Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00273
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: December 23, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00273
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text






RweX4 New RNAi Evcy N

BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
T he APALACHICOLA, FL
PERMIT #8



Franklin





;l Chronicle


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


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. . .


Volume 14, Number 26


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER December 23, 2005 January 5, 2006


Franklin County Lights Up

For the Holidays


Inside This Issue
10 Pages
Holidays Light Up ........ 1 Editorial & Commentary
Publisher Has Surgery.... ............................... 3, 4
.................... 1, 5, 6, 7, 9 Holidays .................... 5
Tax Increase ............... 1 Seascope .................... 5
Assistance to Firefighters FCAN .......................... 8
................................. 1 Business Card Directory
Franklin Briefs ............... ................................. 9
Pay the County Bills .... 2 Bookshop .............. 9, 10


More photos on Page 5
The Boat Parade of Lights was held on Saturday, December 10th, at 7
p.m. Awards top off gala night on Carrabelle harbor.
TIYC Commodore Flo Coody presented the awards at the Chamber of
Commerce office tree lighting celebration during a break in the music
of local rock & blues band Locomotive. Boats paraded past the city
pavilion in the harbor, and were evaluated by the esteemed judging
panel of former Carrabelle Mayor Jim Brown, City Administrator John
Mclnnis and Carrabelle Junction owner Ron Gempel. Points were
scored in the categories Design Originality, Propriety to Season and
Creative Use of Lights. Each boat was assigned a number plaque so
that no bias would exist.
Commercial Boats >24 feet:
First: Amy & Russell Cohoon
Second: Olin Granthum
Third: Kamen Miller
Commercial Boats <25 feet:
First: Bobby Turner
Second: United States Coast Guard, Carrabelle
Recreational >24 feet:
First: Jimmie Crowder
Second: Thomas Kwader
Recreational <25 feet:
First: Brenda & Bobby Sapp
Second: Deanna & Millard Collins
Sailing: no entries
The awarding of $100, $50 and $25 prizes followed the Timber Island
Yacht Club's Boat Parade shrimp boil across the street which was
provided free of charge to all.
In the top frame, the Gibson Inn Analachicola is deked ollt with
hundreds of white lights.


Committee Formed To
Consider Requests To

Operate Weems Hospital
Michael Lake, current operator of the Weems Hospital, Apalachicola,
appealed to the Franklin County Commission Tuesday night to re-
quest proposals to operate Weems Hospital, Apalachicola. The Franklin
County Commission promptly appointed County Attorney Michael
Shuler, Administrator Alan Pierce and Commissioner Noah Lockley to
a committee to review proposals for a short-term operator of the hos-
pital. Dana Holton, Physician Assistant, also appeared before the Board
seeking their help to obtain assistance in obtaining malpractice in-
surance for his clinic in Carrabelle. He reported that insurance un-
derwriters unexpectedly withdrew their approval for insurance for his
medical operation....


House Bill Will Protect
Many North Floridians From

A 2006 Tax Increase
Congressman Alen Boyd (D-North Florida) supported tax relief for
middle-class taxpayers with the passage of the Stealth Tax Relief Act
(HR 4096). Set to expire next year, the bill includes a one-year fix of
the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) to prevent tax increases on more
than 17 million middle-class famies milies next year.
"This legislation provides much-needed tax relief to middle-class fami-
lies who are working hard to' make ends meet" said Congressman
Boyd. "Due to inflation, the riumber of taxpayers that fall into the
AMT group is growing each year, and failure to enact this legislation
and extend the exemption levels would increase taxes on millions of
middle-class families This is simply unfair aid not the purpose of the
AMT."
"The AMT was created in 1969 to ensure that high-income individuals
and corporations who pay little to no taxes under the regular system
because of deduction credits or other provisions are taxed more fairly.
Unlike the regular tax, income levels subject to the AMT are not in-
dexed for inflation. Therefore, if Congress does not adjust the exemp-
tion levels for inflation, a greater number of people would become
eligible each year as incomes grow and exceed these levels.
While this bill gives middle-class families a helping hand, it is only a
short-term solution to the problem," Boyd stated. "It is my hope that
Congress will get serious about budget reform in the upcoming year
and work to enact comprehensive legislation so we can fix the prob-
lem permanently instead of continuing this temporary band-aid strat-
egy.
According to the Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT), while fewer than
1 percent of taxpayers were subjected to AMT before 2000, it is pro-
jected to affect 29 million people-20% of all taxpayers-by 2010 with-
out Congressional involvement.


Assistance to firefighters grants to aid America's
Fire Departments

Department Of Homeland
Security Announces

Assistance ToFirefighters

Florida Receives $244,846 to Assist Local Fire Departments
in Latest Round of Grants
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced 159
grants to fire departments throughout the United States in the fif-
teenth round of the Fiscal Year 2005 Assistance to Firefighters Grant
Program (AFG). The AFG program will issue approximately 5,500
awards worth $600 million in direct assistance to firefighters and first
responders throughout the country, demonstrating Homeland
Security's commitment to ensuring that America's firefighters have
the resources they need to protect their communities.
The Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program includes grants to the
fire departments and emergency medical services organization in
Florida for:
Fire Departments Receiving Aid
South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department, Port St. Joe, Operations
and Safety, $49,014.00. City of Winter Park Fire Rescue Department,
Winter Park, Operations and Safety, $195,832.00.
This fifteenth round of grants provides more than $15,452,198 to
help local fire departments and emergency medical services organiza-
tions purchase or receive training, first responder health and safety
programs, equipment and response vehicles.
The Assistance for Firefighters Grant Program is administered by the
Department's Office of Grants and Training (G&T) in cooperation with
the Department's United States Fire Administration.


Chronicle Publisher

Undergoes Heart Surgery

With An Elevated Risk, An Aortic Valve to the Heart Is
Replaced at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago.
Calcified Valve Is a Birth Defect, But Complicated By
Diabetes.
Publisher's Note: I feel a little strange focusing an article on myself
as I encountered one of the most challenging, yet interesting, ex-
periences in my 67 years of life. Prior to my entry into Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital, I had never spent any time overnight in a hos-
pital. Moreover, I had not encountered the challenge of major
surgery until last 4 August 2005. I think I learned much from
those experiences, and have a desire to share some of that per-
spective and information with the few readers who may be simi-
larly afflicted with diabetes and heart disease. I was among the
many thousands of persons who have undergone replacement of
their aortic valves into their hearts, a major operation requiring
the stopping of your heart, and a transfer of blood-functions to a
heart-lung machine during the operation.
Just a few weeks before the surgery, I had started dialysis, turn-
ing my blood circulation over to a machine that cleaned out the
poisons typical of diabetes. This procedure is saving my life, I
thought, so there should be little to worry about a heart-lung
-machine. Slowly, I learned to cope with the uncertainty of that
procedure my uncertainty, not the doctors who attended me. I
learned that this era is a high-tech domain, in-addition to the
medical jargon that postures very specific procedures in highly
technical medical terms. Physicians and their assistants will ex-
plain those terms and methods in "lay language" if asked, and I
found nimlt were quite willing'to'explaih their diagnosis in detail
Still, in addition to all the high-tech stuff, I am convinced that a
Miracle had been performed on me, with the help of prayer groups
at my local St. George Methodist Church, and my own, along with
the support of friends and relatives who saw me through this
chapter.
Television does provide a window into medicine, but much of this
deals with trauma and emergency procedures, with an emphasis
on the emergency room (ER) environment. Many of these pro-
grams sensationalize the details of surgical procedures. My expe-
rience was closer to an elected surgery, although as the date for
the operation moved closer, the need for the operation grew much
greater. I was told by an expert, that next year I would not need a
surgeon, but an undertaker. These little things tend to move one
along the decision path.
Friday, April 2005, had been a long day of errands and driving in the
Tallahassee area. Around 5:30 p.m. Andy Dyal and I had pulled up to
the editorial building at the Chronicle compound in Eastpoint, and we
unloaded the vehicle. As I was carrying a small parcel weighing a few
pounds, while approaching the office door, I suddenly felt faint. Ges-
turing to Andy to take my small parcel, my vision became cloudy and
down I went, nearly falling into the wooden ramp leading to the office
door. Stumbling for control, I remembered, going through the office
door, but little else for a few seconds. Diane Dyal, Andy's wife, and
our advertising designer, declared, "You have got to get to the hospi-
tal!" She called 911, and within a few minutes, the First Responders

INTERNAL JUGULAR CA THEATER




Catheter



S ,Hcart


The Jugular Catheter permits immediate dialysis.
from the Eastpoint area were at the office, taking the usual vital signs
and other emergency procedures. Unknown to me. a few friends had
been listening to their radios and learned that I was being taken to
Weems Hospital for observation and stabilization. There. I rested for a
couple of hours, being checked over by the doctor on duty. Then, I
was transferred to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital (TMH), 90 miles
north. I was assigned to a private room, to begin a series of tests.
including a repeat of a cardiac catheterization performed a year ear-
lier, in March 2004.
A general physical exam by Steven Medvid on entry into TMH re-
vealed "...He is awake, alert, looks his stated age, in no apparent dis-
tress ... with "... oxygen saturation 93% on 3 liters.. Earlier, my satu-
ration was below 90%. requiring oxygen. North Florida Respitory had
furnished an oxygen generator for use in my duplex apartment, and a
rechargeable yet small, oxygen tank for use in my automobile while
traveling. This apparatus was used continually until the surgery for
replacing the aortic valve was completed in August.

An echocardiogram test revealed that my aortic valve leading into the
heart was heavily calcified with "severe restriction of systolic open-
ing." Dr. D.W. Smith, M.D. performed the exam. He later wrote, "...there
is a mild to moderate aortic insufficiency ... In lay language, I was told
later that this analysis meant that the opening of the aortic valve into
the heart was small; about the size of a dime. "...The right ventricle
and right atrium are of normal size. Right ventricular systolic func-
tion appears normal. The tricuspid valve has normal appearance. There
is moderate tricuspid regurgitation." On Monday. April 4th, a cath-
eter was inserted in my right neck to permit immediate dialysis, due
to my kidney disease from diabetes.

Continued on Page 5


M6RZ

UPSTMSrr


Photo by Larry Lichty


;


, .












Pawe 2 23 Decemher 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle;'


Franklin


Briefs

December 20, 2005

Present: Commissioner
Cheryl Sanders;
Commissioner Bevin Piitnal;
Commissioner Noah Lockley,
Jr.; Commissioner Russell
Crofton and Commissioner
Jimmy Moscon.is.

IFAS Extension Director

Bill Mahan made the following
report:

He furnished the Commissioners
with copies of the November 2005
-recreational & Commercial
Fishing Regulations for the Gulf
of Mexico Federal Waters. Please
note the disclaimer from the Gulf
of Mexico Fishery Management
Council. This publication was pre-
pared for general information pur-
poses in November 2005, and has
no legal force or effect. Fishing
regulations are subject to change.

Recreational Red Grouper Fishing
Update: On December 1 st the FL
Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) approved a rule
that lowers the recreational bag
limit for red grouper in the Gulf
of Mexico state waters firm two
fish daily per person to one fish.
The new limit will take effect on
January 1, 2006. Please see at-
tached summary of FL and fed-
eral recreational bag limits for
grouper in the Gulf of Mexico.

Until January 1, 2006, the only
change to recreational grouper
fishing rules in Gulf of Mexico
waters off Florida is a closed sea-
son to the harvest of red grouper
in federal waters only (beyond
nine nautical miles offshore). All
other state and federal grouper
regulations are unchanged.

Beginning January 1, 2006, a
one-fish daily bag limit on the
harvest of red grouper by recre-
ational fishermen in both state
and federal waters will apply.

Recreational grouper bag limits in
the Gulf of Mexico are as follows:

Aggregate Grouper Daily Use Limit:

Five (5) grouper in both state and
federal waters

Red Grouper Daily Bar Limit:

Florida Waters: Two (2) fish until
January 1, 2006: one (1) fish be-
ginning January 1

Federal Waters: Harvest prohib-
ited November & December 2005:
one (1) fish beginning January 1

FWC Clarifies Total Length Fish
Measurement: On December 1st,
the FWC approved a series of rules
to clarify and standardize how
anglers should measure the total
length of various saltwater finfish.
The total length' of fish such as
redfish, spotted sea trout, and
snook, should be measured by
determining the straight line dis-
tance from the forward most point
of the head with the mouth closed,
to the furthest tip of the tail with
the tail compressed or squeezed
together, while the fish is lying on
its side There is no change in the
way "fork length" is measured for
fish such as Spanish mackerel,
cobia, and pompano. Another
change in the measurement rule
is for gray triggerfish which will
now be measured by fork length
instead of total length to match
the federal measurement regula-
tion.

These rules take effect on July 1,
2006.

Director of Administration

Alan Pierce informed the Commis-
sioners on an update concerning
the Eastpoint Channel.

"I called Mr. Terry Jangula for an
update and this is the report: Con-
gress did not appropriate addi-
tional funds for the Eastpoint
channel. Further, Congress
blocked the Corps of Engineers
from reprogramming funds from
one program to another, so the
Corps is unable to move additional
funds from its budget back into
the Eastpoint project. Both of
these actions were a direct result


I of Hurricane Katrina and the situ-
ation in New Orleans.

Therefore, the Eastpoint channel
will not be dredged in 2006, and
the county will need to make an-
other request to Congressman
Boyd for future funding in 2007.

I have informed Greg Kelly, archi-
tect for the School Board. At this
time, Mr. Kelly intends to obtain
62.000 cubic yards of spoil from
a spoil bank upriver that is slated
for removal, and then obtain some
300,000 cubic yards of spoil from
the Two Mile disposal area. Fol-
lowing the guidelines requested by
Mr. Jangula. the school can dig
out the material inside the retain-
ing walls around the spoil site, but
leave the walls intact. Mr. Jangula
estimates there is 400,000 cubic
yards of spoil material at Two Mile.

The spoil the school obtains will
Sbe used to prep the site for the
high school buildings first. The
school site will be developed so
that if the county can get the
Eastpoint channel dredged in
2007, the school site can still be
used for disposal in future ath-
letic fields."

The Commission decided to write
a letter to Congressman Boyd to
seek his help to intervene in the
matter.

Mr. Pierce spoke to Mr. Kelly re-
garding the development of an
entrance to the school property
from SR65." Mr. Kelly told me that
he had run into wetland problems
and that the school did not have
any land to offer as mitigation for
the impacts the road would cre-
ate. I told Mr. Kelly that it was
imperative that the school have an
entrance from 65, and that the
county would assist in any way
possible to get that road built, in-
cluding providing the mitigation
necessary. I offered this because
the county has various sites that
include wetlands that could be
offered as mitigation, such as
wetlands around the airport, and
various roads in Unit 4 on St.
George Island that the county
never abandoned."

The Board accepted the Public
Official Bond for Ms. Sharon
Thoman, Lanark Village Sewer
and Water Commissioner. Ms.
Thoman sent the Bond to the state
Division of Elections and they re-
turned it to the county with a let-
ter saying the Board was sup-
posed to accept the Bond, and that
the state only got a copy after the
Board accepts it. The Bond will be
kept in Ms. Ruth William's office,
along with the bonds for the other
elected officials.

The Board is to send a letter to
their legislative delegation, Gov-
ernor Bush, and Florida for the
additional $350,000 of SHIP funds
received to assist those- hurt.by
the Red Tide.

The Board was informed that the
DOT has issued Notice of Proceed
:n 2 airport projects: Extending
airportt Road. and Purchasing and
Installing Radio Equipment.

The Board approved submitting
an FAA grant request for the re-
surfacing of Runway 13/31 at the
airport. Mr. Mosteller prepared
the grant.

The Board was informed that
Northwest Florida Water Manage
ment District is recommending
the county receive funding for
some $400,000 worth ol
stormwater improvements on
Sawyer Street on St. George Is-
land. The recommendation will gc
to DEP for approval, but the ap-
proval should be given shortly.

The FWC has submitted the Grant
Agreement for improvements tc
Battery Park Marina. The City ol
Apalachicola will actually super-
vise construction as it is a city
owned facility, but the Chairmar
must sign the Agreement because
the county was the applicant. The
Board approved.

The Board was informed thai
David Kennedy, Preble-Rish, is
researching the possibility of re-
ceiving Federal Highway Author
ity money to widen CR67. Whilk
the county resurfaced the road
few years ago, the road might b(
eligible for widening through
Discretionary Program of th(
FHWA.

The Board action to aware
Apalachee Regional Planning
Council Hazardous Waste Assess
ment Grant that is done once ev
ery two grant that the ARPC regu
larly does for the county. Thi
Board approved.


Inform Board that a press release
from the Governor's Office has
been received announcing that
Franklin County has received a
$75,000 feasibility study for the
seafood industry. The actual grant
documents have not arrived yet
so there is no need for Board ac-
tion yet. The documents will prob-
ably arrive in January.

The Chairman is to sign the re-
newal of the Memorandum of
Agreement between Franklin
County and Office of Tourism,
Trade, and Economic Develop-
ment (O'ITED) for the continued
designation of the Franklin
County as Rural Area of Critical
Economic Concern. It was this
designation that helped the
county get the $75,000 feasibility
study. The Board approved.

The Board funded both a County
Engineer and a Grant Writer.
While interviews -have been done
for the grant writer, none have
been done for the engineer. For
three reasons, I recommend the
Board fill the Engineer's position
first. One, I suspect that an engi-
neer with a PE and the type of
experience desired by the Board
is going to cost more than the
$50,000 budgeted by the Board.
As example, Joe Hamilton was
paid $50,000 and he retired seven
years ago. If more salary is
needed, it may have to come from
the grant writer position. Two, if
an experienced engineer is hired,
they will be involved in most of the
grant writing because most of the
county grants are construction
related. Three of the four grants
discussed today were construc-
tion related. Three, space. There.
is one office left in the Planning
and Building Dept. I believe it is
going to be more productive for the
Engineer to reside here in the
Annex, where he can utilize the
support of three clerical positions.
and Mark Curenton with drafting
skills, and myself I recommend
the Engineer report directly to the
Board, as Joe Hamilton did. but
Sallow the Planning and Building
Dept. to serve as support services
for the Engineer. I have attached
a copy of tht advertisement that
will appear in the Florida Engi-
neering Society's internet help
wanted section. This is the soci-



Pay The Coui

The County Finance Department
disbursements from the Count
outset of the December 20, 200

ACS GOV'T FINANCIAL SYSTEM
12/20/2005 13: Chi
BANK VENDOR
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT


002395
000239
.04064
000100
'002157
001670
000214
000255
002172
..04065
.04066
002281
002435
001000
000322
000318
001613
000320
.04067
002420
002418
.04068
000878
.04071
.04070
000192
.04072
000869
000593
001935
001448
.04069
000872
002110
.04073
.04074
000202
002346
.04076
.04075
000292
001259
002092
000226
001671
000586
001216
002112
001830
001393
002429
.04077
.04079
001900
002285
.04078
000309
002417
'000626
0001'44
.04080
002271
000283
001758
000211
000429
001503
002419
001157
000149
000151
002406
002436
002343
000286
002421
001278
000648
000419
000439
002194
.04062
001972
.04081
002394
000168


ety that most PE's belong to. The
deadline for applying is Jan. 13,
2006,


Report To

The Board Of

County


Commissioners


From the Board of
Adjustment

December 20, 2005

1) Approve a request for a vari-
ance to construct a seawall within
the Critical Habitat Zone on prop-
erty described as Lot 9, Hidden
Beaches Subdivision, Carrabelle,
Franklin County Florida as re-
quested by Garlick Environmen-
,tal Associates, Inc., agent for
Donald & Audrey Schmidt. own-
ers.

2) Approve a request for a vari-
ance to construct a single family
dwelling 3 feet into the west side
lot line on property describe as the
west 38 'feet of Lot 2, Block I, Unit
4, Perkins Beach, St. Teresa,
Franklin County, Florida, as re-
quested by Joe and Nancy 1-
lannon, owners.

3) Approve a request for a vari-
ance to relocate a single family
dwelling 15 feet into the front set-
back line on property described as
SLot 2, Block 12, Unit 1, Dog Is-
land, Franklin County, Florida as
requested by Michael S. McGarry,
trustee.

4) Approve a request for a vari-
ance to construct stairs live feet
into the side setback line on prop-
erty described as the NW /4 of Lot
18, Bay North, Franklin County,
Florida as requested by Stan
Brown, agent for Gerald M. &
Joyce C. Bailey, owners.

5) Approve a request for a vari-
ance to construct a fence within
the Critical Habitat Zone on prop-
Serty described as Seaside Cottages
Subdivision, Eastpoint, Franklin
County, Florida as requested by
SInovia Consulting Group, agent
for Seaside Cottages, owner.


nty Bills

listed $3,030,158.23 in recommended
y General Fund, all approved at the

5 meeting. The list is as follows:


eck Register


AT &T
A.I.P. PRODUCTS INC.
AARON HIPPENSTEAL
ACTION FIRE & SAFETY EQU
"AIRGAS SOUTH
ALLTEL
AMERIGAS
APALACIIEE CENTER, INC
APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE'
APALACHICOLA HOUSING
APALACHICOLA STATE BANK
ARAMARK
AVTECH MARKETING INC
BAKER AND TAYLOR
BCC CAPITAL OUTLAY FUND
BCC GENERAL FUND
BCC LOGT ROAD PAVING FUN
BCC ROAD AND BRIDGE FUND
BENITA JUDSON
BOATWRIGHT/SHAWN
BROWN/ALLISON
BRUFORD FLOWERS
BYRD'S CONSTRUCTION LLC
CAPITAL CITY BANK
CITY OF APALACHICOLA
CITY OF APALACHICOLA
CITY OF CARRABELLE
CITY OF CARRABELLE
CLERK OPERATIONAL ACCOUNT
COLLEGIATE PACIFIC
COMMERCIAL SUPPLY
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS
DEPT OF MANAGEMENT SERVI
DIRT BUSTERS
EASTPOINT REDEVELOPMENT
EASTPOINT REDEVELOPMENT
EASTPOINT WATER & SEWER
ELAN FINANCIAL SERVICES
ERA MILLENDER .
EVEREADY GAS
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUPPLY,
FLEET SUPPLY
FLORIDA LIGHTING SPECIAL
FLORIDA MEDICAID-COUNTY
FLORIDA MUNICIPAL INSURA
FLORIDA RESEARCH, INC.
FOR THE RECORD REPORTING
FREIGHTLINER OF TAMPA LL -
GANDER AUTO PARTS
GATEWAY COMPANIES INC
GIBSON/REBECCA D
GREEN TREE
GREEN TREE
GT COMMUNICATIONS
GULF COAST AGGREGATES LL
GULF STATE
GULFSIDE IGA (CARRABELL
HICKS/SABRINA
ISLAND DRIVE PROPERTIES
J. V. GANDER DISTRIBUTOR
JOHN & JOALICE BUZIER
JUDITH RUNDEL
KELLEY FUNERAL HOME
KENNY STRANGE ELECTRIC
KETCHUM, WOOD ; BURGER
LEITZ OFFICE PRODUCTS
LIBERTY COMMUNICATIONS
LOCKLEY/BELINDA
MIDWEST TAPE EXCHANGE
MILLER MARINE, INC.
MILLER WELDING SUPPLY
MORON, MICHAEL
MOSTELLER/TED
NEXTEL PARTNERS INC
OFFICE OF THE STATE ATTO
PAGE/LISA
PARKER SERVICES, INC.
PEAVY & SON CONSTRUCTION
PEDDIE CHEMICAL COMPANY,
PREBLE-RISH, INC.
PROGRESS ENERGY FLORIDA,
QUALITY PLUS
QUALITY WATER SUPPLY
RAMONA DEAN
REDDY ICE-ALBANY
RING POWER CORPORATION


FRANKLIN COUNT'
GL540R-V06.60 PAGE 1


CHECK# DATE

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34187 12/20/05
34188 12/20/05
34189 12/20/05
34190 12/20/05
34191 12/20/05
34192 12/20/05
34193 12/20/05
34194 12/20/05
34195 :12/20/05
34196 12/20 05
34197 12/20/05
34198 12/20 05
34199 12/20/ 05
34200 12/20 05
34201 12/20/05
34202 12/20 05
34203 12/20 05
34204 12/20 05
34205 12/20 05
34206 12/20 05
34207 12/20 05
34208 12/20/05
34209 12/20 05
34210 12/20/05
34211 12/20 05
34212 12/20/05
34213 12/20/05
34214 12/20/05
34215 12/20/05


AMOUNT

129.50
195.72
1,500.00
41.50
52.40
983.5 ,
394r.74
2,033.33
279.13
620.00
971.88
173.18
19,485.00
515.42
140,000.00
304,000.00
2,013,383.00
15,030.91
600.00
370.00
390.00
1,200.00
4,834.00
1,641.33
393.54
42.74
165,896.76
269.37
14,164.65
23,118.45
836.73
1,159.96
166.29
850.00
1,200.00
1,600.00
89.34
396.00
840.00
217.06
524.36
175.32
531.72
36,859.84
144,302.00
59.00
142.85
713.64
32.78
2,181.28
360.00
925.96
1,397.92
8,499.61
913.99
234.06
35.17
449.98
1,040.06
15,265.87
10,000.00
54.60
1,795.00
3,337.96
351.00
871.01
103.60
135.00
129.96
11.95
232.50
500.00
1,200.00
320.72
1,540.10
565.98
2,773.93
1,510.45
777.34
43,026.79
2,885.48
29.95
121.50
600.00
132.00
682.95


St. George Island Commercial: "Long' Video Building," 115-127 E.
Gulf Beach Dr., Gulf Beaches. This is an awesome location in the heart of the
island commercial district with great drive-by traffic flow and easy access to
beach. Building has three lease spaces with 3726+/- rentable sq. ft., with three
solid tenants. $1,599,000. MLS#108846.
Select Land Value
St. George Island Beachview-Lot 28, Pebble Beach Village, I acre MOL.
Gorgeous private lot located directly on beach easement for easy access to
Gulfl $895,000. MLS#108997.



( Prudential
Resort Realty Wisae
St. George Island Apalachicola Carrabelle Port St. Joe
123 W. Gulf Beach Dr. 71 Market St. 108 Ave. A, Ste. B 401 Reid Ave.
850-927-2666 184 Eighth St. 850-697-2555 850-229-2555
850-653-2555
www.prudentialresortrealty.com
An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.


002269
001942
000132
000569
002424
000665
001995
000175
000870
001269


ROUMELIS PLANNING &
SEVEN TRENT LABORATORIES
SPIRIT SERVICES COMPANY
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
SWITZER/LORI
TALLAHASSEE DEMOCRAT
TAX COLLECTOR, FRANKLIN
TAYLOR'S BUILDING SUPPLY
THE FRANKLIN CO CHRONIC
TIRE DISPOSAL SERVICES


BANK VENDOR
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
000227 TUCKER CPA PA/T MICHAEL
.04063 UPS
002278 URS CORPORATION
001036 VIKING OFFICE PRODUCTS
002377 WARD/LAURA
000179 ZEE MEDICAL SERVICE COMP
GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
FUND RECAP:
FUND DESCRIPTION

001 GENERAL FUND
120 FINE AND FORFEITURE
137' FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC LIBRARY
140 ROAD AND BRIDGE
141 LOOT ROAD PAVING
142 MOSQUITO CONTROL
150 NEIGHBORHOOD REVITALIZTN CDBG
163 ENHANCED 911 FUND
170 AIRPORT FUND
'180 AFFORD.HOUSING ASSIST TRUST
304 LANDFILL TIPPING FEE FUND
TOTAL ALL FUNDS


BANK RECAP:


34216
34217
34218
34219
34220
34221
34222
34223
34224
34225


12/20/05
12/20/05
12/20/05
12/20/05
12/20/05
12/20/05
12/20/05
12/20/05
12/20/05
12/20/05


CHECK# DATE

34226 12/20/05
34227 12/20/05
34228 12/20/05
34229 12/20/05
34230 12/20/05
34231 12/20/05


.11,848.00
630.00
417.77
118.13
1,833.33
157.77
166.23
68.97
205.60
1,737.00

AMOUNT

325.00
14.06
3,316.95
42.53
300.00
576.25
3,030.158.23


DISBURSEMENTS

2,506,061.02
69,798.12
5,278.01
39,390.21
28,987.64
3,019.20
11,848.00
2,911.77
24,684.26
34,180.00
304,000.00
3,030,158.23


BANK NAME DISBURSEMENTS
-- --- 7-- --------- - - -
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT 3,030,158.23
TOTAL ALL BANKS 3,030,158.23


DRIVER LICENSE AND VEHICLE INSPECTION CHECKPOINTS

AUTHORIZATION

OUINCYDISTRICT

December 20, 2005


l [embers in Troop H, Quincy district, are hereby authorized to conduct driver license/vehicle
ii section checkpoints during daylight hours at the following locations(s):

DATE(S) LOCATIONS)

GADSDEN COUNTY

01-01-06 -01-05-06 SR 10(US 90), SR 12, SR 65, SR 267, Fantana Trail
01-006 01-12-06 SR 269, CR 65, CR 157, CR 159, Fantana Trail
0.13-06-01--19-06 CR 161, CR 270, CR 270-A, CR 274, Fantana Trail
o.-20-06- 01-26-06 CR 268, Brickyard Road, Joe Adams Road, Selman Road, Fantana Trail
0 .27-06- 01-31-06 SR 10(US 90), SR 12, SR 65, SR 267, Fantana Trail



DATES) LOCATIONS(S)

LIBERTY COUNTY
: -01-06-01-05-06 SR 267, SR 12, Camel Lake Road, Myers Ann St., River Road, CR 67
0 -06-06- 01-12.06 SR 65, CR 67A, CR 379 (Hoecake Rd.), Joe Chason Rd., Turkey Creek Rd.
0 -13-06-01-19-06 SR 67CR, CR 270 (MLK Rd.), CR 2224 (Blue Springs Rd.), Freeman Rd.
0:-20-06 -01-26-0 SR 20, CR 1641 (Dempsey Barron Rd.), White Springs Rd., Pea Ridge Rd.
0:-27-06 01-31-06 SR 267, SR 12, Camel Lake Road, Myers Ann St., River Road, CR 67



DATE(S) LOCATIONS(S)

WAKULLA COUNTY
0.01-06-01-05-06 SR 30(US 98), SR 375, SR 61(US 319), SR 267, and Cajcr PoseyRoad.
S01.O06 01-12-06 SR 363, SR 369, SR 377, SR 372 CR 375


01-20-06-01-26-06 CR 372, CR 372A, CR 372B, CR 373A, CR 365
S01-27-06 01-31-06 SR 30(US 98), SR 375, SR 61(US 319), SR 267, and Cajer Posey Road.
LOCATIONS(S)

FRANKLIN COUNTY
01-01-06 -01-05-06 SR 30, SR 30A, SR 65
01-06-o601-12-06- SR384,-SR67,.SR37.7: .
O;1306-q01,i9-06 ,,. CR.37,0,CR,157,_,CR59 .. ,.....
01-20-06- 01-26-06 CR 374, CR 30A SR 300 (Saint George Island Causeway).
01-27-06-01-31-06 SR 30, SR 30A, SR 65


STJAMES
S AY


Bayside Realty Inc.
877-577-7177 Toll Free
850-697-3919 Phone
850-697-9607 Fax

Residential & Waterfroht Properties.
Serving you in Wakulla and Franklin County.


THIS SECLUDED 6ULF VIEW HOME IS A PEAL TEPAU$UPE! Special
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Petra MIyricK--ealtor
160 Laughing Gull Lane Carrabelle, FL 32322






Come celebrate with the

FIRST UNITED METHODIST

I CHURCH OF APALACHICOLA


on Christmas Eve at 6:30 p.m.

Ringing in Christmas Eve with our


HAND BELL


CHOIR


This Candlelight Service will involve

| singing of festive and traditional I



Christmas Story, a Christmas

Drama, and conclude with

the lighting of Candles.

to Silent Night.


Also, join us Christmas Day at 10:00 a.m.

for our Christmas Day worship service!


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(800) 822-7530
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SERVING THE COAST SINCE 1913


tCgr%, AW"XFF


Y
0-31-10 6-01-1 6


SR299SR385CR6 e


I








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


23 December 2005 Page 3.


EDrroRIAL & COMMENTARY


Letter To The Editor

Since Mr. Applebee has seen fit to personalize his letter by citing sev-
eral specific individuals, I think it essential to clarify his misconcep-
tions and present some facts.
1. I am not now nor have been for some time the husband of Mrs.
Hitron. Further, Mrs. Hitron was providing quality health care to the
citizens of Franklin County a long time before Mr. Applebee floated up
on his lily pad. The reality of fear for Mr. Applebee is actually his job
loss due to pending litigation against him and the possible need for
his relocation from the area.
2. Mr. Applebee fails to elaborate in his letter that he was fired from
North Florida Medical and may be demonstrating the classic 'sour
grapes' syndrome.
3. The current day-to-day activities by Mr. Applebee which he be-
lieves pass for the practice of medicine are actually being conducted
in violation of his contractual agreements with North Florida Medical.
Despite his whining, I have faith in our judicial system that the truth
about Mr. Applebee will come out during the upcoming depositions
and trail.
I also mentioned only 'one or two doctors' in the county who are stir-
ring up the commission and then refer to them only euphemistically
as Drs. Wilbur and Wendy Whiner. I never mentioned Mr. Applebee or
any others by name. Doth he protest too much? Except for the ac-
tions of those few, there are a plethora of high quality medical practi-
tioners serving in all capacities across the health care spectrum in
Franklin County. Moreover, since he mentions Dr. Nancy Chorba, I
am compelled to point out that she too was providing quality health
care to the local citizenry long before Mr. Applebee floated up to our
shores. In point of fact, Dr. Chorba is one of the finest physicians in
the southeast and while having worked tirelessly for everyone in
Franklin County has never been given any support for her efforts,
certainly not from the county commission. I won't go into a list of her
efforts or achievements for the citizens of this area but only say that
Mr. Applebee couldn't carry her shoes!
Mr. Applebee claims "As a physician" to have treated many patients
without compensation. I'm sure his misrepresentation here is a typo-
graphical error. However, where and how is Mr. Applebee providing
free health care? Could this be the root of his or Wilbur and Wendy's
commission sponsored vendetta? Perhaps if the Whiners filed the
proper forms, charged the necessary fees or submitted requests for
available grants, all where appropriate, he.wouldn't have his bloomers
in such a twist toward North Florida Medical. It would also appear.
that Mr. Applebee failed to read the chapters on hygiene, substance
abuse and, personal health care in his doctor-wanna-be books. His
misquotes and misrepresentations about my references to personal
hygiene, addictive behaviors and preventive medicine vis-a-vis indi-
gent patients and seafood workers clearly demonstrate his disregard
for personal responsibility and certainly the facts as he observes them
daily. Further, he would seem to favor government intervention and'
control of an.individuals health care in a true socialized medicine
environment.
Last but by no means least he fails in every aspect to garner the tone
and meaning of my letter "AS LONG AS THE FRANKLIN COUNTY
COMMISSION IS INVOLVED IN HEALTHCARE IN FRANKLIN COUNTY,
THAT HEALTH CARE WILL BE SIGNIFICANTLY LESS THAN IT COULD
AND SHOULD BE FOR ITS CITIZENS."
Mr. Hoffer, 1 am as happy as many others in the county that another
curmudgeon as crusty as myself is on the mend! I am curious, how-
ever, why you might imply that being a profit-oriented facility might
be a bad thing? All members of the Franklin County medical estab-
lishment, even the profit making Drs. Wilbur and Wendy Whiner, have
an equal opportunity to apply for state, federal and in most cases
private grant funding. I also suspect that the records, during Mr.
Applebee's litigation, will show that North Florida Medical did not "pick
and choose" their patients and.limit anyone's access to health care.
From my perspective, I think it reasonable to state that the American-
health care system is broken and in serious need of repair. Further, it
would seem intuitively obvious that more of the same governmental
involvement of the past two decades can only serve to exacerbate the
challenges. While the lack of character, honor and, personal integrity
of Mr. Applebee as evidenced by his personalized reply, failure to comply
with his signed contractual agreements, and like the county commis-
sion his pandering to those most in need, or the incompetence and
mismanagement of the Franklin County Commission for all that they
do, don't do, try to do ... are certainly problematic, they fail to address
larger issues and certainly the big picture. More later...
John Hitron
P.O. Box Y
Carrabelle, FL 32322


Summary Judgment Decision

Delayed

On Monday, December 12th, four reporters and about thirty fisher-
men witnessed exactly why commercial fishing interests wanted Judge
Philip Padovano's wife, Judge Janet Ferris, recused from their hear-
ing on whether or not the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC), has the right to disobey the Florida Constitution in
their rulemaking procedures. One reporter commented that in his
years of covering court cases, it was the worst hearing that he ever
had the misfortune to cover. Mr. Ronald Fred Crum, President of Fish-
ing For Freedom and the Wakulla Fishermen's Association, brought
the lawsuit against the FWC after repeated attempts to reason with
the commission failed.


toVEM POST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
S850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
I Y Facsimile 850-670-1685
0-o1 re-mail: hoffer531@gtcom.net
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 14, No. 26


December 23, 2005


Publisher ................. Tom W. Hoffer
Director of Operations ............................. Andy Dyal
Contributors ............................................. Dawn Radford
........... Carol Noble
........... Richard Noble
............ Skip Frink
Advertising Design
and Production Artist............................... Diane Beauvais Dyal


Circulation Associate


The litigation arose when the FWC decided to make all nets, except
cast nets, use a maximum of 1 Inch square openings in their web-
bing. For eight years fishermen complained that nets with 1 Inch
square openings "unnecessarily kill and waste" 95% of what they cap-
ture. Fishermen point out that in order to catch enough fish to take to
the market they not only have to waste thousands of juvenile fish, but
also spend hours of their time removing the Juvenile fish from the
nets. In June of this year, the FWC decided to put the fishermen's
claims to the test against the claims of their net expert's 1997 testi-
mony. In the 1997 case, the states net expert, Brent Winner of the
Florida Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI), claimed that 1 Inch nets
would catch fish at a 95% marketable rate. As a result of Winner's
testimony being accepted as fact, and the fishermen's testimony only
being accepted as "anecdotal," the Administrative Law Judge decided
that winners testimony was truthful. June's net tests, which were
supervised by the original FWRI net expert, Brent Winner, proved
that the commercial fishing community were 100% right all along.
FWC/FWRI supervised tests showed that for every fish captured with
the FWC/FWRIS net, more than 20 Juvenile fish were "unnecessarily
killed or wasted." The bycatch rate for the FWC/FWRI nets turned
out to be a horrific 95-97%. The fishermen point out that the net they
recommended to be the minimum size allowed in the side-by-side
tests containing 1 1/2 inch square openings only had a 3% bycatch
rate ... Or for every 33 fish captured, only one was considered to be
bycatch.
Since the Florida Supreme Court determined that the "sole purpose-
of the constitutional amendment to limit net fishing was to, "prevent
overharvest, unnecessary killing and waste," fishermen are challeng-
ing the validity of the FWC to violate the amendment without consid-
ering the impact of their rules on the environment.
On the other hand, the FWC has stated that "unnecessarily killed and
wasted" rates don't matter because they have "full constitutional au-
thority" that can't be challenged .by the court. The FWC have also
stated in writing that they do not have to obey the Legislature's man-
date to provide "due process" in their rulemaking or the Florida Su-
preme Court's opinion that they use the same due process standards
mandated by the Legislature for gear.
If the FWC is successful at defeating the commercial fishermen, rep-
resented by Fishing For Freedom's President, Ronald Fred Crum, they
will have gained control of the Legislative, Executive and Judicial
checks and balances without oversight.... And that is something that
is NOT supposed to,happen in the United States of America.
The main issue at hand was whether the FWC had the authority to
disregard the "single subject" of the Limited Net Fishing Amendment
as determined by the Florida Supreme Court, The court ascertained
the "sole purpose" of the amendment was not "banning nets," but
rather to "prevent overharvest, unnecessary killing and waste" of.the
resource. Tests paid for by your tax dollars proved that for every single
legal fish that fishermen caught in the FWC's small mesh net, more,
than twenty juvenile fish of many. species were "unnecessarily killed
and wasted." No resource can withstand this type of waste, so fisher-
men, represented by Crum, challenged the ability of the FWC to pro-
mulgate rules that are 100% contrary to the intent of the amendment.
During the hearing. Judge Ferris.was argumentative, continuously
badgering the fishermen's attorney. Ron Mowrey. Her conduct was
very unbecoming of a judge in the opinion.of every person that com-
mented about the hearing. Many fishermenn left the courtroom too
angry to speak.
More than once Judge Ferris attempted to claim that, "The NET BAN
amendment only pertained to mullet." I find it strange that Judge
Ferris, being the wife of a 1st DCA Judge that has politically stopped
fishermen from reaching the supreme court for eight years, would
make such ridiculous statements. I'll leave it up to the readers to
decide for themselves whether or not they believe that Judge Ferris
didn't have knowledge of what the single page Limited Net Fishing
Amendment addresses. Which, by the way, is the exact same one
page amendment that she is supposed to rule on in this case! For
those who haven't read the amendment, there is not a single mention
of "mullet" within the entire document. One might theorize that if the
Judge can persuade herself to believe that the amendment only per-
tae.d to mullet, then all of the oth r fish wasted in the small mesh
nets due to the FWC's interpretation of the amendment would be-
come irrelevant. Twisted logic? Yes! But if you .look at Judge Ferris's
husband's irrational decisions dissolving favorable opinions for the
fishermen from the lower courts, then the term "twisted logic" is one
to be feared, despite the Supreme Court declaring that irrational and
absurd conclusions would not be adopted in this amendment.
From the beginning of the hearing, Judge Ferris made it pretty clear
how the entire proceeding would go, and she held true from start to
finish. Fishermen heard "through the grapevine" that the judge stated
to friends she would give the fishermen a fair hearing, but I would
certainly welcome anyone to obtain a copy of the proceeding from the
court and judge the "fairness" for themselves.
State Attorney. Jonathan Glogau, representing the FWC, told Judge
Ferris that the mullet harvest was increasing yearly and was healthy.
Contrary to Glogau's statements, official data from the FWC and Na-
tional Marine Fisheries Service clearly shows that the mullet harvest
has dropped every year for the last 4 to 5 years from 10 million to 7
million pounds ... In all probability it will be less again this year. The
evidence of the harvest decline was presented before the Judge.
Whether or not she listened to, or takes in account the truth, remains
to be seen. Fishermen contend the FWC's self interpretation of the
amendment that any net over 2" stretch mesh constitutes a prohib-
ited net is absurd because the agency disregarded the impact on the
resource while making the rule, The FWC claimed that it doesn't mat-
ter whether or not their nets unnecessarily kill and waste more than
twenty fish for every one kept for market because there are innumer-
ably more juveniles. The decline of the mullet harvest, as well as the
decline in the harvest of several other species beg to differ with such
shortsighted analysis.
Glogau told the judge that there was a thriving cast net industry,
insinuating that the 2" stretch mesh seine nets weren't important.


I, L ---'.--.-.-- rt-" .l ,
Karen's Deli r:
Dine In and Take Out .. ;
Boar's Head Subs i,' '
Blue Bell Ice Cream "', '
Homemade Salads " .
191 U.S. Highway 98 .
Eastpoint, FL 32328 I'
(Behind Car Wash) 1 ..
Phone: 670-8717


ll' IBIf I


......... Jerry Weber


Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein ........... Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis Apalachicola
Skip Frink ....................... Carrabelle
David Butler ............................. ............... Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung ........................ Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins ................. Eastpoint
Barbara Revell Lanark Village
Richard Harper ........................................ St. George Island
Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue would
cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the Chronicle
for price quotes if you seek several different or similar
issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2005
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


5TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY
SHOE DRIVE HAS STARTED!
It's time to go through your closets for those unwanted
pairs of shoes ... IN REASONABLE CONDITION.
Please help those in need and bring the shoes to
Coastal Foot and Ankle Clinic located at
221 Hwy. 98 in Apalachicola.
All shoes will be donated to Franklin's Promise. If you
are interested in receiving shoes, they will be on display
every Tuesday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Eastern
Time at the American Legion Hall located at 801 U.S. 98
at the corner of Apalachee Street in Apalachicola or
call 653-3338 for more information.
ajir~ip ai~ir B~i~iaipi~i@ iaiaj aipii _B _riairiraa prjBaiaafaia-aiaiB


Mr. Glogau evidently doesn't understand that the average 60-80 year
old fisherman cannot sling a 14 foot commercial cast net weighing
about 16-18 pounds to harvest mullet, leaving no option for the older,
disabled or underskilled fishermen to make a living catching the most
important commercial fish in Florida, the mullet. At one point, Glogau
even told the court that there was no such thing as "rectangular nets"
despite admitting the constitution specifically allowing them.
Judge Ferris did not make an immediate decision at the hearing, in-
stead she ordered the two sides to write down the reasons why the
summary judgments should be upheld or denied and to turn them in
by January 6, 2006. What will be the outcome? Only time will tell. If
the case goes against the fishermen, there are ten thousand ways to
appeal it ... especially after the all out effort the fishermen put forth to
have Judge Ferris recused and the manner in which she conducted
the hearing.
Dave Grix
VP Fishing For Freedom
http://fishingforfreedom.net
561-252-0550



Inside Out

Blue Christmas
By Chip Ballard Ballard 2005
As I write these words the hauntingly
S beautiful voice of Elvis Presley is coming
love of his life, proclaiming to the world
that, without her, he will have a blue
.4 Christmas.
And I go: Again?
That Christmas is already right around
the corner is, to me, almost inconceivable. I mean. haven't I only
recently finished putting all the lights, beads, baubles and other as-
sorted Christmas stuff away from last year? Didn't I just pay the final
installment on last year's gifts?
Well, anyhow, I hope your holidays are filled with love, peace, joy,
happiness, friendship, and food; and may the New Year find you lin-
gering beneath the mistletoe, roasting chestnuts over an open fire,
and making a long list of life-enhancing, soul-enriching resolutions
that will remain,unbroken always.
As I listen to Elvis, I can't help remembering last year when, in a mall
in Sarasota in early January, I ran into an old friend, Leslie Lynn
LaRue. I had not seen Leslie since my student days at USF, quite a
few full moons and several Christmases ago. I almost didn't recognize
her. She has packed on a hundred pounds; and her once long, beau-
tiful, natural blonde hair was bobbed and dyed smut black. She told
me she'd married a surgeon, had kids, and was holding advanced
degrees in both nuclear physics and microbiology. This was a shocker
because the last time I saw her she was struggling toward certifica-
tion in elementary education and worrying herself sick that she was
going to flunk out of the program.
Her blue eyes sparkled as she told me that as a Christmas present to
herself she had flown (all by her lonesome-hubby had had to work)
to Memphis to see Graceland. "I've been everywhere," she declared,
"but Graceland is one of the most spectacular sights I've ever seen.
Millions of little blue lights covered the mansion, the meditation gar-
dens, the stables, the guest houses, the acres of sculpted hillside and
manicured lawn...
"It's a Christmas I'll never forget," she panted. The memory was mak-
ing her swoon, taking her breath away. "The only thing missing was
the King himself!"
I told;her Elvis was-there in spirit.
"Oh, I know he was!" She sighed. She said Elvis's presence was pow-
erful and unmistakable. She said once he had come to her in the
guise of the wind, blew her skirt up and hummed "Love Me Tender"
into her ear. "It sent chills all up and down my spine." she said. "My
legs just turned to rubber. I could feel my whole body beginning to
melt. It's a miracle I didn't fall down flat on my face. I wanted so much
to hug and kiss him, but he got away before I could grab him. It's hard
to catch the wind. even a big gust like Elvis!"
Apparently even in death Elvis still wields a powerful effect on women.
Either that or Leslie Lynn LaRue has been educated beyond her intel-
ligence.
Chip Ballard is a writer and educator living in Zolfo Springs. He wel-
comes your e-mail at chipkyle746@earthlink.net.




Air-Con of Wakulla, LLC
HEATING AND COOLING
850-926-5592
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1








SPage 4 23 December 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


The Clerk Of The

SCircuit Court

Your Public Trustee
By Marcia Johnson
Q. I purchased my home years ago, and
I've just made my last payment. Is there
anything I should do now to ensure the
record reflects I've paid the balance?
A. Apparently, you had a mortgage on your home and property with a
bank, credit union, individual, or some other funding source. Now
that your loan is paid in full, a form entitled "Satisfaction of Mort-
gage" should be completed by the mortgage holder and recorded with
the clerk of the circuit court in the county in which the property is
located. In some instances, the mortgage holder sends the original
document to the Clerk's Office for recording and supplies you a copy;
however, sometimes, the original is sent to you. It would be in your
best interest to make sure a properly executed "Satisfaction of Mort-
gage" is recorded with the Clerk. This allows an accurate chain of title
in the official records. At this time, the fee for recording this instru-
ment is $10.00 for the first page and $8.50 for additional pages. If you
have any questions or comments about this column, please forward
them to: Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market St., Suite
203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320.


December 2005

From The Southeastern

Fisheries Association, Inc.

Anglers Want All Grouper For Themselves
The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will have discus-
sions in Corpus Christi, Texas, at their January 2006 meeting con-
cerning taking the consumer share of grouper away and giving it to
anglers and charter boat owners. The thinking seems to be because
so much hatred exists between anglers and longliners and longliners
and fishermen using a bandit rig that now is the time to divide and
conquer and take the fish for recreational fishing and run. There are
no doubts the harsh words and personal attacks have created yet
another division in the commercial (consumer providers) fishing sec-
tor. Throughout history many fishermen have felt if you don't use the
same gear I use and fish the same way I do, you are not fishing right
and need to be stopped. This thinking is not limited to grouper fishing
nor is it limited to the Gulf of Mexico.
What is at stake here are the actions of the Coastal Conservation
Association members and friends to continue taking all the fish at the
expense of everyone else, it is not a new philosophy nor are they
ashamed of how they have savaged the commercial fishing industry
over the years since they were founded. Their Florida lobbyist has
said on many occasions "the way you eat an elephant is one bite at a
time", and this grouper scam is just another bite of the elephant.
Sometimes it seems the state and federal agencies are intimidated by
the Coastal Conservation Association and do anything they can to
avoid being written up in one of their magazines or by some outdoor
writer who works with or for the CCA. But we are a nation operating
under "Rules of Law" and if correct, then this latest "grouper scam"
will not be perpetuated by the members of the Gulf Council nor the
National Marine Fisheries Service or NOAA Fisheries as they prefer to
be called.


The Best Gift Is Your Presence
inWmh ,^4.AT4 ti B-nimi, .W. ,*f *J* .... -- .---- ---, f
-Pleas5e, unve Safely!

Colonel Chris Knight, Director of the Florida Highway Patrol, an-
nounced the FHP's statewide traffic enforcement plans for the up-
coming Christmas and New Year holidays. FHP will implement zero
tolerance enforcement strategies targeting D.U.I., unlawful speed,
aggressive driving and hazardous violations throughout the state. The
FHP is also urging motorists to be mindful and considerate of pedes-
trians and bicyclists who are walking and riding within the public
right-of-way.
; This year's Christmas holiday period will begin at 00:01 hours on
! Saturday. December 24, 2005, and end at midnight Monday, Decem-
ber 26, 2005. The New Year holiday period will run from 00:01 hours
on Saturday; December 31, 2005, and end at midnight, Monday, Janu-
ary 2, 2006. Last year 33 persons were killed in 32 traffic crashes
during the 72-hour Christmas holiday period. Also, 38 people were
killed in 36 traffic crashes during the 72-hour New Year holiday.
As in the past, Colonel Knight has suspended office operations for all
sworn personnel effective at the close of the workday on Thursday,
December 22 and December 29, 2005. All FHP sworn personnel nor-
mally assigned to administrative duties will be reassigned to patrol
interstates, major state roads, and Florida's turnpike throughout both
holiday periods.
Additionally, the FHP will be expanding enforcement operations dur-
ing the Christmas and New Year holidays in an effort to identify and
arrest impaired drivers as part of Florida's You Drink and Drive, You
Lose DUI enforcement crackdown, which began Saturday, December
10, and concludes Sunday, January 1, 2006.
Motorists are urged to contact the FHP or local law enforcement offi-
cials when reporting an impaired, aggressive, or dangerous driver by


Boyd Staff
Holds Office
Hours In

Carrabelle &

Apalachicola

A member of Congressman Allen
Boyd's (D-North Florida) staff will
be visiting Carrabelle and
Apalachicola on the fourth
Wednesday of every month so the
people of Franklin County have
the opportunity to personally dis-
cuss issues concerning them.
Congressman Boyd's staff is
trained to assist constituents with
a variety of issues relating to vari-
'ous federal agencies. It is impor-
tant to the Congressman that his
staff is available for those who are
not able to travel to either his
Panama City or Tallahassee of-
fices.
Office Hours with
Congressman Boyd's Staff
Wednesday, December 28, 2005
9:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.
Carrabelle City Hall
Carrabelle
Wednesday, December 28, 2005
1:30 p.m. -3:00 p.m.
Franklin County Courthouse
Clerk's Office
Apalachicola


simply dialing *FHP(*347) from a cellular phone. Callers can remain
anonymous. Motorists who experience car trouble and are in need of
assistance are also encouraged to use *FHP. For real-time traffic and
road condition reports, as well as maps and other safety tips, please
visit the FHP website at www.fhp.state.fl.us.
Florida drivers can also call 511 for the latest updates on trafficjams,
road construction, lane closures, severe weather and travel times on
interstates and major highways.
Internet address: www.fhp.state.fl.us.

December 2005

From The Southeastern

Fisheries Association, Inc.

Basa/Swai/TRA Imports Could Reach 500 Million Pounds
by 2008
In 1999, 7.2 million pounds of Basa were sold in the United States. By
2002 nearly 47 million pounds were sold and by 2004, 183 million
ponds were served to US customers. Projections indicate over 250
million pounds will be consumed in America this year and with a 33%
increase possible Basa could reach 500 million pounds by the end of
2008. An article in Seafood Business painted out the difficulty Basa is
having in the South because of the ongoing fight with domestic cat-
fish. Three states, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama have halted
the sale of Basa in their states because banned antibiotics have been
found in farmed fish from several exporters. But even with the south-
ern ban in place, Basa is showing up nationwide.
Deep-fried Basa has been substituted for "grouper sandwiches" in
Florida (and probably in other states) and the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services have issued several warn-
ings to vendors: Because Basa can be purchased for less than
$3.00 per pound, it becomes very tempting for some restaurants
to offer Basa for grouper. SFA encourages anyone who is not sure of
what kind of fish they are being served to at least ask the waiter to
check with the chef and see what he/she says. If the answer comes
back that the fish is "pond-raised Mexican grouper", chances are it is
anything EXCEPT grouper.


Former

Chronicle

Editor Brian

Goercke

Writes From

Africa

Former Chronicle Editor, Brian
Goercke, has provided some up-'
dating information about his work'
in Africa, received last week.
His letter, excerpted below,, re-
flects long hours and a full sched-
ule.
"... I'll be in the U.S. from 20-30
December. I would have liked to.
stay longer, but I didn't have a lot.
of leave time remaining. I'll only
be in New York for this time. It
4ieokslike I:ll emnain.with.my tem,-
porary consultancy for Family
Health International until the end
of next March...
Work here has remained ex-
tremely busy. During the month
of October alone, I had to coordi-


nate three workshops ... two of
them involving multiple organiza-
tions attending and presenting.
I've been doing a lot of capacity
building work with partners of
Family Health International. For
instance, the workshops have cov-
ered topics like Anti-retroviral
Treatment for those infected with
HIV, building facilitation skills for
educators reaching youth on HIV/
AIDS issues, strategic planning
and conflict resolution. I've also
taken a lead role in writing and
editing HIV/AIDS curriculum for
youth involved with faith-based
organizations. Just recently, I also
helped a partner conduct a
baseline formative assessment
with youth and educators to re-
ceive feedback on their HIV/AIDS
outreach program. And there's
lots of other work, which seems
to keep me busy ... even on week-
ends...
I just went to Zimbabwe! and saw
the children I'm pont'.orin4. They
.yere in.p,. ett.good spirits ,and
seeImed very healthy. Zimbabwe
still remained an economic swamp
with the value of its dollar trading
at 90,000 to one U.S. dollar or
13,000 to one rand. There doesn't
look like any solutions to its prob-
lems any time soon...


Affordable Health & Life Insurance

* Freedom of Doctors, Hospitals
* Cannot be singled out for rate
increases or cancellation

Call Licensed Agent:
JESSIE HILL, JR.
850-926-6575 or 866-343-6575
Visit approved website: www.jessiehillhr.mw-ins.com
Mid-West National Life Insurance of Tennessee;
Home Office: Oklahoma City, OK
Association membership is required. MW/000023 Exp. 06/06


GENERAL CONTRACTORS
RG0055056


Tractor Work
* Aerobic Sewage Treatment Systems
Marine Construction
Septics Coastal Hauling


Foundation Pilings
Commercial Construction
Utility Work-Public &
Private


Community Health Centers


By Larry Applebee
A community health center (CHC)
is a not for profit provider of health
care in a medically underserved
area (MUA). CHCs were created by
Congress and generally receive a
grant to provide care for the un-
insured. While they may seem
similar to a private medical prac-
tice, CHCs differ by their manage-
ment structure and the broader,
community based services they
provide.
Community Health Centers are
created by local community lead-
ers to fill critical gaps in health
care. 41 million Americans are
uninsured and the number is in-
creasing at a rate of 1 million a
year. Medically Underserved Ar-
eas (MUAs) have higher than av-
erage rates of poverty, infant mor-
tality, and elderly persons and sig-
nificant shortages of primary care
providers.
There Are Four Types of Commu-
nity Health Centers:
* Community Health Center
(330e),
* Migrant Health Center (330g),
* Health Care for the Homeless
(330h), and
* Health Care for Public Housing
(330i)


Community Health Centers must
be located in a high needs area
(MUA). They have comprehensive
health and related services ,and
are open to all residents, regard-
less of ability to pay. CHCs are
governed by community boards
and held to strict accountability
and performance measures for
administrative, clinical and finan-
cial operations.
The Services Provided Include:
* Primary care physicians and
nurses
* Maternity care (pre, delivery and
post) (at most but not all centers)
* Preventive diagnostic and treat-
ment for infants and children
* Laboratory and Radiology
* Immunizations and Well-child
exams
* Patient case management
* Pharmacy as appropriate
We are fortunate to have a Com-
munity Health Center in our area,
otherwise known as a Federally
Qualified Health Center (FQHC).
Our local CHC or FQHC is at
Eastpoint Medical Center, if you
have no insurance please call 850-
670-8585 to establish care.


Three Servicemen Statue

South Welcomes New
Board Member


Three Servicemen Statue South,
Inc. President Jimmy Mosconis is
pleased to announce a new addi-
tion to its board of directors.
George W. Duren of Port St. Joe
has been one of the project's most
dedicated volunteers from the be-
ginning and would make an ex-
cellent director, Mosconis said.
Duren, a Vietnam Veteran, has
been active in many civic and
business organizations in the re-
gion since 1973, including the
Gulf Coast Community College
board of trustees, Bayside Savings
Bank board of directors, Kiwanis
Club, Chamber of Commerce and
many other community organiza-
tions and projects.
He is owner of Duren's Piggly Wig-
gly, and Bluewater Outriggers in
Port St Joe. Duren said that he is
"'ery proud and honored to join
the board and to participate in
seeing this project to completion."


Mosconis said, "We look forward
to his continued active participa-
tion in this project to help us bring
the statue home."
Three Servicemen Statue South is
a nonprofit organization with
plans to bring a bronze sculpture
of the famed Three Servicemen
Statue Vietnam Memorial to
Apalachicola, Florida. The Three
Servicemen Statue gives a human
face to the 58,235 names in-
.scribed nearby on The Wall Of
Honor in Washington, D.C. The
project will honor Vietnam Veter-
ans and veterans of all American
wars.






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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER 23 December 2005 Page 5


Holiday Parties Highlight
Christmas And New Year's
Celebrations


The joint meeting of Riverkeepers and the St. George Is-
land Civic Club meeting in late November is typical of many
holiday get-togethers celebrating Christmas and New Year.
There is always plenty of food, and lively conversation on
contemporary public issues. Other meetings in the Holi-
day motif include Friends of the Library, St. George Island
Civic Club, the Cook Insurance Agency Open House, the
Carrabelle Chamber and the Eastpoint Library Holiday
party.


Heart Surgery from Page 1

The Perma-Cath placement under ultrasound guidance was placed
by Joseph C. Hay, Jr. under the guidance of Dr. Adam Levitt, M.D. A
portion of Dr. Levitt's report read as follows:
"The patient was taken to Specials and laid flat on Spe-
cials table, After IV sedation was established, patient's
right neck and chest were prepped and draped in stan-
dard sterile fashion. Next, a slight right was used to iden-
tify the patient's right internal jugular vein under ultra-
sound guidance, 1% local over the patient's left internal
jugular vein, and then a micropuncture kit was used to
gain access into the patient's right internal jugular vein
under ultrasound guidance. Then, a 0.018 Nitinol wire
was inserted through the internal jugular vein down to
the heart down to the IVC. Next, a 4-French sheath was
inserted over this wire and then an 0.025 Inch angle glide
wire was inserted down to the internal jugular, went down
to the heart down to the IVC. Next, the sheath was re-
moved and then 1% Lidocaine was used to infiltrate the
skin along intended course tunnel and then a scalpel was
used to cut an incision just underneath the clavicle and
then a Maxid 22 cm cut the tip catheter was tunneled
from the chest up to the neck incision. Next, the first
dilutor was placed over the wire under fluoroscopy acid
then the introducer and dilator over the wire. Then the
dilator was removed and then the Perma-Cath was placed
through the peel-away sheath. Once this was down, we
pulled away the peel-away sheath and then positioned
the Perma-Cath at the SVC-RAjunction, and make sure
there was no twist, there was no twist, so then we aspi-
rated both ports which aspirated very easily and then
flushed very easily with Heparinized saline with the rec-
ommended amount of concentrated Heparin in each port.
After we did this, we then closed the neck incision with
interrupted 4-0 Vieryl subcuticular stitches arid then we
used 30 Nylon to secure the catheter to the skin. At the
end of the case all sponge and needle counts were cor-
rect. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was
transferred alert, awake and in good condition to the re-
covery room."
After a brief rest in bed, I was taken to my first dialysis in the TMH.
The buildup of poisons had continued for several weeks before the
catheter was inserted, permitting immediate dialysis, and relief from
that buildup was immediate. The comment from Dr. Ivan Doll, my
kidney doctor, rang true in my memory, "... You will have better days
ahead." I felt considerable relief from the draining of fluids, especially
in my legs, and my weight loss began to register on the scales in
concrete terms. At the beginning, my weight was 231 pounds. After
several weeks of dialysis, my weight event down considerably, to 159
as of December 13th. This fluctuates some, from 159 to about 171
when dialysis is performed again in the twice weekly cycle.
I have to drive four hours each time, with 3.5 hours or slightly less on
the schedule, since there is no dialysis center in Franklin County,
with the nearest facilities available in Perry, Tallahassee, Panama City
or Quincy.
At mid-week, Dr. F. H. Shamsham, M.D. performed a right and left
heart catherization, a coronary angiogram and a left.ventriculogram.
The catherization procedure had been performed one year earlier.
March 2004, by Dr. Shamsham. Excerpts trom his 2005 report were
as follows:
"...Both groins were prepped and draped in a standard
sterile fashion. The right groin was anesthetized using
1% lidocaine. A 6 French sheath was introduced into the
right common femoral artery. A French sheath was intro-
duced into the right common femoral vein. Right heat
catheterization -was then performed using an 8 French
Swan-Gain catheter. Cardiac output was then calculated
using the FICK method. AJL4 catheter was then used to
engage the left main coronary artery originating from the
Continued on Page 6





December 2005


Coming In February 2006,

New Duplex For Rent
A new duplex, with two bedrooms each, will become available for rent on a six-
month or one-year lease at the Chronicle compound, at 33 Begonia Street,
Eastpoint beginning February 1, 2006. Each apartment is 1600 square feet. The
property will be managed by John Strickland of Lighthouse Realty (St. George
Island, 850-927-2821). Call him for details. On Eastpoint water and sewer; brand
new appliances including stove, dishwasher, disposal, refrigerator, washer and
dryer all General Electric. Heat pump for heating and cooling.
Rent = $800 per month, unfurnished. First and last months rent due upon signing of
the lease; damage deposit required. Small animals are permitted. The building is
paired with another duplex, and surrounded with chain link fence, creating a one-
acre kennel.


Lighthouse
S Realty
- Of St. Georgi


e Island, Inc.


Call John Strickland at
(850) 927-2821


Seascope
111N W MNext meeting: January 9,
--,.!, "".' ,' : -....:.- s-2 0

20Annual Membership
tliiiiiii Meeting
anet's Joy Gulf View: 2BR/2BA Rainbow's End Gulf View: East On January 9, 2006 the annual
general membership meeting will
home located on a great corner lot. End 3BR/2BA home located across be held to elect' the new officers
Enjoy easy beach access that is just from beach access. This home fea- and plan the activities for the com-
a short walk away. This fully fur- tures a nice open floor plan, extra ing year. The slate of officers for
nished home has an open floor plan, den, storage, surround sound, and 2006 includes the following:
an enclosed "sleeping porch", and storm shutters. Relax on the open Commodore-Skip Frink
two extra buildings on the lot; one is deck and enjoy beautiful Gulf views. Vice Commodore-Dan Rosier
used for storage and the other as an MLS#108243. $949,000. Past Commodore-Flo Coody
office. MLS#l108060. $565,000. Purser-Margarita Pilkinton
office. MLS#108060. $565000. Scribe-to be determined
4.Directors-Gael Kiser, Chuck
Bennett, Sid Winchester, and Jim
Bryan
INTERIOR homesite with good elevation located on quiet street. Beautiful Please mark your calendar for this
Bay views from water access at end of street. MLS#107785. ........$949,000. date and plan to be present to
support the Club. Unless other-
BAY VIEW homesite on protected corner lot with lovely trees and palmettos, wise announced, the annual
just a short walk to the beach. MLS#107518. $469,000. meeting will be held at 6:00 p. m.
at the Episcopal Church in
ONE ACRE Bay front homesite in St. George Plantation with great views. Carrabelle.
Enjoy the Beach Club with pool and tennis access. MLS#106402. $799,000. Membership Renewal Time
HIGH AND DRY homesite in quiet area with lots of trees and vegetation,
easy beach and Bay access. MLS#106584. $369,000. It is timeto renew your member-
ship with the Club. Each of you
should have received an email
containing the renewal applica-
tion. Last year we added eleven
new members during our annual
drive. Invite your friends and ac-
AIlyciT quaintances who might have in-
terest in our activities to join in
2006.

Timber Island Yacht Club
2006 Membership Application
PO Box 313
Carrabelle, FL 32322

Name Spouse's Name

Complete below only if you are a new member or if there have been any changes from your


2004 membership information.

Mailing Address


Home Phone


E-Mail

Work Phone


Cell Phone


Boat Name Boat Description

Children < 21 years

Submit check or money order to the listed address in the amount of $24.00 for family
membership (one vote) or $24.00 for each person desiring a vote.


I -.. L


xx A A"AAKIIARR % KAX VAJLJLlA


1 - II I I -


.


1"








TPaoP 6 23 Decemher 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Heart Surgery from Page 5



11 1


. "



S.




A cut-away of the heart showing the location of the Aortic
valves See arrows.
right sinus of Valsalva. A lelt coronary angiogram was
performed. The JR4 catheter was then used to engage
the right coronary ostium originating from the right si-
nus Valsalva. A right coronary angiogram was performed.
This same catheter was used to direct a straight tip guide
wire across the calcified aortic valve which was success-
fully crossed and gradient across the aortic valve was
then obtained by measuring simultaneous gradient from
the femoral artery and the left ventricular chamber. Left
vetriculogram performed using 20cc of contrast and he-
modynamic gradient was again obtained across the aor-
tic valve using pullback. The aortic valve area was then
calculated by the Godin formula and the patient toler-
ated the procedure well, without any complications."
The bottom line result of the exam revealed that all of my coronary
artery vessels were heavily calcified, and the aortic valve itself includ-
ing the valve annulus, was heavily calcified. One sentence captured
my attention in close-up, "... the patient is definitely at high risk for
preoperative mortality and morbidity." This risk was later evaluated
from an additional 10% to 25% failure in surgery for replacement of
the aortic valve. I will confess that this evaluation weighed heavily in
my thinking as I consulted with cardiac specialist Dr. Andre Jawde,
M.D. and the surgeon at Northwestern University, Dr. Patrick
McCarthy, M.D.
Dr. Shezad Sanaullah, Apalachicola, had performed several cardiac
exams, including a nuclear stress test weeks earlier.,He had written
his recommendations to Drs. Shamsham and Jawde in his referral to
them.
Thereafter, I did not need motivation to get my legal affairs in order,
taking up to six weeks for that paperwork, still not completed by De-
cember 2005, as this is written. But, the legal mechanisms were cre-
ated to ensure continuity of our two corporations, the Franklin
Chronicle, Inc. and the Eastpoint Theatre, Inc. Since many of the
assets for these two corporations were in land, I chose to put my
estate into a Living Trust to be administered by a three member Board
of Directors, including myself.
There is a designated pattern of succession in the event of my death.
Having had a will many years before, the initial thoughts about death
were considerably jarring to my self-esteem and futures; this has never
been a favorite plan for my demise, but some kind of plan for succes-
sion had to be written, and with the help of attorney Bob Wharrie, a
specialist in geriatric legal matters, this was accomplished. I had to
get beyond the unsettling nature of estate planning in order, toprotect
the interests of employees 'and contributors to our projects.
I checked out of TMH on 6 April, with a tentative plan to have the
aortic valve replaced, but where? Another consultation with Dr. Jawde
was made by the end of May, discussing the pros and cons of a metal
versus tissue valve and the issue of Coumadin anticoagulation and
possible complications.
A tissue valve has a longevity of about 10 to 15 years, I was told. The
longevity of a metal valve appears to be much longer. A metal valve
required the taking of a blood-thinner call coumadin, an extremely
volatile chemical that thins the blood so effectively that it contributes
to connnual Dleeding even with small scratches.
V.a diabetic, my risk revel was elevated, coupled with "significant
vascular calcifications" (calcified arteries) Dr. Jawde expressed the
desire that I obtain'a "second opinion" concerning this surgery. In a
conversation with my major professor and his wife, Larry and Sandy.
Lichty, I was informed about evaluations of hospitals and physicians
on the internet. I went to http://www.nmh.org/nmh/heart/index.htr
for additional information, and discovered the Bluhm Cardiovascular
Institute headed by Dr. Patrick McCarty at Northwestern University,
Chicago.
The Bluhm Institute was comprised of cardiologists, cardiac surgeons,
vascular surgeons, cardiovascular anesthesiologists and radiologists,
providing care for all aspects of cardiovascular diseases. The Center
is described on the internet as follows:
'There are four major valves in a person's heart that di-
rect blood flow forward through the chambers of the heart.
Heart valve disease can occur with any one or a combi-
nation of the valves, and it will often lead to heart failure
if left untreated. Diseases of the mitral or aortic valves
(the valves of the left side of the heart) are most common
affecting over 5 percent of the population. Heart valve




Want to purchase minerals
and other oil/gas interests.
Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, Colorado 80201


disease implies that a valve either fails to open properly
(stenosis) or fails to close properly allowing backward flow
of blood (regurgitation).








T.






'14 I ,-,


One of the high-rise buildings at the Northwestern Memorial
Hospital, downtown Chicagd.
"Our Center for Valve Disease within the Bluhm Cardio-
vascular Institute is led by Robert Bonow. MD who is
recognized internationally for his research and teaching
on both aortic and mitral valve disease and by Patrick
McCarthy, M.D. who is a renowned cardiovascular sur-
geon and innovator of valve repair techniques. He recently
designed a mitral valve prosthetic ring that is used to
repair leaking mitral valves and is regarded as one of the
best devices available. It is a priority among our surgeons
at the Center for Heart Valve Disease to repair rather than
replace heart valves whenever possible to preserve a
patient's own tissues so that blfood thinning (anti-coagu-
lation) medications are not required. Repaired valves do
not deteriorate like other val' e replacements. When pa-
tients have combined disease of both the aortic valve and
the ascending aorta (the large vessel that houses the aor-
tic valve and takes blood out of,the heart), we strive again
to replace the diseased aorta and repair the aortic valve
using a technique known as "valve-sparing aortic root
replacement.
"Our patients also benefit from sophisticated imaging tech-
nology that can detect and assess some types ofheart
valve disease even before s'miptonms appear. Current re-
search trials at the Center for alive e Disease include the
evaluation of new valve repair and replacement tech-
niques, new anticoagulation therapies, and the effects of
certain drug treatments on 1- heart valve disease. Tech-
niques to utilize smaller, cosmetically appealing incisions
have been championed by the surgeons at Northwestern
Memorial. These techniques can allow a more comfort-
able recovery and help patients return to their lives and
day-to-day activities quicker."
Contact Center for Heart Valve Disease
(866) 662-8467 (toll free)
Atrip to Chicago w.\a planned for late June by AMTRAK with connec-
tions in Ne. Orlei an-n A horritahil- cr-i.jed damage l:'t tih rails in the
meantime, after my consultation appoilntmentL- hldd been made, so
the schedule had to be changed. Finally, on July 14th, Andy Dyal and
I boarded the train in Tallahassee at 8:30 p.m. We arrived in New
Orleans the next afternoon, changed trains, and boarded another train
scheduled for Chicago the next afternoon, Saturday, July 16th. We
rented a car, and later discovered the outrageous fees changed for
overnight parking next to our moteldowntown, to be about $26 per
night! The hotel was also highly priced, a "bargain' at $90 per night.
Most hotels in downtown Chicago are priced at $250 per night, or
higher.
While on AMTRAK, I noticed an abnormal number of employees mill-
ing about while Andy and I were boa .ding, contributing to high over-
head, I presumed. Andy was loaded omwn with equipment, and few
ollered Lo help him load onto the train. The corridors were very nar-
row: certainly not a-, spacious as depicted in many films made in the
World War II years, such as "Foreign correspondent The double deck
passenger cars were difficult for m' to navigate but I managed to
climb to the second level after we vere told that the handicapped
room reserved for us in advance had been given up to another party.
The marvel of the trip appeared to bet combination shower and toilet
all in the same compartment; certainly a dubious inno\alion b\
AMTRAK. However, the food was excellent, along with :he rolee-. \\'e
disembarked from the cramped quarters in Chicago al the Central
Station downtown, rented a car, andr'oceeded to the hospital for the
first consultation.
Health Grades, Inc has evaluated ho)t.als and physicians across the
United States, located at www.healthgrades.com. The data of evalua-
tion were based on the years 200 throughh 2003. before the Bluhm
Institute was founded. There were three categories of evaluation, BEST,
AS EXPECTED and POOR. BEST fieant that fewer patients were af-
fected in a particular hospital thanrthe national average. POOR meant



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that more patients were affected in a particular hospital being evalu-
ated than the national average. The patient safety ratings were orga-
nized across several categories, including death prevention, lack of
bed sores, diagnosis and treatment in time, absence of foi iiOng bodies
left in after surgery, avoidance of collapsed lung, lack of hospital l n-
fections, avoidance of excessive bruising, absence of hip fractures
after surgery, av6idance of excessive bruising, adequate organ func-
tion, avoidance of respiratory failure following surgery, and lack of
surgical wound site breakdown. Other categories displayed in addl-
tional charts included Safe Practices, Cardiac Ratings, Stroke Care
Ratings, Pulmonary Ratings, Vascular Surgery Ratings, Critical Care,
and a Checklist for Choosing a Hospital. Each evaluation cost about
$10. The data were incomplete for the Bluhm Institute since It was
founded after 2004. However, evaluations for other hospitals In Florida
and elsewhere were informative, especially for Shands in Gainesville,
evaluated POOR for the aortic valve replacement procedure. Perhaps
the rating was low due to the nature of difficult cases they accepted.
These ratings do not necessarily reflect competencies, but that rating
convinced me to look elsewhere. The evaluations for Dr. Murphy and
his key staff were quite good, but his comment during our interview
convinced me I was at the right place, at the right time. He informed
me that he had performed over 6000 open-heart surgeries. "6,000?"I
asked. "Yes." We moved on to other aspects of my diagnosis.
Health Grades also evaluates physicians arranged in nine categories
including Specialties, Education and Training, Board Certification,
Governmental Disciplinary Actions, (in the previous five years) Quality
Comparisons, Characteristics, Quality Ratings for Area Hospitals,
Directory of Area Hospitals and a checklist of questions. Health Grades
does not collect information of malpractice and lawsuits. Physicians
who choose to become certified must have training beyond what medi-
cal licensure requires. Board certification involves a rigorous review
of the physician's knowledge, experience and skill in a specialty. Health
Grades reports that keeping up with disciplinary action information
on doctors is extremely difficult. All of the states release information
on their disciplinary actions, except South Dakota. About 80% make
records available on a monthly basis. On a federal level, disciplinary
actions relate to Medicare, Medicaid and all federal health care pro-
grams. States vary greatly in their level of detail, terminology and
notification methods. In comparing a particular physician with oth-
ers, three indicators of quality are used: (1) Experience, (2) Certifica-
tion and (3) governmental disciplinary actions (sanctions).
In addition to evaluations of hospitals and doctors, the following web
sites for persons with Medicare may be helpful: www.medicare.gov;
www.cms.hhs.gov; www.socialsecurity.gov or www.ahca.org.
The Florida Dept. of Elder Affairs has released their Fourth Edition of
the Consumer Resource Guide. Besides general information, the book
provides information on specific programs and services, addressing
several key topics, such as Disease prevention, Caregiver support,
Health Insurance programs, Safety and emergency services. Visit the
Internet at http://elderaffairs. state.fl.us/doea/ 200SCRG/TC.html
or send a request to: Consumer Resource Guide, Fla. Dept. of Elder
Affairs, 4040 Esplande Way, Tallahassee, FL 32399-7000.
The briefing booklet from the Northwestern Memorial Hospital con-
tains the usual hype but after my experience for six days, I can cer-
tainly vouch for the truthfulness of the appeal as contained in the
opening paragraphs, as follows:
"At Northwestern Memorial, we want to provide you with
the Best Patient Experience. This means ollering you the
highest quality state-of-the-art medical care with atten-
tiveness to your physical comfort. It also means we will
ensure you are well-informed regarding your medical care,
your treatment options and your medications. We know
that the best care also includes attention to your emo-
tional and spiritual needs, and any other special con-
cerns you may share with us- This is the mission and it
is reflected in everything we do, From our nurses, physi-
cians and other caregivers, to our food service and house-
keeping staff, we all want to be aware of anything special
we can do to help you feel at ease...
I was surprised at the access my visitors and family had, even to
include a visit by my cousin Mary Bergeson and her husband. John.
Just before being taken into the operating theatre, the night before,
my good friends Lariy and Sandra Lichty, the Bergesons and retired
Navy Captain Howard and Patricia Kerr joined me in my room, help-
ing to take away the pre-operation jitters and giving me some mo-
ments of relaxation. Overall, I found the hospital to be extremely clean,
and just plainly, superb.
Following the surgery. I was 'i r-n Hydr'ocddone/Aciaelminnpl-enn, a
cormbinationi arcotict (Hydrocodone) and non-narcotic (Acetami-
nophen) used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Hydrocodone works
by binding to opiod receptors in the brain and spinal cord, and/Ac-
etaminophen decreases the formation of prostaglandins, therefore
relieving pain. I found that this drug, in 500 mg (milligrams) tablets
Continued, on Page 7


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I







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


23 December 2005 Pagee7


Heart Surgery from Page 6


. .. -

Hoffer surrounded by high-tech equipment. Photo by Diane
Dyal.

works! Initially, I also tound me drug induces nausea and constipa-
tion but those effects did not persist. Amiodarone, in 200 mg tablets,
was used to treat irregular heart rhythms (arrhythmias) and to main-
tain a normal heart rate.
Last year, I had added Lisinopril to my drug list, used to lower blood
pressure. In 20 mg tablets, this drug became too effective, lowering
my blood pressure down to 89/45, which seemed to contribute to my
placement in TMH in April 2005. This has been discontinued. With
the weight reduction, my blood pressures have been well below 150/
90, although occasionally the pressure becomes elevated prior to di-
alysis. Many diabetics take Phoslo gel tablets prior to snacking and
regular meals to keep Phosphorus from combining with food. A new
drug in my regimen was Clarinex (Desloratadine), 5 mg tablets, an
antihistamine used to treat allergic conditions. This has provided con-
siderable relief to my sinuses, which tend to close, inhibiting breath-
ing through the nose. Other drugs for Type II diabetes include Clipizide,
Actos and Zeita.

