Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00281
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: April 14, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00281
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text




















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The


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA, FL
32320
PERMIT #8


The Orman House


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Chronicle


Volume 15, Number 8 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER April 14 27, 2006


Issued By U.S. Postal Service


Four Stamps Honor Ben Franklin


Benjamin Franklin, namesake
for Franklin County, was hon-
ored on four new U.S. com-
memorative postage stamps
issued on April 7th in Phila-
delphia 300 years after his
birth.
The stamps highlight four dif-
ferent occupational roles
Franklin occupied in his life-,
time: statesman, scientist,
printer and postmaster. The
stamps are issued in panes of
20. The stamp honoring
Franklin's role as statesman
includes a detail from John
Trumbull's painting of the
Declaration of Independence,
a copy of Franklin's "Join or
Die" (1754) political cartoon,
the top of a printed copy of the
Declaration, a portrait of
Franklin by Joseph-Siffred
Duplessis (1780s) and the
French side of the 1778 Treaty
of Alliance with France, nego-
tiated and signed by Franklin.
His role as a scientist includes
a 19th Century lithograph
showing Franklin and his son
performing the legendary elec-
trical experiment with a kite,
a page from Franklin's report,
a drawing of his three-wheeled
clock, and a depiction of
Franklin at his writing desk.
Franklin as a printer is shown
a portrait by illustrator
Michael Dooling, an early is-
sue of the Pennsylvania Ga-
zette and the front of the 1733
edition of Poor Richard's Al-
manac. The stamp honoring
Franklin as a postmaster in-
cludes a graphic device used
by the Boston Postboy during
the 18th Century and a colo-
nial postal cover from
Marlboro (Maryland) on a
1775 letter to Philadelphia.
Four different stamps is
printed on the back of the
liner-release paper behind
each stamp in a given pane:
The 39-cent Benjamin Frank-
lin, Statesman Stamp says:
"Deeply involved in politics
and civic life, Benjamin
Franklin served in the Conti-
nental Congress and signed
both the Declaration of Inde-
pendence and the Constitu-
tion. Of ten considered
America's first diplomat,
Franklin negotiated an alli-
ance with France and helped














Carrabelle City
Council Meeting
April 6, 2006

Commission

Slams Door

On Public Comment,
Things Get Dicey
By Skip Frink
Picture this: Tim Saunders,
Sr., former owner of Saunders
Seafood and provider of the
free city feast we all used to
have after' the Boat Parade of
Lights each December, being
led from the commission
meeting. Officer Alvin was
able to professionally defuse
the situation between Mr.
Saunders and Mayor Kelly,
which had degraded into a
shouting match and a lot of
gavel rapping. The Carrabelle
citizen had attempted to add
his comment to those of Steve
Bracci, developer of the
Carrabelle Boat Club, after
the chair had repeatedly tried
to end comment.
The Saunders family and what
appeared to be 15 or 20 other
local citizens became irate at
the decision: not only to end
discussion, but to end discus-
sion following the chair's ear-
lier failed attempt to avoid any
discussion on the agenda item
from the start. Mr. Bracci's
persistence in stating his
case, over objections, was the
only thing that got the item
heard.

Continued on Page 11


;" ,
-to secure a peace treaty with
Great Britain."
Benjamin Franklin, Scien-.
tist Stamp; "Remembered for
the pursuits he called 'philo-
sophical amusements,' Ben-
jamin Franklin was intensely
curious about natural phe-
nomena..His observations and
experiments in areas such as
electricity and meteorology
resulted in interesting inven-
tions, including a heating
stove, the lightning rod, and
an early, electrical battery."
Benjamin Franklin, Printer
Stamp: "From his childhood
apprenticeship in Boston to
his career in Philadelphia as
an adult, Benjamin Franklin
enjoyed a lifelong association
with printing. In addition to
the Pennsylvania Gazette and
Poor Richard's Almanack, his
presses, also printed a wide
range of materials such as
government pamphlets, reli-
gious tracts, currency, and
books."
B. Free Franklin, Postmas-
ter Stamp: "Benjamin
Franklin was vital to the or-
ganization of the American
postal system, serving as
postmaster of Philadelphia
and a deputy postmaster for
the American colonies before
being appointed postmaster


general by the Continental
Congress in 1775. He marked
postage-free letters with his
unique personal signature: 'B.
Free Franklin.'"'
Descriptive text for each of the
four different Benjamin
Franklin stamps celebrate a
man whose contributions
helped establish the United
States and echo throughout
the nation's historical and
popular culture;
Benjamin Franklin was born
in Boston on Jan. 17, 1706,
the eighth child of Josiah
Franklin and Abiah Folger
Franklin.
Franklin's formal schooling,
which included time at the
Boston Latin School, came to
an end when hewas 10.
Two years later, Franklin en-
tered an apprenticeship under
his older brother, James, who
was publisher of the New En-
gland Currant. The younger
Franklin wrote under the
pseudonym "Silence Dogood."
On Sept 1, 1730, Franklin
married by common law
Deborah. Read, whom he had
courted six years earlier. The
couple had two children-son
Francis; born in 1732, and
daughter Sarah, born in 1743.


The New Franklin County

Senior Citizen Center

By Richard E. Noble
I was invited this past week (April 6) to a free lunch and lec-
ture on Stroke prevention and treatment at the Franklin County
Senior Citizen Center located in Carrabelle on Avenue F and
ist street. If you are one of the nearly six thousand Franklin
County residents who are over fifty, you are all invited to the
free lunch every Thursday also. These lunches are just like
the ones you used to have over at grandma's house. I couldn't
believe all the food fried chicken, bar-b-que chicken, chicken
and dumplings, macaroni and cheese, five different types of
baked beans, six different vegetables, soups and salads, Cole
slaw and a whole table full of cakes, pies, donuts and what-
nots. There looked to be a hundred or so guests at this week's
extravaganza.
Everything rolled along like clockwork thanks to Bessey
Robinson and the "kitchen girls"-all friends, all seniors, and
all volunteers. I saw Sid Winchester, Jim Lawlor and Pastor
Mark Collins who conducts a nondenominational Bible study
program also on Thursdays at 10: a.m., carting things out to
the serving table and helping out in one way or another. The
place was a bustle. Burt Ivey of the Carrabelle Food Pantry
was handing out the plastic ware while Cal Allen with some
friends from the Lanark Scottish Fiddle Orchestra kept us all
bouncing along to the beat of Robert Burns. It was a casual,
very pleasant luncheon to say the least.
Sue Reed the president of the new board of directors intro-
duced me to a number of the luminaries. I went through the
kitchen and then into the computer room where I met Joyce
Durham. Joyce is a retired high school teacher who volun-
teers her time every Monday between 9:30 and 11 and 1:30
and 3, teaching basic computer skills in the morning and more
complicated stuff in the afternoon. They have a room full of
computers-all donated to the center by the Gulf State Bank
-represented most often by the friendly and affable winner of
the prestigious Banker of the Month Award, David Butler.
I was then taken out back to see the new Bochi Ball course
being constructed, along with a potential shuffleboard area
and several, soon to be finished, horseshoe pitching posts.
The enthusiastic Board members have a good many hopes
and dreams for the newly organized center-including build-
ing expansion and add-ons and additions. The outside walls
of the building are going to be repainted with several murals
which will be added with the help of the new art director Pat
Moore and her students and volunteers. Pat's Art Club meets
Tuesday between 2 4 p.m. at the center and all interested
artist or wannabes are invited.
Each morning now between 8 and 10 a.m. coffee is being served
again for free-of course, as with the Thursday lunches -any
donations are gladly received.
The biggest money making event, as you may have guessed, is
the Monday night Bingo. The doors open at 5 p.m.-early bird
Bingo starts at 6 p.m. and regular Bingo at 7 p.m.
This month is Health Care month and clinics on different is-
sues are being held every Thursday starting at noon. They are
sponsored by the Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare. Sue Pugh,

Continued on Page 12


Smallpox claimed the life of
Francis in 1736, but Sarah
eventually married and had
seven children.
In 1733, Franklin began pub-
lishing Poor Richard's
Almanack, a yearly amalgam
of calendar, weather forecasts
and astronomical informa-
tion, all liberally spiced with
Franklin's witty proverbs and
aphorisms.
"A penny saved is two-pence
clear," which eventually
turned into "A penny saved is
a penny earned"; "Early to
bed, early to rise makes a man
healthy, wealthy, and wise";
and "Haste makes waste" are
among the many sayings that
Franklin bequeathed to sub-
sequent generations.
Franklin's creativity, com-
bined with his insatiable cu-
riosity about the world around
him, made him an ideal sci-
entist.
He conducted numerous in-
quiries beyond his famous
explorations of electricity, and
he is credited with inventing
the lightning rod, bifocal
glasses, the glass harmonica,
the Franklin stove, the odom-
eter and the flexible urinary
catheter.
In 1764, Franklin returned to
England to act as colonial
agent for Pennsylvania. He
actively petitioned King
George III to take control of
the colonial government from
the Penn family, who served
as colonial proprietors.
Whatever hopes Franklin had
of a secure post with the Brit-
ish government were dashed
with his vocal opposition to
the Stamp Act of 1765 and the
Townsend Acts of 1767, which
imposed myriad news taxes
on the colonies, including spe-
cial taxes on glass, lead, paint,
paper and tea.
Franklin returned to Philadel-
phia in May 1775 and was
selected as Pennsylvania's
delegate to the Second Conti-
nental Congress. He assisted
Thomas Jefferson in the writ-
ing of the Declaration of In-
dependence, making substan-
tive changes to Jefferson's
draft.
Upon signing the Declaration
at the age of 70 (he was the
oldest of the signers), Franklin
soberly remarked, "We must
indeed all hang together, or,
most assuredly, we shall all
hang separately?'
Continued on Page 10


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to make a trade with the captain to get his cotton loaded on
board. Prior to that, he basically had to sit here and guard his
cotton. But he did come up with an idea. The idea he had was
simply to establish a cotton merchant trade, something like a
middleman between the cotton growers and the shippers.
What he did, he came up with the idea to build big brick ware-
houses to store the cotton in those warehouses. He told the
either cotton growers that for 2V/2% commission of their crops,
ae would take their cotton and store it in his warehouse. Ba-
sically they didn't have to do anything but grow it and bring it
:o him. He would take care of all the dealings. Mr. Orman had
mough money so that when the ships came in from Europe
oaded with goods he would trade or barter-household goods,
clothes furniture, rum, tobacco, different things of that na-
ure. What Mr. Orman did was go down to the captains, when
he ships came in and tell the captain that he would take ev-
-rything on their ship, basically he bought everything they
lad, by doing that. It gave him exclusive rights to be the one
/o put his cotton aboard that ship. So you can see how impor-
ant he was. Anybody who brought their cotton to Orman,
mew he was going to get his cotton loaded on board, so that
really made a difference. To give you an idea, about 1834 there
vere now 43 cotton warehouses in Apalachicola and Mr. Orman
)wned 11 of those. They were shipping out about 50,000 bales
)f cotton per year at an income of about 3 million dollars. So
'ou can imagine, that was quite a bit of money during that
ime period.
Of course the river system was the main transportation. This
vas the third largest cotton port in the south, through the
820's, 30's and 40's. The only two larger than this were Mo-
)ile, Alabama and of course New Orleans, Louisiana.
Around 1836, Thomas and Sara Orman made the decision
imply to sell their cotton plantation and to move here to the
ity permanently. Mr. Orman was probably making more money
beingg a cotton merchant than as he was trying to grow cotton.
Vhat they did, they actually sold their plantation, packed up
heir goods and at this time he and Sara had their only child.
Continued on Page 12


P,"d- Nt-W JZ"4446E"44~k


Balyc u


By Geri Moore
Built in 1838 by Thomas Orman, this antebellum home over-
looks the Apalachicola River, and was used for both business
and social gatherings. Orman was a cotton merchant and busi-
nessman in Apalachicola from 1840 to the 1870s. He helped
the tiny town become one of the Gulf Coast's most important
cotton exporting ports during the mid- 19th century. The house
features details of both federal and Greek revival styles with
wooden mantelpieces, molded plaster cornices, and wide heart-
pine floorboards. The house is open 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. and
closed 12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. Thursday through Monday, ex-
.cept Thanksgiving, Christmas andNew Year's Day. For a $2.00
fee, tours are offered hourly, except at 12:00 p.m.
I went to the Orman House State Park, not really knowing
what to expect. I had never known "just a house" to be a
Florida State Park, so I was curious about this house and the
origins. I had visited the house much earlier, when it was in
shambles, never knowing about the past history of it. w
thanks to Tommy Davis I know the rest of the story.
Tommy Davis is the Park Ranger who narrates the history of
the Orman Home as he takes you on a tour. Mr. Davis began
his career with the Park Service 6 12 years ago at St. Joseph
State Park and transferred about 2 years ago to the Orman
house. In 2005 Tommy Davis was given the District 1 Inter-
pretive of the Year Award for his interpretation of the Orman
House and for living history programs on turpentine. I have
decided to let Tommy Davis tell you the story of the Orman
House in his own words, as he does during his actual tours.
"Thomas Orman was born in Salinas NY in 1799. At the age of
18 years old, he decided he wanted to come down to the south
to be a cotton farmer. He left !home at the age of 18 and he
traveled down the Mississippi River ended up in New Orleans
to begin with, stayed there about a year. After that he traveled
all the way down to St. Andrews, over by Panama City. There,
with a gentleman by the name of Syrus Young, he got in the
salt business. They would take the seawater, evaporate it down
and get the salt from it, using that to preserve the fish. St.
Andrews was a fishing village. Mr. Orman did this for about 5
years, and then around 1825 he finally made it here to
Westpoint. Prior to 1831 this community was known as
Westpoint, across the river you come to Eastpoint."
"To give you a little information about this, in 1831 the city
took the name Apalachicola, it was given to them by the Creek
Indians. The Creek Indians who lived across the river. It is an
Indian name and it means "the people on the other side of the
river".
"In 1825 Mr. Orman arrived here and he was a bit disappointed.
He thought cotton was going to be growing everywhere. This
was the 3rd largest cotton port in the 1820's and 1830's. When
he got here, he realized he couldn't grow cotton in beach sand.
Basically all the cotton came down the river where it was loaded
onto ships going over to Europe. So what Mr. Orman did, he
actually went back up the Apalachicola River about 80 miles
to a little town known as Webville, today we know that city as
Marianna, Florida.
"There he purchased a piece property and started a cotton
plantation. He met his wife there, and her name was Sara
Tripp and she was a true southern belle. She had been mar-
ried prior, but her husband, Mr. Tripp had gotten killed on
their honeymoon day in a hunting accident. Thomas Orman
met her and they got married. On the way up river, he pur-
chased the slaves he would need to work that plantation.
"When his first cotton crop came in they baled it up and floated
it here to the city. When he got here, he got another surprise.
First thing he saw was cotton stacked up all along the wharf
down here. Basically the other cotton growers had brought
their cotton to the city and they were waiting on ships to come
from Europe to take that cotton. Mr. Orman unloaded his cot-
ton and basically, he waited. Rumor has it that it took a month
to a month and a half for a ship to finally arrive. He was able
iqrbhur








Page 2 14 April 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs

April 4, 2006

Present: Chairperson
Cheryl Sanders;
Commissioner Jimmy
Mosconis; Commissioner
Bevin Putnal;
Commissioner Russell
Crofton and
Commissioner Noah
Lockley, Jr.

Superintendent of
Public Works
Mr. Hubert Chipman reported
to the Board the results of his
department's auction:


County Extension
Mr. Bill Mahan made the fol-
lowing report to the Commis-
sioners:
Medicare Plan D Training:4As
part of a UF-IFAS statewide
program I am one of approxi-
mately 25 Extension Agents
being trained to educate and
assist "seniors" navigate their
way through the Medicare
Plan D enrollment process.
The Web-based program uses
the national Center for Medi-
care and Medicaid Website to
identify the three least expen-
sive prescription drug plans
available to them in the new
Medicare Part D program. The
program will focus on low-in-
come seniors living in rural
areas. Currently in Florida 19
companies have contracted'
with Medicare to offer 44 dif-
ferent plans."
Vibrio vulnificus Illness Rate
Update for the Core States:
Interstate Shellfish Sanitation
Conference Goal-40% collec-
tive reduction in the illness
rate in the Core states of CA,
FL, LA, and TX for 2005 and
2006 average (compared to
the 1995-1999 baseline rate
= 0.303 million). 2005 illness
rate = 0.087 per million. The
illness rate reduction in the
Core states for 2005 = 71 %.
The collective 2006 illness
rate will have to be greater
than 0.277 per million to not
meet the illness rate reduction
goal.
Looking only at Vv oyster ill-
nesses reported in Florida for
2005:
* The FL 1995-1999 Baseline
Illness Rate = 0.627 per mil-
lion.
* The FL oyster Vv illness rate
(reported in Florida) for 2005
was 0.281 per million.
* This represents a 55% ill-
ness rate reduction in 2005.


'tia-t Japtit efhtct

St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor

Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!

Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.


Worship & Praise
Sunday Night
Wed. "Power Hour"


11:00 a.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.


"Walking in Christ"


Looking only at Vv oyster ill-
nesses reported in Florida
harvested oysters reported
from the Core states of CA, FL,
LA, and TX for 2005:
* 1995 1999 Baseline illness
rate = 0.218 per million
* 2005 illness rate = 0.056 per
million
* 2005 illness rate reduction
= 74%
Possible reasons for the ill-
ness rate reductions: 1. At-
risk consumer awareness
through education programs
or other means; 2. Increased
PHP product on the market;
3. CA ban on traditional raw
oysters during warmer
months; 4. lower oyster pro-
duction in the Gulf due to
hurricanes and red tide.
Provided no,changes are made
to the ISSC Vv Risk Manage-
ment for Oysters, it is likely
that the 40% illness reduction


goal will be achieved for 2005
& 2006. According to the Risk
Management goal, should the
40% illness rate reduction not
'be met, the only requirement
would be for the oyster indus-
try to demonstrate a 50%
Post-Harvest Processing (PHP)
capacity and the industry has
already demonstrated a PHP
capacity greater than 50%.
The other Core state illness
reduction rate percentages for
2005 are; CA (100%), LA
(100%), & TX (65%).
FL Post-Harvest Processing
Update: Currently in Florida,
three "freezing technologies"
are being used: Frosted Oys-
ter (Leavins Seafood)-nitro-
gen immersion freezing; Easy-
Shuck Oysters (Buddy Ward
and Sons Seafood)-blast fro-
zen: and Webb's Seafood-
heat shock + freezing.
Both" thiPFrosted' anid 'Easy-"
Shuck' processes have been
validated by U.S.,FDA to re-
duce Vibrio vulnificus to non-
detectable levels based on the
PHP performance data col-
lected by the Allen Boyd-
Franklin County Oyster In-
dustry Lab and the UF-IFAS
laboratories in Gainesville.
Future Florida PHP work will
focus on and "Immediate Re-
lease Program" for product,
processing aids, packaging,
and validation of the heat
shock + freezing process.

Director of
Administrative Services
Mr. Alan Pierce made the fol-
lowing report to the Commis-
sioners:
"Mr. Teddar says he will be
starting the Bluff Road Boat
Ramp on April 10. This is ex-
pected to take two weeks.
The Board approved allowing
Mr. Jeff Lockley to store Port-
a-Lets at the State Yard on
Bluff Road with the same con-

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


editions that the county cur-
rently has in effect with Wil-
son Port Lets.
The Board approved turning
over to County Attorney for
enforcement three remaining
turtle lighting violations. Of
the 7 disorientations reported
last year all have been re-
solved except these three. The
Board asked the County At-
torney to write to the three
violators.

