings and dealings of its present-day
heirs. For all readers concerned with land use and growth
management, particularly those with an interest, in
Florida's fragile wildlife and natural resources, Green
Empire will generate important debate about an often-
overlooked part of the state and will invite*public scru-
tiny of its largest landowner.
University of Florida Press, 2004, 364 pp. Paperback.
Bookshop price = $24.95.


More Savings
A $35+ purchase order in books will earn you a bonus one-year sub-
scription to the Franklin Chronicle at no additional charge!
(Please complete the form below)
I have enclosed my purchase order for S35+ in books and now
request the bonus subscription to the Chronicle. My address and
other data are as follows:
Name
(Please write legibly.)
Address
City
State Zip code + 4
Subscriptions will begin within a 3-week period.
Telephone Number: ( )
You may renew your subscription to the Chronicle under this plan.
Please indicate a renewal by checking the block below and placing
your mailing label to this form.
.. RENEWAL
Attach Mailing Label Here


Please Note
Books from the mail service of the Chromle Bookshop are new and used, and are
so-designated in each item description. Some titles may be temporarily out of
stock, in which case a second shipment wil be made, normally in 14 days Books
are shipped in 48 hours, normally Some of our books are publishers' closeouts
overstocks, remainders or current titles at special prices MIost are in limited sup-
ply and at these prices may sell out fast. If ar.ny hook is sold out your money iwill
be refunded by bank check. To offer the lowest possible prices all orders must be
prepaid. We do no billing and do not accept credit cards


z1 ~c.X
L- ~t~


(318) Home To War, A His-
tory of the Vietnam Vet-
erans' Movement. By
Gerald Nicosia. An epic nar-
rative history that chroni-
cles, for the first time, the
experience of America's
Vietnam veterans.who re-
turned home to fight a dif-
ferent kind of war.
Published by Crown, Hard-
cover, 690 pp. Sold nation-
ally for $35.00. Bookshop
price = $30.00. Due to the
weight and length of this
work, please include $6.00
for shipping and handling.


- ..... Aftershock


I I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs