Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00279
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: March 17, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00279
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text





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BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA, FL
32320
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Franklin 51





l Chronicle


Volume 15, Number 6 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER March 17 30, 2006

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FLAG RAISING: Jack Zurawke (right) furnished the
traditional patriotic music as the Florida Highway
Patrol, Carrabelle police, boy scouts and many oth-
ers raised the flag to begin the patriotic celebration.
Mayor Kelley hosted the opening exercises.

Camp Gordon Johnson
Celebrates World War II
Victory

2006 Commemoration Reflects Fresh Emphasis on
Victory and Heroic Veterans Who Made It Possible
Despite overcast skies, and cool breezes, the victory commemo
ration celebrated in Carrabelle brought out the crowds of pa
triotic citizens anxious to render heartfelt recognition to the
"greatest generation" once again on Saturday, March 11, 2006

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Several Color Guards participated in the Carrabell
Parade.
Registration of veterans visiting Carrabelle began Friday, March
10th at the Camp Gordon Johnson World War II Museum a
302 Marine Street. After 6 p.m. Friday night, the Americar
Legion Ladies Auxiliary in Lanark Village hosted a welcome
reception with entertainment provided by the "Not Quite Ready'
band. The big day was Saturday, March 1 1th beginning with
breakfast hosted by the Masonic Lodge on Avenue C, and fol-
lowed at 10 am with a flag raising at Veterans Park on high-
way 98. The parade began at 10:45 a.m.-At Noon, the dedica-
tion of the new Carrabelle fire truck on Tallahassee Street fire
station, followed by a free seafood luncheon, courtesy of the
City of Carrabelle. At 5 p.m. a dinner dance was staged at the
Senior Citizens Center, for a swinging night of entertainment
by the Tallahassee Swing Band. They played until 9 p.m. with
a nostalgic selection of tunes from the 1940s.

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It would appear that Mayor Kelley was among the
many who had a lot of fun on Parade Day.


SOUTHERN BELLES: As part of the Sons of
Confederate Veterans, these ladies wore traditional
dress reflecting memories of a conflict years earlier.


Continued on Page 7


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Inside This Issue
10 Pages
Camp Gordon Johnston Celebrates............. 1, 7
Auditor General Report .......................... 1, 5
Cape San Bias....................................... 1, 6
Franklin Briefs ......................................2, 3
Editorial & Commentary ........................... 3, 4
FCAN...................................................... 8
Business Card Directory ............................ 9
Bookshop .......................... .. ............. .... 10


Auditor General Report
On The Franklin County
District School Board
Released

For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2005
The annual audit of the Franklin County School Board was
released in late February 2006 by the Auditor General, Will-
iam 0. Monroe. The audit was conducted by Stanley B. Dillard,
CPA and supervised by Gregory L. Centers, CPA. The report
may be obtained at the web site http://www.state.fl.us/audgen
or by telephone at (850) 487-9024.
The findings of the audit are listed below, occasionally with
longer explanations, followed by responses from the Execu-
tive Director of the School Board, the Superintendent of
Schools, JoAnn Gander.
Finding No. 1: Information Technology-Access
Controls
An inadequate segregation of duties existed in that the finance
officer, responsible for reviewing and approving finance and
payroll transactions, was also the District's security adminis-
trator and, thereby, and full update capability to computer
flies. Absent compensating controls, these circumstances al-
low the finance officer control of the transaction process such
that errors or misappropriations, should they occur, may not
be detected in a timely manner.
Response/Proposed Corrective Action: We agree with this
finding. The personnel specialist responsible for the Gateway
Student Records System will be designated as security ad-
ministrator for the TERMS Finance and Payroll systems. As
she has no responsibilities for any of the duties associated
with these systems, placing her as security administrator over
them resolves the issue of inadequately segregated duties.
Finding No. 2 Collateral Management
We requested, but were not provided with, documentation to
evidence the District's compliance with State requirements
governing collateral management for public deposits..If a pub-
lic depositor does not comply with the requirements on each
deposit account, the protection from loss provided in Section
280.18, Florida Statute, is not effective as to that deposit ac-
count.
Continued on Page 5


Archaeology: A Side Bar
Archaeology is the study of the human past by analysis of the
material remains. It is a branch of anthropology, the study of
humankind's many cultures and societies from a bio-cultural
perspective. But unlike other anthropologists, archaeologists
usually cannot observe the behavior of the people they study,
and must reconstruct the past using the artifacts and other
evidence left behind. Archaeology investigates the human
past-in Florida human occupation spans the time from the
arrival of the first people, about 13,000 years ago, to the
e present.
h Many people collect stone tools, pottery, or other artifacts made
t by prehistoric Native Americans. But archaeologists do much
more than this. More important than the artifact itself are the
e pieces of information about it (size, shape, material, etc.) and
Sits context how deep, next to what other artifacts or ecofacts,
etc.). When archaeologists dig they look for other signs of hu-
man activity such as filled-in garbage pits or dark circles indi-
cating where posts were once placed in the ground. They col-
lect other materials such as tiny animal bones or charred seeds,
which might indicate diets or past environments. They exca-
vate extremely slowly so as not to destroy small clues, care-
fully recording soil colors and exact locations of every item,
drawing and photographing everything as they dig. For every
hour of digging archaeologists must spend up to 10 hours for
processing the materials and information. In the laboratory
artifacts are washed, sorted, classified, numbered, and re-
| corded on tables that show where they were found; micro-
scopic animal and plant remains are identified; maps are made:
and information is entered into computer programs. Char-
coal, and other remains are preserved for radiocarbon dating.
What is the state of archeological knowledge of the Cape San
* Blas region? The citations to the professional literature are
provided below.
a. The northwest coast of Florida has had two major surveys
since the turn of the century. C. B. Moore conducted several
surveys between 1901 and 1918 gulf coast. His primary inter-
est was ceremonial and largely ignored all the midden sites
along the coast.
b. The next survey was conducted by Gordon R. Willey and
was published in 1949. Willey's monumental 1949 publica-
tion remains the standard reference volume for this area. He
Swas responsible for detailing the ceramic chronology for the
Florida gulf coast.
c. 1960's, William C. Lazarus published several site reports
for this area. James J. Miller conducted a survey of nearby St
Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. In 1980, Jerald T. Milanich
and Charles H. Fairbanks published a volume summarizing
current knowledge of Florida archaeology.
Willey, Gordon W. 1949. Archeology of the Florida Gulf Coast.
Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Vol 113. Washington,
D. C. (This has been reprinted by the University of Florida
Press).
Lazarus, William C. 1964. The Postl's Lake II Site, Eglin Air
Force Base, Florida (OK-71) Florida Anthropologist; 17(1) 1-
16.
Miller, James J. et al. 1981. Archeological and Historical Sur-
vey of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge, Florida. U. S. Fish
and Wildlife Service, Region A, Atlanta.
Milanich, Jerald T. and Charles H. Fairbanks. 1980. Florida
Archeology. Academic Press, New York.
David S. Brose and Nancy Marie White. 1999. The North-
west Florida Expeditions of Clarence Bloomfield Moore. Uni-
versity of Alabama Press. (This volume is a reprint of the Moore
publications sold by the Chronicle Bookshop).


Cape San Bias Archeology:
A Forewarning
Publisher's Note: In the last issue of the Franklin Chronicle,
Geri Moore outlined the major appeals of the sugar beaches
that appealed to thousands of visitors to that peninsula.
In this issue, the Chronicle turns to the archives of arche-
ology and history of this region that may help temper the
frenzy generated by newspaper coverage of this area. There
is no question that the history of Florida was first recov-
ered from the ground, as state archeologist Calvin Jones
said when he practiced his professional craft, along with
the hundreds of other pros who have dug up Florida his-
tory and postulated conclusions based on evidence not
hearsay. Indeed, historical appeals are part of the reasons
for the escalating real estate prices in this area, some fac-
tual, others imagined. In reviewing the archeological evi-
dence, we find some stark revelations, as shown below.
For example in the Cape San Bias area, in particular those
areas managed by the Eglin Air Base, the erosion of the
land over the last 150 years has been very severe, as shown
in a 1994 study. The outline in dark lines shows the land
contour as measured in 1890, in contrast to the 1994 con-
tour, depicted in the map of the area. There is no reason
to expect that this erosion has not been continuing. Buy-
ers, of beachfront property, beware.



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ONTO OF THE LAND AS OF1994


Historical Development of the
San Bias Region
By Robert E. Johnson
Colonial Periods (1513 1820)
The numerous large bays of the northwest coast of Florida
invited exploration by sixteenth century European explorers.
The first Europeans to examine the area accompanied an ex-
pedition led by the Spanish explorer, Panfilo Narvaez, in 1528.
Because of his exploits in Mexico, Narvaez had been awarded
a patent by Charles V of Spain to settle Florida. After bringing
his expedition ashore at Tampa Bay, Narvaez sent his ships
ahead to the panhandle coast while he and his men marched
inland looking for gold, expecting to reunite. The rendezvous
never took place. In desperation, Narvaez and his followers
constructed handmade boats, which they attempted to sail to
Mexico. Eight years later three survivors reached Mexico City,
having made their way along the entire Gulf coast.
One of those survivors, Cabeza de Vaca, treasurer of the expe-
dition, wrote an account some eight years later of the ill-fated
voyage and journey of the survivors. A twentieth century his-
torian, George M. West, believes that a comparison between
geographic descriptions in the de Vaca narrative and local con-
ditions indicate that the Navarez expedition went ashore from
St. Andrews Bay in the late fall of 1529.

PART TWO OF TWO: GROWTH AND OUR SHORES

Florida's last frontier

feels growing pains


o00, 0he t.ib0 vlut. litld 6,0ulf C .n l 0.000. I$ 0. 0 005. th v t hid c0mbed to $2.6 hilon.
Cape San Bias sees land boom Workers
.. .....l ,. h... ld...... . and poor
.".'."".-. .".. ,... jb. being left
ThsB u~ed lo be ,-nile,!, ileer ndbeac hem mon
Fl.a ..," ...F.r ulk hi (....... ..... be in d
Co lul not anym ,re por county. ad AJn s behind
The 20-mile Ilre-ch of MrNair, a "retlr who I* jft '
1.r-hil n. fr- hcdnc Gulf Counlf'" ,-_ B, L.rM- '
nlv picked onZ o -ool loored E -nomic no
Ithr rIa'K.T.t bc't bl h cer IDveiopmnl Co uncdl "It
becau e of oIU remotenes' assets are aond and water
has bern transforrmed andpmletree"
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A subsequent expedition, led by Guido de las Bazares, con-
sisting of three vessels and sixty men, sailed from Vera Cruz
in 1558 and may also have entered St. Andrews Bay (West
1922) A year later, the Spanish Crown sponsored its first
effort to establish a permanent settlement in what is now
Flnnrida A rnnvn nF thirf pn shins enntlinin F500 soldiers.
Continued on Page 6


PHOTO BY GERI MOORE


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Page 2 17 March 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs

March 7, 2006

Present: Commissioner
Jimmy Mosconis;
Chairperson Cheryl
Sanders; Commissioner
Bevin Putnal;
Commissioner Russell
Crofton and
Commissioner Noah
Lockley, Jr.

Superintendent of
Roads
By Richard Noble
Mr. Herbert Chipman and his
County Road Dept. were once
again very busy. Between Feb-
ruary 17 and March 3, 1264
tons of lime rock were hauled
to various locations through-
out the County; 63 loads of
debris were removed; 261 yds.
of road material were hauled
-sand, yellow sand, black
dirt and asphalt: grass was
cut along hwy 98 and Wilder-
ness Road; miscellaneous
tasks were performed in all
areas of the County with con-
siderable attention being
given to the Carrabelle Ball
Park; several roads were
graded in both Carrabelle and
Apalachicola; culverts and
ditches received maintenance
in all areas of the County; a
new paved parking lot was
constructed at the
Apalachicola Court House
and two buildings were
pushed down; and dozens of
roads about the County re-
ceived maintenance and
needed TLC.
The ball park should be ready
to go for the '07 season. Mr.
Chipman explained that he
would be meeting with engi-
neers with regards to the Lake
Morality Rd. project it
should be getting under way
soon.

Franklin County Sheriff
Mike Mock appeared before
the Commissioners to explain
a continuing problem with ris-
ing medical costs of incarcer-
ated persons. He presented
the following data:


What 1 propose is this:
1. 2 PA visits per week
2. More MD involvement and
oversight
3. Unit dose medication sys-
tem
4. On site EKG machine
5. EMT on site 16 hours a day
seven days a week
6. CONMED covers all medi-
cation
7. CONMED covers all medi-
cal supplies
8. CONMED will cover all hos-
pitalizations capped at 55,000
per inmate per year.
9. CONMED will cover all x-
rays
10. CONMED will cover pro-
fessional liability insurance
for PA and MD and EMTs
while at your facility
11. CONMED's corporate rep-
resentative readily available
when needed.'
12. CONMED will provide
AED training for your officers,
as well as CPR training.
13. CONMED will provide an-
nual PPD testing for your staff
14. CONMED will instruct
your staff in areas such as
blood borne pathogens i.e.
HIV.
The annual cost for this ser-
vice is $356,670.00 as you
can see this is approximately
$150,000 above what you are
currently paying for, but you
are obtaining a much more
comprehensive on site pro-
gram in addition, these staff
members will be able to par-
ticipate in our 401k program,
share in CONMED employee
benefits etc.

IFAS Extension
Bill Mahan made the follow-
ing report:
Commercial Red 'Snapper
Update: The commercial fish-
ery for red snapper in Gulf of
Mexico federal waters opened
at noon, March 1, and will
close at noon, local time, on
March 10, 2006. The 2006
Gulf of Mexico commercial red
snapper quota is 4.65 million
pounds. The commercial fish-
ing season is divided into
spring and fall seasons. The
spring season began on Feb-
ruary 1, with 3.10 million
pounds available, and the fall


Average Daily County Inmate Population
Average Off Site Visits Per Month
7 Dental
5 Mental Health
3 Emergency Room
2 Health Department

Contracted Medical Provider
($ 1,000.00 per month)

Medical Supplies
(Pharmacy and Moore Medical Supply Co.)

Inmate Medical Care
Various Providers for the following services:


Doctor's Fees
(Hospital and ER Visits)
Hospital Admissions
Emergency Room Visits
Emergency Transportation
Air Med Transportation
Dental
Diagnostic & Lab


$S 16,264.83

$17,389.42
$16,821.11
$ 1,237.57
$ 8,170.00
$ 10,797.00
$17,956.33


Hunt's Insurance Group
Inmate Medical Insurance

TOTAL


He presented a proposal for
"outsourcing Inmate medical"
tasks with an organization,
ConMed, a private contractor.
There was about $75,000 al-
located in the current Sheriffs
budget for inmate medical but
the costs have risen to above
$175, 000.
The proposal from ConMed is
excerpted below:

CONMED Inc.
9375 Chesapeake Street
#203
La Plata, Maryland 20646
Dear Sheriff Mock,
I have worked up a medical
service plan for your facility.
As you know, you currently
have one PA visit per week and
your corrections officer is
passing the medications. In
our meeting we discussed how
this system is inadequate and
very open for litigation.


73
17





$ 12,000.00


$ 58,580.77


S 88,636.26


$16,709.42


$ 175,926.45


season begins on October 1,
with the remainder of the an-
nual quota available. During
the spring and fall seasons,
fishing will be allowed the first
10 days of each month until
the quota is caught. Prelimi-
nary landings data for Febru-
ary 1-10, 2006, totaled
296,835 pounds of red snap-
per landed. Therefore, a total
of 2,803,165 pounds remain
in the spring quota.
Goliath Grouper Update: On
March 3, 2006-The NOAA
Fisheries Service removed
goliath grouper from the spe-
cies of concern list because a
recent status report showed a
significant increase in abun-
dance to the U.S. population.
The report also showed the
species is reestablishing
throughout its historical
range. These positive en-
hancements are the results of
protective management mea-
sures started over a decade
ago by state and federal agen-


cies. However, in spite of this
positive news, the stock is still
considered over-fished under
the Magnuson-Stevens Fish-
ery Conservation and Man-
agement Act. Therefore, all
recreational and commercial
harvest is still prohibited.
FL Leads The Nation in Reg-
istered Boats: According to
figures released by the Na-
tional Marine Manufacturers
Association, earlier this year,
after years of trailing Michi-
gan and California, Florida
now is #1 in the number of
registered boats. More than
946,000 boats were registered
in FL, 944,800 in MI, and
895,000 in CA, in 2004.

Solid Waste Director
Van Johnson made the follow-
ing report:
"At the request of Commis-
sioner Crofton I have drafted
a policy for Board consider-
ation and approval governing
uncovered debris delivered to
the landfill for disposal. At-
tached you will find a copy of'
the proposed policy which
states in part that:
"All debris, regardless of type,
size or weight delivered to the
Franklin County Central
Landfill for disposal, must be
completely enclosed and se-
cured to the vehicle by tar-
paulin or similar material.
Uncovered debris delivered to
the landfill for disposal shall
be assessed a ten dollar
($10.00) per load fee. This in-
cludes debris delivered in
plastic bags."
The adoption of this policy
should help reduce roadside
litter by encouraging citizens
to use tarpaulins while trans-
porting debris to the landfill.
Also, any fees collected could
be used for litter removal.
The effective date if adopted,
will be April 7, 2006, this will
give staff enough time to place
notices with the media to in-
form the public of the new
policy.
The Board approved the pro-
posal.

Feasibility Study Update
Dave McLain reported to the
Board:
"I am here on behalf of your
oyster/s6a'food task force,"
explained Mr. McLain. "Mr..
Putnal who is a member of
that Task Force recommended
that we give you periodic re-
ports to let you know what we
are doing. The Task Force met.
on February 22 to, get the re
sults of the,,trip o Washing,, i
ton which was to seek fund-,,
ing that had been set aside for;.
the (damage from) hurricanes
from this past year. I am con-
fident that we have been suc-
cessful in getting their atten-
tion. Though we don't yet
know what the number will'
be, I am confident that we will'
have additional funding to
help us with the recovery pro-.
cess. We also received a brief-
ing from Lampel-Herbert, ex-
perienced consultants best
equipped to initiate the
OTTED study (Office of Tour-
ism, Trade and Economic De-
velopment-$75,000 grant to
fund Study). The Oyster Har-.
vesters Association will be
briefed by a Doctor Otwell
concerning post harvest treat-
ment of oysters. The Seafood,
Workers Association has re-
cently met and selected new
officers and approved new by-
laws. Mr. Putnal participated
in that process as well. They
will meet again on the 20th of
this month to discuss the
planning for re-laying. Finally,
Sen. Lawson's bill to replace
the Bag Tax with a line item
appropriation in this coming
budget will have its second
hearing before the Agriculture
Committee and the legislature
tomorrow morning at 9:
o'clock (March 8th, '06). I be-
lieve Chairman Sanders and
Commissioner Putnal will join
me and a couple of others up
there to speak in behalf of this
particular piece of legislation.
Are there any questions?"


There were no questions. Mr.
McLain then informed the
board that he or Grady
Leavins would be giving an
update at least once a month.

Clerk of Court
Marcia Johnson made the fol-
lowing report:
Unanticipated Revenues. The
$1,520,000 received from the
Dept. of Transportation for
maintenance of the old St.
George -Island bridge was re-
solved into the county budget.
Bay Aid Committee: Upon rec-
onciliation of the Bay Aid
Project Bank Account and
checkbook register, the cor-
rect balance to be brought for-
ward is $835.99.
In the future, checks written
from the Bay Aid Account
should have a detailed stub
left in the checkbook. The
stub should reflect all of the
same information on the
check as well as clearly defin-
ing qualifying individual. The
information on the check stub
remaining with the checkbook
must be correct, legible and
contain adequate detail. If a
check is voided, the check and
stub must remain in the
checkbook, should be clearly
marked void and not removed.
A register sheet should also
be kept of the Bay Aid Project
funds. This registry sheet
should contain check num-
bers and amounts, deposits,
and the running balance. This
registry will enable an easier
reconciliation process and
work to protect against over-
drawing the Bay Aid Account.
All applications and backup
documents are to be kept.
Auditors require the backup
documents to ensure that
funds were allocated cor-
rectly.
If you have any questions,
please call (850) 653-2275
Ext. 172.
Hospital: Ms. Johnson pre-
sented the latest expenses for
the Hospital payroll and gen-
eral expenses, as follows.


Franklin's Promise
Coalition
Bob Connors addressed the
Board:
"I wanted to address all of you
regarding 2 items
1. Food Pantry
2. Elder Care Services within
the County

Food Pantry
As you are probably aware, we
have been providing a Food
Pantry for the citizens of
Franklin County for approxi-
mately 31/2 years. Commis-
sioner Lockley has been out
to visit to see the Food Pantry
in action. We are housed at
the American Legion Hall on
98 and at the Carrabelle Un-
tied Methodist Church in
Carrabelle. We are open from
10-12 on Tuesdays in


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Apalachicola and on Thurs-
days from 10-12 in Carrabelle.
We are serving 75% of the, on
the average, 380 families per
month. 75% of the people
served are from Apalachicola/
Eastpoint/Island and the
other 25% are from Carr-
abelle, Lanark and Alligator
Point.
I'm not going to go into detail
today, but I will provide in-
formation to you through a
letter to Chairperson Sanders
and a copy to each of the Com-
missioners, Alan Pierce and
Marsha Johnson. In that let-
ter I have outlined three years
of growth and services, our
food cost, our operational
needs, as well as a volunteer
and a donations list. We are
requesting that you review the
documents and become famil-
iar with what we have been
doing over the last 3+ years.
In the body of the letter I am
asking for support from the
County Commissioners as
you approach your budget
planning for the 2006-2007
year. I am not asking for you
to fund the whole operation,
but rather be a partner with
us in our effort.
Thank you for your consider-
ation of our request.

Elder Care Services
The second reason I wanted
to address the Commission is
related to the Elder Care Ser-
vices for Franklin County. I
was here at the meeting that
Janice Wise of the Area
Agency on Aging for North
Florida, Inc. addressed the
Commission. At that time she
indicated that they would be
looking for some group to take
over the administration of
projects that are provided
Under their umbrella of ser-
.vices. The minimum services
required come under the
headings of:
* Community Care for the
Elderly (CCE)
* Medicaid Waiver (Home and
Community Services)


* Alzheimer Disease Initiative
(ADI)
* Home Care for the Elderly
(HCE)
* Services include
-"Meals on Wheels"
program
-Case Management
-Homemaker
-Respite
-Personal Care
-Emergency Alert
Response
-Consumable/durable
supplies
-Pest Control
-Environmental
Modifications
At that time, she brought up


the tact that the present man-
agement of the program is
provided by the Wakulla
County Senior Citizens Direc-
tor, RH Carter. This will come
to an end on June 30, 2006
and they will be looking for
another entity to take over the
leadership and management
of the services. She indicated
that they would come out with
a Request for Interest (RFI)
supposedly in March. If more
than one group shows an in-
terest, then as I understand
it, a Request for Proposal
(RFP) would be issued. At that
time all entities would be re-
quired to submit a proposal
and after review by the Agency
a grant would be awarded to
the group submitting the best
proposal.
SAt the same time that Janise
Wise was addressing the is-
sue, the name of Franklin's
Promise Coalition was
brought up as a group that
may be interested in the chal-
lenge of providing services. I
want to clarify this interest.
The reason we indicated that
we may be interested would
be if no one else from the
County showed an interest
and thereby services would be
halted or disrupted. Members
of our Board have a strong
commitment to the social ser-
vice needs of all citizens of this
County and they do not want
to see the minimum services
that are presently being pro-
vided to the Seniors not be
addressed.
Our Board has had Janice
Wise and her staff over to talk
to the Coalition regarding
what is required and how it
operates. Administrative Co-
ordinator and I have met with
RH Carter and he has pro-
vided us with a lot of infor.-
mation regarding the past and
present operation, as well as
some ideas for the future of
the program.
There are some members of
our Board encouraging us to
go forward as well' as some
members of the Community.
It is however a major under-
taking and we need to look at
our infrastructure in order to
determine whether we want to
embark on this journey. If we
decide to do it, I would like to
request that the County Com-
mission commit to budgeting
the $30,000 that you have
provided in the previous years
to support the program.
In addition, I would request if
we are the only responder to
the RFI that you provide us
with $10;000 to provide an
infrastructure to help us de-
velop a transition plan as well
as lay'thefoiundation -for the
futtlre of'the program.
,* AdministrativeSpace
* Administrative Office
establishment
* Walk in Freezer
* Establishment of 2 sites
-Apalachicola
-Carrabelle
* Hire Personnel
-Executive Director: 2 mths
-Finance Officer: 1 month
-Secretary: V month
-2 Case Workers: V2 month
Thank you for your attention
and if we undertake this'ac-
tivity, we hope you will play
an active role with us in try-
ing to provide appropriate and
fulfilling programs for all Se-
niors within the County of
Franklin."

Director of
Administrative Services
Mr. Alan Pierce made the fol-
lowing report:
Mike Dombrowski will be at
the April APTA meeting to pro-
vide an update on the costs
of beach renourishment.
The Area Agency on Aging will
be announcing a Request Of
Interest for groups interested

Continued on Page 3


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the G6ulf of Mexico. The house and I acre come with a doct and boat lift.
House amenities include "on demand" tankless water heater, oak cabinets,
vaulted tongue and groove ceilings, and whirlpool tub in master bath.
This acre offers 12.' of river frontage. Adjacent riverfront I acre tract
also available for purchase. MLSIFlo597. $(175,000.o0.
Freda White Moore-Licensed Real Estate Broker
Beth Barber-Realtor
Petra Myrick-Realtor
160 Laughing Gull Lane Carrabelle, FL 32322


Inmate Medical Expense
Fiscal Year Ending 09/30/205


HOSPITAL EXPENDITURES
I I I !
S HOSPITAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES I TD
;^ i TOTAL PAYROLL
-' DATE DESCRIPTION AMOUNT TOTAL YTD & OPERATING EXP
84,108.26
S 1/13/2006 Supplies 13,077.81 13,077.81J 190,323.24
1/17/2006 Supplies 39.374.62 52,452.43; 229,834.11
1/20/2006 Expenditures 5,040.00 57.492.43,
g' 1/23/2006 Expenditures 1,411.74 58,904.171
S 1/26/2006 Expenditures 23,454.67 235.84
S 1/31/2006 Expendilures 595.35 82,954.19'
2/2/2006 Expenditures 879.25 83833.44 .
2/7/2006 Expenditures 37,615.17 121.448.61) 401,192.15
2/15/2006 Expenditures,-,,-. ;10,948.52 132,397.13,
S 2/21/2006 Expenditures 52.408.60 184.805.73, ,. 561,610:88 ,,
S 2/24/2006 Expenditures 14,251.13 199,056.861 678,463.27
3/6/2006 Effendilures ... .. 4,989.97 204,046.831.
I 3/7/2006 Expenditures 39,606.11 243,652.94; 723,059.35
"I I I :
HOSPITAL PAYROLL

DATE DESCRIPTION AMOUNT TOTAL YTD
12/30/2005 Payroll 84,108.26 84,108.26 ,
1/13/2006 Payroll 93,137.17 177,245.43
1/13/2006 Payroll Processing 136.25 177,381.68
1/27/2006 Payroll 102,361.86 279,743.54.
2/10/2006 Payroll 97,061.61 376,805.15;
2/24/2006 Payroll 102,601.26 479,406.41


Rsident1ciai


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ELECTRIC CL.,LLC

850.927..4610



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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


17 March 2006 Page 3


Briefs from Page 2

in running the stood programs
that Ms. Wise spoke of re-
cently. Bob Conner is here to
tell you that his group,
Franklin's Promise, will put a
request in, although they pre-
fer that some other group step
forward. However, he needs 3
things: commitment of
$30,000 of program money in
next year's budget; assistance
in office space for 3 employ-
ees; and $10,000 in start-up
money in this year's budget
because he will start getting
organized in May or June,
which is before the county's
budget year is over.
Conner's report is published
elsewhere in the Franklin
Briefs.
Mr. Seth Blich, will be at the
March 21 Board meeting to
discuss hunting on Little St.
George. Also at that meeting,
there will be a representative
from St. Vincent to discuss
hunting and the red wolves on
St. Vincent. Both items are on
the agenda.
"I signed an approval for the
City of Carrabelle to construct
3 crossings of River Road
through directional borings,
and to place a sewer force
main on County Road 67. I
received a copy of the hold
harmless agreement that the
City has with its contractor,
and the City will provide the
same agreement with the
County. The work had already
commenced by the time the
documents were received in
the Planning Office."
Board action to release the
letter of credit for the roads
in The Reserve at Magnolia
Ridge. Preble-Rish has re-
viewed the test results and
approved them. The Board
approved.
Board action to release the
letter of credit for the roads
in Rivercrest Phase I. Preble-
Rish has reviewed and ap-
proved the test results. The
Board approved. Provide
Board with copy of letter from
St. Joe Community Founda-
tion extending the grant time
line.
The Board.authorized the ad-
vertising of bids for C-30A and
Lake Morality Road. Prelimi-
nary construction estimates
are $2.8 million for both
projects which means that if
the bids come in at or near th
estimates the Board will need
more than the $,1 Million set
aside for these two projects.
The projects are 50% match
by the state, so the state
would pay $1.4 Million and
the county would pay $1.4
Million if the bids meet the
construction estimates. There.
are some changes that can be
made to reduce costs if nec-
essary.
The Board approved the fee
proposal for architectural ser-
vices for the renovations to
the Courthouse contingent.
The fees total approximately
10% of estimated construc-
tion costs, which is consistent
with current fee schedules for
architectural services.
The Board approved Interlocal
Agreement between Franklin
County and Eastpoint Sewer


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


ana water for the use of a
portion of the Road Depart-
ment property for a potable
water well. The county is not
charging a lease and in ex-
change Eastpoint will provide
a free commercial water tap
and no charge for the water
used. Board action contingent
upon the County Attorney
approving Agreement.