Update on Alligator
Point
The Board postponed a deci-
sion from the last Board meet-
ing regarding how the Board
will pay its share of the final
engineering and design costs
associated with beach
renourishment. The Board
needs to allocate $158,895. A
likely source is the Bald Point
Trust Fund. The Board needs
to allocate the funds and then
direct the Chairman to sign
the DEP grant agreement.
The Alligator Point Water Dis-
trict continues to have a criti-
cal water shortage because
the main 10 inch line has not
been replaced. At this time, I
have recommended to the Dis-
trict that they use their exist-
ing FEMA funds to replace the
10 inch main in the existing
Alligator Point Right-of-Way,
and to do it under emergency
orders so that the Point can
have appropriate fire protec-
tion as soon as possible. I then
recommend to the Board that
it allow the District to apply
to use the Board's Hazard
Mitigation Grant Funds for a
mitigation project to relocate
the main. The Board has ap-
proximately $400,000 avail-
able for mitigation projects.
The initial project was going
to be an elevation project for
a house on Alligator Point,
and then Mr. Dave McClain
was hoping some funds would
be available for land acquisi-
tion associated with the se'a-
food industry project he is
working on. I believe support-
ing the Water District provides
a higher level of public health
and safety than any other
project being proposed. The
Board approved Mr. Mike
Rundel, Franklin County
Emergency Management Of-
fice work with the District and
FEMA to determine the best
use of the county's HMGP
funds, and that Mr. Rundel to
take the appropriate steps to
allocate the funds to the Dis-
trict if FEMA recommends it.
The action authorizes Mr.
Rundel to amend the Local
Mitigation Strategy to include
the Alligator Point Water Dis-
trict project.
The Board waived bid policies
and found a contractor to
'make FEMA approved repairs
on other sections of Alligator
Point road that had damage,
these being near the intersec-
tion of Chip Morrison, and the
other near the end of Alliga-
tor Drive near the S curve. The
Board action would also in-
clude directing Preble-Rish to
assist developing the scope of
work consistent with the
FEMA Project Worksheet. The
reason for the action is to
make as many repairs as pos-
sible before the beginning of
next hurricane season. The
Board approved Mr. Pierce's
recommendation.
Rose Drye has announced
that she does not want to
serve another term on the
county Planning and Zoning
Commission when her term
ends in May. She fills a seat
from the Real Estate Indus-
try. The Board decided to ad-
vertise the vacancy.
The County Attorney is to re-
lease the existing Letter of
Credit dated March 16, 2005,
for Resort Village and replace
it with a new smaller Letter of

Sr J~p


850-697-2376
Fax: 697-4680


3 i&ty

850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836

SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


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United Methodist Church


h You ARE INVITED To
SUNDAY WORSHIP 9:30A.M.


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Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org Pastor: Ray Hughes


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Miss Brenda's

Family Restaurant

Pizza Burgers *Steak Seafood

Highway 98 in Carrabelle
Open 11:oo a.m. til 9:oo p.m.
9 CLOSED MONDAY
I!r rI3r Cl-J'l_


Credit because a substantial
part of the infrastructure has
een completed and ap-
proved.
"Mr. Bill Hobson, ofCarrabelle
Beach, has contacted me, and
perhaps some of the commis-
sioners regarding trespassing
by the public upon his prop-
erty near, but not adjacent to
the Carrabelle Wayside Park.
Mr. Hobson owns property on
the south side of US 98 some
several hundred feet from the
end of the county property.
Because there is no indication
on the beach itself of what is
public and what is private,
beach goers wander up and
down the beach. Mr. Hobson
believes it is the county's re-
sponsibility to direct the pub-
lic to the appropriate areas. I
told Mr. Hobson that at this
time he was the only private
property owner in a row of
about five that was complain-
ing. He would like the Board
to erect signs around his
property saying "Private Prop-
erty."
Board action to submit the
following projects to the Tour-
ist Development Council for
funding:
$25,000 for engineering fees
associated with designing the
St. George Island boat ramp
$25,000 for dune walkovers
on Alligator Point at the fol-
lowing sites-Bald Point, Car-
. nival Land, Pelican St., Gulf
Shore Blvd. Also build a path
at the s curve to guide visi-
tors away from sea oats.
$100,000 for Kendrick Park
improvements.
$150,000, if necessary, for the
rebuilding of the main St.
George Island parking area.
The Board approved Ms. Beth
Brinkley and her firm to im-
prove at their expense a pub-
lic parking area on the south
side of the bike path on St.
George Island directly across
from prudential realty, and to
remove the parking area on
Gulf Beach Drive. This will be
done with the understanding
that the property remains the
county and any improvements
could be removed by the
county.
The Board requested assis-
tance from Senator Bill Nelson
with regard to Medicare bill-
ing. The letter will be sent to
Mr. Frank Detoma, Sen.
Nelson's aide.
GT Comn has responded to the
Board's that a local payment
office be opened.
Mark Curenton is working on
,the DCA grant to develop,a
Capital improvement element
for.thecomprehensive plan.. If
the board has any suggestions
or questions please feel free
to contact him. If there are
any capital improvements that
the board knows it can fund
and wants to identify the
funds at this time, those
projects could be included in
the element. Please contact
Mark if you have any such
ideas.
"Mark Curenton has informed
me that over the last year or
so the city of Carrabelle has
annexed land into its city lim-


its. Mark needs direction from
the board to update the
county land use and zoning
maps showing the annex-
ations. The board needs to
direct Mark to make the ap-
propriate changes as Mark
does not make changes to the
maps without board action.
The Board approved.
Board direction regarding the
workshop with Mr. Peter
Heckathorne, sacred hearts
executive. At this time the
workshop is set to run from 3
to 5 p.m. on April 18th, which
is the time before an evening
board meeting. Does the
board want to invite a repre-
sentative from Gulf County?
"Dr. Marsh, Health Council
chairman, would like for the
board to know that the Health
Council in conjunction with
the Franklin County Public
Health.Departmerit has devel-
oped a telephone survey that
will be used in Franklin
County over the next several
weeks to elict citizen's views
on the current county
healthcare picture and on
adding the sales tax. It is de-
signed to be answered in
about 15 minutes. The health
council asks that the public
not hang up on the surveyors.
In order to prevent that from
happening the surveyor is
announcingthat the survey is
being conducted for the
Franklin County Commission.
By Richard E. Noble

Keith Hardy-Deer Park
Seawall
The eight or nine foot seawall
over Carrabelle way was once
again a point of contention at
this week's County Commis-
sion meeting. The Hardy fam-
ily is attempting to get the
Deer Park partners to stop
their development plans until
some kind of a settlement be-
tween the County, Deer Park
and the Hardys can be
reached. The Deer Park devel-
opers (spokesperson Attor-
ney Barbara Sanders) feel that
the Hardys have no reason-
able complaints and if they
are worried about their prop-
erty, they should get busy and
construct their own wall. At-
torney Clinton MaCahill was
first to address the Board on
behalf of the Hardy family.
"Good morning Commission-
ers, my name is Clinton
MaCahill and I am an attor-
ney from Port St. Joe and I
have been retained by ...
Ralph and Katherine Hardy to
represent them in their dis-
pute with their neighbors,
Deer Park Developers, regard-
ing the already constructed
nine foot high seawall ... Com-
missioners we do have a prob-
lem here. My clients have
'owned this property for ap-
proximately 30 years and they
did not create this problem; it
was forced upon them. Their
property is now totally unpro-
tected and God-forbid another
storm should hit. If one does
(hit), their property stands to
be severely damaged ... The
original permit was granted
for the construction of this
wall without notifying my cli-
ents as proscribed by law. And
the County did not appear to
follow (its) Comprehensive Plan
and its permitting process.


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U


"The County has subse-
quently asked the parties to
work this thing out and sev-
eral proposals were made re-
garding Deer Park Partners
purchasing my clients' prop-
erty. However, at this time,
these proposals are not work-
able, and, quite frankly, are
rather ridiculous. My clients
do not want to get into the
development business, nor do
they want to serve as the
developer's banker. Therefore
it does not appear that a pur-
chase solution is going to
work. It is my clients' deepest
desire to work this matter out
in a way that (all concerned
parties) can be happy with.
They definitely do not want to
have their property destroyed,
and they do not want to spend
their golden years in litigation
either. They want to try and
work this out one last time
before they are forced to take
whatever steps are necessary
to protect their rights. They
have many ideas ... but any
attempts to resolve this prob-
lem must involve the County.
We need the County involved
for obvious reasons-any per-
mitting that would have to be
done would have to be done
at the same time; other prop-
erty owners and neighbors
would need to be notified. The
Hardys are not interested in
doing to anybody else, what
has already been done to them
... At this time, we would re-
quest that the Board issue a
moratorium on any further
permitting in regards to the
Deer Park development until
a reasonable mitigation solu-
tion plan can be worked out.
However this is going to have
to be done relatively quickly
within the next couple of
weeks."
"Well, we have been talking
about this for over a month
now," said Mr. Mosconis.
"Yes, but we haven't got any-
thing (accomplished). We need
to get a mitigation plan mov-
ing forward ... we have this big
clock on the wall that is tick-
ing towards the hurricane
season. We currently have a
wall that needs to be finished,
and my clients property needs
to be protected-something
has to be done. And any solu-
tion that might be worked out
would involve further permit-
ting, and other numerous
things and we need all of this
done. My clients are getting
scared. We are moving into
the hurricane season. Their
property is totally unpro-
tected. It could be destroyed.
Things need to get working."
"You couldn't work this out
with them other people?"
asked Mr. Lockley.
'We have been trying. So far
the discussions have revolved
around the purchase of the
property, and the proposals
have been outlined. They (the
proposals) are just unwork-
able. My clients would basi-
cally have to go into partner-
ship with them (Deer Park
Developers). My clients have
no desire to do that. We would
like to move on to whatever is
going to be the next step."
"Just to remind you," Keith
Hardy interjected. "We were
asked at the last Commission
Continued on Page 3


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ITEMS AUCTIONED OFF ON FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 2006


.' -. SALES :NAMEOf .
YEAR 'MAKE/MODEL NERf L PRICE :-- BUYER CITY
VIN: Marvin H.
1990 INTERNATIONAL MHTSCNEN4LH296148 $1,600 Garett Eostpoint FL
VIN:
1989 FORDF800 IFDXK84P3KVA53484 $4500 David Barber Eostpoint FL
VIN:
1989 FORD F800 UFDXK84P7KVAS3486 $6.000 Chuck Marks Apolochicola FL
1990 FORDFISO VIN: IFTDF15N4LLA56133 $500 David Barber Eastooint FL
FORD 655A SERIAL: C769158 $4.700 Wille Luberto Eastpoint FL
FORD 6600 SERIAL: A343682 $3.900 Jeff Vonier Bristol FL
1973 GENERATOR SERIAL: 611565ADK0033 $100 JeffVonier Bristol FL
HUBER SERIAL: 10DG111063 $I.000 Bruce Johnson Grand Ridqe FL
ROAD & BRIDGE SURPLUS SALE AMOUNT 22,300.00

1993 FORD F350 2FTJW36M4PCB36780 $700 Jeff Vonier Bristol FL
1977 DODGE 4X4 W24BE75090203 $25 Randy Richards Eastpoint FL
Leonard
1980 FORD BUS B71HVJH2172 $100 Brannan Corrobelle FI
DODGE 350
1990 VAN 2BSWB3576LK750639 $25 Thoma Sadler Bristol FL
SOUD WASTE SURPLUS SALE AMOUNT 850.00


JOHN'S
CONSTRUCTION


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SERVING FRANKLIN COUNTY SINCE 1982
Specializing in Custom Homes-Remodeling
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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


14 April 2006 Pane 3 "


Briefs from Page 2,
meeting to try and work this
out. We tried but Deer Part-
ners were not available. What
we are asking the County to
do is to facilitate a meeting to
try and work this thing out. I
would really like to try and
work this thing out before it
gets too difficult."
Barbara Sanders then came
forward to speak on behalf of
Deer Park Partners. "Some of
the members of Deer Partners
are here today. Deer Partners
has tried for some length of
time to negotiate purchase of
the property from the Hardys.
Originally Mr. Ralph Hardy
offered to Mr. Akins (Deer
Park owner and developer)
that he would do (arrange)
owner financing. Deer Part-
ners began that process of
negotiation. They eventually
met'the price of 1.5 million
dollars for the lot. Deer Part-
ners were going to allow Mr.
Keith Hardy to remove the
structure on the property ...
Deer Partners did negotiate in
good faith in an attempt to
purchase the property. Deer
Partners is, of course, not the
cause of the Hardys' predica-
ment. The cause of the
Hardys' predicament is that
they have a structure that is
very close, to the water and
they don't have sufficient re-
taining walls or protection
built there. We do not object
if the Hardys wish to go for-
ward and ask for a permit to
protect their property. In fact,
we think that they should ...
But what the County has done
to this point has not had any
negative effect on the Hardys'
property-we dispute that
charge). There was proper
notice given ...The Comp Plan
has been followed. The impli-
cation that Deer Partners is
not trying to meet with these
people is, in fact, not correct.
We wanted to meet last night
at six-thirty, on site, to hear
for the first time what the pro-
posal is by the Hardys. The
Hardys have said numerous
times that'they have propos-
als but they won't tell us what
the proposal is. I would ask
this Board to ask (them) to-
day exactly what it is they are
asking. That has not yet been
revealed. We don't know what
they are asking for.
"There will be further permit-
ting. Deer Partners owns the
property between the (Hardy)
property and where the wall
ends. You have a very capable
staff, allow them to evaluate
any permits-like they do ev-
ery other permit in Franklin
County; determine if it meets
the rule; if it does, then grant
the permit. If Mr. Hardy is
unhappy with that he can cer-
tainly appeal, to this Board.
But I don't think that the
Board ought to be sitting in
the seat of your staff and rul-
ing on every permit that
comes forward. If we are go-
ing to make special rules for
Mr. Hardy then we need to
promulgate those and have a
public hearing and put those
rules on the book that are
special for Mr. Hardy. Other-
wise we ought to let your staff
do its job. I don't think that
you can make us meet with
them (the Hardys) or prevent
us from meeting with them.
We are more than willing to
sit down and meet with them.
It is just not right for the
County to interfere with two
private individuals. We can


answer any questions about
the engineering or the wall, if
you have any questions about
that."
'The issue here is that there
are three parties involved -
the County, Deer Partners
and my parents." offered Mr.
Keith Hardy. "We have the
notebook with us with the
proposals in writing that have
gone to Deer Partners. We
ave requested six or seven
times to talk about the wall
and we were ignored, actually.
What we are here about today
is to ask the County to act
where they didn't before. The
fact is that on the day that you
granted this permit, my par-
ents were the owners of the
adjacent property. The County
chose to contact by phone ev-
eryone else. The County did
not contact my parents in
writing or by phone. That can
be verified by Rachael's tele-
phone records. The County is
at fault for allowing this to go
ahead without allowing pub-
lic comment by the neighbors.
That is what you are required
(to do). Instead we were sur-
prised after coming back af-
ter the Christmas holidays. In
fact, when we saw this (wall)
just starting to go up we con-
tacted you before the first (bit)
of concrete was poured. We
contacted the staff; provided
information and there was no
response because everything
was moving along too fast. In
fact, it was your (the Board's)
comment at our first meeting
that this should not move so
far ahead before we could no
longer do anything about it;
which is exactly what hap-
pened. What we are asking for
.now is that the County meet
with us and Deer Partners to
go over this. Until last Friday
there was no talk about miti-
gating this at all. So we are
asking you to facilitate this
meeting. We think that Mr.
Shuler could do that. And we
don't think that would be a
problem. We would like to sit
down and talk through this.
If we determine that there is
no common solution for the
three parties, then, of course,
we have to move ahead to do
something. We think this
should be a pretty simple
thing. We don't think that this
is simply a private matter be-
tween Deer Partners and us.
We think that the County is
directly involved in the deci-
sion process." Mr. Hardy went
on to explain that he was not
asking the County to propose
another meeting-they had al-
ready done that. He wanted
the County to meet with all
parties and resolve this issue.
The attempts at resolution
between him and Deer Part-'
ners had all failed. It was now
time to resolve the issue-one
way 6r the other.
"Can we meet right now?" sug-
gested Mr. Mosconis. "We've
got a captive audience here
right now. Why don't we do
it?"
"We can; if you would like,"
said Mr. Hardy.
Attorney Barbara Sanders
agreed but submitted the
criticism that she had never
seen any proposals. Mr. Keith
Hardy countered that not only
had he emailed her his pro-
posals but he had her re-
sponses. At this point the de-
bate became more of an ar-
gument and it was finally de-
cided that all parties would
meet immediately after the
Commission meeting in a pri-


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THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


vate room and attempt a reso-
lution.
At the resolution meeting the
bulk of the conversation dealt
with the sale of the Hardy
property to Deer Partners. No.
decision or compromise at
this time has been finalized.

T. Michael Shuler
Report
Mr. Shuler informed the
Board that he was in the pro-
cess of submitting a letter re-
questing special exemption for
duck hunting on St. Vincent.
The letter had not been sent
as of the April 4th, but should
be completed shortly.
.He then informed the Board
about some ownership and
business interests in a re-zon-
ing and development issue
that would be coming before
the Board. He presented this
information to the Board for
their consideration. He then
went on to recommend a pub-
lic hearing for the land in
question-The New River For-
est Development. The issue
involved a rezoning of some
ten acres of land from agricul-
tural to residential. The prop-
erty is owned by a Mr. Cresent
and the property in question
is in Carrabelle. The rezoning
is said to be a controversial
issue and at least one half
hour should be allocated to
the public discussion on the
issue.
The public hearing was ap-
proved by the Board. It should
take place on the first or sec-
ond Tuesday Commission
meeting in the month of May.
The. next item had to do with
a request by Mr. Crofton with
regards to a noise ordinance.
Mr. Shuler investigated rules
with regards to the prohibition
of fireworks which was the
initial cause of the complaint.
The discussion turned away
from the fireworks and settled
in on "noise".
"The question was," said Mr.

Crofton, "not dealing with fire-
works per se ... somebody was
shooting off fireworks at 1:30
in the morning and waking
everybody up. What (can we
do) to stop him from doing
that? I would say that a nui-
sance law should cover that."
'That probably comes under
the discretion of the officer in
the field more than anything
else," responded attorney
Shuler.
"This guy shoots fireworks all
night and you are telling me
that I can't do anything about
it! The guy next door starts
burning oil andit's coming in'
my windows ..."
It seetns, quite 'evident that
Commissioner Crofton would
like to make a law stopping
"somebody" from doing
"something"-trash along side
the road; extension cords to
relatives in the back yard,
tarps at the dump, fireworks,
noise, soft shell crab farming
in the back yard, speeding
between Carrabelle and
Eastpoint, code enforcement
agency etc. I suppose it would
be rather thrilling to have
ones name on a law. In my old
neighborhood back in the 50's
we had the Commissioner
Mall's "no mini-skirts on main
street on Tuesday nights" or-
dinance. Commissioner Mall
,complained about the social
disgrace of the girls in their
skimpy attire at every meet-


ing but no local police officer
ever dared to arrest one. He
chose Tuesday night because
that was the night that all the
local teenage boys and girls
went downtown to "gawk" at
one another. I would imagine
that the Mall Mini-skirt law is
still on the books up there to-
day. It didn't accomplish a
great deal but it made Mr. and
Mrs. Mall mighty proud.
Mr. Shuler went into general
explanation about the legal
understanding of the word
"nuisance" and then dis-
cussed various firework ordi-
nances. He promised to follow
up with information on laws
to stop other people from do-
ing something enacted in
other Florida communities
that were more general in
their nature. The end result
of this investigation should be
interesting.
The inter-local agreement
with regards to the health care
sales tax was then discussed.
This inter-local agreement
Would have to be considered
by both the cities of
Apalachicola and Carrabelle.
"If those two entities do not
agree to enter into the local
agreement what happens is
that roughly a third of the
sales tax money gets diverted
from health care purposes
into the cities coffers and they
(cities) can use it (the money)
essentially for other pur-
poses."
A discussion on this issue was
then dropped momentarily
while Mr. Shuler updated the
Board on the results of the
Williams and Alexis law suits.
"As you know we have been
sued with regards to the
beaches along St. George Is-
land. We had the Alexis case
where they tried to get ...
street endings and four miles
of beaches. That case was de-
cided in the County's favor.
"In the Williams case .. if they
had been successful, the pub-
lic beach would have disap-
peared (in front of the prop-
erties in question). Last Mon-
day we had a hearing on my
motion to dismiss that case
with prejudice. On Friday the
court agreed with the County.
That case was considered to
be without merit and he (the
judge) has dismissed that case
with prejudice."

Hospital Issue
Attorney Shuler then in-
formed the Board on the sta-
tus of the Weems Hospital
situation. This is a problem for
.the County that seems to be
growing rapidly. There were
three main issues explained
Attorney Shuler: the details of
the lease agreement, primarily
the. length of the- lease; an..
.option to eventually buy the
hospital requested by the
Blackhawk group; and the
subsequent financial issues-
the most important of which
involves the GE law suit,
against the previous owners
DasSee. The DasSee group
has left the County with what
appears to be a "world" of fi-
nancial woes.
Todd Bitterman, Mr. John
Russell, and Ron Wolf spoke
on behalf of the Blackhawk
organization. Ron Wolf spoke
first giving some-recent his-
tory. "I will give you a quick
operational update. I'll give
the Board a rundown on some
of the things we have been
doing. Although I am affiliated


with Blackhawk, I have been
appointed as a County em-
ployee. And that (representing
the County) is exactly what I
will be doing this morning. In
the past three months we have
made substantial changes and
improvements to the hospital.
Employee morale has been
constantly elevated. Many
people have been resenting
the fact that this has been
known as a band aid hospi-
tal. That is not the term that
they are working towards any-
more. We have saved a lot of
lives since I have been here.
And I can tell you that there
are many people who can tes-
tify. You made a courageous
decision back in December to
save this facility-otherwise it
would have gone under. We
are living up to your objectives
and we are keeping this hos-
pital open. We are also.mak-
ing many improvements and
adding new services. We are
adding a new GI lab ... that is
all good paying business by
the fact that it is elective and
it is covered by almost all in-
surance policies. We are
shortly going to be opening a
sleep lab-again that is good
business... People don't really
worry about health care until
they need it. Some of the de-
cisions that you are making
here in this County, I can tell
you, are going to pay off large
dividends in the future. The
problems that we have been
dealing with are problems that
have been mostly generated
by past problems that we have
inherited from the last own-
ership-especially in the area
of finance. I am glad to hear
that Senator Nelson's 'aides
are going to get involved and
we have tried to involve Con-
gressman Boyd to give us
some assistance with a vital
issue that will be of major con-
cern to whoever gets involved
with this hospital and that is
Medicare.
"Medicare is the life-blood of
this facility-the Medicare
imbursement. You (the Hos-
pital) are paid full cost plus
one percent for all costs re-
lating to Medicare. This in-
cludes inpatient or outpatient,
swing-bed or whatever. I am
not going to lie to the County,
we have encountered serious
problems that the County
couldn't have foreseen and
neither could Blackhawk.
Back in December, nobody
knew what we were getting
into. Now we are beginning to
find that we cannot bill Medi-
care as quickly as we wanted
to. It is DasSee and GE that
is causing this problem. The
County has already put a lot
of money up to save this hos-
pital. We have finally started
billing for everything except
Medicare. There is a reason
for that. You are almost for,-
feiting your income from
Medicare if you start billing
too early. We are forced into a
position of having to wait up
to ten months. These are is-
sues that are beyond our con-
trol. This is the one biggest
problem that we face; opera-
tionally I think that we are
doing well. But this is a ma-
jor issue (Medicare pay-
ments). Calhoun County just
made a big mistake. They
billed Medicare and just about
forfeited a quarter of a million
dollars. I recommend that the
County take action to keep
this place going because in the
long run it will pay big divi-
dends."
The discussion continued and


then Mr. Bitterman explained
the specifics of the problem.
"What basically happened is
that the County took on the
provider number of the past
operators because you wanted
to retain your critical access
status. In doing that you take
on future settlements possi-
bly for that owner. The issue
is that there is a settlement
out there against the period
that the hospital was being
run by the former owner. So
there are some settlements
out there-negative settle-
ments. Medicare Is going to
take back some funding be-
cause they overpaid. So what
is basically happening here
is-we were trying to keep this
quiet, but the cat is out of the
bag-we want to wait until GE
or DasSee or whoever bills
first because otherwise if we
bill that money, it is taken
away. It is just taken rather
than being paid to the facil-
ity. It is in the County's best
interest to wait-and it is in
the best interests of whoever
comes next to wait also. So, it
is protection for the County.
We have 318,000 dollars
worth of bills. This money is
ready to bill. Some of that I
have suspended. I have said
do not bill any Medicare. My
recommendation is that you
do not bill that. We have one
year from the date of service
to bill that service. The bot-
tom line is that the County's
yeaS and whoever (may) come
next, is longer than the previ-
ous owner. So they (DasSee)
will have to bill first."
"My question is," asked Mr.
Lockley. "What are Black-
hawk's intentions while this
process is going on?"
"What is our intention as far
as billing for Medicare, Mr.
Lockley or what ... ?"
"... as far as being a part of
this hospital?"
"We actually still have the
agreements. There are three
small issues that are hanging
on here. We haven't changed
our intentions-if that is what
you are asking."
"When are you all going to
take over?" asked Mr..
Mosconis.
"Our proposal date is May 1st,
but there are some things that
we have to work out before
that. You must understand
that Medicare is fifty percent
of the total revenue for that
facility. You are talking about
not having 50% of the revenue
for a prolonged period of time.
It could be up-through Octo-
ber... November, possible even
December."
"Is Blackhawk prepared to
"take over this on May 1st?"
asked Mr. Lockley.
"We don't think that the Medi-
care issue will be resolved. Are
we willing to put in the money
that we (originally) committed
to ... Yes... as long as we get
resolved this cash flow issue
that we are discussing. We are
committed to doing that as
soon as this issue is solved."
The County's financial officer
(Ms. Ruth Williams) then
came forward and gave an
estimate of the County's
present financial status. She
informed the Commissioners
that the County was funded
to approximately the 18th of
April-barring any unforeseen
Continued Page 10


- mesites Now-Available


Vol. 15, No. 8


April 14, 2006


Publisher ................... Tom W. Hoffer
Director of Operations ......... .Andy Dyal
Contributors ........... .... .Skip Frink
Geri Moore
Carol Noble
Richard Noble
Dawn Radford
Photographers .................Diane Beauvais Dyal
Geri Moore
Advertising Design and
Production Artist ...............Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate ...........Jerry Weber

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein .................. Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis ............... Apalachicola
Skip Frink .................. ....Carrabelle
David Butler .................. ..Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung ........... Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins .......Eastpoint
Barbara Revell .................. .Lanark Village
Richard Harper ............... . St. George Island


Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue
would cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the
Chronicle for price quotes .if you seek several different
or similar issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96
including tax. Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26
including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.

All contents Copyright 2006
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


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Page 4.. 14 April 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


EDrrORIAL & COMMENTARY


Letter Addressed To

Secretary Castille And
Others In The DEP
These are photographs of the lime rocks and dirty sand that
are being dumped on the Alligator Point beaches of Chris Bates
.and Bunky Atkinson. These beaches are prime turtle nesting
grounds that are being destroyed by these actions. These
beaches have never had unnatural rocks or sand on them
before. Bates beach has a home on it and has always been
natural. Atkinson's beach has always been natural without
:any structures on it. In 2005 we had 3 turtle crawls on these
properties and in past years we have recorded several crawls
on these beaches including one that was an endangered green
!sea turtle.
In light of these blatant violations, I want to bring this to your
attention as I feel quite certain that DEP is not aware of the
situation and would not have permitted such actions, May 1,
2006, will begin the new sea turtle season and there is plenty
of time to remove the rocks and sand before then. Please keep
me apprised as to what DEP actions will be taken to have
these unnatural substances removed from these 2 beaches
before May 1, 2006.
Thank you,
Bill Wargo, Coordinator
Alligator Point Sea Turtle Patrol
1295 Angus Morrison Road
Alligator Point, FL 32346
(850) 349-2295


Letter To The Editor


What's A Person To Do?
Dear Editor:
I was disappointed but not surprised that Florida Senator Bill
Nelson joined his liberal.friends in the Senate in opposing the
nomination of Judge Sam Alito as Justice on the United States
Supreme Court. That's right, disappointed but not surprised.
You may recall that Senator Nelson was still finding his way
around the Capitol when he fell in line with Teddy Kennedy
and other liberals in the Senate to oppose President Bush's
nomination of John Ashcroft as Attorney General.
John Ashcroft was the former Governor and United State Sena-
tor from Missouri. According to news sources at the time,
Nelson and his new found liberal friends were opposed to John
Ashcroft because of his strong religious beliefs and his oppo-
sition to gun control. Unless my six grade civics teacher was
wrong, this country was founded by men and women seeking
to practice their strong religious beliefs and have fought and
died for the right to hold to these beliefs ever since. As to gun
control, Mr. Ashcroft was a strong defender of the Second
Amendment to our Constitution and fought every attempt by



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liberals to weaken it by taking away an individual's right to
own and bear firearms.
Nelson, Kennedy and their liberal friends lost their attempt to
block the nomination of this great American to serve as Attor-
ney general. Following 9/11, Mr. Ashcroft and his legal staff
presented to Congress the Patriot Act which has played a sig-
nificant part in protecting all of us from further attacks by
terrorist. Due to ill health, Mr. Ashcroft resigned at the end of
President Bush's first term.
Most recently, when the people of Florida needed him most,
Bill Nelson stood with his liberal friends against the nomina-
tion of Judge Sam Alito. The Supreme Court with Alito as a
new member is closer now than it has been in fifty years in
having a majority that can restore constitution interpretation
to its founding principles.
SO WHAT'S A PERSON TO DO to prevent political ditappoint-
ments and surprises? It would behoove us all to search the
record and souls of those that wish to represent us. If we con-
tinue to elect people of the Nelson mold, we could lose our
right to practice our religious beliefs and a federal Marshall
could be at our door to confiscate our firearms. And, you could
join and support a conservative organization that is working
to protect our freedoms from governmental encroachment at
all levels. I joined the Republican Party. There is room there
for you, too.
Sincerely,
Willie Norred
St. George Island
P.S. In the interest of full disclosure, I am now Chairman of
the Franklin County Republican Committee.
t


"Chicken Wars" By
And Anne Rudloe-
By Richard E. Noble
Well, if you are anything like me, you have bee
self for decades when oh please God when -
come along who will stand up for the rights c
processing chicken?
Finally ... finally, at long last, a book is here for
lovers and we owe it all to the very creative a
efforts of Jack and Anne Rudloe our well k
documented panhandle resident biologists.
What a book! I loved it. Anne and Jack truly tal
of chickenhood everywhere. Superchicken has
is armed and dangerous-and very funny.
Superchicken, Augustus Herkissing (formerly
life-Henry Kissinger) the champion of chicken
has been sent to our present day world via a he
He has been sent to earth to free the chickens
to the Promised Land.
Kissinger I mean Herkissing is at first appalled
of being reincarnated as a chicken, but after ge
ers he takes up the role courageously.


He is found floating down the Lockaloukee River by adorable
little Jennifer and her chicken rancher daddy. The brave little
Herkissing gets the country folks attention by standing up to
a menacing hawk.
At this point the initial conflict begins. Tenderbird, the chicken
processing giant, does not tolerate their chicken farmers or
members of their families harboring any pet chickens. And
from this point onward the story evolves into a classic tale of
adventure, culminating in a massive nationwide chicken revo-
lution.
I am not going to tell you the whole story-it will be a lot more
fun for you to read it yourself.
On the serious side, the book points out and graphically de-
scribes the true and horribly inhumane state of affairs that
exists all over America and, I dare say, the world with regards
to present day civilization's methods of rendering what were
once barnyard livestock into food for the masses.
Since my wife and I were both one time chicken factory em-
ployees-Carol in hearts and livers and Richard snipping giz-
zards-we know the story first hand. We have seen it all up
close and personal. What the Rudloes describe is no exag-
geration, no far-flung "humaniac" melodramatic fabrications.
So if you would like to know "the other side of the story" or
garner a more insightful view of the evolution of the grocery
store chicken or the boneless, skinless chicken breast that
you have grown to know and love from watching the Galloping
Chef on the cooking channel, pick up a copy of "Chicken Wars"
by Anne and Jack Rudloe. It's an eye-opener, besides being a.
hen house full of fun.
In addition, this book is packed full of information about the
local outdoors-the birds, the bees, the katydids, the cicadas
etc. It is not the conventional philosophy of the tree-hugging
humaniac. There is even a defense of Cock Fighting, not to
mention the heavenly glory of the backyard chicken bar-be-
que and chicken eating in general. It is the work of two very
practical minded animal lovers.
The whole point of the book is that the human race has lost its
contact with the Great Agreement. Like Rousseau's Social
Contract this is a supposed agreement between animals and
man that took place when Adam and Eve were expelled from
the Garden of Eden. It was a simple Agreement in which some
of the animals decided to join domestically with the humans
while the others, less trusting of human nature, decided to
weather the perils of the wild. In the Agreement humans agreed
to love the animals and treat them with decency and respect,
in return for their fellowship and contributions to their food
supply. Of course, Mankind via Agribiz has grossly violated
this Agreement -thus the necessity for a Divinely inspired Super
Chicken.
This is a fascinating book-great for the kids; great for the
adults; and a laugh a minute for the intellectually inclined.
You can purchase this book on line for $14.95 at
www.gulfspecimen.org/chicken.html or pick up a copy at the
following locations: Downtown Books in Apalachicola, Tattered
Pages in Crawfordville, Borders Bookstore in Tallahassee
(Apalachee Parkway) and, if you take a trip over to The Gulf
Marine Laboratory in Panacea, Jack and Anne will be more
than happy to autograph a copy for you.


> ..> Library Happenings
By Judi Rundel
The Franklin County Public Library's calendar of events and
happenings is as follows:
The Franklin County Public Library Advisory Board will not
Jack meet in April. The next scheduled meeting is May 15th at the
a k Carrabelle branch beginning at 5:30 p.m.
-Due to-the Easter-holiday; the Franklirr county Public Library,
will be closed Friday, April 14th and Saturday, April 15th. Both
branches will reopen on Tuesday, April 18th.
The FROG Family Learning Program will be offering parenting
en asking your- classes at the Eastpoint branch. Call 670-4423 for informa-
will somebody tion.
)f the American
Sunday, April 30th, 3:00 p.m.: The Trio Internazionale will
fill the Carrabelle branch meeting room with great music. This
all of us chicken free event is part of the Seasons of Music at Your Library pro-
nd imaginative gram, made possible through a Community Libraries in Car-
mown and well ing Program Grant-Florida Department of State.
Monday, May 1st, 11:30 1:00: The Friends of the Franklin
ke up the cause County Public Library will host an author luncheon to be held
Arrived and he at the Eastpoint Firehouse. Michael Lister will speak about
his writing and autograph his books. The cost of the luncheon
is $15.00 and benefits the library building project. Tickets are
y, in a previous available at both library branches, Carrabelle and Eastpoint.
ns everywhere, Beginning Monday, May 1st, from 4:30 5:30 p.m., six weeks
heavenly council, of basic computer classes will be held at the Eastpoint branch.
Sand lead them Call Jhaki at 670-4423 to reserve a place as seating is limited.
Every Monday and Thursday, 4:30 5:30 p.m.: Yoga class
d at the thought at the Carrabelle branch, hosted by the FROG Family Learn-
etting his feath- ing Program. Call Marlene at 697-2091 for information.

Continued on Page 10


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


14 April 2006 Page 5 '


Second Circuit

Court Report

March 14, 2006
All persons listed below are
innocent until proven otherwise
in a court of law.


6


PRE-TRIAL CONFERENCE
CAMPBELL, MARVIN: Charged with sale/possession of controlled
substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a church; charged
with armed trespass of structure or conveyance; charged with utter-
ing (passing worthless document); charged with sale of controlled
substance on October 5, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The de-
fendant was present in court with Attorney Sherrie J. Barnes. Pre-
trial Conference continued to May 9, 2006.
CUMMINGS, LARRY: Charged with aggravated battery with deadly
weapon on May 17, 2005. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Robert Culpepper II. Case Manage-
ment continued to April 11, 2006.
GOLDEN, JOHN H: Charged with possession of controlled substance;
drug paraphernalia use or possession on May 5, 2005. Bond was
$10,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Paul
G. Komarek. Trial set for March 16, 2006.
JOSEPH, KAYLA DENISE: Charged with possession with intent to
sell cannabis; possession of cannabis on May 20, 2005. Bond was
$50,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Robert
Culpepper II and entered a plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld.
The defendant was sentenced to 30 months probation count 1; 1 year
probation (concurrent) count 2, with 2 days credit for time served; 60
hours community service; $510.00 court costs and fees.
POOL, JUSTIN M: Charged with possession controlled substance on
March 29, 2005; DUI on April 14, 2005. Bond was $5,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger
and entered a plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defen-
dant was sentenced to 24 months probation with 2 days credit for
time served, count 1; 6 months probation to lesser charge of reckless
driving count 2; substance abuse evaluation and treatment; 10 day
vehicle impound; 50 hours community service; $670.00 costs and
fees.
RHODES, TOBIAS J: Charged with aggravated battery with deadly
weapon on September 14, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney Michael Rayne admit-
ted being in violation and was found in violation of probation. Proba-
tion revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 5 years in prison (sus-
pended); 5 years probation with 280 days credit for time served; any
conditions of probation not met, re-imposed. This case is concurrent
with all other cases.
RHODES, TOBIAS J: Charged with throwing deadly missile; crimi-
nal mischief (3rd degree felony) on September 14, 2004. Defendant
was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Attorney
Michael Rayne, admitted being in violation and was found in viola-
tion of probation. Probation revoked. The defendant was sentenced to
5 years in prison (suspended); 5 years probation; 280 days in.jail with
280 days credit for time served; This case is concurrent with all other
cases.
RHODES, TOBIAS J: Charged with aggravated battery great bodily
harm on December 28, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The de-
fendant was present in court with Attorney Michael Rayne, entered a
plea of no contest to lesser charge of aggravated battery and was
adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 5 years in prison
(suspended); 5 years probation with 280 days credit for time served;
$722.00 court costs and fees. This case is concurrent with all other
cases.
RHODES, TOBIAS J: Charged with aggravated battery with deadly
weapon on January 13, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The de-
fendant was present in court with Attorney Michael Rayne, entered a
plea of no contest to lesser charge of aggravated battery and was
adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 5 years in prison
,(suspended); 5 years probation with 280 days credit for time served;
$722.00 court costs and fees. This case is concurrent with all other
,cases.
RHODES, TOBIAS J: Charged with 5 counts armed robbery with
firearm; 4 counts aggravated battery with firearm; grand theft motor
vehicle on February 1, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-





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dant was present in court with Attorney Michael Rayne, entered a
plea of no contest to lesser charge of armed robbery with deadly weapon
(count 1), aggravated battery with deadly weapon (count 6) and grand
theft motor vehicle (count 10); and was adjudicated guilty. The defen-
dant was sentenced to 5 years prison (suspended); 5 years probation
with 280 days credit for time served; $722.00 court costs and fees.
The State Attorney's Office will drop all other charges. This case is
concurrent with all other cases.
ROBINSON, BRANDON DEMAR: Charged with 5 counts armed rob-
bery with firearm; 4 counts aggravated battery with firearm; grand
theft motor vehicle on February 12, 2005. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Gregory
Cummings, entered a plea of no contest to the lesser charge of armed
robbery with deadly weapon (count 1), aggravated battery with deadly
weapon (count 6), grand theft motor vehicle (count 10), and was adju-
dicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 2 years probation (con-
current); 396 days in jail with 396 days credit for time served; restitu-
tion to victim; $722.00 court costs and fees. The State Attorney's Of-
fice will drop all other charges.
ROBINSON, BRANDON DEMAR: Charged with battery by inmate on
March 30, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Gregory Cummings, entered a plea of
no contest to lesser charge of simple battery and was adjudicated
guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 350 days in jail with 350 days
credit for time served.
ARRAIGNMENT
APONTE, CARLOS E: Charged with driving while license suspended
(felony) on January 17, 2006. The defendant was present in court
and entered a plea of not guilty. A public defender was appointed.
Case Management continued to May 9, 2006.
BANKS, CLAUDE JR: Charged with sale of substance in lieu of co-
caine on.January 3, 2006. Defendant released on own recognizance.
The defendant was present in court with Attorney Rachel Chesnut,
and entered a plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defen-
dant was sentenced to 24 months probation with 1 day credit for time
served; $370.00 court costs; random testing for alcohol and illegal
drugs.
BLACK, CHARLES W: Charged with resisting officer with violence;
battery on January 12, 2006. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant
was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler and entered a
written plea of not guilty dated March 2, 2006. Case Management
continued to May 9, 2006.
CARGILL, GEORGE FREDERICK: Charged with 3 counts sale/pos-
session of controlled substance with intent to sell within, 1,000 of a
church; 1 count trafficking in controlled substance MDMA on Janu-
ary 21, 2006. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present
in court and entered a plea of not guilty. An attorney was assigned.
Case Management continued to April 11, 2006.
CARGILL, STEPHON EUGENE JR: Charged with 3 counts sale/
possession of controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000
feet of a church; 1 count trafficking in controlled substance MDMA
on January 21, 2006. Defendant was'incarcerated. The defendant
was present in court with Attorney Rachel Chesnut and entered a
written plea of not guilty dated February 2, 2006. Case Management
continued to May 9, 2006.
DASHER, WILLIE GENE JR: Charged with false imprisonment on
February 8, 2006; felony fleeing or attempting to elude officer, battery
on January 21, 2006. Bond was $3,500.00. The defendant was present
in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a written
plea of not guilty dated February 13, 2006. Case Management contin-
ued to May 9, 2006.
ROGERS, MICHAEL SHEA: Charged with felony fleeing or attempt-
ing to elude officer on December 5, 2005. Bond was $500.00. The
defendant was present in court and entered a plea of not guilty. A
public defender was appointed. Case Management continued to May
9, 2006:
SAND, CRYSTAL AMANDA: Charged with grand theft (third degree)
on November 28, 2005. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was rep-
resented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way who entered a writ-
ten plea of not guilty dated December 8, 2005. Case Management
continued to April 11, 2006.
VIOLATION OF PROBATION ARRAIGNMENT
DALTON, BILLY DANIEL: Charged with grand theft on December
20, 2004; charged with driving while license suspended (felony) on
June 27, 2005. The defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a
plea of denial. Case Management continued to April 11, 2006.

Carrabelle

High School

SAnnual

Career Day
iSTMENTS
Students from Franklin
County Schools and employer
representatives will hold the
annual career day at the
Carrabelle High School gym
(1001 Gray Avenue, Carra-
belle) on Thursday, May 4,
2006 beginning at 9:00 am to
the Noon hour. Set up will be
YRscheduled at 8:00 a.m. A
lunch buffet will be prepared
and served by students from
Creek's Culinary Cafe imme-
diately following the event. For
J additional information please
call (850) 697 3815, or fax
(850) 697-4136.


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BRISTOL 10956 NW STATE ROAD 20 850-643-2221
CARRABELLE 912 NORTHWEST AVENUE A 850-697-5626
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GORSKI, THOMAS A: Charged with sale of controlled substance on
February 16, 2005; charged with possession of controlled substance
with Intent to sell or deliver on February 16, 2006. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Stelger, admitted being in violation and was found in
violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 32 days in jail with 32 days credit for time served; probation -
reinstated; any conditions not met, All concurrent.
LANGLEY, MICHAEL SHAWN: Charged with obtain or attempt to -
obtain controlled substance by fraud on November 23, 2004. Defen-
dant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by
Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial. Case Man-
agement continued to April 11, 2006.
MYNCH, SEAN P: Charged with driving while license suspended
(felony) on August 10, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admit-
ted being in violation and was found In violation of probation. Proba-
tion revoked and terminated. The defendant.was sentenced to 1 year,
1 day in prison with 123 days credit for time served. Defendant re-
ceived 30 days in jail with 30 days credit for time served for misde-
meanor charges.
-BARWICK, JOHNATHAN K: Charged with 7 counts uttering (pass-
ing worthless document) on July 22,. 2005; charged with dealing in
stolen property on August 19, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court and entered a plea of denial dated
February 23, 2006. Case Management continued to April 11, 2006.
BENTLEY, FRANKLIN J: Charged with burglary of a dwelling; grand
theft of a firearm on June 15, 2004. Defendant was released on own
recognizance. The defendant was present in court and entered a plea
of denial. A public defender was appointed. Case Management con-
tinued to April 11, 2006.
BROWN, KEVIN LEE: Charged with aggravated battery with deadly
weapon on August 11, 2001. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who
entered a written plea of not guilty dated March 13, 2006. Case Man-
agement continued to April 11, 2006.
SUGGS, KRISTOPHER: Charged with burglary of a dwelling; grand
theft of a firearm. The defendant was represented in court by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial. Case Manage-
ment continued to April 11, 2006.
TOLLIVER, TAUREEN 8: Charged with sale of controlled substance
on June 24, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a
written plea of rot guilty dated March 13, 2006. Case Management
continued to April 11, 2006..
VINSON, AMBER: Charged with sale of controlled substance on June
24, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented
in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of de-
nial. Case Management continued to April 11-, 2006.
WALDEN, TANYA R: Charged with dealing stolen property on May 9,
2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented
in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a written plea
of not guilty dated March 13, 2006. Case Management continued to
April 11, 2006.
DISPOSITION
GOLDEN, JOHN H: Charged with possession of controlled substance;
drug paraphernalia use or possession; tampering with physical evi-
dence on May 5, 2005. Bond was $10,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Paul G. Komarek and entered a plea of
no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentenced to 2 -
years probation; substance abuse evaluation and treatment; 2 days
in jail with 2 days credit for time served; $370.00 court costs. The
State Attorney's Office dropped charges for counts 1 & 2.
JENKS, JOSEPH A: Charged with grand theft on January 15, 2005.
Bond was $1,500.00. The defendant was represented in court by At-
toiney Ethan Andrew Way. Disposition continued to April 11, 2006.
THOMPSON, DONNIE H: Charged with uttering on March 6, 2001.
Defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
admitted being in violation and was found in violation of probation.
Probation revoked and terminated. Defendant was sentenced to 35
months in prisonwith 430 days credit for time served. This case runs
concurrent with all other cases.
THOMPSON, DONNIE H: Charged with 2 counts uttering on April 2,
2001. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger, admitted being in violation and was found in violation of pro-
bation. Probation revoked and terminated. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 35 months in prison with 403 days credit for time served. '

Continued on Page 6









Paee 6 14 April 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin ChrnnieI~


Court Report from Page 5

This case runs concurrent with all other cases.
'THOMPSON, DONNIE H: Charged with 2 counts uttering on April 2,
2001. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger, admitted being in violation and was found in violation of pro-
bation. Probation revoked and terminated. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 35 months in prison with 403 days credit for time served.
This case runs concurrent with all other cases.
THOMPSON, DONNIE H: Charged with uttering on July 3, 2001.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
admitted being in violation and was found in violation of probation.
Probation revoked and terminated. The defendant was sentenced to
;35 months in prison with 311 days credit for time served. This case
runs concurrent with all other cases.
'THOMPSON, DONNIE H: charged with 7 counts uttering on August
20, 2001. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender
Kevin Steiger. admitted being in violation and was found in violation
of probation. The defendant was sentenced to 35 months in prison
with 263 days credit for time served. This case runs concurrent with
,all other cases.
'THOMPSON, DONNIE H: Charged with 4 counts uttering on Sep-
tember 21, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of
no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced
to 35 months in prison with 183 days credit for time served. This case
runs concurrent with all other cases.
STHOMPSON, DONNIE H: Charged with grand theft of motor vehicle
on November 30, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a
plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was
sentenced to 35 months in prison with 183 days credit for time served.
This case runs concurrent with all other cases.

CASE MANAGEMENT
AIRENT, SANTANA K: Charged with throwing deadly missile on
October 31, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Kathy Garner. Case Management con-
tinued to May 9, 2006.
ALTMAN, VICTOR J: Charged with possession of controlled sub-
.stance cocaine on October 1, 2005. Bond was $3,000.00. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and
entered a plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant
was sentenced to 24 months probation with 1 day credit for time
served; no alcohol, random tests for illegal drugs; $510.00 court costs
and fees.
BAUCHAM, ROBERT T: Charged with battery on law enforcement
officer;, resist officer without violence on November 8, 2005. Bond was
$500.00. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney Gre-
gory Cummings. Case Management continued to April 11, 2006.
BRADLEY, SAMUEL J: Charged with felony DUI; felony fleeing or
attempt to elude; driving while license suspended (felony); resisting
officer without violence; criminal mischief 200 to 1000 dollars; re-
fusal to submit to balance test on December 10, 2005. Defendant was
:incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and was adjudi-
cated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 24 months probation
with 94 days credit for time served; drug treatment and after care; 10
year driver license suspension; 2 year interlock device on vehicle;
advanced driving school; 90 day vehicle impound; random testing for
alcohol and illegal drugs; $410.00 court costs and fees. Restitution
reserved on for 90 days.
SBROWN, BRIAN J: Charged with possession with intent to sell can-
,nabis on June 9, 2005. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was
Present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. Case Management
continued to April 11, 2006.
BROWN, ELIJAH III: Charged with sale of substance in lieu of co-
caine on June 24, 2005. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and was
found in violation of probation. Probation revoked and terminated.
The defendant was sentenced to 18 months in prison with 160 days
credit for time served.
,,CALDWELL, JOHN ROBLEY JR: Charged with possession of con-
;trolled substance cocaine on July 27, 2005. Bond was $10,000.00.
',The defendant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler
-and entered a plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defen-
dant was sentenced to 24 months probation with 2 days credit for
time served; random testing for illegal drugs (use or possession);
$470.00 court costs and fees.
CAMPBELL, ERIE LEO: Charged with attempted burglary of a struc-


ture on November 26, 2005; charged with sale of controlled substance
on November 29, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Man-
agement continued to April 11, 2006..
CARGILL, GEORGE FREDERICK: Charged with 3 counts posses-
sion of controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver; 1 count
possession of firearm by convicted felon on March 2, 2005; charged
with driving while license suspended (felony) on May 21, 2005. Bond
was $55,000.00. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney
Gregory Cummings. Case Management continued to April 11, 2006.
CHISHOLM, HOPE CREAMER: Charged with 2 counts uttering (pass-
ing worthless document) on October 16, 2005. Bond was $2,000.00.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Case Management continued to May 9, 2006.
COLON, EDWARD ANTHONY: Charged with uttering a forged in-
strument on July 18, 2002; charged with possession of controlled
substance on July 18, 2002. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admit-
ted being in violation apd was found in violation of probation. Proba-
tion revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 2 years probation; 90
days in jail with 69 days credit for time served, 1 year community
control (early termination possible); restitution to victim. Both cases
will run concurrent.
CREAMER, BOBBY GENE: Charged with driving while license sus-
pended (felony) on May 20, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler, en-
tered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant
was sentenced to 93 days in jail with 93 days credit for time served; 3
years probation; $370.00 court costs and fees; no driving without a
valid drivers license.
CROOIA, DERRICK B: Charged with burglary of structure on Sep-
tember'12, 2005; charged with grand theft (third degree)'on Novem-
ber 7, 2005. Bond was $7,500.00. The defendant was represented in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Pre-trial Conference set for
May 9, 2006.
DEJUAN, PEDRO JUAN: Charged with sexual battery by familial or
custodial authority on July 7, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
entered a plea of no contest to lesser charge of sexual battery and
was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 11 months
29 days in jail with 250 days credit for time served; 60 months sex
offender probation; 6pm to 6am curfew; $762.00 court costs and fees;
no contact with victim unless victim requests.
DELACRUZ, OCTAVIO: Charged with possession of controlled sub-
stance (cocaine) on September 10, 2005. Bond was $1,500.00. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney Gregory Cummings and
entered a plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant
was sentenced to 2 days in jail with 2 days credit for time served; 18
months probation (may be transferred to Leon County); random test-
ing for illegal drugs; $510.00 court costs and fees.
DILLON, DANIEL ALBERT: Charged with sale of controlled sub-
stance on November 15, 2005. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant
was represented in court by Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. Case Man-
agement continued to April 11, 2006.
EBY, GEORGE W: Charged with DUI manslaughter on September
23. 2005. Bond was $2,500.00..The defendant was present in court
with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. Case Management continued to June
13, 2006.
EMSWILER, AMY LEE: Charged with possession of controlled sub-
stance x 2; driving while license suspended or revoked on December
1, 2005. Bond was $25,205.00. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to
May 9, 2006.
ESTES, PAMELA SARAH: Charged with tampering with witness on
April 11, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present
in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in viola-
tion, was found in violation of probation and was adjudicated' guilty.
Probation revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 1 year 1 day in
prison with 65days credit for time served.
EVANS, JOHN E: Charged with sale of controlled substance on De-
cember 10, 2005. Defendant released on own recognizance. The de-
fendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case
Management continued to May 9, 2006.
GORDON, WARDELL C: Charged with sale of controlled substance
on July 1, 2005. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was repre-
sented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Pre-trial Confer-
ence set for May 9, 2006.


HARRIS, OMARSHAREK A: Charged with sexual battery by some
force and violence; lewd or lascivious battery on January 14, 2005;
charged 2 times with sale of controlled substance on December 6,
2002; charged with possession of controlled substance with intent to
sell or deliver on January 14, 2005; charged with driving while li-
cense suspended (felony) on January 14, 2005. Defendant was incar-
cerated. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan
Andrew Way. Pre-trial Conference set for April 11, 2006.
HINSON, MICHELLE NICOLE: Charged 2 times with sale of crack
cocaine on November 15, 2005. Total bond was $20,000.00. The de-
fendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Pre-
trial Conference set for May 9, 2006.
HUTCHINSON, MAUREEN J: Charged with burglary of occupied
dwelling on November 4, 2005; petit theft on December 16, 2005.
Bond was $1,000.00. The defendant was represented in court by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to May 9, 2006.
JACKS, TERRY LEE: Charged with grand theft (third degree) on
December 6, 2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Manage-
ment continued to June 13, 2006.
JACOBS, DANIEL ROY: Charged with grand theft on May 27, 2005.
Defendant was incarcerated. Case Management continued to June
13, 2006.
JOYNER, AMY M: Charged with dealing in stolen property on Octo-
ber 16, 2005. Bond was $2,000.00. The defendant was present in
court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Pre-trial Conference set for
May 9, 2006.
KENNEDY MATHEW: Charged with possession contraband at county
detention facility on October 21, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
entered a plea of no contest-and was adjudicated guilty. The defen-
dant was sentenced to 60 days in jail with 60 days credit for time
served. $410.00 court costs and fees.
KILGORE, JIMMY DEAN: Charged with fishing with suspended salt-
water license on September 12, 2004. Defendant released on own
recognizance. The defendant was present in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to April 11, 2006.
KORNEGAY; ALBERT: Charged with grand theft (third degree) on
August 25, 2005. Defendant on conditional release. The defendant
was represented in court by Attorney John H. Sytsma. Case Manage-
ment continued to May 9, 2006.
KRISS, THOMAS M: Charged with aggravated assault with deadly
weapon on July 18, 2005. Defendant released on own recognizance.
The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin
Steiger. Case Management continued to April 11, 2006.
LADNER, KATHERINE DIANE: Charged with possession of controlled
substance without prescription; possession of legend drug without
prescription on August 2, 2005; DUI; possession of cannabis; posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia on May 22, 2005. Bond was $1,465.00.
Case Management continued to April 11, 2006.
LARKIN, JENNIFER MICHELLE: Charged with child neglect with-
out great harm on October 6, 2005. Bond was $250.00. The defen-
dant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case
Management continued to September 12, 2006.
LATTIMORE, CORLINDA: Charged with sale of controlled substance
on November 15, 2005. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Pre-trial Confer-
ence set for May 9, 2006.
LATTIMORE, ROBERT CHARLES: Charged with felony fleeing or
attempting to elude; possession with intent to sell cannabis; posses-
sion of controlled substance on August 13, 2005. Bond was
$60,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Steven
P. Glazer and entered a plea of no contest. Disposition set for May 9,
2006.
LITTLES, KENYATTA R: Charged with possession of controlled sub-
stance with intent to sell or deliver; possession with intent to sell
cannabis on November 23, 2005. Bond was $10,000.00. The defen-
dant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case
Management continued to April 11, 2006.
MARTIN, KELVIN A: Charged with sale of controlled substance on
November 1, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Manage-
ment continued. to April 11, 2006.
MARTIN, KELVIN A: Charged 2 times with sale/possession of con-
trolled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a church on
December 13, 2003; Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
Continued on Page 7


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LEFT: Kitchen
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I I I I L I


I I


I


The Franklin Chronicle









Thp Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


14 April 2006 Pane 7


Court Report from Page 6
represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Violation of Pro-
bation Hearing set for April 11, 2006.
MATHES, GEORGE D: Charged with dealing in stolen property on
October 18, 2005. Bond was $2,000.00. The defendant was present
in court with Attorney Gregory Cummings. Case Management con-
tinued to April 11, 2006.
MCANALLY, DAVID E: Charged 2 times with sale of controlled sub-
stance on August 5, 2005. Total bond was $50,000.00. Thedefendant
was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Pre-trial Con-
ference set for May 9, 2006.
MEARS, DEBORAH VALLERY: Charged with introducing contra-
band at county detention facility on November 26, 2005. Bond was
$2,500.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Gregory
Cummings and entered a plea of no contest to the lesser charge of
attempted intro contraband co detention facility. Adjudication with-
held. The defendant was sentenced to 1 day in jail with 1 day credit
for time served; $335.00 court costs and fees.
MOODY, MARK A: Charged with sale of substance in lieu of cocaine
on September 1, 2005; charged with burglary of a dwelling; grand
theft (3rd degree); resisting officer without violence; possession drug
paraphernalia on December 14, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated.
The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin
Steiger. Case Management continued to April 11, 2006.
MOORE, KATIE NICOLE: Charged with 3 counts possession of con-
trolled substance with intent to sell or deliver on March 2, 2005. Bond
was $2,500.00. The defendant was present in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. Case Management continued to May 9, 2006.
MYERS, MICHELLE RENEE: Charged 2 times with sale of controlled
substance on November 15, 2005. Total bond was $50,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way.
Case Management continued to April 11,.2006.
NOWLING, JENNY: Charged with possession with intent to sell can-
nabis on June 9, 2005; charged with sale of controlled substance on
June 24, 2005. Total bond was $35,000.00. The defendant was present
in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of no
contest. Disposition set for May 9, 2006.
PALMER, DAVID RAY: Charged with felony flee or attempt to elude
officer; no valid drivers license on December 6, 2005. The defendant
was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The de-
fendant was found to be incompetent.
PATTERSON, TIMOTHY WADE: Charged with sale of controlled sub-
stance on November 15, 2005. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant
was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Man-
agement continued to May 9, 2006.
POOL, FRANKLIN R. II: Charged with sale of controlled substance
on June 24, 2005. Bond was $25:000.00. The defendant was present
in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of no
contest to lesser charge of possession of controlled substance cocaine.
Adjudication withheld. The defendant was sentenced to 3 years pro-
bation with 30 days credit for time served; $410.00 court costs and
fees.
PRINCE, EDWARD J: Charged with sale of controlled substance on
December 11, 2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being
in violation and was found in violation of probation. Probation re-
voked. The defendant was sentenced to 24 months probation with
188 days credit for time served (concurrent); random tests for illegal
drugs. Any conditions not met, re-imposed.
PRINCE, EDWARD J: Charged with Criminal mischief (3rd degree
felony) on October 1, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
O1ant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, en-
tered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant
was sentenced to 37 days in jail with 37 days credit for time served;
24 months probation (concurrent); random tests for illegal drugs: res-
titution to victim; $410.00 court costs and fees.
PUGH, ELEX D: Charged with possession of controlled substance
with intent to sell.or deliver; possession with intent to sell cannabis
on November 5, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was represented in court by Attorney Rachel Chesnut. Case Manage-
ment continued to May 9, 2006.
RAMIREZ, CARLOS: Charged with resisting officer with violence.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation and was
found in violation of probation. Probation revoked. The defendant was
sentenced to 180 days in jail with 154 days credit for time served; 2
years probation. Any conditions of probation not.met. re-imposed.


RHODES, GUINNALAND J. JR: Charged with throwing deadly mis-
sile on December 1, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case
Management continued to April 11, 2005.
RUCKER, KENNETH R: Charged with purchase controlled substance
cocaine; fleeing attempting to elude police officer on September 1,
2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented
in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Pre-trial Conference set for
June 13, 2006.
RUSS, JEROME D: Charged with sale of controlled substance on
December 22, 2001; charged with sale of controlled substance on
October 7, 2002. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was rep-
resented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Case Management
continued to April 11, 2006.
SALMON, JAMES A: Charged with 4 counts burglary of a dwelling
on December 30, 2004; charged with 1 count burglary of a dwelling
on January 9, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Probation modi-
fied. The defendant was sentenced to 60 days in jail with 44 days
credit for time served.
SAND, CRYSTAL AMANDA: Charged with purchase controlled sub-
stance cocaine on November 15, 2005. Bond was'$10,000.00. The
defendant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way.
Case Management continued to April 11, 2006.
SANDERS, ANTHONY: Charged with 3 counts delivery of controlled
substance on August 10, 2004; 3 counts false report to law enforce-
ment officer on August 10, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way.
Pre-trial Conference set for June 13, 2006.
SCOTT, RAMAH TULANE: Charged with possession of cannabis (more
than 20 grams). Bond was $5,000.00. Case Management continued
to April 11, 2006.
SEAMON, TONYA CHARLENE: Charged with aggravated battery with
deadly weapon on March 24, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way and
entered a plea of no contest. Adjudication withheld. The defendant
was sentenced to 81 days in jail with 81 days credit for time served;
24 months probation; restitution to victim; $410.00 court costs and
fees.
SHIVER, JAMIE L: Charged with possession with intent to sell can-
nabis on June 9, 2005. Bond was $25,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Pre-trial Confer-
ence set for May 9, 2006.
STEPHENS, MELVIN BERNARD: Charged with sale of crack cocaine
on November 15, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a
plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was
sentenced to 118 days in jail with 118 days credit for time served; 24
months probation; substance abuse evaluation and treatment; ran-
dom tests for no alcohol and illegal drugs; $510.00 court costs and
fees.
STRONG, WILLIAM A: Charged with sale of crack cocaine on No-
vember 15, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Pre-trial Con-
ference set for May 9, 2006.
VONIER, BROOK J: Charged with grand theft on June 1, 2002.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Attorney J. Gordon Shuler, admitted being in violation and was found
in violation of probation. Probation terminated.
VONIER, BROOK.J: Charged with aggravated battery great bodily
harm on March 19, 2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler, admitted
being in violation and was found in violation of probation. Probation
revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 48 months in prison (sus-
pended); 3 years probation (concurrent with another case) with 215
days credit for time served. Any conditions of probation not met, re-
imposed.
VONIER, BROOK J: Charged with grand theft (third degree) on Au-
gust 22, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present
in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler, entered a plea of no contest
and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 48 months
in prison (suspended); 3 years probation (concurrent with another
case) with 13 days credit for time served; must testify truthfully in
another case; joint restitution-to victim: $ 370.00 court costs.
WALLACE, KENNETH L: Charged 2 times with sale of controlled
substance on June 5, 2001.; charged with aggravated battery on preg-
nant victim on August 10, 2004; charged with battery by inmate on


March 3, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was rep-
resented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Violation of Proba-
tion Hearing set for April 11, 2006.
WARD, TIMOTHY SHAWN: Charged with throwing deadly missile
on March 11, 2004. Defendant released on own recognizance. The'
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Probation modified to include 20 hours community service.
WILLIAMS, LAURA JEAN: Charged with possession of controlled
substance cocaine; possession of cannabis; possession of parapher-
nalia on November 26, 2005. Bond was $9,000.00. The defendant
was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Case Man-
agement continued to April 11, 2006.
WILLIAMS, MARTALIUS DEMETRIUS: Charged with possession of
controlled substance cocaine; possession of cannabis, not more than
20 grams on August 15, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The de-
fendant was represented in court by Attorney Dennis Boothe who
entered a written plea of denial dated March 10, 2006. Case Manage-
ment continued to April 11, 2006.
WILSON, PAUL DENNIS: Charged with possession of controlled sub-
stance cocaine on July 28, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler and
admitted being in violation. The defendant was sentenced to 35 days
in jail with 35 days credit. for time served; probation, modified.
YOUNG, FREDERICK J: Charged with possession of controlled sub-
stance; driving while license suspended (felony) on November 3, 2005.
Bond was $7,500.00. The defendant did not show up for court, capias
(warrant for arrest) was issued and bond forfeited.
ZACKERY, REGINOLD T: Charged with felony fleeing or attempting
to elude officer (property damage $1,000.00) on November 3, 2005;
driving while license suspended (felony) on January 30, 2006. Bond
was $1,500.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney
Gregory Cummings. Case Management continued to April 11, 2006.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION HEARING
BOONE, MICHAEL: Charged with lewd of lascivious'battery on April
23, 2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation
and was found in violation of probation. Probation revoked and ter-
minated. The defendant was sentenced to 36 months in prison with
389 days credit for time served.
HUBBARD, ROBERT J: Charged with sale of controlled substance
on October 24, 2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being
in violation and was found in violation of probation. Probation re-
voked. The defendant was sentenced to 48 months in prison (sus-
pended); 18 months probation; drug treatment and aftercare.
KEITH, JASON DERRICK: Charged with felony DUI on December
22, 2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation
and was found in violation of probation. The defendant was sentenced
to 24 months community control with 81' days credit for time served;
substance abuse evaluation and treatment; random tests for no alco-
hol or illegal drugs. Any conditions of probation not met, re-imposed.
LEE, ROBERT KEVIN: Charged with dealing stolen property; grand
theft motor vehicle; 10 counts uttering (passing worthless document);
uttering a forged instrument. Defendant was incarcerated. The de-
fendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, ad-
mitted being in violation and was found in violation of probation. Pro-
bations revoked. The defendant was sentenced to-54 months in prison
(concurrent with all counts and cases) with credit for time already
served.
LEMON, LAKEISHA: Charged with battery on law enforcement of-
ficer on May 9, 2003 and on July 1, 2003. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger admitted being in violation and was found in violation of pro-
bation. Probation revoked and terminated. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 269 days in jail with 269 days credit for time served.
RHODES, QUINNALAND J. JR: Charged with sale of controlled sub-
stance; aggravated battery with deadly weapon on Sept 14, 2004.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. Violation of Probation Hearing con-
tinued to April 11, 2006.
YARRELL, RICO L: Charged with a variety of charges on several
different dates. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant admitted
being in violation of probation, entered a plea of no contest to the
others and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to
58 months in prison with credit for time already served. All counts
and cases run concurrent.'
HEARINGS


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workshop, fireplace, 1.5 acre $299,000
owner/agent.


.- ,2,. -- ,.:. -- . -.

Krisy: New 16x80 mobile home on 1 acre,
3BR/2BA, partially fenced backyard, back
deck, $125,000.


2003: 32'x64' double-wide on 1.96 acres on
Harbor Rd., 3BR/2BA, large pond, beautiful
property $249,500.
NEW LISTINGS
* Beach lot in private area, 50'x100', $895,000.
* 50'x150' MH lot, Lanark, $165,000. Reduced to
$150,000.
* (2) Five-acre tracts on Hwy. 67, $195,000 each.
* One acre on Harbor Rd., high & dry, $109,500.
* Walk to Lake Talquin,'32'x64' Redman DW,
3BR/2BA, great room on 1 acre at end of cul-
de-sac, $118,500.
* Weekend Retreat, 2BR Mobile Home
on Corner Lot. $103,500.


Kathy's: immaculate 3BR/2BA home on two
and one half lots, spacious master bedroom
with private entrance, fenced yard, large
workshop, call for all the details; $350,000_..


WALLACE, ALFRED II: Restitution Hearing continued to April
2006
FICHERA, TILDEN LEE: Order to show cause granted.


MARINE SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES TRAINED MECHANICS

YAMAHA" outN:J


MIKE'S MARINE SUPPLY
P.O. BOX 429 HWY. 98 PANACEA, FL 32346
PHONE: (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693 FAX: (850) 984-5698
www.mikesmarine-panacea.com
HOURS: MON., TUES., THURS., FRI: 8:00 6:00
WED.: 8:00 1:00 SAT.: 8:00 5:00
PRO-LINE GHEENOE BOSTON WHALER
PONTOON BOATS SEA PRO G-3 CENTURY



Air-Conof Wakulla, LLC
HEATING AND COOLING
850-926-5592
* Installation
* Service
* Repair
Gary Limbaugh, owner Lic # CAC1814304
Serving Franklin and Wakulla Counties since 1988





Penelope's Pet Stop

ose, PROFESSIONAL FURMINATOR
PET GROOMING SHED-LESS
f AND PET SITTING TREATMENT Ol


2.5 FiANKLIN ST. EASTPOINT, FL 32-32.
85O-W6o-2257 950-323-o0036
penelopespetstop.com





Two BLONDE


11,


Road To

Permanency

Conference

At GCCC

Gulf Coast Community
College's Lifelong Learning
Division will host the Road to
Permanency Conference on
April 20 and 21 from 7:30 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. in the Student
Union East Conference Cen-
ter.
The goal of the conference is
to provide people who inter-
act with abused and neglected
children new and innovative,
as well as time-tested ideas,
which will enable them to pro-
vide better service. The con-
ference will be offered to all
case managers, social work-
ers, law enforcement, counse-
lors, and others who are in-
volved in the welfare of abused
and neglected children.
The conference is free and
open to the public.
For additional information,
call Sherrie Lock at 872-3819.


r" HAIR
NAILS
PEDICURE SPA
WAXING
FACIALS
BODY WRAPS
TANNING

CONNIE RDEHR
NAIL TECH
ANGELA CREAMER
STYLIST

407 HWY 98
EASTPDINT. FL 32328
850-B70-5220
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^_keg> Ii AAA ^>hh A >*s


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Paoe 8 *14 Anril 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


F[ Florida Classified


Advertising Network


Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience of

1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!


The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper with

the FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-1687, fax: 850-670-1685.


Announcements

Is Stress Ruining Your Relationships? Buy and Read
DIANETICS by L Ron Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send
58.00 to Dianceics. 3102 N. Habana Ave.. Tampa FL 33607.

Auctions

LAND AUCTION Central Florida Acreage 10am. Saturday
April 22, Hardee County. FL. 320sAcres in 14 parcels
Higgenbotham Auctioneers M.E. Higgenbotham CAI FL Lic #
AU3051AB158 www.higeenbotham com (800)257-4161.

BROAD RIVER AIRPARK Fly-in and Auction Franklin
Counly, North Georgia Close to Lake Ilarwell and 1-85 Sat.
April 22, 21tI6at l:0l0am P'revicw Dales: Fri. 4/21 12-5pm.
Sat. 4122 I lam ForlInformation: www savaacrealestate com
or call Keinclh (770)718-8297 Savage Real Estate & Auc-
ion Co Inc. (800)983-0066 GAL#3124, 3125


Building Materials


METAL ROOFING SAVE $5$ Buy Direct From Manufac-
turer. 20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick turn
around! Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn S800/day? 30
Machines. Free Candy All for 9.,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. CALL US: We will not be undersold!

Receive checks of $3200 $4800 per month in as little as 60.
90 days for 20-40 years from a 40K investment in Oil & Gas.
(888)722-5790.

Orange County Choppers OCC seeks Distributor for New
OCC Energy Drink product. 515.000 req'd for Inventory. Pro-
tectedTerritory &TV Exposure. YOU CANTLOSE!! (888)216-
5831.

Learn lo buy Foreclosures, tax liens, and rehabs for pennies on
the dollar. Mentor walks you through each deal A-Z to insure
SUCCESS (800)693-3967.

PROFESSIONAI.VENDING ROUTE: Snacks,soda.juice,
water. ALL BRANDS. Great equipment &support. Financing
available with S7,500 down. Call Tom: (877)843-8726.
BO#2002-037


HelpWanted

AMERICA'S DRIVING ACADEMY Start your driving ca-
reer! Offering courses in CDL A. One tuition fee! Many payment
options! .No registration feel (888)808-5947
info@americasdrivingacademy.com.

Drivers CDL A. Special Orientation Pay for Experienced
Drivers! Home Weekends! Great Pay & Benefits! Paid Training
for School Grads! Cypress Truck Lines, Inc.
www cvoresslrckcom (888)808-5846.

Driver- NOW IIIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS for Central
Florida Local & National OTR positions. Food grade tanker, no
hazmiat. no pumps, great benefits, competitive pay &new equip-
ment. Need 2 years experience. Call Bynum Transport for your
opportunity today. (800)741-7950.

Drh ers- BE IN DEMAND: Plenty offreight. Many Home time
Options. Low Cost CDL Training Available, 100% Tuition
Reimbursement (800)231-5209 www.SwifTrackingJobs comr

A COOL. TRAVEL Job. Now hiring (18-24 positions). Guys/
Gals to work and travel entire USA. Paid training, transporta-
tion. lodging furnished. Call today, Stari today. (888)272-
2/32.

PRESS OPERATOR NewsKing experience preferred. Ben-
efits group health, vacation/sick time and holidays. E-mail
bcldettonc isb-observercom fax (386)424-9358. Publisher.
Observer Newspapers. P.O. Box 10, New Smyrna Beach, FL
32168.

"NOW HIRING 2006" AVERAGE POSTAL EMPLOYEE
.ARNS 557,000/YR Minimum Starting Pay S18.00/hr. Ben-
rfits/Paid Training and Vacations No Experience Needed
(800)584-1775 Ref #P4901.






Workforce

Center

Professional

Employment

Expo At Gulf

Coast

Community

College

The Workforce Center of Gulf
Coast Community College will
sponsor a professional em-
ployment expo on, April 18,
2006 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in
the Student Union East Con-
ference Center on campus.

The job fair is free ard open
to the general public, and is
geared toward high skill, high
pay jobs and as well as entry-
level. Over 40 area employers
expected to participate. For
additional information, call
Connie Brackett at 872-4340,
ext. 123.


HelpWanted

TIIERAPISTSWANTED-LICENSEDSLPSinMiami-Dad
and Broward counties. Bilingual a plus. Per diem & F/T.
Bilinguals Inc. Child & Parcnt Srvics. (866)696-0099 x03
www bilineualsinc corn

Travel Ihe USA for Pay! Delivcr"ncw" RVs, buses and trucks
to all 48 states and Canada. Get paid to see the country.
www horizontransport com
Drivers CDL A. True Lease to own program. Low pay-
ments/short term lease. Avg. S1.1 I/mile plus fuel surcharge.
No hazmat. No forced dispatch. FFE Transportation (888)864-
0012.

Owner Operators wanted. Long Haul loads FL to CACA to
WA, WA to FL. PullourAir-Ridc Reefers. HammcllTransport
Service Inc. Ask for Paul Magana (541)571-3974.


RealEstate

MURPHY, NORTH CAROLINA AAH COOL SUMMERS
MILD WINTERS Affordable Homes & Mountain Cabins Land
CALL FOR FREE BROCHURE (877)837-2288 EXIT RE-
ALTY MOUNTAIN VIEW PROPERTIES
www exitmurphy con.


Real Estate

BEAUTIFUL TEXAS LAND! 20 Acres. Only 8 Miles East
of Pecos and 3 Miles North of 1-20. Roads, References, Sur-
veyed. S13,500. S500. Down-S135. Per Month. No Credit
Check! (800)887-3006 Ilurry! Limited Quantity.


The
The he


24"
4 C. F FLWheelbanw
210 lb. load limit
2-ply tire, 16"x4"
All steel undercarriage,
hardwood handles
ul place. 7127129


North Carolina Gated Lakefront Commiilly 1.5 acres plus. 200 Acres Prime Iluntng Land SE GA. 2000 sqf home
90 mile ofshoreline. Never beforeoffered with 20% pre-devel. macjstic oaks lake, dck pond. 6yrgam mgm, turkey deer 18yr
opment discounts, 90% financing. Call (800)709-5253. planted pine & ar od 985000 Family O ed 35 y
(904)321-2679.


Mountain Property! Interested in buying property in the Blue
Ridge Mountains of NC? Call Active Realty today at 800-979-
5556 or visit our website at www ActiveRealtyNC corn

"Location,Localion,Location" Timetobuy. LNVESTORS &
BUILDERS. Great Buildable Lots For Sale in one of FI vida's
Fastest Growing Areas Fort Myers. (888)558-0032.


AD OF A I.IFETIME! E-Z CASII! S500-5 1.000t Daily! Not LAKEFRONT LOG HOME, $99,900. New 2000 Sq.Ft. Log
a Job, Not MLM, No Selling (888)248-4544. 'I Home on Lake Cumberland, KY. Jamestown/Russell Springs
Area. Ist Time Available April 22nd! (800)770-9311, Ext.S5.


Earn Up to $550 WEEKLY Working through the government.
PT No Experience. Call Today!! (800)488-2921 Ask for D-
paementi.

Hunting

HUNT ELK, Red Stag, Buffalo, Whitetall, Boar. Season
August 25. 2006-March 31, 2007. Boar all Year. Guaranteed
license. $5.00. we have a no-game-no-pay policy, book now.
Days (314)209-9800; Evenings (314)293-0610.

Legal Services


North Carolina Cool Mountain Air, Views & Streams. Homes.
Cabins & Acreage. FREE BROCHURE (800)642-5333. Really
Of Murphy 317 Peachtree St. Murphy. N.C. 28906.
www realtvofmurphy com

BEAUTIFUL NORTI CAROLINA. ESCAPE TO BEAUTI-
FUL WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS. FREE COLOR BRO-
CHURE & INFORMATION. MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES
WITH SPECTACUI.AR VIEWS HOMES.CABINS, CREEKS
& INVESTMENT ACREAGE. Cherokee Mountain Realhy
GMAC Real Estate. www cherokeemountainreally comr
(800)841-5868.


WESTERN NORTII CAROLINA 14.3 beautiful acres long-
DIVORCES275-$350*COVERS children. etc. Only one sig- rangcviewsofmountains.Woodcd.flatridge.betweenMurphy
nature required! *Excludes govt. fees!Call weekdays (800)462- and Andrews. Small double-wide. S275,000. (800)632-2212
2000.ext.600.(8am-7pm) AltaDivorce.'LLC. Established 1977. htlp//vallcvlownrcally com


ARRESTED? All Criminal Defense Felonies...Misdemeanors.
State or FederalCharges. Parole...Probation.DUI...TraficTick-
ets, Bond Reduction. 100's of Lawyers Statewide 24 HOURS
A-A-A ATTORNEY REFERRAL SERVICE(800)733-5342.

ALL PERSONAL INJURIES. ACCIDENT WRONGFUL
DEATH AUTO.. MOTORCYCLE.. TRUCK.. PREMISE..
PRODUCT SLIP & FA.L..PEDESTRIAN..ANMAL BITES
A-A-A ATTORNEY Referral Service (800)733-5342.24 Hrs
100s of Lawyers Statewide.

Miscellaneous

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal. Computers *Criminal Justice. Job Placement Com-
puter provided. Financial aid if qualify. (866)858-2121
www onlinetidewatertech corn

Pond and LakeFountalnsand Aeraors(888)776-3159.Com-
plete pond information online: Algae control, fish, aeration.
pond bubblers. Online store www absolutiaquatics corn

Sales

S5,500 Weekly Goal Potential If someone did it, so can you!
2-3 confirmed appointments daily! Benefits Available...Call
Catherine McFarland (888)563-3188.
Sales: $400,000 +/yr Ilow Good Are You? Retiring Million
Marketer seeks TWO sales professionals to teach my business
to. Top producers currently averaging S30-S40K per month.
PLEASE, serious inquiries only. Goji Intl. LLC. Commis-
sion/Bonuses (800)605-8675.


S Skilled Trades/Crafts


JobCrlfters. Inc. NOW IIIRING!llFirst Class Shipyard
Trades: Pipe Fitters. Structural Fiters. Structural Welders.
Work in FL. ALOverTime + Per Diem UPTO S23./hour. Toll-
Free: (800)371-7504 Phone: (251)433-1270 Fax: (251)433-
0018.

Steel Buildings

BUILDINGSALE!"Bcat Next Incras!"20x26Now S4200.
25x30 S5800. 30x40 S9200.40x60 S14,900. Etensive range
of sizes and models. Front end optional. Pioneer (800)668-
5422.


S&


I


This
dow
view
with
wor
to s
ML'
F


Lakefront and Lakeview Properties Nestled in the hills of
Tennesseeon the shores ofpristine Norris Lake. Call Lakeside
Realty at (423)626-5820 Or visit www lakcsidcrcalty-tn corm

FT. MYERS 1, 2, & 3 bedroom luxury condos from the low
100s!!!! CALL Allyn Watermann NOW for more info
(888)521-3790 hotto//wwv vcnctian-nalms com/ or
www naramountcomanies comr
ORLANDO 1, 2, & bedroom luxury condos from the low
S 1 Ws!I th! CALL Rob Sncddon NOW for more info (888)295-
0797 www rcgcncvoarklakemarv com/ or
www paramnuntcomoanics com

Waterfront Land Sale! 3 Acres Dockable Watcrfront Prop-
rty Build Up to 3 homes Only S99,9001 Ask About Our
Investor Pkg. 7 Waterfront Lots for Only S79,900! Call toll-
free (866)770.-5263 ext8.

ADIRONDACK LAND BARGAINS! 5 to 50 acres tracts
from S19,900! Quality NY land! Forests & waterfront! Build,
camp, hunt, fsh, invest! Guaranteed! Terms avail! Call today!
(800)890-7927 www mooscrivrland cornm

COASTAL GEORGIA. Land for sale by owner. Private golf
community designed by Fred Couples / Davis Love. Marina/
Tennis/Pool/Fitness. Jcckyll/St Simons Island S119,900 Call.
(315)529-1277.

FL LAND BARGAINS. Opportunities to own your own
farm, ranch woodland or lakefront homestead. Old Florida at
its best! Still, affordable! Call (866)352-2249 or
www flandbarmains corn

Large Min. Land Bargains, High Elevation. Adjoins Pris-
tine State Forest, 20+ AC to 350 AC. Sweeping Mm. Views,
Streams. www.livcinwv.com.


MOVE TO TENNESSEE! Looking for Lake Lots, Lake
Ilones. Land, Farms, Investment properties or Marinas? We
have it all. EXECUTIVECHOICE REAL ESTATE inTenncs-
sec (865)717-7775 CALL US FOR RELOCATION PACK-
AGES OR visit' our wcbsitc:
WWW EXECUTIVECHOICEREALESTATE COM

LOOKING TO OWN LAND? Invest in rual acreage through-
out America; coastal, mountain, waterfront properties. 20 to
200 acres. FREE. monthly Special Land Reports: www and
wanted.crr0msw

FLNAL CLOSEOUT- Lake Bargains! April 8/9. Water ac-
cess from S34.900 with FREE Boat Slips. PAY NO CLOSING
COSTS! Huge $5.000 savings on beautifully wooded parcels at
34.000 acre lake Tennessee. Enjoy unlimited water recreation.
Surrounded by state forest. Excellent financing! Call (800)704-
3154. x 722 TN Land Partners. LLC.

LAKEFRONT PROPERTY IN TN Waterfront. view & estate
homesites. 1 to40 acres from the $40s. Situated around a 45,00C
acre lake. Just 90 min to.Nashville. New building sites just
released. Call owner (866)339-4966.

NC- ASHEVILLE AREA HOMESITES Gated community
with stunning mountain views. Situated between 2 mountains
on over 4 miles of riverfront. to 8 acres from the S60s. Custom
owners' lodge, riverwalk & more. Call (866)292-5762.

NC MOUNTAINS 3 acres on mountain top in gated commu-
nity. view, trees, waterfall & large public lake nearby, paved
private access. S58,500 owner (866)789-8535 www.NC77.com:

TN LAKESIDE MOUNTAIN ACREAGE Situated around
a36.00 acre lake in eastern TN. 1/2 to 5 acre building sites from
the 40s. Planned community amenities & direct lake access.
Owner: (866)292-5769.

NorthGA & Western NC- HEAD FOR THE MOUNTAINS!
Call Mary Hedden. RE/MAX Ml. Connection. See hundreds of
listings at www lakechatugepropersy coam e-mail:
sold@maryhedden.com.

GEORGIA BLAIRSVILLE IN THE NORTH GEORGIA
MOUNTAINS. Land, Homes, Commercial & Investment. "EV.
ERYTHNGWETOUCH TURNSTOSOLD"Jane Ber Realty.
(706)745-2261, (800)820-7829 www.janebaerrealty corn
janebaer@alltel.net. .

NC Mountain Property for Less! Breathtaking Blue Ridge
Parkway, New River. Stone Mountain, Golf Courses and quaint
shops of Sparta. www scenicrealty corn (877)372-7211 or
(877)363-5550.

New, Pre-Construction Golf Community-Coastal Georgia.
Large lots w/deepwater, mash, golf, nature views. Gated. Golf.
Fimtness Center, Tennis,. Trails. Oak Park, Docks. S70k's-S300k.
(877)266-7376. ww cooperspoint corn

COASTAL NC WATERFRONT! 1.5 Acres- $99,900. Beau-
tifully wooded ws, views.pristine shoreline, deep beatable
water! Enjoy access to ICW. Sound Atlantic. Paved road. un-
derground utilities. Excellent financing. Call now (800)732-
6601 x 1510.

WESTERN NORTI CAROLINA, Andrews. 3.5 arces on the
headwatersof Valley River, drive and house pad. Price SS9.500
Valleytown Really ..*'.- i ... *..i.. .2212 }ILEd


1 COL iMiI LAND.R\ KG Ir> '<.. ..,:...: ,i...r. ,11. ... .I. h .,r.
NI ClUs si [tN.LND B4R1., sI .. ..N., .z .. -
Build, camp, invest! Guaranted! Terms avail! Call today!
(888)925-9277 www usstatcNYland cornm


699.


Fiberglass Handle o
Lawn & Garden Tools hover oerowRake
SPowder coated heads


PVC grips
7168784, 7168792, 7168818

While Supplies Last During April!

JACKSON ACE HARDWARE

Highway 98 Carrabelle, FL

850-697-3332




Flamingos!
A full-service Restaurant and Bar
at Juice & Java
Hours:
SMon. Tues. Wed: 8A-2P
Thurs. Fri.: 8A-9P
Sat.: 8A-10P
Live Music Sat, 6-9P e

49 W. PINE AVENUE ST. GEORGE ISLAND
PHONE: 850-927-3925


WantedToBuy

Wanted to Buy: OLD US COINS. Singlecoins. accumulations.
and entire collections. Lilleton Coin Company in business
since 1945. Call (800)581-2646, e-mail
coinbuy@littletoncoin.com. Mention code B8K320.


Bayside Realty Inc.
877-577-7177 Toll Free
850-697-3919 Phone
r. 850-697-9607 Fax
Ta Residential & Waterfront Properties.
L.JA ESI Serving you in Wakulla and Franklin Count
A Y Freda Moore Licensed Real Estate Broke
















6 wonderful waterfront home offers a 27W31 screen porch
rnstairs and a 31all screen porch upstairs with bceathtaking
as. 6reat room with fireplace and a great large open Kitcher
I all appliances conveying to new owner. 2-car garage with
shop area and a long pier to dock. Call for your appointm
aee this one today. Don't let this great catch get away!
.5lo58(s4. $1,275,ooo.oo.
reda White Moore-Licensed Real Estate Broke
Beth Barber-Realtor
Petra Myrick-Realtor

160 Laughing Gull Lane Carrabelle, FL 32322


y.
r.


n

ent



er


St. George Island


First Tier Home/Beachfront
View! One acre in East End.
Heated swimming POOL,
large deck, screened porch,
roll-down shutters, brick
paver drive, landscaping &
irrigation.Unobstructed Gulf
view! 2BR/2BA. MLS#102265.
$1,275,000.


Phone: 850-927-4777
Toll Free: 800-344-7570
www.sgirealty.com


First Class Island Home.
3BR/2BA. Oak floors, gran-
ite countertop, cherry cabi-
nets, mahogany trim, fire-
place, garden tub & a hot
tub! Lot backs up to State
Lands with path to Bay
Beach. MLS#108071. $649,000.


St. George Island Realty
235 E. Gulf Beach Dr.
St. George Island, FL 32328


LAND FOR SALE:
2nd tier Plantation 1 acre lot.
Beautiful open path to
Beach/Dune walkover. Small
reflecting pond on Western
edge of lot attracts wading
birds such as heron .& egrets.
MLS#108860. $775,000.
Canal Front lot located mid
block on the best canal. Great
Bay views with excellent pro-
tection from bay waves. Deep
canal allows docks to be build
parallel to lot. MLS#107294.
$745,000.
Plantation Full Acre. Gated
community with pool & tennis.
Lush vegetation for privacy &
serenity. Build your home here
for a beautiful Bay view.
MLS#105542. $597,000.


Ee dym erd srt antt






No dstiutd*n rnkin akul a, ndGlfCuais


'Ub' V -~-^'----; -- i I


- :~












The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


14 April 2006 Page 9


Stacy's Hair Design


850701772

Hours: Tues-Fri 10-5, after 5 by apt. Sat. 10-until
TAKING CARE OF
Stacy Williams, ALL YOUR HAIR
Stylist CARE,
347 Highway 98 MANICURES,
P.O. Box 977 PEDICURES &
Eastpoint, FL 32328 ACRYLICS






VACANT LAND

Vacant land for sale by owner. 2.37 acres in

Baywood Estates, Carrabelle, FL.

$179,900-Owner Financing Available.

Very nice area, no mobile homes. Lot can be

divided and is partially cleared.

CALL 850-210-5882 or 219-313-7988.
04-14/04-28/05-12/05-26


4 SURFSHOP

S & CAFE


Surfbbards/T-Shirts/Swimwear


Breakfast Buffet/BBQ/Ice Cream


850-927-3700 139 E. Gorrie Drive St. George Island
(across from the Shot Gun Houses)
03-31/04-14





CoastalTreasures &e fbrist

S#6F Pint Maf, IslandDrive

P.O. BoX827

"- 'Eastpoint, FL 32328

4'5 "0670-5242
0 00 Gift and Fruit Baskets
0o0e '- Floral Arrangements For All Occasions
$01 Alterations & Custom Sewing
Specializing in Weddings, Proms & Pageants 03.31/04-14











6690 SW Sundown Creek Road, Greenville, FL
Friday -:- April 28 -:- 10:00 a.m.
* Great Cattle and Horse Farm (2) Large Barns 4" Well Planted Longleaf Pines
*1 1/4 Miles 1-10 Frontage Aircraft Hangar LARGE GUEST LODGE
* Great Development Potential 3200' Approved Pratt Ranch 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths
* Quail Hunting Operation Grass Landing Strip (# 20.FD) PLUSA LARGE SELECTION OF
* Large Food Plots Contain Both Fenced & Crossfenced WELL MAINTAINED EQUIPMENT
Natural & Planted Habitats Well Stocked Duck Pond

Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10%Buyer'sPremium AU479 AB296
800-323-8388 For Complete Information www.rowellauction.com


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle
pages is an efficient way to promote your business to
the public and save money at the same time. These

ads are strictly business cards magnified to 2 columns
by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two
insertions. Send your business card or copy to:

Franklin Chronicle, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL
32328 or fax 850-670-1685. Your check for $15.00 will

guarantee position in the next issue.







FOR RENT




For rent COMMERCIAL BUILDING.


Located in Carrabelle. $800.00 a month.

Call 850-697-3919 or 877-577-7177.


04-14104-28





HOME TOWN BP & DELI

113 ST. JAMES AVENUE, JUST OFF
HIGHWAY 98 IN CARRABELLE 697-5111

Friendly atmosphere and ',

the best chicken and burgers'

in town!

LIVE BAIT FOR SALE
Now serving 7 days a week full breakfast03-31/04-14
03-31/04-14



I - i

M~m rofBxi~ig Agtr^


2x2 Rates
Statewide $1200
SRegional or National
Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


2x4 Rates
Statewide $2400
Regional Placement
also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


Tuesilay, April.1 at 12:30 PM



l561 unmal nlea, L uante.i ub Shores, L8gboat Key (Sarasota. fU
Deep Salt Waterfront 3 Bed 3 Bath, Pool Home, 116 feet of Seawall on Deep Sailboat Water
Long Dock with 16,000 Ib. Boat Lift & Jet Ski rmps, On Longboat Key's desirable South End,
No Bridges. Minutes to the Gulf of Mexico, Nice clean home. Deeded Beach Access,
Nicely landscaped lot. Light & Bright Interior or build 3 level home with panoramic water views
Directions: Off Gulf of Mexico Dr., I mile north of the bridge on right.
i ;ritfiTllil[ipll,,P(.I Hl; ilitiill i illIlili I I 1if ] i l l 11i'. i :1 4 I VI ll [* I ;ilm r I [11i I I
Neal Van De Ree auctioneers 941-488-1500
More InformaUton and Pictures a: wwwvaderee.com




Pay The County Bills


The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of
$1,440,929.72 at their April 4, 2006 meeting. The bills are listed
as follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Of-
fice.


ACS GOV'T FINANCIAL SYSTEM
04/03/2006 13:
BANK VENDOR

BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT


OPENING NOVEMBER 200,6.

THE S
OF DAYTONA BEACH.
The Ultra-Luxurious Oceanfront
Condominium with Concierge Services
and Golf & Spa Privileges.

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and Lush Gardens

Ultra-Luxury 2 and 3 Bedroom
residences with Fireplace, Panoramic
View Balconies, Gourmet Kitchens
and Designer Baths.


Call today 1-866-741-8317
www.oceanvisrasdaytona.com


DOUBLE YOUR INVESTMENT IN ONLY 1 YEAR!


Builders Lots Available in the

Fastest Growing Areas of Florida













Want to purchase minerals


and other oil/gas interests.


Send details to:


P.O. Box 13557


Denver, Colorado 80201


002395
001121
001982
002157
001379
001670
002468
002483
.04219
002172
.042111
002281
000104
002521
001000
002539
002535
000209
000318
000320
002538
002470
000194
002495
002534
002448
001721
001994
002496
002085
002210
.04220
000192
000869
000540
001935
001448
001734
002533
002484
002457
.04217
002385
002508
000202
002005
000292
000557
002537
001259
001921
001092
001149
000226
000449
002510
000267
001830
'000184
002429
.04221
002409
001900
002285
000138
.08352
000309
000140
.04222
002452
000635
000395
002500
000273
002482
002460
000144
001502
002329
002514
002271
000283
002099
001838
002392
000429
002235
001600
002536
.04223
002063
002451
000149
002330
001440
002436


Check Register


AT&T
AARON'S ELECTRIC INC
ADVANCED DRAINAGE SYSTEM
AIRGAS SOUTH
ALLEN ENTERPRISES, INC.
ALLTEL
AMERICAN RED CROSS
AMERICAN SYSTEM TECHNOLO'
ANTHONY PIERCE LLC
APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE
APAlIACIl1COLA ACE LDWR
AIRAMARK
HARD'S FINAL
B BRAUN MEDICAL
BAKER AND TAYLOR
BARRY'S BATTERY WAREHOUSE
BAXTER HEALTHCARE CORP
BAY MEDICAL CENTER
BCC GENERAL FUND
BCC ROAD AND BRIDGE FUND
BEAPRO.COM SPORTING GOOD
BECKMAN COULTER INC
BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD 0
BRIGGS CORPORATION
BROWN/VENEKA V
C & W FOOD SERVICE INC
CAPITAL HYDRAULICS
CAPITAL TRUCK, INC.
CARDINAL HEALTH
CENTURION TECHNOLOGIES
CERTIFIED PLUMBING &
CITY OF APALACHICOLA
CITY OF APALACHICOLA
CITY OF CARRABELLE
CLERKS TRUST ACCOUNT
COLLEGIATE PACIFIC
COMMERCIAL SUPPLY
COMP USA, INC. "
CROWDER-GULF
CULLIGAN
DADE BEARING
DAYTONA PLAZA
DISASTERS STRATEGIES AND
DOHMEN DISTRIBUTION PART
EASTPOINT WATER & SEWER
EMERGYSTAT INC
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUPPLY,
FEDERAL EXPRESS CORP.
FISHER HEALTHCARE
FLEET SUPPLY
FLORIDA COMBINED LIFE IN
FLORIDA DEPT OF TRANSPORT
FLORIDA LIBRARY ASSOCIATE
FLORIDA MEDICAID-COUNTY
FLORIDA MOSQUITO CONTROL
FOLEY/VIOLET
FRANKLIN COUNTY HEALTH D
GANDER AUTO PARTS.
GIBBS/DORIS S.
GIBSON/REBECCA D
GINNY GRINER
GORDON TRACTOR INC
GT COMMUNICATIONS
GULF COAST AGGREGATES LL
GULFSIDE I.G.A. (APALACH
GULFSIDE IGA
GULFSIDE IGA (CARRABELL
H & B INDUSTRIES, INC.
H LEE MOFFETT CANCER CTR
HARBOR MEDICAL CENTER
HARRIS,JR./JAMES A.
HOLLEY, INC.
HUMPHREY/WILLIAM
HUNT INSURANCE GROUP
INSTRUMENTATION LABORATO
IVERS MD/VINCENT
J. V. GANDER DISTRIBUTOR
JACKSON-COOK
JOHNSON/MARCIA M.
JONES/MELISSA A
JUDITH RUNDEL
KELLEY FUNERAL HOME
KIMBALL MIDWEST
KONE INC.
LANARK VILLAGE WATER &
LEITZ OFFICE PRODUCTS
LEPRECHAUN ENTERPRISES L
LOCKLEY JR/NOAH
MCKESSON
MEDIA COM
MEDIACOM
MEDIFAX-EDI LLC
MILLER MARINE. INC.
MOCK/MIKE
MOORE'S BACKFLOW TECHNIC
MOSTELLER/TED


FRANKLIN COUNTY
GL540R-V06.71 PAGE 1


CHECK DATE




35132 04/04/06
35133 04/04/06
35134 04/04/06
35135 04/04/06
35136 04/04/06
35137 04/04/06
35138 04/04/06
35139 04/04/06
35140 04/04/06
35141 04/04/06
35142 04/04/06
35143 04/04/06
35144 04/04/06
35145 04/04/06
35146 04/04/06
35147 04/04/06
35148 04/04/06
35149 0/04/06
35150 04/04/06
35151 04/04/06
35152 04/04 06
35153 04/04 06
35154 04/04 06
35155 04/04 06
35156 04/04 06
35157 04/04 06
35158 04/04 06
35159 04/04 36
35160 04/04 06
35161 04/04 06
35162 04/04/06
35163 04/04/06
35164 04/04/06
35165 04/04/06
35166 04/04/06
35167 04/04/06
35168 04/04/06
35169 04/04/06
35170 04/04/06
35171 04/04/06
35172 04/04 06
35173 0404 06
35174 004 06
35175 04/04 06
35176 04/04 06
35177 04/04 06
35178 04/04 06
35179 04/04 06
35180 04/04/06
35181 04/04/06
35182 04/04/06
35183 04/04/06
35184 04/04/06
35185 04/04/06
35186 04/04/06
35187 04/04/06
35188 04/04/06
35189 04/04/06
35190 04/04/06
35191 04/04/06
35192 04/04/06
35193 04/04/06
35194 04/04/06
35195 04/04/06
35196 04/04/06
35197 04/04/06
35198 04/04/06
35199 04/04/06
35200 04/04/06
35201 04/04/06
35202 04/04/06
35203 04/04/06
35204 04/04/06
35205 04/04/06
35206 04/04/06
35207 04/04/06
35208 04/04/06
35209 04/04/06
35210 04/04/06
35211 04/04/06
35212 04/04/06
35213 04/04/06
35214 04/04/06
35215 04/04/06
35216 04/04/06
35217 04/04/06
35218 04/04/06
35219 04/04/06
35220 04/04/06
35221 04/04/06
35222 04/04/06
35223 04/04/06
35224 04/04/06
35225 04/04/06
35226 04/04/06
35227 04/04/06


AMOUNT




123.87
780.00
2,403.23
250.14
823.64
121.00
496.00
2,589.76
2,395.34
27.99
92.49
-222.20
28.00
600.00
157.35
51.00
454.80
6,139.28
700.00
373,321.00
3,659.91
609.69
77,526.08
922.07
204.66
839.01
2,119.82
213.79
4,186.39
20.80
827.64
820.81
1,388.52
58.70
111.00
472.42
762.96
127.01
41,288.80
216.00
2,351.73
435.00
7,052.00
1,809.89
952.82
17,000.00
398.91
67.91
833.35
45.28
7,178.39
60.00
255.00
13,555.36
74.00
160.00
49,053.00
1,704.49
18,457.00
885.00
814.00
1,641.87
2,766.55
13.199.41
188.93
16.80
84.25
203.00
1,935.04
5,081.50
41,724.00
794.28
187.11
2,059.02
2,047.94
5,760.00
17,052.29
1,144.96
27,047.00
150.00
40.00
1,145.00
151.86
606.06
54.00
115.60
1,600.00
95.00
2,749.55
495.23
23.00
195.00
19.53
404,574.00
200.00
3,110.00


PIc

Av,


New & Gently Use4 Buy & Sell

kup & Delivery 2481 Crawfordville Hwy.

r4lable Crawfordville, FL 32327

850-926-8765
Open Wed. to Sat. 10-6 pm Sun. 12-5 pm


Wade's Bail Bonds

Bill Wade, Agent
James NesSmith, Bondsman
Charles Golden, Temp Agent
Deedre Golden, Temp Agent

24 HOUR SERVICE

All Major Credit Cards Accepted

5A Bay Street (850) 670-5051
Eastpoint, FL 32328 03-03/03-17,03-3104-14











The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits,.Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE







CASH NOW As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on TV.

ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS


(800) 794.7310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW

for Structured Settlements!


001360
001101
002343
002174
001933
000589
000286
002531
002479
.002445
001949
002507
001566
001321
.04225
001151
002103
002461
.04224
002194
001972
001489
002255
002486
000168
000518
001739
000217
002039
000642
002463
000729
000132
001642
001929
002513
002186
000524
000175
000835
001851
000241
002456
.04226
002489
001036
002215
001725
001993
000808
002450


MUNICIPAL SUPPLY & SIGN
NE-RO TIRE & BRAKE SVC,
NEXTEL PARTNERS INC
NORTHERN SAFETY CO INC
NORTHERN TOOL & EQUIPMENT
OFFICE BUSINESS SYSTEMS
OFFICE OF THE STATE ATTO
OFFICEMAX CONTRACT INC
OSCEOLA SUPPLY INC
PAYROLL SYSTEMS
PENDLETON/DORIS B.
PIERCE DO/DAVID
PIERCE LLC/ANTHONY
POLORONIS CONSTRUCTION
POSTMASTER
POSTMASTER EASTPOINT
POUNCEY/PAULA
PREMIUM ASSIGNMENT CORPO
PROGRESS ENERGY
PROGRESS ENERGY FLORIDA,
QUALITY WATER SUPPLY'
QUILL CORPORATION
REFUGE HOUSE INC
REGISTER/PAMELA
RING POWER CORPORATION
SAM'S CLUB
SANDERS/CHERYL
SCOTT/WILLIAM E.
SEAHORSE GIFT & FLORIST
SHADE TREE TOWING
SHAM K MANGALVEDKAR
SHULER/THOMAS M.
SPIRIT SERVICES COMPANY
ST.JOE RENT-ALL, INC.
STANDARD INSURANCE COMPA
STONE/MELANIE R
SUWANNEE RIVER SUPPLY. I
TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL RMC
TAYLOR'S BUILDING SUPPLY
TECH CARE X-RAY
TERMINIX
TOMMY'S GLASS & MIRROR C
UMI LLC
UPS
UPS
VIKING OFFICE PRODUCTS
WARD INTERNATIONAL TRUCK
WASTE MANAGEMENT OF PC
WATER MANAGEMENT SERVICE
WILLIAMS METRO COMM.
WOLFF/RONALD


GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT

FUND RECAP:
FUND DESCRIPTION

001 GENERA. FUND
120 'INI AND 1O)'RFIiTUInE
1 7 I-'IANKI.IN CO1 I'lltllIC LJlIAltY
140' ROAD AND BRIDGE
142 MOSQUITO CONTROL
163 ENHANCED 911 FUND
170 AIRPORT FUND
180 AFFORD.HOUSING ASSIST TRUST
201' GEORGE E WEEMS HOSPITAL FUND
TOTAL ALL FUNDS


BANK RECAP:
BANK NAME
-- - - ------------------~~~` ~ ~
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
TOTAL ALL BANKS


Coastal Consignment

Furniture


35228 04/64/06
35229 04/04/06
35230 04/04/06
35231 04/04/06
35232 04/04/06
35233 04/04/06
35234 04/04/06
35235 04/04/06
35236 04/04/06
35237 04/04/06
35238 04/04/06
35239 04/04/06
35240 04/04/06
35241 04/04/06
35242 04/04/06
35243 04/04/06
35244 04/04/06
35245 04/04/06
35246 04/04/06
35247 04/04/06
35248 04/04/06
35249 04/04/06
35250 04/04/06
35251 04/04/06
35252 04/04/06
35253 04/04/06
35254 04/04/06
35255 04/04/06
35256 04/04/06
35257 04/04/06
35258 04/04/06
35259 04/04/06
35260 04/04/06
35261 04/04/06
35262 04/04/06
35263 04/04/06
35264 04/04/06
35265 04/04/06
35266 04/04/06
35267 04/04/06
35268 04/04/06
35269 04/04/06
35270 04/04/06
35271 04/04/06
35272 04/04/06
35273 04/04/06
35274 04/04/06
35275 04/04/06
35276 04/04/06
35277 04/04/06
35278 04/04/06


755.65
401.52
267.06
85.35
112.19
110.00
1,682.86
64.31
1,144.92
266.25
157,067.00
12,062.00
1,570.72
3,333.33
39.00
273.00
180.00
1,411.74
5,890.13
4,604.33
161.80
176.91
12,500.00
66.17
S523.67
1,098.46
48.33
838.16
15.00
49.45
3,384.00
7,440.00
439.84
553.58
578.85
150.00
495.41
15,160.56
1,197.78
171.00
271.00
225.82
5,000.00
59.74
29.37
131.66
333.27
804.89
23.39
7,500.00
618.17
1,440,929.72


DISBURSEMENTS

862,381.10
44', l.ad .39
2,060.82
48,964.33
651.95
2,937.41
4.311.38
9,131.39
64,552.95
1,440,929.72



DISBURSEMENTS

1,440,929.72
1,440,929.72


I -


5444








Page 10 14 April 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Summer

And Fall

Registration

At GCCC

Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege campus advising and reg-
istration for the summer 2006
i) as follows:

Summer A
Registration: April 17 May

Classes Begin: May 8
Registration Fees Due: May 3


Summer B
Registration: April
June 14 to 16


17-21


Jeff

Galloway

Team

Number

One In The

United

States

The Jeff Galloway Team of
Prudential Resort Realty was
given the Number One Pin-
nacle Award for the highest
production nationwide by the
Prudential Real Estate Affili-
ates. Jeff was honored at a
special awards ceremony,
hosted by comedian Jeff
Foxworthy, at the annual
Sales Convention held in San
Antonio, Texas.
Jeff and his team were Num-
ber One among over 60,000
Prudential sales associates for
the second year in a row. He
also received the Chairman's
Circle Diamond Award and
the Prudential Legend Award,
given for five years in a row of
top-ranking performances.
"I'm proud to work with Jeff
and his team of top perform-
ers," said Helen Spohrer,
owner of Prudential Resort
Realty. "Jeff is a special per-
son whose energy and abili-
ties help him provide top qual-
S ity service to all of his custom-
ers. Jeffs achievements are
truly remarkable."
The Jeff Galloway Team in-
cludes licensed sales associ-
ates Hollis Vail, Mark Shep-
herd, Jamie Huggins, Ron
Wells and Anna-Maria
Cannatella. Their office is on
St. George Island and they
may be contacted at 850-927-
2596.


Classes Begin: June 19
Registration Fees Due:
June 9
Early Fall
Registration: April 17 21
July 10 -21
August 14-15
Classes Begin: August 16
Registration Fees Due: Au-
gust 11

Summer A
Registration: April 12 (9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. (EST)
Classes Begin: May 8
Registration Fees Due: May 3


Summer B
Registration: April 12 and
June 7 Classes Begin: June
19
Registration Fees Due:
June 9
Late registration and drop/
add for all facilities is as fol-
lows:
Summer A May 8 9
Summer B June 19 20
For more information, call
(850) 872-3892 for the main
campus, (850) 227-9670 fr
the -Gulf/Franklin Center
(EST) and (850) 283-4332 and
for Tyndall Air Force Base
Education Office.


Resolution
FRANKLIN COUNTY
Board Of County Commissioners

WHEREAS, sexual violence continues to be a major social cri-
sis in our society; and
WHEREAS, sexual violence affects every child and adult in
Franklin County as a victim/survivor or as a family member,
significant other, neighbor or co-worker of a victim/survivor;
and
WHEREAS, volunteers and service providers in our commu-
nity are working to provide a continuum of care to sexual vio-
lence survivors through 24-hour hotlines, counseling, sup-
port groups, advocacy, medical care and education; and
WHEREAS, Refuge House seeks to improve services for vic-
tims/survivors of sexual violence and prevent future sexual
violence through public awareness and services for victims;
and
WHEREAS, this community recognizes the vital importance of
designating a time devoted to increase the general public's
awareness and support of agencies providing services to rape
victims; and
WHEREAS, we hold forth a vision of a community free from
sexual violence;
NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS proclaim the
month of April as SEXUAL VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH.
This Resolution adopted by the FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS this 4th day of April, 2006.
By: Cheryl K. Sanders, Chairman


Resolution
Board Of County Commissioners

FRANKLIN COUNTY

WHEREAS, libraries are part of the American Dream- places
for opportunity, education, self-help and lifelong learning;
WHEREAS, our nation's public, academic, school and spe-
cialized libraries help people change the world;
WHEREAS, libraries play a vital role in providing millions of
people with the resources they need to live, learn and work in
the 21st century;
WHEREAS, libraries are changing and dynamic places and
librarians are the ultimate search engine, helpingpeople of all
ages find the information they need-in print and online;
WHEREAS, libraries bring you a world of knowledge both in
person and online, as well as personal service and assistance
in finding what you need, when you need it;
WHEREAS, libraries are a key player in the national discourse
on intellectual freedom, equity of access, and narrowing the
"digital divide;"
WHEREAS, more individuals must be recruited to the profes-
sion of librarianship and to work in libraries to maintain their
vitality in today's changing workplace;
WHEREAS, libraries, librarians, library workers and support-
ers across America are celebrating National Library Week with
The Campaign for America's Libraries.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS proclaim
National Library Week, April 28, 2006.
This Resolution adopted by the FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS this 4th day of April, 2006.
By: Cheryl K. Sanders, Chairman


Library from Page 4
Every Monday and Friday, 10:00 a.m. 12:00 Noon: The
FROG Family Learning Program holds GED classes in
Apalachicola at the Library's program site (148 8th Street -
in the New Life Center). Call Jhaki at 670-4423 for more infor-
mation.
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 2:30 5:00 p.m.: Tu-
tor Time for students is available at the Carrabelle Branch
with Marlene. Adult education in literacy, computer instruc-
tion, pre-GED work and GED preparation can also be obtained
by calling 697-2091 for more information and to make an ap-
pointment.
Every Tuesday and Thursday, 5:00 6:00 p.m.: The FROG
Family Learning Program holds GED classes at the Eastpoint
branch of the library. Call Jhaki at 670-4423 for more infor-
mation.
Every Thursday: "Read To Me"-reading to pre-school chil-
dren is held at the Eastpoint branch from 11:00 11:30 a.m.
Ms. Tonia delights young children and their caregivers with
one half hour of stories from the many books in the library's
collection. For further information, call Tonia at 670-4423.
Every Friday: The young adult book club at the Carrabelle
branch, held from 2:30 4:00 p.m., helps young people find
the best books to read. The TIGERS students have an oppor-
tunity to participate in this new activity but all teens are wel-
come. For more information, call Tonia at 697-2366.
3:00 4:00 p.m.: Chair exercise-realistic and helpful for
persons of varying degrees of ability, gentle movements are all
done while sitting in a chair:
4:30 5:00 p.m.: Story Time at the Carrabelle branch with
Marlene.
The Franklin County Public Library's programs-FROG, WITH-
IT! and TIGERS are offered at no cost to participants. Reg-
istration however is required. For information about the Li-
brary and any of its programs, please call 697-2366, 670-8151,
or 653-2784 or view the Library's website located at
www.franklin.lib.fl.us.


000000000000000000 000000000
TWO CRACKED POTS PLANT NURSERY

0 Sagos 0 Camellias" 0 Century Plants
0 Bulbs 0 Custom Pots

DISCOUNTS ON PRE-ORDERSI
LANDSCAPE SERVICES AVAILABLE!.
1s Located corner of
S 1st St. & Ave. A, Eastpoint, FL
0000000000000000000000000000


TH RAKI


CHONCL
SEVIG


16th Annual Carrabelle

Riverfront Festival
The 16th Annual Carrabelle Riverfront Festival will be held on
Marine Street along the beautiful Carrabelle Riverwalk on April
22nd and 23rd.
The Sunny Jim Band
Sunny Jim and his band will be playing at the Festival again
this year. With his laid back attitude and island style, he is a
favorite for Parrot Head parties across the U.S. Some of his
current venues include Margaritaville Cafe Citywalk at Uni-
versal Studios in Orlando, Margaritaville Cafe in Key West, FL
and Margaritaville Cafe in New Orleans.
Sandsational Sand Sculptors
A talented group of artists from Melbourne, FL called
"Sandsational" will be demonstrating a seldom seen art form
that will impress young and old alike. Using a huge block of
wet sand, they will be creating some amazing sand sculptures.
They also provide an area where children and adults can par-
ticipate, so everyone can join in the fun. Their creations are
real show stoppers so don't miss this one.
We have vendors coming from all over the southeast and are
anticipating a great Festival this year.


Ben Franklin
from Page 1

December, 1776, Franklin
journeyed, to France and
served as commissioner to the
United States.
During his nine-year stay in
France, Franklin proved adept
at representing the interests
of the new nation, securing
critical military ties with
France that would help win
the Revolutionary War and
negotiating the 1783 Treaty of
Paris that formally ended the
war.
Franklin returned to the
United States in 1785 and re-
ceived a hero's welcome.
Two years later, in 1787,
Franklin agreed, to serve as a
delegate to the Constitutional
Convention in Philadelphia.
At age 81, Franklin was the
oldest delegate to sign the U.S.
Constitution.

First-Day Cancel
Ordering
Information
Standard ordering in-
structions apply. Collec-
tors are encouraged to
purchase their own
stamps and affix them to
envelopes. Envelopes
should be addressed for
return and placed in a
larger envelope, ad-
dressed using all capital
letters and no punctua-
tion, except'the hyphen in
the ZIP+4 code, and be
sent to: Benjamin
Franklin Stamps;. Post-
master, 2970 Market St,
Room 525, Philadelphia,
SPA 19104-9611.:Requests
for iast-da. cancels. must
be postmarked by May 6.
Instruction to order the
Postal Service's
uncacheted first-day cov-
ers for the 39-cent Ben-
jamin Franklin stamps
(USPS item No: 459163 at
$3.08 for a set of four,
FDCs; 459165 at $1.50
for a random FDC with
Digital color postmark;
and 459168 at $6 for a set
of four FDCs with digital
color postmarks) are near
the end of Linn's 2006
U.S Stamp. Progr.-

Fra'-kiii biographical,
formation furnished by
the U.S. Postal Service
and published in Linn's
Stamp News, April 5,
2006.







I I
kli7^H^^^^^^l


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Briefs from Page 3

additional expenditures. This
would exhaust the approxi-
mately 1.3 million investment
by the County thus far. Ms.
Williams estimated that the
County's investment would
not make it through the end
of April.
"I would like to make a sug-
gestion," offered Ms. Sanders.
"Hold off on the agreement
with Blackhawk and May 1st
Blackhawk (will) be ready to
take over or we (will) go and
look somewhere else. Then
let's go to the April 18th work-
shop with Sacred Heart and
Gulf County and see what can
be done there. I'm saying if
Blackhawk is not ready to
come in on May 1st and as-
sume all responsibilities and
the irreversible line of credit
that I requested and have that
money in the bank and do
everything else, then they
walk; we'll get somebody else.
That is my suggestion."
"We can't wait to May 1 for and
answer to this," said Mr.
Mosconis. "It has got to be
done now."
"I'm here to tell them if they
can't do it today... walk!" said
Ms. Sanders. "One way or the
other we're going to keep this
hospital open, but if
Blackhawk don't want to be a
part of it ...? We've put over a
million dollars into this. And
so far we've got $12,000 in
revenue."
"There is some confusion
here," said Mr. Bitterman.
"You own the accounts receiv-
able. The hospital is close to
break-even."
"This is not simple," said Mr.
Mosconis. 'This is a real com-
plex problem here. It is going
to take some time and money
to work out."
'The bottom line is this," of-
fered Mr. Lockley. "You are
getting everything set up, just
as you said, but you are get-
ting everything set up on
Franklin -County money. It
isn't going to cost you no
money; instead it is costing us
the taxpayers."
"The agreement that was
given was that there would be
zero assets and zero liabilities.
This Medicare issue wbuld
have carried through to all
three parties anyway-or to
Blackhawk anyway. That
doesn't affect us. When we
walk through the door, we will
have to be able to cover pay-
roll and all expenses until we
are able to bill for our own
services. That has never
changed. We have already put
$50,000 into the account and
a part of that has been used
to support the hospital. We
will immediately put 200,000
dollars in on day one. The is-
sue is that we can't bill Medi-
care. We cah't do that for up
to, what amounts to eight or
nine months. That is half the
revenue for this facility. I un-
derstand your feeling in that
you say maybe you should
find somebody else; and that
is your prerogative. We have
done everything that we have
ever said that we would try to
do. I've talked to your staff;
I've been up front-that's who
we are. I don't want you to say
that we are something differ-
ent, because we aren't."
"I know one thing," said Mr.
Mosconis. "We have got to
keep moving and we've got to
et this thing over into some-
ody else's hands."
"I have put three months of
blood, sweet and tears into
this place," commented Mr.
Wolf "I don't want to see any-
thing happen. I can tell you
this. Mr. Russell just ex-
plained that half of your gross
revenues are Medicare. Un-
fortunately that is not half of
the money that it takes to run
the hospital. It is probably
about seventy percent. One
out of every five patients who
comes to Weems is self-pay;
which means that they have
no insurance or they are char-
ity cases. Think about that.
We are starting off with a busi-
ness where twenty percent of
your business isn't going to
pay you-maybe three cents
on the dollar, maybe five
cents. That is because
Franklin County does not
have a lot of employers who
carry insurance-even the
hospital. We have to have
some decisions made pretty
quickly. I'm telling you, it is
going to take some money to
carry through. And the


County's borrowing power is
much better than any outside
firm. Whoever comes in here
has got to come up with short
fall and deal with it. Somebody
or other is going to have to
have a big deep pocket."
"We are going to keep that
hospital open," said Mr.
Lockley. "But what we got to
know is; Blackhawk, are you
with us?"
"We always have been."
"Well, then, we need a date,"
said Mr. Lockley.
"We are going to keep this
hospital open," offered Ms.
Sanders. "We need a good
stable company in here to run
it. We don't need the same
thing that we have had here
for the last ten years. We need
somebody good in here that
caies about the people; the
County doesn't mind putting
money into it because we have
already done it. But as far as
going on a line of credit for you
all -no way Jose'! No way that
I will approve it. No way! If you
all can't get some stability
from that company and bring
it to the County I'm not going
to be in favor for going for a
line of credit for you all-that's
for sure.
"This has nothing to do with
stability. You are borrowing
against an institution that has
traditionally lost money. It has
zero assets; it's got zero liabili-
ties and it has zero equity.
Our financial stability is fine.
Our commitment has always
been the same. We have been
committed to doing this. We
are not taking a management
fee for doing this. We hre try-
ing to work together to resolve
the issue."
"Part of the problem, by the
way," offered Mr. Wolf, "is that
Blackhawk is the renter. You
can't borrow money to keep a
house up because you don't
own it. We can't secure the
house.
They (Blackhawk) must go out
and borrow on their own. That
is why they are going to get
interest rates that are off the
map."
"It is not on our credit," of-
fered Mr. Russell from
Blackhawk. "It is on the facil-
ity. This facility's track record
is what prohibits you from
being able to borrow at a re-
alistic rate."
This discussion went round
and round. It was decided that
further discussions would
continue after the regular
Commission meeting. The
hospital board and all con-
cerned parties would have to
be involved and some deci-
sions would have to be de-
cided promptly.
This problem is not happen-
ing in Franklin County alone.
It is happening all over the
United States. Since I started
covering this issue over two
years ago, the number of es-
timated uninsured has gone
from 35 million to 75 million.
It does not appear that this
number will decrease in the
future. Large companies and
corporations are scrambling
to divest themselves of these
type responsibilities-not only
health care but pension pro-
grams also. Cities, municipali-
ties and government employ-
ers are on a similar course.
The average worker can nei-
ther afford to pay his hospital
bill nor purchase the neces-
sary coverage. New workers
can look forward to providing
their own health care cover-
age, their own pension pro-
gram, and lower wages in gen-
eral.
Health insurance costs have
skyrocketed over the past de-
cades and there is no end in
sight. The current recom-
mended health care policy is-
wash your hands frequently
and thoroughly, being sure to
scrub under your fingernails.
I would add to that caveat the
recommendation to stay away
from any hospital if you can
possibly do so-more people
die from infections contracted
while in a hospital than from
what they went in for in the
first place. My older brother
was a recent victim of this ris-
ing phenomena. He had sub-
stantial health care coverage.
There are only 200 million
working people in the United
States. So the number of un-
insured or self-pay is ap-
proaching the 50% mark. This
percentage will get higher in
the coming years-it is inevi-
table. The cost to those with
coverage will, of necessity, rise
due to the shrinking pool of
insured workers. Many of the
insured will be forced to drop


their coverage; young workers
will stop thinking of insurance
coverage as a realistic option;
small employers simply can
not afford insurance coverage
as a benefit. Many economic
experts claim that the U.S. is
in "a race to the bottom"-
lower wages, lower benefits,
and lower living standards.
The day of reckoning with re-
gards to this issue is rapidly
approaching. The buck has
been passed from the Federal,
to the State and now to the
County. Everybody is hoping
that some little community
somewhere will stumble onto
a solution-let's all hope that
County is Franklin County.


I _- - _


ow








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


14 April 2006 Page 11


Slams Door
from Page 1
Asked after the meeting if he
cared to comment, he did: "All
night long the mayor pointed
out the wonderful system of
public discourse, but actions
speak louder than words...
this is the most recent ex-
ample of the chilling effect of
lack of free speech...that hav-
ing been said, with gavel in
hand, Mayor Kelly is willing to
make her personal opinions
known on any number of top-
ics.
"It's obvious that the city
knows that the dredge appli-
cation is reasonable, and is
afraid for that information to
get out to the public." At is-
sue is the application of the
Boat Club to dredge 600' of
Poston Bayou, essentially be-
hind the old Julia Mae's, to
drop the bottom about a foot
in the center of the channel.
The club has been under con-
struction for about 2 years,
and is preparing for its Grand
Opening. "The record on our
application clearly shows that
the opposition has been led by
the commissioners and their
family members. Some of the
first 'citizen' letters of opposi-
tion received were from Com-
missioner Tyre, Mrs. Tyre,
Commissioner Parmenas and
her partner Roger Bybee.
Twenty-plus supporters waited
for 5 hours (for the agenda
item, which was toward the
end), but then only support-
ers of the City position were


allowed to speak at will ... it
was apparent that Mayor Kelly
did not intend to permit any
discussion on the subject.
Mayor Mel appears to enjoy
her newfound power."
The City position, stated by
the mayor and Attorney Cox,
is that dredging is contrary to
the Comprehensive Plan in
that bayou. The public com-
ment that was allowed stated
that the bayou has never been
dredged. Many old-time resi-
dents, however, explain that
shrimp boats, with their mass
and powerful prdps, have
prop-washed the channel for
many years. It was also ob-
served that the Carrabelle
bridge construction and
dredging at the mouth of the
bayou caused much siltation
into the bayou, which has
made it shallower.
Cooler heads, when asked,
expressed various opinions.
Most cited the economic, traf-
fic and water access advan-
tages the new business would
bring. Hundreds of "slots"
have been sold from the $30-
thousands to over $100 thou-
sand, bringing much tax rev-
enue. That many boats will
not be on our roads, and will
not need water access. The
writer's personal observation
coming from a visit to the
project is that this business
now joins St. James Bay Golf
Community as one of the new
first-class service operations
in this area. Hopefully the is-
sue of water depth will be re-
solved soon.


Other agenda items in the
meeting which lasted past
midnight paled in comparison
to the above. Deadline de-
Smands require that further
i information be printed in the
Franklin Chronicle's next
issue.


Aerobatics

Highlighted

At Tyndall's

Open House

Tyndall Air Force Base will
feature several professional
aerobatics teams during Gulf
Coast Salute 2006, "Thunder
Over the Gulf," April 22 to 23.
Patty Wagstaff flies one of the
most thrilling, low-level aero-
batic routines in the world.
Flying before millions of air
show spectators each year,
her breathtaking perfor-
mances give spectators a
front-row seat view of the pre-
cision and complexity of mod-
ern, unlimited hard-core aero-
batics. Her smooth aggressive
style sets the standard for
performers the world over.
Providing a blend of low-level
precision formation and solo
aerobatics, the Red Eagle fly-
ing team is nationally known
Ifor eye-popping, spectacular


performances with flat spins,
Inside and outside loops, mul-
tiple snap rolls, tall slides and
torque rolls, plus many signa-
ture maneuvers.
Flying the Red Eagle and one-
of-a-kind Talon Eagle, the
team demonstrates the 375
horse-power of the highly-
modified. Team-lead McClung
harnesses the raw power of
.the Talon Eagle to push the
aircraft to its performance
.envelope.
[The Oregon Aero SkyDancer
Steam includes the world's only
husband-and-wife profes-
sional aerobatic and skywrit-
ing duo. The team performs
tight and low aerobatic rou-
tines in a highly modified two-
place warbird.
Admission and parking to the
open house are free. Shuttle
bus transportation will be pro-
vided from the parking area
to the flightllne. Security will
be emphasized: no pets, weap-
ons, glass bottles or contain-
ers will be allowed. Small cool-
ers and backpacks will be per-
mitted, but are subject to
search.
For additional information,
check out the Gulf Coast Sa-
lute 2006. official Website
linked to our home page at
http://www.tyndall.af.mil or
e-mail pacontactstyndall.af.
mil.


Funds Requested For

New Trauma Center


SBy Brandon D. Oliver
,In an effort to treat Franklin
County trauma victims faster,
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital
has asked the state for $550,000
to start a new trauma center in
Leon County.
Franklin County victims could
reach the Leon County center in
half the time it takes for them to
'reach the nearest trauma center
now, which is at Sacred Heart
Hospital in Pensacola.
Franklin County ranks 19 among
the state's 67 counties for ,death
resulting from trauma.
TMH spokesman Warren Jones
said a big reason they want to
start the new trauma center is
what they call the golden hour. If
you can get to a trauma center
within an hour, your chances (of
healing) are much higher." Jones
said.
TMH is a member of the
Healthcare Responsibility Act, a
statewide group which devotes
money to needy patients' emer-
gency care, so it will be a great
place to help Franklin County
trauma victims, said
Apalachicola resident Jinny
Trammell, fiscal assistant at the
Franklin County Health Depart-
nment.
"I know children that have gone
to Sacred Heart," Trammell said.
,"By (TMH) being a participating
program, it will help most people
-in Franklin County."


If the state funds the trauma cn-
ter al TMH, Jones wants to send
people to Franklin County to train
citizens to help patients until
paramedics arrive.
That would work out well, Tram-
mel said, because there are al-
ready many people in Franklin
County who are "first respond-
ers."
First responders are volunteers
who have basic medical training
for emergencies. Many of the first
responders are the county's
firefighters, Trammell said. "They
have to be certified in certain ar-
eas. They're great to have," said
Trammell.
The TMH trauma center would
serve 10 surrounding counties.
The center would be for the
"worst-case scenario patients,"
said Deborah Fairhurst, an aide
to Sen. Al Lawson, D-Tallahassee.
The Florida Legislature is plan-
ning the state budget now. It is
scheduled to finish and adjourn
May 5.
For information on the proposed
TMH trauma center, go to http:/
/www.tmh.org/traumaCenter/.
For information on the Pensacola
trauma center, go to http://
www. sacred -heart.org/
emergencydept.asp.


16th ANNUAL


Saturday, April


22 10 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sunday, April

ADMISSION 15 FREE


23 10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.


Fine Art & Crafts e Seafood Wildlife Exhibits.Live Music 5and Sculptors


Festival located on.Marine street along Carrabelle's iverwalk

For information-call: The Carrabelle Area Chamler of Commerce at (85o) 697-2585


r ^ r


t


I _ ____~_~ I~ ~~__~ ~~__~_ ~


L









Page 12 14 April 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


Senior Center from Page 1

a Neuro Nurse Specialist gave this Thursdays lecture and an-
swered the numerous questions from this weeks audience on
Strokes -how to prevent one, and what to do if you find your-
self or a loved one experiencing one. Check out their ad in this
issue of the Chronicle for what is planned for the coming Thurs-
days in the month of April. For more information about any of
these events you can call 1-866-220-1043. This added health
initiative has been via the influence of two new Advisory Board
i. Members-Don Nicholson M.D. and Thomas Schoborg M.D.
Neither of these gentlemen was looking for any publicity or
notoriety-but I thought that I would mention their names
anyway. The seniors are very grateful for their added support.
The aim of the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center Coun-
cil is to help the Seniors of this County meet their needs, both
social and physical, so that elderly members of the commu-
nity who live independently or require a few services can re-
main on their own and out of nursing homes. The center is for
all seniors, fifty and older.
The Council is a private, nonprofit agency. Their goal is to
help the senior citizens of Franklin County live life to the full-
est extent possible. They are emphasizing that this is now a
Senior Center for ALL seniors. All seniors in Franklin County
are encouraged to stop by-you are more than welcome. If you.
have some free time and you would like to help out, they would
,love to have you. If you have a skill or a craft that you would
like to share, you will be more than accommodated. THEY
NEED YOU!
If you have more money than you know what to do with, don't
be afraid to bring some of that along also.
The spacious building and all of its facilities can also be rented
for weddings or special occasions.
More information about the Franklin County Senior Citizens
Council and Center can be found at http//fcscc.org (Franklin
County Senior Citizens Council.org). This is a great website. It
will give you the whole story. So if you have been trying to
memorize this article STOP! You can find it all at fcscc.org.
Make some new friends and have some fun; become a part of
something. At the newly organized Franklin County Senior
Center remember, if you are fifty or older-THEY WANT YOU!


Orman House from Page 1


Tommy Davis is the Park Ranger who narrates the
history of the Orman Home. He welcomes people to
take the tour Thursday through Monday every hour
on the hour except noon. Mr. Davis received the
"Interpretive of the Year Award" for his interpretation
of the Orman House. His tours are interesting and
informative.


i.


This is where the Orman's used to socialize and
entertain family and friends. The furniture in this
room dates back to the 1800's. The piano dates back
to 1889.


This is the last surviving home of slaves that used to
work with the Thomas Orman family. There used to
be several on the grounds, when the Orman's ran the
home, but they have been lost to the ravages of time
and renovations.
a son named William. They moved here to Apalachicola. They
saw this piece of ground where this house sits; this is called
the bluff. It is the highest piece of ground here in Apalachicola.
They purchased this piece of property in 1836 and commis-
sioned to have this house built. It took two years to finish this
home so the Orman's moved in it in 1838. The house is built
of two native woods of north Florida, and they are heart pine
and cypress. Most of the foundation of the house is made of
cypress, and the rest of the house is built out of heart pine.
The lumber was actually cut to order out in New Orleans. This
was pretty typical during the time period, simply because there
were no sawmills in the south. But what they did, they took
the lumber out to New Orleans, they had it cut to measure.
They brought it back by ship and the house was built on loca-
tion. Even though it was already precut, it did take two years
to assemble the house; so it is dated 1838 the Orman Home.
"The house itself, is not a Victorian Home. This is a Federal
Reserve Greek Revival plantation home. The house basically
has four rooms, the main part of the house has 2 bedrooms
upstairs, and a dining room and a parlor that sits downstairs.
The area that we are in now is part of the original kitchen.
Keep in mind, that when the house was built, the kitchen was
not attached to the house. It was separate; it stood about 15
yards behind the house. That was done mainly for two rea-
sons. Number 1 because of the heat from cooking all day heated
this house up and that would make it unlivable in the hot part
of the summers. The second reason was simply because of
fire. There wasn't a fire department, so if the kitchen caught
on fire, it was better to lose your kitchen, than it was to lose
your whole house. So the kitchen was-detached. The kitchen
was brought forward and added to the house during the modi-
fications in the late 1890's.
"What makes this house amazing is that it was kept in the
original Orman family for 156 years! When I say that, I mean
Thomas and Sara, their son William and his wife Anna, Will-
iam and Anna's daughter, which was Thomas and Sara's only
grandchild, lived here all the way up to 1952 and then the
great-great grandniece, Mrs. Iona Orman Andrews, lived here
all the way up to 1994. So for 156 years, this house stayed
with the original family.
"In 1994, Mrs. Andrews made the decision to sell the house to
a local couple by the name of Doug and Anna Gaidry. Doug
was an attorney here in Apalachicola. They purchased the
house from Mrs. Andrews and they have done a lot of renova-
tions to the house. In 1995 the house was in really bad shape,
it was completely falling apart. The Gaidry's did major renova-
tions to it and after the renovations were finished they opened
the house as "Magnolia Hall Bed and Breakfast".
"For the next four plus years, the house was actually run as a
bed and breakfast. You could stay in the two guest rooms up-
stairs.,Mrs. Gaidry would fix breakfast for everyone in the house
in the morning. Lunch and supper were up to you she said,
but guests were welcome to use the kitchen. The only meal
she cooked was the breakfast..
"In 2000, or late 1999 the Gaidrys decided to sell the house
and move to Colorado. They put the house up for sale, and of
course, the state was interested in it simply because of the
history of Thomas Orman. They bought it in 2000 and opened
it in 2001 and been doing tours here ever since. The state is
in the process of doing some renovations to the house.
"Entering the first room, this is the dining room. Probably one
of the first things you notice when you enter the room is the
high ceilings. This housedoes have 11/2 foot ceilings; basi-
cally that was done for one reason, and that was simply to
keep the heat off of you during the hot part of the summers.
The ceilings, the crown moldings, and the cornice pieces you
see above the doorway are done out of poured plaster. The
plaster was actually a better insulator than wood and it helped
to keep the house cooler in the hot part of the summer. The
cornice pieces are patterned after the big magnolia you see
out back. Believe it or not, that tree was on the property back
in 1838 and across the street you noticed the Chapman Bo-
tanical Gardens. Well, Dr. Chapman was a good friend of
Mr. OrrIan, he told Mr. Orman that he wanted to do an ex-
periment with that magnolia tree. That tree started growing;
he cut all the limbs off that grew vertical, or straight up on it,
forcing the tree to grow out and low to the ground, rather than
grow up like a typical southern magnolia. So it is very uniquely.
shaped and, of course, Mr. Orman loved the magnolia so he
carried that pattern throughout the house. Even the fringe over
the front door is patterned after the big magnolia.
"Most of the furniture here was placed here by the Gaidry's
during the renovation period. The flooring throughout the house
is original heart pine that came from the long leaf pine. The
long leaf pine is pretty much gone today, simply because the
long leaf was used to make turpentine. They started working
those trees up around North Carolina for the pine gum and
after a couple of years, they would cut the trees down to use
the wood to build houses. Now this is the heart, or the center
of that pine. It was an excellent grade of wood to build houses


out of because it is very hard and durable and the resin in it is
so high that termites will not eat it. This floor has been re-
sanded and clear polyurethane put on it in 1995 when the
Gaidry's did the renovations. Other than that, it is original.
Now a lot of people have asked how old is the wood? This
house was built in 1838, the lumber that they used to put
down the floor was heart pine, probably long leaf pine that
may have been 200+ years old. You could probably date some
of this lumber back to the 1600's without any problem.
"Today the pines that you see are the slash pines, basically
the paper industry planted these and the wood that you get
from those-are not near as good as what you see here, the
heart wood from the long leaf pine. You will notice on this
floor, that there are very Yew knots in the wood; it is just an
excellent grade of lumber.
"Every room in the house basically looks like this room, even
the bedrooms upstairs. They are wide open and each has a
fireplace in it. Apalachicola did not have electricity until Au-
gust 22, 1900. So anything from 1838 until 1900 was non-
electric. There was no need for electricity. Basically the family
got up at sun up; they worked all day and at sunset they went
to bed.
"Above the fireplace you notice a portrait of a group of young
men from here in Franklin County. Believe it or not, they fought
for the Confederacy in the Civil War in 1861. William Orman,
Thomas and Sara Orman's only son is in the portrait. I men-
tioned that when they moved here to Apalachicola back in
1836, William was just an infant. Now by the time William was
old enough to go to school he went to Yale University. He had
a college education and came back here to be a lawyer. When
the Civil War broke out, William was one of the first in Franklin
County to enlist in the Confederate Army. He served as a Lieu-
tenant. After the war was over, William came back home and
instead of pursuing law he actually decided he wanted to be a
politician. He ran and was elected as Franklin County's repre-
sentative, later ran and was elected one of our Florida Sena-
tors.
"The gentleman in the lower left hand corner is John Gorrie
Jr.; his father was Dr. John Gorrie who invented the artificial
ice machine. The gentleman in the upper left hand corner is
Davie G.O.P. Raney, his father owned the 1836 Raney home.
Basically his father and Thomas Orman were the same thing,
they were cotton merchants, cotton brokers and they were
entrepreneurs. Those goods that they were getting from those
ships that came from Europe, they were selling them to the
locals here in Apalachicola. So they established a pretty good
trade in the city.
"Sadie, the granddaughter, added The Glass Room, or the
Judges Room as I call it, was added on in the late 1800's or
early 1900's for her husband Judge Griggs. This room was
added to the front porch at the same time the kitchen was
added to the rear of the house and the column porch extended
on the far side of the house. The Judge's room was built as an
office for Judge Griggs. Griggs was a sitting Circuit Judge and
lawyer. Family members donated the items displayed in this
glass case. They range from Thomas Orman to the great-great-
grand niece who was the last descendant to live here.
"The main entranceway to the house was located in the front
of the house, facing the river. The river used to be much higher
than it is now. Recent times have seen the Apalachicola River
diverted many different ways before it reaches the Gulf, there-
fore lowering the water level to where the river no longer runs
directly in front of the house now. As you enter the front door,
you see the stairway leading to the second floor. There are two
bedrooms that are exactly like the two rooms downstairs. At
the present time, we do not tour the upstairs of the home.
The next room is the parlor room. This is where the socializing
and entertaining was done. The furniture in this room dates
back to the mid 1800's. One of the sofas dates to 1840, the
other to 1850 and the piano dates 1889. You notice that the
arge window extends all the way to the floor and there were
no screens on the windows. This large window would give you
i nice breeze though the house on hot summer days. All the
-ooms have large fireplaces to heat the home during the win-
ter.
'The large painting over the fireplace in the parlor room is of
rhomas Orman, painted by a local artist from Apalachicola.
"The back room of the house, that was once part of the kitchen;
has been added on to and was the main living area for the
great grand, niece, and also for the Gaidrys when they lived
here and ran the bed and breakfast. This room also contains
the original coal burning fireplace.
"To give you an idea of what happened here in the city of
Apalachicola, the railroad industry started taking the cotton
industry away in the mid to late 1840's. The city turned to the
lumber industry as it struggled to survive. After the Civil War,
Apalachicola never fully recovered and by the late 1890's, the
lumber industry also vanished. In the early 1900's, the city
turned to the seafood industry. Today a lot of the residents of
Apalachicola still make their living from the shrimp and oys-
ters. In the last few years, the city has turned to tourism.
Many of the old homes have been restored and changed to
Bed and Breakfast businesses. Many of the old downtown
buildings are also being restored.
"The quaint town of Apalachicola lives on, well after the origi-
nal Orman Family has passed on. Most are buried in the Old
Chestnut Cemetery here in Apalachicola. I think Thomas
Orman and his family would be proud to say that they were an
important part of this wonderful city, and the house is still a
reminder of the days and life of the Orman family and what
they contributed to the city of Apalachicola."
Orman died in 1880 at 81 years of age, wife Sara born in 1805
and died in 1896. Son William was born in 1830 and died in
1888. Sadie, William's child, was born in 1869 died in 1952.
Admission to the tour is $2.00 per person. (children under 6
are free.) An hour long history presentation of the house since
1838 is part of the,tour of the Orman house.
The Historical Orman House is located in Apalachicola, off
U.S. 98 in the downtown historical section. From Panama City,
Take U.S. 9 east to Apalachicola. At the 3-way traffic light in
downtown turn left and follow the signs to the Orman House.
From Carrabelle, head west on U.S. 98, when you come to the
traffic light downtown Apalachicola, you will have the right of
way to go straight through the light and follow the signs to the
Orman House.
The Orman House is located 177 5th Street, Apalachicola
32325. Phone: 850-653-1209.


The "Glass Room" or "Judges Room" as it is also
called, was added on by Thomas Orman's only
granddaughter, Sadie. She added this rounded glass
walled room as an office for her husband Judge Griggs.
He was a sitting Circuit Court Judge and a lawyer. In
the room sits a glass case full of items donated to
the Orman House by original family members. They
range in items from Thomas Orman to his great-great-
frand niece who was the last descendant to live here.


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