County Attorney
By Richard Noble
J. Michael Shuler reported to
the Board:
"...to advise the Board the
Comp Plan Challenge hearing
ended last week in Tallahas-
see. We do not expect a judg-
ment regarding the matter
until May of this year ... I want
to advise the Board that Gen-
eral Electric has filed a claim
against the County and I will
be responding to that com-
plaint." Due to the involve-
ment of other Counties in the
GE action which concerns the
Weems hospital situation, the
complaint is being handled in
Gadsden County. Mr. Shuler
explained that he is request-
ing a change of venue. Ms.
Sanders asked Mr. Shuler if
it would be better to join in
with the other Counties in-
volved with the suit. Mr.
Shuler suggested that it would
not. "I am more, comfortable
defending a case against
Franklin County in Franklin
County if, in fact, I am suc-
cessful in this change of
venue ... They want to do two
things. They (GE) are asking
to set aside as a fraudulent
transfer, the transfer of the
Hospital license from DasSee
to Franklin County because
they are saying that insuffi-
cient monies were paid (for the
license by the County); and
secondly they are saying that
the County has acted as a
joint tort with DasSee (in com-
bination with DasSee). You
will remember that the only'
reason that GE is after
DasSee is because they
loaned DasSee money to op-
erate the hospital. As security
for that loan they took certain
collateral ... The real issue
that we are fighting there is
the Hospital license. I think
that the license has no value
but it will take an appraiser
to determine that." The case
at this time is being heard by
Judge Renoylds in Gadsden
.County. "They made a bad
loan (GE) and they haven't
managed it well and I thirik
that they have some finance
officers that need to be fired."
Also at issue is the County's
liability in relation to the debts
of the DasSee corporation.
The County, of course, as-
sumes no liability but GE sees
it otherwise.
Mr. Mosconis pointed out that
the hospital license was is-
sued, not sold as a commod-
ity. It was his opinion that this
then disqualifies it as a com-
modity with a cash value.
"This is just a part of their
(GE) strategy to get some
money out of somebody." Mr.
Shuler then went on to ex-
plain that the hospital admin-
istrator (Mr. Mike Lake) may
have obtained this loan from
GE with questionable security
- the County had no say in


,vt POST OFFICE BOX 590
S EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
6 YFacsimile 850-670-1685
toN e-mail: hoffer531@gtcom.net

THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.
Vol. 15, No. 6 March 17, 2006
Publisher ..................... Tom W. Hoffer
Director of Operations ..........Andy Dyal
Contributors ......... ........ .Skip Frink
Geri Moore
Carol Noble
Richard Noble
Dawn Radford
Photographers ................ Diane Beauvais Dyal
Geri Moore
Advertising Design and
Production Artist .. ........... .Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate ...........Jerry Weber

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein ................. Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis ................Apalachicola
Skip Frink .......................Carrabelle
David Butler ..................... .Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung ...........Eastpqint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins .......Eastpoint
Barbara Revell ................... Lanark Village
Richard Harper ................. St. George Island


Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue
would cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the
Chronicle for price quotes if you seek several different
or similar issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96
including tax. Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26
including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2006
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


the matter.
The license is important for
many reasons. One reason
has to do with Medicare pay-
ments. These payments
amount to hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars and the Fed-
eral Government will not for-
ward this money until this is-
sue is resolved and they have
a legitimate payee.
"Also there is the Wilson vs.
Franklin County case. They
are seeking to do away with
the public beach on St. George
Island. This suit was filed by
a William Wilson up in Talla-
hassee. He is represented by
two attorneys. That case is
pending. My motion to dis-
miss will have a hearing on
March 27 and 28th. Hopefully
the judge will see it our way
and dismiss the law suit. They
are asking the court to reform
the plats of units 1, 2, and 3
- St. George Island Gulf
Beaches." This would turn the
beach between the lots and
the Gulf over to the property
owners rather than being a
part of the County's public
access/beach area. There had
been a previous action simi-
lar to this issue which has
since been settled to the fa-
vor of the County. This case
was concerned with sections
of the public beach and cer-
tain street endings.
Mr. Mosconis then expressed
an interest in the County be-
ing able to recoup attorney's
fee and court costs on the
contention that people trying
to claim ownership of public
beaches is an issue long ago
decided on by the State of
Florida. He considered these
suits to be of a frivolous na-
ture. "To me that was a bo-
gus law suit and they ought
to pay our taxpayers from this
County for the debt they
made." Mr. Shuler informed
Mr. Mosconis that he had a
motion pending dealing with
that very notion.
"This Wilson case is Franklin
County's first class action law
suit. Franklin County has now
hit the big time. Lucky us!"
Mr. Shuler then commended
Alan Pierce and Mr. Ken
Osborne for their positive
roles in the Comp Plan chal-
lenge case.
The new ambulance contract
was then discussed. It was
concerned with duration,
maintenance of equipment
etc. "Probably the most impor-
tant part (of the new contract)
-deals with the ambulance ser-
vice leaving the community
during a time of disaster."
Language was added to deal
with that negative happen-
stance. Mr. Shuler then rec-
ommended the contract for
approval by the Board. The
contract was approved.
Mr. Shuler then provided the
Board with a proposed sales
tax plan that had been sug-
gested to him by the Board in
past sessions. The bill is to
assure that the monies col-
lected within the County
would go directly to subsidize
the hospital and not to any
city or County general ex-
penses. This was for the at-
tention of the Board and will
be discussed in greater detail
at the next County Commis-
sion meeting. This idea will be
put before the voters next
November.
The next issue dealt with the
Revolving Loan program
which was set -up several
years ago. The Apalachee Re-
gional Planning Council had
been contacted to collect bad
debts from a revolving loan
program which was enacted


several years past. The Coun-
cil states that since their con-
tract has since been termi-
nated they have no obligation
to collect any past debts or
delinquent monies. It seems
that they think this is the
County's responsibility of
course the County feels just
the opposite. Ms Sanders said
that she would bring the is-
sue before the Council at the
next meeting of the Council.

Toronto vs. Roux
Ms. Toni Toronto and Delores
Roux had a rather atypical
confrontation at this week's
Commission meeting. The de-
bate involved the interpreta-
tion of zoning requirements
with regards to a property on
The Bay City Road. "This is on
the same property which the
property owners last year
wanted to place commercial
boat storage units in an area
zoned for 'Single Family Home
Industry' R-4," said Ms.
Toronto in a prepared state-
ment. "With so many of the
neighbors objecting to this
commercial business in this
zone, it is apparent that the
owners have changed their
tactics. Last year, in March,
the owners applied for and
received a permit to build a
525sq,ft. heated area house.
The site plan showed an area
for approximately 33 boat
storage units. When neigh-
bors objected before the
County Commission, Chair-
man Sanders requested that
before any permits on this
property be granted, that she
wanted it brought before the
Board. Alan Pierce stated that
he ... would. On March 23,
2006 the property owners ap-
plied for and received a per-
mit to build a second 528
sq.ft. house on the property
.. next to the existing one.
When the first house was
completed a sign was installed
in front of the building. The
sign advertised weekend and
weekly rental. It is apparent
that the owners intend to have
these two units used as tran-
sient rentals for fishermen
and/or short time visitors.
According to the zoning code
handbook, the intent of the R-
4 zone is for single family
homes which maintain and
support home-related activi-
ties associated with fishing
which occur in or near the
Family residence and for cer-
tain cottage industries." It is
Ms. Toronto's contention that
this type usage does not con-
form to the R-4 zoning and
would be more suitable to the
C-3'commercial zoning. She isg
also extremely unhappy that
"the neighbors" were not no-
tified when new site plans
were submitted and building
permits were issued as was
promised. This property is
said to contain 19 acres. Ms.
Toronto wants to know if this
means that there will be 19 of
these rental units eventually
on this property -and if so,
is this within the zoning regu-
lations. She thinks not; and
would like a stop-order/ and
or fine placed on this second
property. "I request that these
property owners and any fu-
ture owners of this property,
be denied any farther permits
for either transient rentals,
boat storage units, or any
other building or facility that
is not allowed in this zone ac-
cording to the handbook."
At the last County Commis-
sion meeting Attorney
Yonclas, who was sitting in for
Mr. Shuler, was assigned the
duty of bringing to the Board
a legal recommendation. Mr.
Yonclas found that he.could
not, due to a personal conflict
of interest.


JOHN'S
CONSTRUCTION


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RG0050763
RC0051706


Mr. Shuler was then given the
assignment. Ms. Toronto
asked if Mr. Shuler would also
meet with the neighbors as
Mr. Yonclas had agreed. He
said that he would.
It was at this point that local
resident and long time busi-
ness owner Delores Roux
came forward to speak on the
issue. "It seems strange to me
that you would use the
County's money and the
County's time for a personal
vendetta. .1 don't see where
this Board has anything to do
with this. I'm Delores Roux
and I am the owner of this
property. This lady (Toni
Toronto) is the wife of my
brother and she hates my
guts! And that is exactly why
she is here."
"Ms. Roux at the last meet-
ing," Ms. Sanders explained in
a very soft-spoken, respectful
manner, "the Board decided,
at that time, to have Mr.
Yonclas look at this and see if
Mr. Pierce followed proper
procedure in issuing the per-
mit for your land. That is what
we are looking at here to
make sure that Mr. Pierce did
follow proper procedure on R-
4 zoning."
"Well," Ms. Roux offered in a
very sweet tone. "I think that
all of you should be com-
mended for your patience,
your time and everything that
you have done to accommo-
date this poor mentally de-
ranged woman ..." Ms. Roux
had turned her head in order
to direct her remarks to her
sister-in-law. Ms. Toronto sat
with her hand to her mouth,
pink-faced in what can only
be described as total shock
and embarrassment.
"Thank-you, Ms. Roux," Ms.
Sanders interrupted. "Thank
you very much ... but..."
"Would you, Mr. Shuler, hand
this to the Chairman," Ms.
Roux requested of the County
Attorney, holding out a pack-
age containing a tube of
Chapstick.
"No, I don't think I can do
that," Mr. Shuler responded.
Ms. Roux then tossed the
Chapstick towards the area in
front of Chairman Sanders.
"Thank you," Ms. Sanders
said courteously.
"You are welcome," responded
Ms. Roux in a contained, con-
trolled voice, "I really want to'
thank-you because I think
that you, honey, havte..."
My boss says that it would not
be appropriate to express Ms.
Roux sentiment in her exact
words. So be it suffice to say,
that it was Ms. Roux's vitu-
perative opinion that Ms.
Sanders was in need of a
Chapstick to sooth her lips
because of her overly accom-
modating, gracious, under-
standing, community spirit.
Mr. Mosconis suggested that
this was more of a family dis-
agreement and something
that could not be settled by
the Board. He felt that it was
a matter that could best be
handled by a civil court or by
the parties between or among
themselves.
Mr. Crofton suggested a Pub-
lic Hearing on the issue or to
have Attorney Shuler study
the issue and return with a
recommendation to the Board
as Mr. Yonclas had been ad-
vised to do at the previous
meeting.
At the previous meeting and
at this meeting, Mr. Pierce
stated that it was his opinion
that there was no violation of
the R-4 zoning code by Ms.
Roux and that other action
should be taken by Ms.
Toronto.
Ms. Toronto asked that the
County Attorney be asked to


850-697-2376
Fax: 697-4680


examine the zoning code with
special attention to page 66
where R-4 zoning is clarified.
"If you can not see a differ-
ence between residences and
rental units, then that is not
my problem," she suggested.
"Alan do you have a recom-
mendation?" asked Mr.
Mosconis.
'The County does not distin-
guish between short term
rental and long term residen-
tial use," answered Mr. Pierce.
"A house can be built in R-4
- a minimum lot size is 450
ft, the size of a small mobile
home. The county does not
have a standard on how long
a person has to live there or
whether the owner has to live
in the residence. The city of
Apalachicola does distinguish
between short term rentals
and permanent residences -
and they prohibit that sort of
activity in certain sections of
the City. So people get con-
fused sometimes about what
is allowed in the City and what
is allowed in the County. The
County does not have any
guidelines about the rental of
residential property."
Mr. Mosconis then pointed
out that the rental of resi-
dences was a common prac-
tice throughout the County
and a common practice out on
,St. George Island.
"This Board does a lot of
things, but we do not mitigate
family squabbles," said Chair-
man Sanders.
Mr. Putnal suggested that this
type problem was not solvable
on the basis that a person has
the right to do as he wishes
with his own home whether
he chooses to rent it or live in
it is his business.
Mr. Crofton offered the opin-
ion that it was the rental signs
sitting outside of the residen-
tial units that offended him.
Some of the Board members
chuckled and suggested that
Mr. Crofton pay closer atten-
tion to the roadside in his Is-
land district on his way home
to the Plantation.
Mr. Shuler agreed with and
supported the argument of
Alan Pierce, but yet the debate
went-round and round. It was
finally decided to ask the
county Attorney to give the
issue one final examination
and return at the next County
Commission meeting with his
legal opinion on the matter.






















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:Pae 4 17 March 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


Letter To The Editor

February 7, 2006
Letter to the Editor:
After a late afternoon visit to Weems Hospital Emergency room
on Monday, February 6, I have a deep appreciation of the care,
concern and capability of the staff.
This hospital is a great asset to Franklin County and should
be maintained with an even higher priority of our resources
than roads, drainage, etc.
Ben Revell
Carrabelle


Library Happenings

By Judi Rundel
LIBRARY HOURS
Eastpoint: Tue., Wed., Thurs. 10 am-6 pm;
Fri. 11 am-7 pm; Sat., Sun., Mon. Closed
Carrabelle: Tue. 11 am-7 pm; Wed., Thurs., Fri. 9 am-5 pm;
Sat. 10 am-2 pm; Sun., Mon. Closed
The Franklin County Public Library's calendar of events and
happenings is as follows:
Saturday, March 18th-The Franklin County Public Library's
TIGERS and WITH-IT! students will participate in the Lanark
Village 50Lh Anniversary craft fair.
Monday, March 20th-The library's Advisory Board will hold
its regular monthly meeting at the Eastpoint branch begin-
ning at 5:30 p.m. The public is welcome to attend.
Every Monday and Friday, 10:00 a.m. 12:00 Noon-The
FROG Family Learning Program holds GED classes in
Apalachicola at the Library's program site (148 8th Street-in
the New Life Center). Call Jhaki at 670-4423 for more infor-
mation.
Every Tuesday and Thursday, 5:00 6:00 p.m.-The FROG
Family Learning Program holds GED classes at the Eastpoint
branch of the library. Call Jhaki at 670-4423 for more infor-
mation.
Every Thursday-"Read To Me" reading to pre-school chil-
dren is held at the Eastpoint branch from 11:00 11:30 a.m.
Ms. Tonia delights young children and their caregivers with
one half hour of stories from the many books in the library's
collection. For further information, call Tonia at 670-4423.
Every Friday-The young adult book club at the Carrabelle
branch, held from 2:30 4:00 p.m., helps young people find
the best books to read. The TIGERS students have an oppor-
tunity to participate in this new activity but all teens are wel-
come. For more information, call Tonia at 697-2366.
The Franklin County Public Library's programs-FROG, WITH-
IT! and TIGERS-are offered at no cost to participants. Regis-
tration however is required. For information about the Library
and many of its programs, please call 697-2366, 670-8151, or
i653-2784 or view the Library's website located at
www.franklin.lib.fl.us.


Sewer Watch Help Soue


: By Sue Cronkite ,
'Four Franklin County corn-
munities are seeking assis-
tance of residents to watch
"candy cane" vents for prob-
lems with Vacuum Sewer Sys-
tems. Apalachicola, Eastpoint,
Carrabelle, and Lanark Village
all have the vacuum systems.
Eastpoint is one of the oldest
of such systems and has been
in operation since around
1973.
In a press release titled "Ev-
eryone Can Assist" the City of
Apalachicola and ESG Opera-
tions asked for help in locat-
ing problems with the system.
"If you see a candy cane vent
leaning or missing, it will or
is currently causing a prob-
lem," the press release states.
"If you see a cleanout cap
missing or broken, it too, will
or is causing a problem. If you
are near a valve pit and hear
a loud continuous hissing or
sucking noise, it also will or
is currently causing a prob-
lem. To report any of these
conditions please call
Apalachicola City Hall at 653-
9319 or ESG Operations at
653-6847."
Only 200 communities in the
United States and 400 foreign
communities operate Vacuum
Sewer Systems, according to
the press release. The vacuum
sewers are one of several al-
ternative sewer system de-
signs approved by the Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency.
In the late 1990s, after spend-
ing a great deal of money to
patch and repair the existing
gravity sewers in
Apalachicola, the city con-
ducted several studies and it


was concluded approxi
SO percent of the old .
system-should beTeple
Upon further study, a v
style design was chose
a common gravity design
chosen, deep holes
have had to be dug and
streets, along with oti
isting utilities woulc
been taken out of sen
many weeks or mont]
cording to the press re
In order to explain
vacuum system the pr
lease described sever
components. A vacuu
tion is where the "Vacu
created using pumps. E
pumps are also located
vacuum stations. The
transport collected
through a pipeline
wastewater treatment
for treatment and disp
Electrical controls
standby emergency gel
are located at the vacuum
tion. All these devices ;
tomatic and will work
electrical power is lost
the vacuum station, v
collection lines are in
throughout the city t
consumer.
At each consumer locz
"Valve Pit" accepts s
from, homes, busine
other type of structure
pit becomes the interfe
tween the city's vacuum
and the consumer's
sewer. The valve pit has
mal capacity of 30 gallo
operates on a much loI
pacity of 10 gallons.
At each pit is. loca
"Vacuum Valve." The


rely on the vacuum pressure
to function and are operated
automatically, based on the
liquid level in the pit. Further,
the vacuum available to each
pit is important to the con-
sumer, since it will not func-
tion if vacuum pressure is
lost.
If pressure is lost or low
vacuum occurs, the most
common cause may be the
result of the following factors:
Excessive flows from outside
the pit area. Some of these
causes are older leaking
plumbing, connections of
down spouts, broken or miss-
ing vent pipes (called "candy
-canes), and one of the most
common is broken cleanouts.
Also stuck-open valves cause
by large debris entering the
sewer system.
Another common condition is
called "waterlogging." A Wa-
terlogged vacuum system will
not operate correctly. A large
percentage of the problems
reported on the system can be
traced to issues associated
with waterlogging resulting
from broken cleanouts or low
pressure created by open
valves as a result of large de-
bris.
The City of Apalachicola asks
that problems seen by those
in the community be reported,
especially a cleanout cap
missing or broken, or a hiss-
ing or sucking sound coming
from a valve pits. The num-
bers to call include
Apalachicola City Hall at 653-
9319 or ESG Operations at
653-6847.

Tyndall

Sets Gate

Times For

Gulf Coast

Salute

Tyndall Air Force Base will
open its gates to the public at
9 am. April 22 to 23, to cel-
ebrate Gulf Coast Salute
2006, "Thunder over the
Gulf."
This vear's air show will kick


off events April 22 at 10:40
Sam. with an official welcome
iht by Brig. Gen. Jack Egginton,
325th Fighter Wing com-
mander, followed by the first-
mately aerial demonstrations at 11
gralvty am..
aced.
The weekend's events will be
acuum highlighted by the U.S. Air
n: Had Force Demonstration Squad-
in been ron, "Thunderbirds'. This pre-
would miere demonstration team will
I entire perform precision aerial ma-
her ex- neuvers to exhibit the capa-
i have abilities of the F-16 Fighting
vice for Falcon to audiences through-
hs, ac- out the world. The team has
lease. utilized this modern high-per-
n theformance aircraft throughout
n the their 20-year history.
ess re-
ral key The two-day event will also
m sta- feature a wide variety of mili-
tum" is tary and civilian aerial perfor-
Sewage mances. The action includes
Sat the breathtaking jumps by the
pumps U.S. Army "Golden Knights."
waste An array of civilian flying per-
to the former, including interna-
Splant tional aerobatic champion
)osal. Patty Wagstaff, will do their
and a aerial magic and military avia-
nerator tion heritage will be show-
iersta- cased. Numerous ground air-
im sa- craft and attractions will be
eau- available for 'young and old
w Fren alike. There will be plenty of
. various food, gamesandattractions to
stalled make this year's event a
stalled memorable one for the entire
o each family.

action a Admission and parking are
Safree. Shuttle bus transporta-
sewage tion will be provided from the
:ss, or
es. The parking area to the flightline.
ace be- Security will be emphasized:
sewer no pets, weapons, glass
gravity bottles or containers will be
a nor- allowed. Small coolers and
ns but backpacks will be permitted,
wer ca- but are subject to search.
For additional information,
,ted a check out the Gulf Coast Sa-
valves lute 2006 official Website
linked to our home page at
http://www.tyndall.af.mil or e-
mail pacontacts@tyndall.af.mil.


Beware Of

Jury Duty

Scam

By Sue Cronkite
So many people try to skip out
of jury duty that a new scam
to get people's personal infor-
mation has been mushroom-
ing. In the con, someone calls
pretending to be a court offi-
cial and threateningly says a
warrant has been issued for
an arrest because the person
didn't show up for jury duty.
When the person receiving the
call says they never received
a summons for jury duty, the
scammer asks for the Social
Security number and date of
birth so the information can
Sbe verified and the arrest war-
rant cancelled. Sometimes
they ask for credit card infor-
mation.
Do not give out information on
the telephone. This scam is
particularly insidious because
the caller tries to use intimi-
dation over the phone and
bully people into giving infor-
mation by pretending they are
with the court system. The
Federal Bureau of Information
and federal court system have
issued nationwide alerts on
their websites, warning con-
sumers about the fraud.
Court workers never call to
ask for Social Security num-
bers and other private infor-
mation. In fact, courts issue
summons for jury duty by
mail. If the person doesn't
show up, then a follow-up
goes out through the mail. In
Franklin County the notice
which comes in the mail gives
a telephone number to call if
you have a valid excuse for not
serving on a jury.
The jury duty scam is the lat-
est in a series of identity theft
scams where scammers use
the phone to try to get people
to reveal their Social Security
number, credit card numbers
or other personal information.
Another recent one was where
the caller claimed to be from
the local bank and asked for
an account number "for veri-
fication."
One variation was to claim
that the person had just won
a great deal of money and it
would be deposited in the ac-
count, when the account
number was provided, of
cl6otitr'e'' Other scainom ers
claimed the person had
money left from some un-
known relative, but must pay
an amount first as "earnest
money." Many elderly people
fell for that one.
It may be that greed plays a
large part in the "pay earnest
money" scam and in the
"you've won a jackpot" scam.
The bottom line is that people
should NEVER give out bank
account numbers or credit
card numbers to anyone on
the telephone. Exceptions be-
ing when you call a company
yourself to order an item and
provide a credit card number.
Even PayPal, E-bay's suppos-
edly "secure" way to buy and
sell, has been targeted by
scammers who send an e-mail
demanding personal informa-
tion. I received such a mes-
sage in my e-mail and imme-
diately following it was a note
from the real PayPal telling me
to go to their web page to sign
in.
The phone and e-mail at-
tempts to obtain personal in-
formation canbe categorized
as a "social engineering"
scam-a technique which
preys upon people's unques-
tioning acceptance of author-
ity and willingness to cooper-
ate in order to extract from
them sensitive information.
In the "jury duty" scam people
need to remember that even
if local court personnel were
to have a reason to call them
at home, they would never ask
for a Social Security number,
credit card number, bank ac-
count number, or date of
birth.


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After being alerted that the
scam was going on in one
area, the scammers changed
their tactics and said they
were gathering information to
set up a jury pool for the next
term of court. That's not the
way it is done. Potential jurors
are picked from voter files and
notices are sent in the mail.
Do not give out personal in-
formation on the telephone if
you did not initiate the call,
whether it is someone trying
to sell you something or some-
one who claims to be from a
bank or government depart-
ment, or someone who claims
you have "won" something.
If the callers insist they need
to "verify" information, ask


them to read the date to you
from their notes. They will
usually hang up when you
make that request. If they
don't, ask for their name,
company, and their telephone
number.
Report such calls to the
Franklin County Sheriffs of-
fice, (850) 670-8500, to the
County Clerk's office (850)
653-8861. County State
Attorney's office (850) 653-
8181, or to the state Attorney
General's office in Tallahassee
(850) 414-3300.
Also, examine your credit card
and bank statements every
month, looking for unautho-
rized charges or withdrawals.
Immediately challenge items
you did not approve.


DRIVER LICENSE AND VEHICLE INSPECTION CHECKPOINTS
AUTHORIZATION
OULNCY DISTRICT
March 7, 2006

Iv embers in Troop H, Quincy district, are hereby authorized to conduct driver license/vehicle
in sp.'ction checkpoints during daylight hours at the following locations(s):
DATE(S) LOCATIONS)
GADSDEN COUNTY
o-.ol- -04-06-06 SR 10(US 90), SR 12, SR 65, SR 267, Fantana Trail
0 -07-06-04-13-06 SR 269, CR 65, CR 157, CR 159, Fantana Trail
0 -14-06-04-20-06 CR 161, CR 270, CR 270-A, CR 274, Fantana Trail
04-21-06-04.27-06 CR 268, Brickyard Road, Joe Adams Road, Selman Road, Palmer Road
04-28-06 04-30-06 SR 10(US 90), SR 12, SR 65, SR 267, Fantana Trail


DATE(S) LOCATIONS(S)
LIBERTY COUNTY
04 01-06 -04-06-06 SR 267, SR 12, Camel Lake Road, Myers Ann St., River Road, CR 67
04 07-06 04-13-06 SR 65, CR 67A, CR379 (Hoecake Rd.), Joe Chason Rd., Turkey Creek Rd.
04.14.06 04-20-06 SR 67CR, CR 270 (MLK Rd.), CR 2224 (Blue Springs Rd.), Freeman Rd.
04.21-06- 04-27-06 SR 20, CR 1641 (Dempsey Barron Rd.), White Springs Rd., Pea Ridge Rd.
04 .28-06 04-30-06 SR 267, SR 12, Camel Lake Road, Myers Ann St., River Road, CR 67


DATE(S) LOCATIONS(S)
WAKULLA COUNTY
04 01-06 -04-06-06 SR 30(US 98), SR 375, SR 61(US 319), SR 267, and Cajer Posey Road.
04 07.06- 04-13-06 SR 363, SR 369, SR 377, SR 372 CR 375
04 14-06- 04-20-06 SR 299, SR 385, CR 61, CR 370, CR 373, Trice Lane
04 21-06 04-27-06 CR 372, CR 372A, CR 372B, CR 373A, CR 365
04 28-06-04-30-06 SR 30(US 98), SR 375, SR 61(US 319), SR 267, and Cajer Posey Road.


LOCATIONS(S)
FRANKLIN COUNTY
4-01-06 -04-06-06 SR 30, SR 30A, SR 65
(4-c7-o6- 4-13-06 SR 384, SR 67, SR 377
0-.14.06- 04-20-06 CR 370, CR 157, CR 59
C4-21-06 -04-27-06 CR 374, CR 30A SR 300 (Saint George Island Causeway).
1-28-06 04-30-06 SR 30, SR 30A, SR 65
,-I

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The Franklin Chronicle


Auditor General from Page 1

Response/Proposed Corrective Action: We agree with this
finding. This failure was the result of the District Office not
receiving the required forms tote completed. Apparently,'they
were sent to an incorrect address, and the recipient failed to
forward them. We have notified the office of the Chief Finan-
cial Officer of the State of Florida and updated our mailing
address with them to ensure we receive the forms in the fu-
ture.
Finding No. 3: Bank Reconciliations
Of the 12 monthly food service bank statements for the 2004-
05 fiscal years, the District only reconciled the June 2005 bank
statement to its general ledger, and it was not reconciled until
November 18, 2005. Additionally, the District did not have
supervisory review procedures in place to timely detect the
lack of bank reconciliations. Failure to provide for timely in
bank reconciliations increases the risk that errors or misap-
propriations of District moneys could be made and not be
promptly detected.
Response/Proposed Corrective Action: We agree with the
findings. This failure was due to having inadequate procedures
in place to ensure the reconciliations were timely made. We
will revise and enhance procedures to ensure the reconcilia-
tions are more timely completed in the future.
Finding No. 4: Tangible Personal Property
The required annual physical inventory was not conducted for
property items at Apalachicola High School, which had tan-
gible personal property with costs totaling $521,560. The fail-
ure to conduct complete annual physical inventories and main-
tain accountability of tangible personal property limits the
District's assurance that its property is adequately safeguarded.
Response/Proposed Corrective Action: We agree. The prop-
erty clerk at the District Office generated an inventory list and
sent it to the Principal in early Spring of 2005. He learned
about the same time he would not be rehired the following
year. and apparently felt no responsibility to complete the in-
ventory. Under the circumstances, there was little the District
Office could do to compel him to carry out his responsibility
with regard to the inventory. We will attempt to develop proce-
dures whereby responsibility for completing the inventory can
be delegated to another employee at the school should this
situation arise again.
Finding No. 5: School Internal Funds
The 2004-05 fiscal year audit of school internal funds noted
several control weaknesses, such as instances of not property
accounting for receipt books and not conducting bank recon-
ciliations. The absence of adequate controls over school inter-
nal funds increases the risk that errors and misappropria-
tions may occur and not be detected in a timely manner.
Response/Proposed Corrective Action: We agree. Principals
were made aware of these findings and instructed to make
corrections as appropriate to ensure the findings do not re-
cur. The Director of Financial Services will follow up with the
principals to determine what progress is being made in cor-
recting the deficiencies that led to these findings.
Finding No. 6: Relocatable. Facilities Inspections
The District did not provide for the required annual inspec-
tions of nine relocatable buildings used for classroom pur-
poses and did not obtain the required occupancy inspection
for one relocatable building purchased in October 2004. Fail-
ure to provide for the required inspections of relocatable build-
ings could result in unsafe conditions not being corrected in a
timely manner,
Response/Proposed Corrective Action: We agree with this
finding. All of the relocatables were inspected subsequent to
June 30, 2005. They have been inspected by three different
inspectors the PAEC safety and fire inspector, a UBCI inspec-
tor, and the S ate Fire Marshall. All the deficiencies disclosed
in those insr actions s have not yet been corrected, but we are


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


currently working on them and expect to have them completed


currently working on them and expect to have them completed
in the near future.
Finding No. 7: Architect Services
The District did not obtain the architect services for the new
K-12 Consolidated School project through the required com-
petitive selection and negotiation process, contrary to Section
287.055, Florida Statutes. Also, the District did not initially
require the architect to provide evidence of errors and omis-
sions or liability architectural insurance coverage for this
project.
Response/Proposed Corrective Action: We agree, but with
qualifications. We did not go through the competitive selection
process for the new K-12 school because we had already come
through the process in selecting the architect for an earlier
contract, and the K-12 project was an outgrowth of the work
the architect had done under that contract.
The firm prepared the Educational Plant Survey that served
as the model for the new school and guided us through the
Special Facilities Construction Account application process to
secure the necessary funding for the project. The firm also
conducted the search for and played a major role in securing
the land for the site. The land, which the Florida Department
of Transportation donated to us, was appraised at 4.7 million
dollars. It performed a significant amount of preliminary work
for us prior to the award of the new contract. It charged us for
none of those services nor any of the work it did during the
approximately two and a half years under the initial contract.
At typical consult fee rates, the value of those services repre-
sented a significant savings to the District, not to mention the
almost 5 million they helped us save on the land.
When the savings outlined above are considered, I believe we
made the right choice from the standpoint of obtaining the
greatest value for the taxpayer dollars spent. Notwithstanding
that, I recognize that a major component of your audits is to
determine compliance with laws, rules, regulations, etc. You
have determined that we did not comply in this instance, and
that is how your report will stand. But I believe that there
were extenuating circurrintances in this case, and I question
whether the outcome with regard to making the choice of the
greatest benefit to the District would have been any better had
we gone through the competitive selection process. Please be*
assured however, that we wish to be team players, and in the
future, we will endeavor to follow the letter of the law.
Finding No. 8: Personnel and Payroll-Terminal
Leave Payments
Improvements were needed in procedures to provide for su-
pervisory review and approval of terminal leave pay calcula-
tions prior to payment.
Response/Proposed Corrective Action: We agree with this
finding. The $78.00 amount has been collected, and arrange-
ments have been made to collect the 51,450.00 amount. We
are in the process of examining our procedures to determine
how they can he enhanced to prevent such errors in the fu-
ture. One possible solution will be to have another person per-
form all manual calculations a second time to verify their ac-
curacy.
Summary of Report on Federal Awards
We audited the District's Federal awards for compliance with
applicable Federal requirements. The Child Nutrition Cluster,
Charter School, and Twenty-First Century Community Learn-
ing Centers programs were audited as major Federal programs.
The results of our audit indicated that the District materially
complied with the requirements that were applicable to the
major Federal programs tested. However, we did note internal
control and compliance findings that are summarized below.
Federal Awards Finding No. 1: Eligibility/Special
Tests and Provisions
The District should enhance its procedures to ensure that free
and reduced-price meal applications are properly retained and
evidence the timely review and approval or denial of the eligi-
bility of students applying'for such.meals by appropriate Dis-
,;. I . ; r. 1 I , - 11 L ,!


17 March 2006 Page 5


trict staff.
Response/Proposed Corrective Action: We agree with this
finding. Subsequent to the end of your audit fieldwork how-
ever, we determined that the 2 children for which no applica-
tions were found included on the State list of children directly
certified as eligible for free or reduced meals. No applications
are required for these children. The food service administrator
has the list on file if needed for verification. With regard to the
other deficiencies noted, the food service administrator has
been instructed to improve procedures to provide greater as-
surance that all free and reduced meal applications are prop-
erly approved of record by an official designated of record for
that purpose, and that the applications will be retained on file
for as long as needed for audit purposes.
Federal Awards Finding No. 2: Subrecipient
Monitoring
The District should enhance procedures over Charter School
middle school implementation grant funds passed through to
the Apalachicola Bay Charter School, Inc., to demonstrate
compliance with Federal subrecipient monitoring requirements.
Such procedures should include periodic site visits to review
financial and programmatic records and observe operations
at the Charter School.
Response/Proposed Corrective Action: We agree with this
finding. As the Charter School has considerable autonomy and
latitude in controlling its funds, we were unaware that we had
an obligation to perform such monitoring duties. In consulta-
tion with numbers of your stall; we have identified what we
need to do in this regard) and will comply with your recom-
mendations.
Audit Objectives and Scope
Our audit objectives were to determine whether the Franklin
County District School Board and its officers with all adminis-
trative and stewardship responsibilities for District operations
had:
* Presented the District's basic financial statements in accord
once with generally accepted accounting principles;
* Established and implemented internal control over financial
reporting and compliance with requirements that could have
a direct and material effect on the financial statements or on a
major Federal programs; and
* Established management controls that promote and encour-
age: 1) compliance with applicable laws, administrative rules,
and other guidelines; 2) the economic, effective, and efficient
operation of the District; 3) the reliability of records and re-
ports; and 4) the safeguarding of District assets;
* Complied with the various provisions of law, administrative
rules, regulations, and contracts and grant agreements that
are material to the financial statements, and those applicable
to the District's major Federal programs; and
* Corrected, or are in the process of correcting, all deficiencies
disclosed in our report No. 2005-138.
The scope of this audit included an examination of the District's
basic financial statements and the Schedule of Expenditures
of Federal Awards as of and for the fiscal year ended June 30,
2005. We obtained an understanding of internal control and
assessed control risk necessary to plan the audit of the basic
financial statements and Federal awards. We also examined
various transactions to determine whether they were executed,
both in manner and substance, in accordance with governing
provisions of laws, administrative rules, regulations, contracts,
and grant agreements.


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APALACHICOLA 58 4TH STREET 850-653-9828
BLOUNTSTOWN 20455 CENTRAL AVE. WEST 850-674-5900
BRISTOL 10956 NW STATE ROAD 20 850-643-2221
CARRABELLE 912 NORTHWEST AVENUE A 850-697-5626
MEXICO BEACH 1202 HIGHWAY 98 850-648-5060
PORT ST. JOE 418 CECIL G. CosTIN JR. BLVD. 850-227-1416


*APY is Annual Percentage Yield. APYs are accurate as of 3/12/06.
For the 13 month CD, the minimum balance to obtain the stated APY is $500 and will require a checking or NOW account such as
Superior's Free Checking or Treasury Checking accounts. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal.
For Treasury Checking, the minimum balance to open this account is $50. 3.35% Annual Percentage Yield (APY) will be paid on
balances of $50,000 and up; 2.75% APY on balances between $25,000 $49,999; 2.25% APY on balances between $5,000 $24,999;
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SUPPER BUFFET Mon.-Fri.
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1593 West Highway 98-Carrabelle
697-2776
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Open 6 days 11:00 a.n. 9:00 p.m.
Closed Tuesday
Thank you for letting us serve you!


Newell Concert Series

Presents The Synergy

Brass Quintet

On Sunday, February 261h, Historic Trinity Church in
Apalachicola was the site for presenting the Synergy Brass
Quintet in the latest offering of the Newell concerts featuring a
range of music from early Renaissance through jazz and even
a little rock-and-roll.
The Quintet, comprised of Bobby Thorp (trumpet), Chris O'Hara
(trumpet), Jonathan Hurrell (horn), Bo Clifton (trombone) and
Nickolas Genzalez (tuba) presented music by Tallis, Rimsky-
Korsakov, Bach, Aaron Copland, George Gershwin and oth-
ers, The audience warmly received the group as they downed
at bit between musical offerings.
There are two concerts in March, on the 12th and 26th. On
March 12th, the series will present the Con Brio Trio, and on
March 26th, Leo Welch and Wendell Dobbs will present a pro-
gram of parlor and concert music.

[] irJnrJrrJIrJJrJIirJJirJ- rrJ r rrrrJErlrJriiasElUie r-ruur- r- -ji-JE -I ralrJI lrJlrIriJIrJIrJIrJIJ i

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Highway 98 in Carrabelle
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CLOSED MONDAY
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Pane 6 17 March 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Cape San Bias from Page 1
- -*--- --. -----._ -J -.- ----r'-
1,000 civilians, animals, and equipment set outlrom Vera Cruz
for Ochuse Bay, site of present-day Pensacola. Within a year,
the colony disbanded in failure, at a cost of more than 2,000.
Not for 125 years would the Spanish return to settle in north-
west Florida.
In 1565, six years after the failed attempt at Pensacola, the
Spanish succeeded in establishing a permanent colony in St.
Augustine, on the Atlantic Coast. From this position, they were
able to monitor and protect the sea passage which led from
the Western Hemisphere to Europe. In occupying the Florida
peninsula, Spain was moved by a need to prevent its Euro-
pean rivals, principally Great Britain and France, from con-
structing military positions from which they might attack the
Atlantic shipping routes. Additionally, Spanish priests desired
to establish missions among the Indian tribes in the area.
I .,


PHOTO BY GERI MOORE
At contact, many Indian tribes inhabited northwest Florida.
The Pensacola, Chatot, Hitchiti, Koasati, Choctaw, Yuchi, and
Yamasee were hunter/gatherer tribes that lived off shellfish
and game. Their population at the time the Spanish arrived
remains uncertain, but quickly declined. The Spanish brought
with them virulent disease strains to which the Indians had
no immunity. Whole tribes were ravaged by influenza and other
viruses. The changes wrought by trade with the Europeans
destroyed the traditional ways of life for all aboriginal popula-
tions of Florida. British settlement of the Carolinas and Geor-
gia in the late seventeenth century forced the comparatively
hostile Creek Indians south into Florida. By the late 1700s,
few of the original tribes remained in Florida.
Spanish missionaries may have ventured as far west as St.
Joseph Bay or St. Andrew Bay, but no evidence exists that a
mission site, permanent or temporary, was established along
the Gulf Coast in that region. The nearest mission sites ap-
peared to have been located around Lake Seminole, at the
headwaters of the Apalachicola River, and near the mouth of
St. Mark's River in what is now Wakulla County. The decline
of the Indian population in the century following the Spanish
landing at St. Augustine and the depredations of raiding En-
glishmen and their Indian allies from the Carolinas in the lat-
ter part of the seventeenth century forced the abandonment of.
the Spanish mission system in the early 1700s.
The Bay of St. Joseph was invariably recorded on the charts
and maps drawn in the seventeenth century, suggesting that
explorers, missionaries, and soldiers had gained familiarity
with the region surrounding the bay. Late eighteenth century
accounts also speak about ruins of settlements found along
the bay, but they might have been the remnants of a French
fortification that was erected there in 1717. The French Gov-
ernor of Louisiana, who had recently established himself at
New Orleans, founding that city, sent a detachment of fifty
men under his brother to build a fortification between Pensacola
and St. Marks.
By May 1718, a stockade with four bastions had been com-
pleted at the northern tip of St. Joseph Peninsula. The re-
mains of this occupation may be present in the recorded Span-
ish site. Named Fort de Crevocoeur, it was soon abandoned.
Spain soon divided Florida into two colonies, East Florida, ruled
from St. Augustine, and West Florida, administered from
Pensacola. In 1763, at the close of the 1st Spanish period, the
Spanish surrendered control of Florida to Great Britain, which
claimed the Floridas as a prize of victory., More than 3,000
inhabitants abandoned Florida when the Spanish departed.
The resulting sparse population presented problems for the
English in developing their new colonies. They attempted to
encourage settlement by offering land inducements to pro-
spective settlers. Articles in journals such as the London Ga-
zette told of extensive and rich agricultural lands and pro-
claimed the ease which with they could be obtained.
Although a few substantial plantations were established in
northeast Florida, the British did little to encourage develop-
ment of the interior or panhandle areas. The Panton, Leslie
and Company, the most important mercantile firm in Colonial
Florida, established a trading post at Pensacola in 1785 to
which later in 1805 the company added another at Prospect
Bluff on the Apalachicola River. Part of a network that ulti-
.mately spread throughout much of the interior Southeast, those
trading posts served as a foothold for company agents who
conducted trade with the natives of surrounding interior lands.
The demand for leather, primarily from deerskins, formed the
basis for the trade. Panton, Leslie agents exchanged blankets,
guns, and metal products for Indian skins. Timber, indigo,
cattle, corn, tallow, bear grease, rice, tobacco, salt fish, pe-
cans, sassafras and oranges were also exported from the area
:during the British Period. The Pensacola and Prospect Bluff
trading posts continued to operate into the 1830s.
SDuring the two decades (1763-1783) they occupied the Floridas,
- he British transformed the economy of the peninsula, creat-





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Call 850-927-2336.


PAID FOR BY THE FRANKLIN COUNTY REPUBLICAN
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. NOT AUTHORIZED BY ANY
CANDIDATE OR CANDIDATE COMMITTEE.




B St. George Island
United Methodist Church

You ARE INVITED TO
SUNDAY WORSHIP 9:30A.M.


201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org Pastor: Ray Hughes


ing a plantation system which endured even after their depar-
ture.
The return of Florida to Spain in 1783 retarded further eco-
nomic development in northwest Florida. Like the Spanish
inhabitants before them who fled the colony when the British
arrived, the British inhabitants in turn left along with their
colonial overseers when the Spanish returned. To encourage
repopulation, the Spanish emulated British policy by offering
incentives for settlement, even allowing non-Catholic immi-
grants, permitted in no other part of their empire.
Their grasp on the colony was tenuous. Indians, escaped slaves,
British arms merchants, slave traders, irrepressible frontiers-
men, and adventurers alike created foment and unrest. The
American settlers who accepted Spain's terms and immigrated
to the peninsula brought with them a determination to add
Florida to the Union. Established planters became increas-
ingly alarmed by growing violence that the Spanish barely
suppressed.
Life in West Florida became more dangerous each year as re-
lations with the Indians deteriorated. American cattlemen in
southern Alabama competed with Creek Indians, who raised
cattle in West Florida. The Creek chieftain, William Augustus
Bowles, incited numerous attacks on white settlements in the
panhandle between 1788 and 1803. Americans persisted in
their efforts to acquire Spanish West Florida. In 1810, a group
headed by John Rhea captured Mobile and declared the area
from the Pearl River to the Mississippi as the Independent
Republic of West Florida. Ignoring the revolution, President
James Madison pressed .American claims upon the area re-
sulting from the Louisiana Purchase (1803), drawing a bound-
ary first along the Perdido River, and later the Iberville. In so
doing, the western boundary of Florida was reduced to its
present configuration.
In the early years of the nineteenth century the United States
became anxious about the threat which Florida, occupied by a
weakened Spanish power, posed to its national security. The
peninsula provided a haven for runaway slaves and Seminole
Indians who were involved in armed encounters with settlers
in south Georgia and Alabama. During the first of three con-
flicts with Seminole Indians (1815-1818), Andrew Jackson led
an armed expedition into Florida with accompanying hopes of
actually taking possession of Spain's colony. The James Mon-
roe administration failed to pursue Jackson's aims, but did
embark upon diplomatic negotiations to acquire Florida. The
Adams-Onis Treaty, concluded in 1819, gave the United States
ownership of the peninsula, though diplomatic moves delayed
a transfer of authority until 1821
The Territorial Period (1821 1845)
The United States Territory of Florida was established in 1821.
Andrew Jackson was named provisional governor and, as one
of his first acts, he created St. Johns and Escambia Counties,
the first political subdivisions in the newly-formed territory.
American acquisition of Florida encouraged immigration into
the new territory, and the population increase prompted the
political subdivision of Escambia County. Within three years
four new counties were created in west Florida, including
Walton, Jackson, Gadsden and Leon Counties. Franklin County
was added in 1832. Calhoun County was carved out of parts
of Jackson, Washington, and Franklin counties in 1838. Not
until the twentieth, century did say and Gulf counties appear.
By 1825, a total of thirty-eight Spanish land grants in the
former colony of West Florida were confirmed by the Territo-
rial Government. Land grants in the western panhandle, most
of which were limited to the Escambia River area, belonged
chiefly to Americans who had settled there during the Second
Spanish occupation (1783-1821).
Emigration of Americans from the eastern seaboard into new
territories of west Florida intensified during the second and
third decades of the nineteenth century. The efficient process-
ing of short staple cotton made possible by the invention of
the cotton gin in 1793, opened the interior South for the pro-
duction of that important cash crop. With a vast area of rela-
tively cheap and fertile land, west Florida became an attrac-
tive destination for families from agricultural states through-
out the South. Added to the ranks of the immigrant farmers
were soldiers who sought employment and land after the stand-
ing army was reduced at the conclusion of the War of 1812. In
an effort to establish communication and provide ah avenue
for settlement, the U.S. Congress appropriated funds for a road
to connect Pensacola with Tallahassee in 1824. Although sig-
nificant appropriations were made for the construction of this
road, residents of Jackson and Washington Counties indicated
that the road remained impassable and petitioned Congress
for additional funding in 1842. The area along the coast lay
some distance south of that road, however.
The first description of west Florida to appear following the
establishment of the Territory of Florida was produced by John
Lee Williams, a Pensacola lawyer, who, along with William
Simmons of St. Augustine, selected Tallahassee as the territo-
rial capital. Williams traveled from Pensacola to the site of the
future seat of government in 1823, compiling journal, which
he published in 1827 under the title A View of West Florida.
His descriptive account contains the first American survey of
the St. Andrews Bay and St. Joseph Bay areas. Williams found
a few families settled at the head of St. Andrews Bay and along
the Econfina River, but no others.


The bulk of federal lands within that part of west Florida which
eventually became Gulf County rested within the domain of
the so-called "Forbes Purchase," a vast tract of territory whose
legal ownership was organized in the first decade of the nine-
teenth century, when Florida was still a Spanish colony. The
grant'grew out of claims filed by the company against the crown
for property losses it suffered at the hands of Indians allied
with a competing firm. In addition to receiving the compensa-
tory grant of lands from the Crown, the company persuaded
leaders of the Creek Indian Nation to cede to it a tract of land
east of the Apalachicola River in payment for damages the
Creeks had inflicted on company property during some two
decades of international, commercial, and tribal conflict. The
cession was concluded by treaty in 1804 and subsequently
acknowledged by the Spanish Government.
To be continued in the next Chronicle issue of March 31, 2006.
The material for this article was drawn from "An Archeological
and Historical Survey of the Eglin AFB Cape San Bias Tract,
Gulf County, Florida" by Robert E. Johnson, submitted by
Florida Archeological Services, Inc. (August 1994).

Local Health Care

Partnership Brings Discount

Prescription Drug Program

To Area Patients


Local Franklin County resi-
dents will now be able to take
advantage of a little known
federal statute that allows
them to save money on their
prescription drugs through
their local Community Health
Center Franklin Medical Cen-
ter, and its partnering phar-
macy, Bi Rite Drugs.
Together they are taking ad-
vantage of this federal law by
working with RxStrategies,
Inc., a company that provides
a turn-key solution that uses
the 340B Drug Pricing Pro-
gram of the Public Health Ser-
vice Act.
North Florida Medical Cen-
ters, Inc. will begin the pro-
gram in Eastpoint, March
20th, 2006, with the other six
service sites in the Big Bend
to follow shortly thereafter'
Franklin Medical Center be-
gan.partnership with Bi Rite
Drugs because they know that
the rnrrrm x ill o tno, +,.hi


helping imeir patients stay
healthier and learn more
about their medications. They
can get their medications at a
more affordable price, as well
as the personal attention they
deserve.
Eastpoint Medical Center, a
service site of North Florida
Medical Centers, Inc., a mem-
ber of the National Association
of Community Health .Centers
(NACEC), is a private, not-for-
profit, consumei-directed
health care corporation,
which provides high-quality,
cost-effective and comprehen-
sive primary and preventive
care to area patients.
Eastpoint Medical Center will
hold a Press Conference an-
nouncing this program on
March 20th 2006 at 10:00
a.m., area residents that are
interested in learning more
about the Center's services
and discount prescription
drug program are invited.


patients, without insurance For more information about
and/or with Medicare, up to Eastpoint Medical Center, its
50% on their brand name discount prescription drug
drugs. Together with their program, and the Press Con-
pharmacy partner, Bi Rite ference please contact Denise
Drugs, they look forward to Donohue at (850) 298-6003.

Do Endangered Red

Wolves Live In The Area?

St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge is a partner in the red
wolf recovery program. The goal of the program on St. Vincent
Island is to safely propagate red wolves while maintaining eco-
logical balance and visitor access on St. Vincent Island. The
first pair of red wolves was placed on St. Vincent Island in
1990. Over the last 16 years the red wolves on St. Vincent
Island have produced 19 pups, including 4 born this past
spring.
If you are interested in learning more about red wolves or have
concerns now is your opportunity to get any questions an-
swered, Bud Fazio, the Red Wolf Recovery Team Leader from
Alligator River NWR, in North Carolina will present a variety of
information related to the red wolf recovery program on March
23, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. at the City of Apalachicola Community
Center. Please come and join us for this educational opportu-
nity. For more information call the St. Vincent NWR office at
850-653-8808.
"Our mission is working with others to conserve, protect, and
enhance fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the
continuing benefit of the American people."



Io 0




*W[eV'ZS and1 Gulf 31 t1 S


L Pranklin Chronicle
Now distributed in
Fr nklin, Wakulla and
Gulf Counties


9ibt Mapti"t tewsd

St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!

Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 7:00 p.m.
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU










y f
J'duntj

850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


St. GeorgeIsland
Rea lty


Historic District/Apalachicola.
Charming newer home on comer
with adjoining lot included.
Beautifully furnished 2BR/2BA.
Hardwood floors, fireplace,
Jacuzzi tub, alarm system & metal
roof. Landscaped & irrigation sys-
tem. Separate storage building.
Convenient to downtown shop-
ping, dining & launch ramps.
MLS#110437. $525,000.


Phone: 850-927-4777
Toll Free: 800-344-7570
www.sgirealty.com


Spectacular Bay Front! Great
Gulf View too! Secluded home
on 1 acre in the East End of SGI.
4MBR/4.5BA, brick fireplace,
high ceiling, wide stairs & much
more! Open living spaces leading
to screened porch overlooking
the Bay. Private dock. Kayaker's
dream! Comparable vacant lot
listed at $950,000. MLS#107238.
$1,100,000.


St. George Island Realty
235 E. Gulf Beach Dr.
St. George Island, FL 32328

LAND FOR SALE:
Large Dry Lot/SGI. May be able to
build for a Gulf view. Located on
Palmer St. just off paved Bayshore Dr.
Quietest area of St. George Island.
This lot is 85' x -235' deep or .45 acre.
Has convenient access to beach via 7th
Street. MLS#109682. $340,000.
Bay Front/SGI Plantation. View over
gorgeous marsh grasses & waterway
to the Bay! This view cannot be
obstructed! A full acre with beautiful.
mature palm, oak & pine trees. 50 feet
of Bay FRONTAGE. Perfect for canoes
& kayaks. MLS#103547. $665,000.
100 front feet Mixed Use Building Site.
Located on main street of St. George
for maximum business exposure.
Zoned C-4 allowing Commercial
space downstairs & residential up.
2nd Tier parcel provides excellent
Gulf View from upper floors & con-
venient beach access. Seller financing
available. MLS#109733. $999,000.


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I


I








'rho irnm-rlin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


17 March 2006 Page 7


Camp Gordon Johnston from Page ,, -


ROBUST BAND MUSIC: This group literally adde
the frosting of celebration to the parade, playing
many armed forces themes and World War II no.
taglic tunes. The rhythms and beat literally stimi
lated the parade participants into a festive atmo,
phere as the units paraded by.


E'3


CLASSIC DUCK: Many returning veterans opted t
ride atop this landing craft in the parade.


-d
Ig
s-
P-
s-












Senator Al Lawson was presented an honorary fire
hat as recognition for his efforts in the Legislature
in facilitating the money for the purchase of the
new Carrabelle fire engine. Representative Kendrick
is on the right, relishing the moment along with
hundreds of onlookers who had gathered at the fire
station for the dedication.
to, r


Senator Lawson telling of his scenario about obtain-
ing the money for the new fire engine, and his meet-
ing with Governor Bush over the matter.

A very definite highlight of the weekend celebration was the
arrival of the LCD (Landing Craft Utility) 2000 class, named
"the New Orleans" from the Tampa area. This 174 foot ship
displaced 575 tons, with a deck area of 2,500 square feet:
capable of carrying five Ml main battle tanks. The range of the
ship is 10,000 nautical miles at 12 knots or 6,500 nautical
miles at 10 knots (loaded), with a 9 foot draft when loaded. j


NZ r Z- -'r' i.r.


CARRABELLE REALTY, INC.

P.O. Drawer 708 1526 Highway 67 in Carrabelle, FL
www.carrabellerealty.net

1 (850) 697-2181 1 (800) 530-1473


We are a small, independently owned
agency. YOU, the customer, are our most
important asset whether you are BUY-
ING or SELLING, we go the extra mile
to make sure you receive excellent
service..If you don't want to get lost in
the crowd, stop by and get personal
attention!


*t ( '' *. ...i,,-- ^- .. .... .


Cary Lanark: 240 ft. waterfront lot, 60 x
250 building site with add'l frontage, next to
boat launch, $565,000.


Golf Course: Prestigious lot on the 9th tee,
corner lot, $365,000 owner/agent.


House 002: Country home in a private set-
ting, 3BR/2BA, enclosed garage, separate
workshop, fireplace, 1.5 acre $299,000
owner/agent.
NEW LISTINGS
* Beach lot in private area, 50'x100',
$895,000.

* 50'x150' MH lot, Lanark,
$165,000.

* (2) Five-acre tracts on Hwy. 67,
$195,000 each.

* One acre on Harbor Rd., high-&
dry, $109,500.
* 2003 32'x64' double-wide on 1.96
acres on Harbor Rd., 3BR/2BA,
large pond, beautiful property
$249,500.

* Walk to Lake Talquin, 32'x64'
Redman DW, 3BR/2BA, great
room on 1 acre at end of cul-de-
sac, $118,500.


Krisy: New 14x80 mobile home on 1 acre,
3BR/2BA, partially fenced backyard, back
deck, $125,000.


Kathy's: immaculate 3BR/2BA home on two
and one half lots, spacious master bedroom
with private entrance, fenced yard, large
workshop, call for all the details, $350,000.


-- T ,
-.. .. "i
--'t;J I.(:,. .- ..


Your

Capitol

Bureau

By Shayla Cooper
Franklin County has re-
quested from the Florida Leg-
islature $20,279,801 to pay
for 15 projects. The projects
include:
* Construct a seafood indus-
trial park ($2 million);
* Acquire land in Eastpoint to
gain access for loading and
unloading seafood products
($3 million);
* Renovate the courthouse
($500,000);
* Remove existing fire station
and construct new police and
fire stations ($1.5 million);
and
* Complete wastewater im-
provements in Apalachicola
($1 million). Franklin County
has also asked for
$12,279,801 to operate a
medical facility, improve
stormwater management and
public safety radio communi-
cation, expand parks and fish-
ing docks, remove storm de-
bris, and rebuild a public
beach.
An aide from the office of Sen.
Al Lawson, D-Tallahassee,
said it is too early to deter-
mine if Franklin County will
get funding for these projects.
"We haven't started the fund-
ing process yet, but it looks
like a good budget year," the
aide said.
The Florida Legislature will
convene March 7 for its 60-
day Regular Session to create
the states 2006-2007 budget.
Franklin County is seeking $1
million to complete rebuilding
of Apalachicola's wastewater
system. Engineer Bill
McCartney said the project is
almost complete.
"We have replaced the entire
city's wastewater system,"
said McCartney, who has
been the engineer since 1992.
He said Franklin County has
asked the Legislature for
money for the project for
about 12 years and has re-
ceived funding 10 of those
years.
"We've done $39 million worth
of improvements to the
Apalachicola wastewater in-
frastructure."


LANDING CRAFT UTILITY: This is the modern-day
Army version of the old LCM, capable of carrying 5
tanks. "The New Orleans" has a crew of 13 and can
be sustained on board for up to 18 days. The ship
departed from Tampa and moored in Carrabelle for
the celebration. Tours were conducted by the
ship's crew.


The view from the bridge of the ship.
1 -< '
I---- '









.7 J
Jit .ro '...ea hd da












An interior view of the cargo hold and ramp.

I r 1m
.. ---,-


Navigation or Chart Corner, just aft of the bridge.


~1
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I~
~Le
1


The line of hungry luncheon clients.,


I ,


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V"W~-~LI -JY


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-hcr
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.,.









Pa2e 8 17 March 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


.aO


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Announcements

IS- R,-.,-I ... Rd.1-0,0 Ha,=d Ra. l y DI SAalS [CS b L
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01 en1r1-erl po,:ionr.., paid- ral0 S20-hr plus bonuesl. af
1', ,l 1.4471 141141 ullloa a fl ulpan tracladballaOOO
\Iiii h.0: run4.,-1dci'lp i-dilli. d a dnlonI hlMO, y and b Jblro
0r.l.,u0 h, all i41 9100 R 1 o Cilrr31 14 Osm9 coa""r' or rofa
C' 11 S 34 00',94 0100l 0 t .i A a.dO L 1i.l L EOE l i 'D,' i
1(.0. U|I, I, Ollll \TK.\ r or.l0 Ilr.'IC h h1 0 o'41 i0"i$-12 l PI' No

1).nir- l,.,ih. eer & 01 RK. R,'eenrl -\,agi Sl 27 i-1 47 per mie0
\o I 4',rrlnll.' OUl Ih Ko.J aid 1a1un A1ailble (S00)771- 031


06r 1rr 1 ( 1)1. Tru- l a-- It, m ,n pl ranl L- pa) Iernts'shor
e AS I Aaa S I I11 lue .pl1l.llll aNdunrg I,.o ,ha, alil Nof ',nlCd
h ain 11+10r1-11rta' .0( ,41o 0112

Sales

5a.500 4 rekly Go(l Polrnllal If someone did it, so can ou' 2-3
corinmed appo-nmnroll dads' Benerits Aailablr Call Catherne
McF0tland1SSS)5o3-: ISS

Racrh For Ilr Siarm Clam Your $.,000 Signing Bonus' And ElevaIt the
Qu i oaiLitr uo'E erone You Sbr Herea1 e IhbTop 10- Reasons Why
Our Sales R.ps .Loe Ls' 10 Company Pud Health Bcnfis 9 Weekly
Pa) S No Slow Sra-ons 7 smagemenm Opponunlnlr 06 Ilatnon Proot
Product 5 Rcogniled llouschold Nale 4 2-3 Pre-Soe Qualiy Apps
Duaty Intrelted Hot Prtospecs 2 Hi :al I50 per Compleird Proena-
lion IsOl 0 Day I S2.000 Sigang Bonus ,Ile' S;23.Sb4l in "50"
W003ly Comm Checks Pad im Our High Elarnn I '200-' S703 0 2.
' 6457 3, 0 1', J3. 85823 25. 1716 49. 15'21 142. 5493 00. 55432 2.
5421 31,5539412' 15137S 50,. $J 15, 580o5 70. 0528 0.S52 01 10.
525 ?0 182220 l. ISI 1:. 15080 0. S5069 ,42., 018 81. $l012 17.
S4901 .3 8S413407. 4B1l$I03.SI40SOBI 1.S4731324. S46b 08. S0401 61.
14661 0 7, S4604 ]3.S 4 S7 1439 50S. 4' ? 751.4387 13. 4293 64.
S4271 48 S424, 04 S439 q6 14237 70 .14 1 14 41959. 0$415.24
S414329. $;41 i9 60. 41120,1. 8404 87. S4054 04024 243, S964 28
To Claim Your :2.000 SigmIng Bonus FrF Into & Proragm D1,ads Call
Caihetrine McFarld al (88S563-31SS

Hunting

i111t NELK. Red Slag. thintail. Bufflao. Wld Boar Our seasn non-
01 31 O Gua-ltee1d license. 85 0 troph) in Iwo d-ays No-GanleNo-
Pay policy Days (314)209-9800. evenlls (3141293-0610
IILNT DEER, TLRhE K:. OQ' ll SLenu.-grSnd dhun. s 5 day., room
included lBook 5 hu1nagt I FREE Ollahumaborderinu Kansas. I Irct
alona lh Cimarun RiSer Appro- 6.i000acres Call Sid aI Woullhii
Ranch(0U)Ji4-8294

Legal. Services

DI\ORCES215-.350-COVERS chlld.en. I; Onl, ona sagnaolre r,-
quired' 'E\cludIa eol rs' Call -edW"s 100)462.200U. ex600O
1S00-7pm) Alia D-lur0, I.L.C E labhl,hd 1077


ARRESTED. All Criminal Defase FetoiMes Oldem anor Slate
Frd-crl C'hargr. ProLe' Probaln. DLI Tralic, TkiL. Bond R5du
Tlon PRIVATF ATTORNEYS STATEWIDE 2 HOURS A-A-A Ai
TORNEv REFERRAL SERVICE (SOO)733-5342.


Miscellaneous


"CIIRIST IS AL1.." If)uu have Chat. you have eueytlhing Wthoul
J1hus Chnil. you hae absolutely nothing Read a IIfi-changig book at
\VWWCHRIST-IS-M L L'S

EAR5 1)EGREE onlne from home "Medical. *Businrs. "Praleal.
'Conmpulera Crinlnal ucJlle Job Placemel n Computerprovided Piman-
cial ad ir qualify (866)359-2121 'al a onlinlldcwa-Lr'ch -om


Pools


Real Estate


u* 4 -C'fIO 200 lopa Slua bra Sold' Laa Do-m i E1.
F- a aaa Fra Ca0,r (980)9537.laO0 3u' L AINDA1'CTION IIOS

t1N 1.l lA [OR I C,01C1AROLI AAllH COOl SUMMIIERS MILLD
''IFS ,RSlafrdobl, 11ll--, C S ~olllal Cabraa Land CALL FO0
FRI I FROCH19'H 187'1)37.'228 8EIT REALTY OOL AT At 01'I101

ST. PETEIIri0II'11ON ('1111OS a CldanI OaaaodO 51'. 5- o R.r\ala a,
sll~nrI ul 800Call Fialrac~ala( Fanroharal Kl1)(17201520 00 17'0102)1.

NIO S' .510(11004I %IN .or,%OK rrI 4'alaOlualrl Laa l,,
A.10000114 -lslu.ddn Paraal rioln F,-I 0 195 A,000 DI- 011-0


'la,'llno lola F,".,o u['a,'d aohll 2W, pcd dl-,-lar
I 0 d rlra 1aclau- C all 14' 1r1 M 1Wl

\S.allr~IralallllllllO~.,la'17roaluuoalnroll laura41 3,o llnlal 509.000'
s Itnilbr l I q Cbln Pk 6o fr- 4.5 -Is~lr dar&,bl,
-laral .oal 0,1 54940001 All .roparlla- ala -o-a In o1110' Call lollt
IrcO (soaaa)?oroi 0200 4

LiiaLa(aal laa ld lllis ll.aaaaa lalapraalra~oalld 01111'I lllOP]'a,'olal a all
trlra.04 alalhlll4 0.lrrlA la'll ( a'aI A ld- Ronoly A(0(ll2-)626 51l
Or aillraoao.d.ciauulul.,ucO

'A lo E171 1010111.SF l016''l IO' 111S'lla r S..01 r317
I''.l-l S OlurlhlaNC4'810-, 1AO004001.1004
ID60 -rI orno i. Sarah ahr laaa. pa-luo. limbra. 90Sa1 duor and
ratoUy h-ksgllo0..dr and 350814 81,500.OO0Oaaso OaF Prapor,
risofIhcOmrls100007110'3-b3

lol ar -lill a 40 Il-nl-,l arl Cail 11,0 r'21'' 'a.

SOS'rS 1511010 0 RECCIE.SI I O'SL P.oa10rl\la 111010491 IF[41.
STTF.OFGORGIA CIllroaPochStoo ,lal 196j6a0.'9a bo %
P.,,pcny For &d1. S-i- It, h ...... Ifl,-1I ll, l Ie 1r'l G \i 21

AN,,oal FCllSolaall-l Ra l"aaul'l ll'r 4i'C012.
ta lAloaRCll ..C.ual 1''A!-
0'aa~lalo HaollIoulab'llllrlg a: I011a1a11'''14li. 0l~. "1414 A'.li
Caurlo. 0041010 Call laraal'l0010"; a:'-Olaoiri: 1' '.01460.1

10 land -lBmLA.IRSVoILLINi It[ lllaa.l.'RIl 'l.910RG'1VOL0V
901 1 OLCII ,C9710111 0"iI Il & 1144 I4K) I'0 l [I\(:
(9001))20.7921)oallaku'005.,0Iilbu0I11'

N-oa aa31slealP1-11"4 2 A'9.,14 SlSI104.'1-1\11 i,1-5a .1'
0011111,51110. palurs-lalrd. Sorjlra OLOI 1191 11, 30, l' h-a---l!, ,
IalnrlI lolaahsa. kadlll. llliaa, h~llll,4 100,1lllliI:21 l(.(
lI!p IPO%0,,arhtn I,91 09k1.9 .90 0202


COlSTb.aC 99,0104y11! 19 0Nu- S911010 1140111
lnll,,a,,o,,ol'al,,P, 14Ilqo 0114 14.1


Walitetdl To 1315



1015. .1'_~ _


DF,0100105\F91T050 %N'lEDNOO5S!Foohr0FNS'EWKao'Pw!'TFh
OniooomnO dP04l -hl, In-rrourd F00lurcs- UniqurOppo-muily SAVE:
85 Cl( (36)349-75150 FRI--[: ESTIMlATESl F-,raagc


Real Estate

0.1CTIF0L L8NORTH C SCOLIN S .SIOTLR SF400 ISF HER1
SILSO SEE I 110 AEL'FI9LL lIF SCFFLL !OU10 .190 OF 1 FS I
ERN \C %IOL\TI% T m~ lhn krlrbI"Sm l Ch-,l,
ira Sloollalar l (rllar (IdolC Coall Frl~ 0111 01411
~Labr uS'lm:i'm~lllnallaaallaCII 'Ill (il iora F1'o 4r9.So- 0 1800184,
1090

LOOhIuI T.O OS0\LSO42:Illuaal laruralaarasrO.lmuu~'a ul Smcrau
___41414101. 01101.14000 P14p40140 200.0'-W 4r FREEo~la
Spoucl lLand Capmac C41SalO~iaaS~aa441a;.aoa

51' 9 -11 1111g, 1051 100c, 1I. kloula,,l -Ob 14 '1-d0 .lmmu l,
S119 %0 0,04",ar.1lal004I Mal s -'

TENNESSEE SIOL0SIO .1ACREAG0' 5(20 1.1140 01441114
bardaan0'0 Ira las i.o 4phblaulaa..o..al'OCllam..ol' b4 raml' Ill' 010
boal allp OallahaO a C 0114K--10 ,lol C,10, 15041',a.0-1.
0.0 b oP Io S a orc

TO 54400FH40 rIOL01 010 PROPER1 I4.01I10 Ilarn 100.
round,.g LAenBll'0 I tl, u6 -.olaa 5c01104'a 1,1, ... .,
Sn~a Oar 840e 00 mla In 004111130 brnlGd oalnlo ihaao II Ph 1
aoaan' Call 10010 ol40~~a

ASH EVILLE. tC.sREAAs 5(40 500 Pala-. "alrdaulal.un 0'l.
al~ lylullS-lr laliIal~laofrlcrmlll Ilao'aa Iaa lilala'4,aSula Ill,.la~lb'
alala' (40401oal~mnm',ra 141144 allI '0.1 allan 0304 11,11040i lo'
10401202.0'a2 anl~l aol~ Lad~r
IIATE R FRo.%,r BARG 111S! UL.i;Er lAcc 520! -uN'- lnr
L.k~rtat -11V 11 I S'in.a001 ONE DAN~ O.M.) LA\D ALP S Al L R-
04.S I..g flOabli', CCi 10, ,-Ib' 0a. -11S 11 82130 041910 0,,4l
I.L aarar 1'anla1 418111019110011040o 0019 LUOOI SIL'.dvn 001CC
SAL~nL WIJ 00048onlpuraaa rfao 19S0000,, l~~.~
141010Pr671%PoO5300~ IO',oaarorrr~,bla bdonllpoanrl-acl 00141 90.0.1
T- 000i"'lauld rloaauSosrl jl- r0allllloor rtlau 0'oldaagarv
proSh,bl!d ha lal

5',A--. N-aI- i-ao 20lA rdla(,nalaarar Sua%9 910 'al' 410
aluad Ilal-laPaaaa 100',l6lll-m llN OLClUol700''11
.1raaaalO NIA0 K O I -r! I D E El' 1E R LO I SOPO a ,l1 ''aa114 f ll
Iaaufoo SC OIT4010 dap --llfollldO. lor140r14 7114001
andod n lola alala laara1 90%.400 Call 1(1877)292807

N,'ATERFROrT: I 2r S 0" 8159900, 9110C-al111004r'o04
pllalll-lsO'hhee14ll -bd4Farlalta-arna'000144'-- C N- lllnla.'a1l1
1094 Iluod 01141110 Pauodmad ullS ,ll Wd ullall,, 11.1 d. _
003011 appro~ad 10,011001 laolron CaapomllllalnlI orb4'lI 11110u


'II' .01 I'll A'1C Sn'o~cllg~lll 0110, I;lS014.la'l'l..7.44llU1424.'o

Steel Ituildines

RHI'l1 SALE 04181 "'Rlluk 1 20.l'll '1,,,." 20,340 S11,001 25,.'-
30l'llC 000114 0.0.00 411000 010 101 FISAII0IIO r 0-112441a,',.

IIIA SA 1 !04 .'' 1,00111 11,141,e!' 4540 a''
S'903l4loMl) 01 00',
Fr l:4900p1111.ll14,', I l..a'


Travel


1w is I.. N I(;Ill l: vs-i I. it N ("%R MR F "A. I "o. p~l~3plll



V'a2Ocation Renltlls

Ml 1IN.'l 111114. 01041,1 '. the %V- 00',. F4' \E .1o' I"
61,,. lo~ll. 1 p,, ,,l 11 0 -04lO.l4.ll 0.11.1,G


Highlights From The 2006 Chili Cookoff


Among the notables present at the Ground Breaking
of the new Educational Facility in Eastpoint on
March 13, 2006 were Will Kendrick, State
Representative; Casey Kelley, Project Manager of
Peter Brown; Gene Boone, Coordinator of
Maintenance and Transportation of the Schoo!
Board; JoAnn Gander, Superintendent of School.,
Jimmy Gander, Chairman of School Board; Teresa
Martin, School Board; David Hinton, School Board
and James Harris, Tax Collector.











850-926-6181 -

5Ai PERFORMANCE SPRAY-ON BED LINERS

WREC ECKTM FULL LINE OF
AUTO ACCESSORIES
3140 COASTAL HWY.
WWW.MIKESPAINTANDBODY.COM CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327







Peneropes Pet Stop


,ne'. ,PROFESSIONAL FURMINATOR

PET GROOMING SHED-LESS T
f 'l AND PET SITTING TREATMENT 'P

^,OF, '
25 S. FRANKLIN ST. EASTPOINT, FL 32-32.
65o-(70-2251 50-32?-00o3(
penelopespetstop.com










DOUBLE YOUR INVESTMENT IN ONLY 1 YEAR!


Builders Lots Available in the o

Fastest Growing Areas in Florida c




95-5S50 J~


OI'ENIN N OVEM BE I 2006.

THE (Ws
OF DAYTONA BEACH.
The Ultra.Luxurious Occanfront
Condominumrn with Concierge Services
and Goll & Spa Privileges.

Oceanfront Pool with Sun Terraces
and Lush Gardens

Ultra-Luxury 2 and 3 Bedroom
residences with Fireplace, Panoramic
View Balconies, Gourmet Kitchens
and Designer Baths.


OCEAN VISTAS
DAYIONA BEACH SHORES

Call today 1-866-741-8317
'www.oceanvistasdaytona.com


NOTICE! If you have a HOME MORTGAGE

with SunTrust, Bank of America, Wells Fargo or

Wachovia Mtg Cos. Market Research Co. is seeking
customers to participate in an independent study of customer
service levels in the aforementioned Mtg Cos. telephone call
center. Earn $$ for each completed evaluation- Absolutely No
Selling! Absolutely NO Account Information collected! Call Toll
Free: 1.866.451.5020 or Email: banksurveyl@yahoo.com State:
Name, Address, Telephone Number and Mortgage Co.
affiliation to receive your information packet. (Mortgage company
employees and their families are excluded.)



SRMIS MARINE

RlN SUPPLY, INC.


St. George Island was crowded with thousands of visitors for
the Charity Chili Cookoff staged on Saturday, March 4th. The
weather was warm; the beer flowed, and according to a spokes-
person doing the accounting, the 2006 event broke last year's
record of $85,000. A final accounting remains to be done.

The Professional Chili Cooks winners were: (1) Kenneth Burke
(Dead Serious Chili); (2) Raul Nunn (Nunn Better Chili; (3)
Bruce Gayler (Dead Serious Chili).

Crockpot Winners were: (1) Sandy Mitchem (St. George Island);
(2) Edie Brandt (Crawfordville, FL) and (3) Karl Kennel and Joi
Robinson (St. George Island).


C L:,- L' L L ,L ,i -' 1


ONLY 11 Units Left! Starting at $168,000
Rental History Available Possible Owner Financing

LAUREL RIDGE SUBDIVISION
GREAT SMOKEY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK~ j
RENTAL CABINS

Call 1-866-774-0215 for more information
www.timbertopsrealestate.com
RENTAL HISTORY AVAILABLE ON ALL MOUNTAIN CABINS.
See www.yourcabin.com for a list of managed properties.


SgWR ELECTRONICS
O
ICOM RADIOS

FURUNO
GARMIN


MARINE SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES TRAINED MECHANICS

0YAMAHA" z


MIKE'S MARINE SUPPLY
P.O. BOX 429 HWY. 98 PANACEA, FL 32346
PHONE: (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693 FAX: (850) 984-5698
www.mikesmarine-panacea.com
HOURS: MON., TUES., THURS., FRI: 8:00 6:00
WED.: 8:00 1:00 SAT.: 8:00 5:00
PRO-LINE GHEENOE BOSTON WHALER
PONTOON BOATS SEA PRO G-3




Air-Con of Wakulla, LLC

HEATING AND COOLING
850-926-5592

* Installation

* Service

* Repair

Gary Limbaugh, owner Lic # CAC1814304
Serving Franklin and Wakulla Counties since 1988


Adult & Children's Boots Anchor Retrieval
Systems Rope Frozen Bait Team Fish
Line Deep Sea & Flat Rods and Reels *
Live Bait and Crab Traps Fishing Tackle *
Fiberglass & Paint Supplies Trailer Parts


WAKULLA PORTABLE BUILDINGS

3771 Crawfordville Highway, 2 Miles South of Traffic Light, Crawfordville, FL

(850) 926-8215 or (850) 926-2664


.'.

-


* HANDI-HOUSE
BUILDINGS
KENNELS
* CARPORTS & SHOP
PORTS
* SINGLE & DOUBLE
WIDE UNITS
AVAILABLE
*ALUMINUM *T1-11
*MASONITE CEDAR
*6x8-14x50


dm ~ w^--- ky-I


'"


or


i











-Ti Tl'-oiilrliu Chronile


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


17 March 2006 Page 9


Espresso Ice Cream
Pastries Soups
Coffee Salads

Sandwiches




Carrabelle Junction

88 Tallahassee Street 697-9550
Across from the Post Office 03-17/03-31


Unique


Nails

& more


P.O. Box 736 347 Highway 98 Eastpoint, Florida 32328
Phone: (850) 670-4000
03-03/03-17




CDL with HAZMAT LOCAL DRIVERS NEEDED!!
POOLCORP, a public company and the world's largest supplier of Swimming
Pool supplies & equipment, has need for permanent & temporary CDI drivers
WITH HAZMAT endorsements at its SCP and Superior branches. Candidates
must be able to lift 100 pounds using a dolly. Please contact branches directly for
information about local'nccds:
Gainesville 352-3336-9788
Jacksonville 904-739-3511
Pensacola 850-484-4544 / 850-476-3200
St. Augustine 904-808-0432
Tallahassee 850-942-4575
Panama City Beach 850-233-3266
ixcellcnt Benefits & Competitive Pay FO1I M/I'/V/D and Drug-lFree
.. www.poolcorp.com


Six Parcels to be sold
ABSOLUTE
to the last and
Highest Bidder
Regardless of the price!


s. S eel"



j


311 River Ranch Lots
Offered in 14 parcels Ten parcels include road frontage on Highway 630
NB Owner Financing Available
HI1GENBOTHAM For further information:
SUCTIONEERS ..0, _
\Nrw olnoNALrD.,c. 4 ,"" 800-257-4161

.t.rd M,. S awmrtm fath,.I- www.higaenbotham.com


THE






The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits, Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE







Now is the time to


subscribe to the


FRANKLIN



I CHRONICLE

The Chronicle is published every other Friday.

Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County

are $16.96 including taxes for one year, or 26

issues. The out-of county rate is $22.26 includ-

ing taxes.


Subscriber ._

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City

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State


D Renewal*

Basic Subscription, 26 issues.

O Out of County O In County
Date:

*If renewal, please include mailing label


Please send this form to:


Franklin Chronicle
Post Office Box 590
Eastpoint, Florida 32328
850-670-1687


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle pages is an
efficient way to promote your business to the public and save
money at the same time. These ads are strictly business cards
magnified to 2 columns by two inches, offered to you at 50% dis-
count for two insertions. Send your business card or copy to:
Franklin Chronicle, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL 32328 or fax
850-670-1685. Your check for $15.00 will guarantee position in
the next issue.




Licensed & Insured





Pat Patterson Painting LLC



469 Whiddon Lake Road
Crawfordville, FL 32327
Pat Patterson (850) 294-2049
03-17/03-31/4-14/4-28






HELP WANTED


ROYAL FLUSH PLUMBING is accepting applica-
tions for new construction, service and plumber's
helpers for a new satellite office in Port St. Joe
area. Our company offers numerous benefits.
Please call 850-236-5852 for appointment (we will
come to you) or apply in person at 1736 Bayview
Avenue, Panama City, FL.
02-17/03-03/03-17/03-31




Evrydymrerades rI trin oh




,Franklin Chronicle,


Pay The County Bills

The Franklin County Commission approved the expeni
$1,455,770.30 at their March 7, 2006 meeting. The
listed as follows, published for the Board by the Co
nance Office.
/


ACS GOV'T FINANCIAL SYSTEM
03/06/2006 13:


BANK


Check Register ,


VENDOR


BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
002395 A T & T
002352 ACE AIR CONSULTING
0017,57 ACS
001670 ALLTEL
.002467. ALSCO
002483 AMERICAN SYSTEM TECHNOLO
002469 AMERIFILE
000214 AMERIGAS
.04194 ANTHONY PIERCE, LLC
000255 APALACHEE CENTER, INC
002172 APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE
.04195 APALACHICOLA ACE HDWR
002440 APALACHICOLA PARKS FOUND
002281 ARAMARK
002521 B BRAUN MEDICAL
'001000 BAKER AND TAYLOR
000209 BAY MEDICAL CENTER
000318 BCC GENERAL FUND
000455 BqC HOSPITAL FUND
002470 BECKMAN COULTER INC
002124 BEN MEADOWS
000194 BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD O
002495 BRIGGS CORPORATION
001845 BROWN/JAMES
002426 BRYCO ENTERPRISES LLC
002448 C & W FOOD SERVICE INC
000547 C.W. ROBERTS CONTRACTING
002496 CARDINAL HEALTH
001340 CARRABELLE HIGH SCHOOL
.04197 CITY OF APALACHICOLA
000192 CITY OF APALACHICOLA
000869 CITY OF CARRABELLE
000593 CLERK OPERATIONAL ACCOUNT
000540 CLERKS TRUST ACCOUNT
001115 COOK-WHITEHEAD FORD-ISUZ
.04196 COURTNEY MILLENDER AND
002340 CROWN TROPHY DOTHAN
002484 CULLIGAN
002457 DADE BEARING
002520 DATA EQUIPMENT INC
.04198 DAVE MCLAIN
002185 DEMCO, INC
002508 DOHMEN DISTRIBUTION PART
000202 EASTPOINT WATER & SEWER
002005 EMERGYSTAT INC
.04199 FED EX
000557 FEDERAL EXPRESS CORP.
002444 FIRST CHOICE PHARMACEUTI
002488 FIRST RESPONSE INC
001259 FLEET SUPPLY
001921 FLORIDA COMBINED LIFE IN
002510 FOLEY/VIOLET
002112 FREIGHTLINER OF TAMPA LL
002518 G E MEDICAL SYSTEMS
001830 GANDER AUTO PARTS
000136 GANnER'S iGUIF SUPPLY liAR
001393 GATEWAY COMPANIES INC
002519 GE HEALTHCARE
'000184 GIBBS/DORIS S.
002429 GIBSON/REBECCA D
002454 GRAYLINK WIRELESS
002509 GREENSOUTH EQUIPMENT INC
001900 GT COMMUNICATIONS
002285 GULF COAST AGGREGATES LL
000138 GULFSIDE I.G.A. (APALACH
.04200 GULFSIDE IGA
000140 H & B INDUSTRIES, INC.


FRAi
GL540R-,V06 .


CHECKII DATE

34861 03/07/06
34862 03/07/06
34863 03/07/06
34864 03/07/06
34865 03/07/06
34866 03/07/06
34867 03/07/06
34868 03/07/06
34869 03/07/06
34870 03/07/06
34871 03/07/06
34872 03/07/06
34873 03/07/06
34874 03/07/06
34875 03/07/06
34876 03/07/06
34877 03/07/06
34878 03/07/06
34879 03/07/06
34880 03/07/06
34881 03/07/06
34882 03/07/06
34883 03/07/06
34884 03/07/06
34885 03/07/06
34886 03/07/06
34887 03/07/06
34888 03/07/06
34889 03/07/06
34890 03/07/06
34891 03/07/06
34892 03/07/06
34893 03/07/06
34894 03/07/06
34895 03/07/06
34896 03/07/06
34897 03/07/06
34898 03/07/06
34899 03/07/06
34900 03/07/06
34901 03/07/06
34902 03/07 06
34903 03/07/06
34904 03/07/06
34905 03/07/06
34906 03/07/06
34907 03/07/06
34908 03/07/06
34909 03/07/06
34910 03/07/06
34911 03/07/06
34912 03/07/06
34913 03/07/06
34914 03/07/06
34915 03/07/06
34916 03/07/06
34917 03/07/06
34918 03/07/06
34919 03/07/06
34920 03/07/06
34921 03/07/06
34922 03/07/06
34923 03/07/06
34924 03/07/06
34925 03/07/06
34926 03/07/06
34927 03/07/06


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Eastpoint, FL 32328 ACRYLICS






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James NesSmith, Bondsman
Charles Golden, Temp Agent
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Hooked on Books




NEW AND USED BOOKS!



116 East Pine Avenue

St. George Island

850-927-3929
03-03/03-17


b
diture of
bills are
unty Fi- 00035E
002517
000395
002500
NKLIN COUNTY 000273
71 PAGE 1 002482
000144
AMOUNT 000143
002329
002514
3. .s. 002099
109.23 002099
757.96 002447
810.00 002475
2 002512
121.19 002392
918 62 .002503
3,016.88 000429
1 3
: 002235
-1 2 002455
1.n Z 001503
2,033.33 04201
262.62 002063
31.94 002451
2,489.61 000149
1,947.11 002330
7|9 002330
7,905.92 002343
357;0 -00286
2,044.46 001278
186,331.55
469,000.00 002160
182.25 002516
698.36 .04202
77,526.08 001566
1,485.86 000252
450.00 .04204
31.46 .04205
1,263.04 .04203
17,511.91 002194
4,113.42 001972
150.00 b01841
772.90 002394
1,245.09 002486
400.22 000168
265.86 002410
74.00 000217
37.67 000729
10,000.00 002139
825.95 002515
345.50 000312
4,599.62 00013Q
5S.64 001929
1,919.19 002481
128.89 002513
2,412.76 001995
1,556.47 000175
15,500.00 001851
92.40 000205
8.69 000677
92.98 001658
001725
4,500.00 002450
45.00
7;,203.34 GENE0
40.00
328.44 FUND R
131.50
1,471.03 FUND
70.2118 ---
1,399.00
527.19 001
18,457 00 120
637.50 137
140
165.17 141
363.54 142
113.66 170
13,650.36 180
363.96 201
117.72
136.32 TOTAL


HARBOR ELECTRIC SUPPLY,
HARRIS,JR./JAMES A.
HENDERSON/REBECCA
HOLLEY, INC.
HUMPHREY/WILLIAM
HUNT INSURANCE GROUP
INSTRUMENTATION LABORATO
J. V. GANDER DISTRIBUTOR
JACKSON AUTO PARTS & ACE
JOHNSON/MARCIA M.
JONES/MELISSA A
KIMBALL MIDWEST
KONICA MINOLTA MEDICAL I
LAKE/NANCY K
LAMPL-HERBERT CONSULTANT
LANARK VILLAGE WATER &
--LAND'S END BUSINESS OUTF
LEITZ OFFICE PRODUCTS
LEPRECHAUN ENTERPRISES L
LEROY HILL COFFEE CO INC
LIBERTY COMMUNICATIONS
MEDIACOM
MEDIACOM
MEDIFAX-EDI LLC
MILLER MARINE, INC.
MOCK/MIKE
NEXTEL PARTNERS INC
OFFICE OF THE STATE ATTO
PARKER SERVICES, INC.
PAUL'S PEST CONTROL, INC
PETSCH/CHRISTOPHER A
PETTY CASH
PIERCE LLC/ANTHONY
PIERCE/ALAN
POSTMASTER
'POSTMASTER
PROGRESS ENERGY
PROGRESS ENERGY FLORIDA,
QUALITY WATER SUPPLY
R GRAY & ASSOCIATES, INC
REDDY ICE-ALBANY
REGISTER/PAMELA
RING POWER CORPORATION
RUNDEL/MICHAEL
SCOTT/WILLIAM E.
SHULER/THOMAS M.
SKILLPATH SEMINARS
SONITROL
SPEARS SMALL ENGINES & T
SPIRIT SERVICES COMPANY
STANDARD INSURANCE COMPA
STAPLES BUSINESS ADVANTA
STONE/MELANIE R
TAX COLLECTOR, FRANKLIN
TAYLOR'S BUILDING SUPPLY
TERMINIX
THE APALACHICOLA TIMES
THE LIBRARY STORE, INC.
TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT CO.,
WASTE MANAGEMENT OF PC
WOLFF/RONALD
RAL BANK ACCOUNT
RECAP:
DESCRIPTION
----------------------------
GENERAL FUND
FINE AND'FORFEITURE
FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC LIBRARY
ROAD ANDn nDR I:
OGT ROAD I'AVING
MOSQUITO CONTROL
AIRPORT FUND
AFFORD.HOUSING ASSIST TRUST
GEORGE E WEEMS HOSPITAL FUND
ALL FUNDS


34928 03/07/06
34929 03/07/06
34930 03/07/06
34931 03/07/06
34932 03/07/06
34933 03/07/06
34934 03/07/06
34935 03/07/06
34936 03/07/06
34937 03/07/06
34938 03/07/06
34939 03/07/06
34940 03/07/06
34941 03/07/06
34942 03/07/06
34943 03/07/06
34944 03/07/06
34945 03/07/06
34946 03/07/06
34947 03/07/06
34948 03/07/06
34949 03/07/06
34950 03/07/06
34951 03/07/06
34952 03/07/06
34953 03/07/06
34954 03/07/06
34955 03/07/06
34956 03/07/06
34957 03/07/06
34958 03/07/06
34959 03/07/06
34960 03/07/06
34961 03/07/06
34962 03/07/06
34963 03/07/06
34964 03/07/06
34965 03/07/06
34966 03/07/06
34967 03/07/06
34968 03/07/06
34969 03/07/06
34970 03/07/06
34971 03/07/06
34972 03/07/06
34973 03/07/06
34974 03/07/06
34975 03/07/06
34976 03/07/06
34977 03/07/06
34978 03/07/06
34979 03/07/06
34980 03/07/06
34981 03/07/06
34982 03/07/06
34983 03/07/06
34984 03/07/06
34985 03/07/06
34986 03/07/06
34987 03/07/06
34988 03/07/06


225.09
41,724.00
800.00
162.25
37.26
1,791.72
2,004.52
33,227.24
103.26
27,047.00
150.00
63.80
776.64
425.00
4,125.34
54.00
266.95
457.63
1,600.00
350.86
336.70
245.28
23.00
115.90
361.61
404,574.00
209.28
798.52
1,132.00
60.00
34 .34
246.54
3,318.00
208.20
116.00
78.00
4,947.99
4,183.31
137.75
8,577.00
132.00
83.60
6,224.01
70.40
206.08
6,576.00
178.00
16,573.50
149.87
439.84
585.00
387.47
150.00
50.85
478.75
271.00
1,268.50
526.39
338.00
828.03
565.39
1,455,770.30

DISBURSEMENTS

669,512.63
459,611.64
4,786.09
5,1, nl i ,)f.
17,511.91
529.95
136.04
22,920.52
225,937.66
1,455,770.30


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11.1 -,.. 11--l........-I









Page 10 17 March 2006


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


the Chronicle Bookshop


Mail Order Service *

P.O. Box 590
Eastpoint, FL 32328


(313) The Northwest Florida Expeditions of Clarence
Bloomfield Moore. The classic studies of Archeologist
Clarence Bloomfield Moore have been republished and
available from the Chronicle Book-shop in very limited
copies. When Clarence Bloomfield Moore cruised the riv-
ers of Florida in search of prehistoric artifacts a century
ago, he laid the groundwork for archaeological investiga-
tions to follow. This volume reflects Moore's fieldwork
along the northwest Florida coast, the most
archaeologically rich area of the state, as well as up the
Apalachicola River to the Chattahoochee and Flint Riv-
ers in Alabama and Georgia. Here readers will share
Moore's first look at the northwest Florida area in 1901 -
1903 and additional observations made in 1918 during
what was to be his last field season. Moore's works re-
veal ceramics, tools, skeletal remains, and exotic arti-
facts excavated fromthe earthen mounds and shell
middens built by native peoples over the last twq millen-
nia. In the introduction to this edition, David S. Brose
and Nancy Marie White place Moore's investigations
within the context of science, natural history, and anti-
quarianism of his day. They document what happened to
the sites he explored, tell how his findings fit into the
body of his research, and explain how those findings
should be interpreted in the context of southeastern cul-
ture history and modern archaeological theory. Univer-
sity of Alabama Press, 1999, 525 pp. This is an oversized
book measuring 10" x 14" requiring postage and han-
dling charges of $8.50. Bookshop price for the volume is
$60.00. Softcover.


. ta q '"i.';; ~n~.


C r- -

,,.. .. i

U


'ut costs on


the gulf


Saint George 1Ind & Apflachicola
orn ') Eall EalirN.atloll

tCO \\C11j \.ild1


(321) Voices of the Apalachicola. Compiled & Edited by
Faith Eidse, University of Florida Press, 328 pp, 2006.
One of Florida's most endangered river systems is the
Apalachicola River and Bay basin, and it is not just the
natural areas that are threatened but also the history
and culture of its people. In Voices of the Apalachicola,
veteran storyteller Faith Eidse, together with the staff of
the Northwest Florida Water Management District, has
compiled a remarkable collection of oral histories from
more than 30 individuals who have lived out their entire
lives in this region, including the last steamboat pilot on
the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system,
sharecroppers who escaped servitude, turpentine work-
ers in Tate's Hell, sawyers of "old-as-Christ" cypress,
beekeepers working the last large tupelo stand, and a
Creek chief descended from a 200-year unbroken line of
chiefs.
As developers increase pressure and populations grow
within the basin, this timely collection captures a fasci-
nating and unique moment in history, recalling a resource
that once brimmed with life-bigger oysters, larger s'tur-
geon, healthier Torreya. trees. Already several of Eidse's
subjects have passed away and were it not for Voices of
the Apalachicola; their stories would have disappeared,
as surely as the Apalachicola will dwindle away to a
shadow of its natural glory if its historic flows and envi-
ronmental health are not preserved.
The Apalachicola River system is one of the main re-
sources of water not only for Florida, hut also Alabama
and Georgia. It flows unimpeded for 106 miles from Lake
Seminole where the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers
merge-through the Florida Panhandle into Apalachicola
Bay and finally into the Gulf of Mexico. From emerging
technologies to environmental health, Eidse captures the
battle to preserve and persevere, providing historic and
current photos that show how the basin has changed.
Habitat maps indicate where our sensitive species live
and land preservation maps illustrate how the state of
Florida is trying to protect them. Bookshop price = $29.95.

Removal .


-:, Aftershock

The Seminoles' Struggles to Survive
in the West, 1836 1866
By Jane F. Lancaster
The University of Tennessee Press/Knox-
ville, hardcover, 225 pp, 1994.


(322) Pepper: Eyewitness To A Century. The Chronicle
bookshop has obtained a few previously owned copies of
Claude Denson Pepper's memoir sold nationally for
$17.95 and published by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich,
1987, 320 pp. This is the tale of a man who has lived
long, made history, and compromised nothing. The story
begins in 1900 and nearly spans the century. These cop-
ies are in good condition. Bookshop price = $10.00.


The St. Joe company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle
The St. Joe Company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle


(21) Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers. Uni-
versity of Florida Press, Hardcover, 297 pp. In this book,
Rogers traces and documents the economic, social and
political emergence of the Gulf coast port of Apalachicola
and the pristine barrier island, Saint George. From the
earliest times, both the island and Apalachicola have be-
come intertwined. The account of the machinations of con-
troversial developer William Lee Popham is the first phase
of area development, later leading to the controversial
struggles of the 1970s when environmentalists and sea-
food industries fought to determine the ecological and eco-
nomic fate of the Bay area. The Chronicle has obtained
a fresh supply of newly reprinted volumes at an at-
tractive price. Available elsewhere for $35.95 plus ship-
ping and handling. The Chronicle Bookshop price is much
cheaper at $25.00 per volume.


This book focuses on this hitherto neglected
era in Native American history and places
the Seminoles in their correct historical po-
sition as a Native American tribe. By exam-
ining the Seminoles' adjustments during R
their first decades in the West in light of fed- *-' -'
eral Indian policy, it concludes that after
thirty years of struggles, caused largely by the faulted policies of the
federal government, these Indians were a "stricken, divided, and
beggared people scattered over hundreds of miles." For this tribe, the
federal government's program of placing it in a western land away
from white settlers, where it could he nurtured toward civilization
and Christianity, was not only a shortsighted policy but also an illogi-
cal and inhumane one. Without the stubbornness and determination
of these early tribal members, no western Seminole tribe would have
existed in 1990. Truly, the mere survival of the early Seminoles earned
them special distinction as a tribe.
-Published by University of Tennessee Press, 1994, 225 pp., Hard-
cover. Sold nationally for $28.95. Bookshop price = $24.00.


- - - --- ------- ------*-
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------------


(317) Green Empire, The St. Joe Company and the
Remaking of Florida's Panhandle. By Kathryn Ziewitz
and June Wiaz.
Based on hundreds of sources-including company ex-
ecutives, board members, and investors as well as those
outside the company-this factual and objective history
describes the St. Joe Company from the days of its
founders to the workings and dealings of its present-day
heirs. For all readers concerned with land use and growth
management, particularly those with an interest in
Florida's fragile wildlife and natural resources, Green
Empire will generate important debate about an often-
overlooked part of the state and will invite public scru-
tiny of its largest landowner.


University of Florida Press,
Bookshop price = $24.95.


More Savings
A $35+ purchase order in books will earn you a bonus one-year sub-
scription to the Franklin Chronicle at no additional charge!
(Please complete the form below)
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Please Note
Books from the mail service of the Chroncle Bookshop are new and used. and are
so-designated in each item description Some titles may be temporarily out of
stock, in which case a second shipment will be made, normally in 14 days Books
are shipped in 48 hours, normally. Some of our books are publishers' closeouts.
overstocks, remainders or current tides at special prices. Most are in limited sup-
ply and at these prices may sell out fast If any book is sold out your money will
be refunded by bank check To offer the lowest possible prices all orders must be
prepaid We do no billing and do not accept credit cards


2004, 364 pp. Paperback.


''I,'


(318) Home To War, A His-
tory of the Vietnam Vet-
erans' Movement. By
SGerald Nicosia. An epic nar-
rative history that chroni-
cles, for the first time, the
experience of America's
Vietnam veterans who re-
turned home to fight a dif-
ferent kind of war.
Published by Crown, Hard-
cover, 690 pp. Sold nation-
ally for $35.00. Bookshop
price = $30.00. Due to the
weight and length of this
work, please include $6.00
for shipping and handling.


.


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