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Upon entry to the hospital, one begins a paper trail. In my case, this
extended to nearly a one inch volume, containing very detailed re-
ports on my progress. The surgery was performed on Friday morning
on August 26th. The procedure involved "minimally invasive aortic
valve replacement with a 21mm Edwards Pericardial Magna valve.
The procedure was described in the "final report" by the physician-
surgeon Patrick M. McCarthy, M.D.
'The patient was prepped and draped in the usual fash-
ion. A primary upper sternotomy (chest incision) was made
Heparin was given and the patient was cannulated with
an arterial cannula in the ascending aorta and a superior
vena cava cannula. Bypass was established, a cross clamp
was applied antegrade cardioplegia was given and car-
dioplegia into the left main and right coronary ostia. The
ascending aorta was opened obliquely, the aortic valve
was excised, the annulus was ringed with pledgeted 2-0
Ti-Cron sutures.
These were passed through the sewing ring of a 21 mm
Edwards pericardial Magnia valve. The valve was seated,
the sutures were tied and cut. The aortotomy was closed
in 2 layers with running 3-0 Prolene (suture material).
The aortic cross clamp was removed and the patient was
easily weaned from bypass with satisfactory hemodynam-
ics. Protamine (blood thinner) was given and the cannu-
lae were removed in the usual fashion. Pacing wires and
chest tubes were placed.
When we were satisfied with homostasis, the sternum
was closed with interrupted wire and the remainder of
the incisions were closed in the usual fashion. The pa-
tient was transferred to the ICU (intensive care) in satis-
factory condition."
When I awakened from a pitch lack view, recalled only for a very few
seconds before full vision was restored, I was on my back, with a
collection of tubes running down my throat so crowded that I could
not speak. I heard two young nurses talking about their Saturday
night dates while I was struggling to get their attention. They were
redressing me around the legs but I could not tell them I wanted to
"sit up." Finally, Dr. McCarthy came into the ICU, looked me over,
and I grabbed his arm, spelling out in the air with my free arm, "SIT
SUP." He exclaimed to the nurses, "Why, this patient wants to Sit Up.
Get him there." In 5 minutes, I was sitting up, and breathing much
easier. I looked around and down at my chest where several elec-
trodes were taped on my body, running to heart monitors. One drain
tube was secreting fluids from the heart cavity, another drain tube
was secreting fluids from the lung cavity. These stayed in for a couple
of days and were finally removed, along with the urine catheter by an
attendant working the weekend shift from Indiana. I took a few min-
utes before I was able to talk. I, noticed that my breathing seemed
much easier, even with the catheters in place.
My Cousin Mary Bergeson kept a log during the surgery, and her
narrative is as follows:
"Friday, August 26, 7:20 a.m.: Tom climbs on a gur-
ney, back side down. He says (in effect) "I want to be
anesthetized soon." We follow him on an elevator and as
he enters his waiting area, we go to ours. There are about
26 chairs, many filled with family clusters.
7:20 a.m.: A volunteer takes information that I am Tom's
cousin.
8:20 a.m.: We are permitted to visit slot 4 in the surgery
patient waiting area. By now Tom has heard his surgery
will last about 2 hours, not the 12 hours his previous
night nurse predicted. That is good news, less time for
body cooling and respiration support.
8:20 a.m.: We have a short visit in slot 4. Then Dr. Patell
(anesthesiology resident) comes in the "slot" and starts
talking with Tom. Prior to Dr. Patell's entrance, we chat
with Tom. Tom reports that he is donating his valve to
research at Rush (another teaching hospital). He donated
on condition that he receives results of the research so
he would know why he has his heart valve condition.
Finally, Dr. P says Tom would go to the next stage in 20
minutes when his surgery would begin. We return to the
family waiting area.
8:30 a.m.: John and I goto breakfast, excellent cafete-
ria. This whole .hospital is deluxe-marble floors. single
rooms, ahd finest doctors.. '
9:15 a.m.: We return. A volunteer receptionist is receiv-
ing phone calls and then calling family members to the
phone.
10:03 a.m.: Nurse Linda calls me. She says the surgery
started a few minutes ago. Tom is stable, sleeping. Ev-
erything is going fine. She repeats, "Dr. McCarthy started
a few minutes ago.


11:55 a.m.: Dr. McCarthy calls me. He says. "Everything
is fine. All went well. We were able to do a minimal inci-
sion. He was born with an abnormal valve. We are off to
a good start. He will be available after 2 p.m. in ICU. The
first two days are critical."
1:30 p.m.: I call Larry and Sandy. They will tell Diane
and Andy. I call Patricia and Howard. All are relieved and
interested that the valve was a birth condition. As for me,
I am relieved-could use a good cry-relief of fear and
tension, I believe. So far, all the families in this room are
getting good news about their loved ones.
2:30 p.m.: Raz is the ICU nurse. He explains the tubes,
etc. Tom is wearing a bunch of them.
1) Ventilator-breathes for Tom due to his having been
cooled and the effect of anesthetics,
2) Tubes putting fluids in,
3) Tubes from the surgery site. These detect bleeding right
away,
4) Cath to collect urine.
I tell the nurse Tom had been on dialysis for 16 weeks.
Raz didn't seem to know that.
My impression is that all is well, but intensive care is not
as intensive as I had imagined. Raz seems almost casual.
6:45 p.m.: Tom's eyes are starting to open. He is begin-
ning to 'breathe over" his ventilator.
6:51 p.m.: Dr. McCarthy comes by. He says things went
well. "So far so good". He is escorting two residents. By
now Raz has gotten the picture regarding Tom's kidneys.
He was spouting terms like "Chronic renal insufficiency.
He'll have dialysis tomorrow sometime. Maybe Sunday,
maybe Monday he'll be out of ICU." Tom's heart monitor
is reading a steady 74 with blood pressure at 103/45.
7:05 p.m.: Raz says, "We are going to give him blood
products." He hangs something from the ceiling and it
drips into Tom.
7:15 p.m.: Raz talks to Tom, "Breathe slowly, breathe
deep. That is how we are going to get the ventilator off.
I'm going to suction you out. You are starting to breathe
over. That is good."
8 p.m.: Another resident appears. He says one,of the
' leaflets in Tom's valve was fused, but calc lill(lion was
themaiii issue. He says that Dr. McCarthy does 2-5 sur-
geries per day, 5-6 days per week." No wonder he didn't
call on Tom the night before his surgery.
8:30 p.m.: Night nurse Brenda appears. Tom's heart beat
is 75 per minute and blood pressure is 128/53. We leave.
"So far so good." During the next day Tom returns to us.
Amazingly he feels little chest pain. He complains some
of feeling stiff. Biggest issue is his sore throat which was
abused by a huge tube, now removed.
Continued on Page 9


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The draft plan for the Eastpoint
Theatre has been modified since
the last publication, showing the
ancillary room (bottom of diagram)
moved from the front to the stage
area next to the main auditorium.
This change will also contain rest
rooms and storage areas for live-
action entertainment and staging,
now depicted at the west end of
the 8,500 square foot structure.
The delay in these plans has been
largely attributed to Tom Hoffer's
surgery in August, as explained
elsewhere in this issue. He is now
recovering, and continuing dialy-
sis.


In the meantime, the Chronicle iA
seeking bids for the concrete slab:,
hopefully to be poured this spring
2006. The contract for the build'-
ing shell has been taken witli
Vulcan Steel (Adel, Georgia). Many
details still have to be resolved,
including windows and doors,
projection room, concession op-
erations, and staging-screen
area and stadium seating. The
search for solar applications has
continued since the building con-
tract has been signed, and thiB
frustrating problem is still com-
plicated by the current reliance
upon fossil fuels nationally.


"C j

r 'V


-''-







Qr.





'C 1'

II'
I'.4


Frankin Chonicl


Now diZstr*VI IIibutedin Franklt ~9 ~in
6 Sl n G l onie --


- I





NOW

is the time to
subscribe to
the Franklin
Chronicle








Pane 8 23 December 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


23 December 2005 Page 9


CRUM'S MINI MALL
PANACEA,FL (850) 984-5501
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ALSO DO MANICURES & PEDICURES.
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Phone: (850) 670-1772
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(286) Spring Creek
Chronicles by Leo Lovel.
SE Paperback, 240 pp, 2000.
An inside view of a people,
AMERIA a culture and "a lifestyle
that's goin' out like a full
moon tide ... Stories of
commercial fishing huntin',
S l 1 working' and people along
Sthe North Florida Gulf
'-. Coast. Bookshop price =
$13.00.
'^ ,i ** *!.;* '. .fl S: i" .'?'..'


RICHARD EDWARD NOBLE
(305) Hobo-ing America by
Richard Edward Noble, Pa-
perback. A humorous, light-
hearted, workingman's, true
life, travel adventure story.
Work 'your way around
S America with Dick & Carol
... feel the pain and the joy
... shake the calloused
hands that make America
what it is. Bookshop price
= $14.00.










tIiRICt HtIDr t
I!1 Is


(265) Hollywood Cartoons:
American Animation in
its Golden Age by Michael
Barrier. Oxford University
Press, 1999, 649 pp., Hard-
cover. Michael Barrier
takes us on a glorious
guided tour of American
animation in the 1930s, 40s
and 50s to meet the legend-
ary artists and entrepre-
neurs who created Bugs
Bunny, Betty Boop, Mickey
Mouse, Wile E. Coyote,
Donald Duck, Tom and
Jerry and other favorites.
This massive work de-
scribes the story of the
Fleishers as they produced
Betty Boop animations in
New York and Miami. John
Canemaker wrote, "This
long-awaited book by
Michael Barrier, a pioneer
in the field of animation
studies, raises the bar for
serious analysis of Holly-
wood animation... Barrier's
research is rich and impec-
cable, his arguments ar-
ticulate, and his uncompro-
mising, astringent conclu-
sions will be. a source of
scholarly debate and dis-
cussion for years to come."
This new work sells nation-
ally for $39.95. Bookshop
price = $29.00.


(150) The Trail of Tears:
The Story of the American
Indian Removals, 1813-
1855, by Gloria Jahoda. A
1995 edition published by
Wings Books, distributed
by Random House. 356 pp.
Hardcover. Here is the bit-
ter tale of the events that led
to the final massacre at
Wounded Knee. In 1830,
Congress passed a bill per-
mitting the removal of all
Native Americans living east
of the Mississippi to the
west. This is the story of
some 50 tribes which were
uprooted from their ances-
tral homes to the alien
lands of the west. Initially
sold nationally for $29.95.
Bookshop price = $18.95.
Included are the figures of
the age such as Andrew
Jackson, who created the
removal policy and its
execution.


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at the same time. These ads are strictly business cards magnified
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check for $15.00 will guarantee position in the next issue.




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ORDINARY






Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt:
The'HomeFront in World WarI

DORIS KEARNS
GOODWIN
Author uf The ril:rgerlks and thKemwei. s

(212) No Ordinary Time.
Here is a compelling
chronicle of America and its
leaders during the period
when modern America was
created. Doris Kearns
Goodwin has written a nar-
rative of how the United
States, in 1940, then an
isolated nation divided
along class lines, suffering
the ravages of a depression
and woefully unprepared
for war, was unified by a
common threat and also by
the extraordinary leader-
ship of Franklin Roosevelt
to become the preeminent
economic and military
power in the world five
years later. At the center of
this transformation was the
complex partnership of
Eleanor and Franklin
Roosevelt. You have not
read this history before.
Using diaries, interviews
and White House Records,
Goodwin paints a detailed,,
intimate portrait on the
daily conduct of the Presi-
dency and the Roosevelts
themselves. Here is the pro-
found story, of the
Roosevelt's leadership that
led the nation to military
victory and the changing
fabric of American society.
Sold nationally for $30.00
Bookshop price for this
Pulitzer Prize book, $18.00.
Hardcover, 760 pp., Simon
and Schuster, 1994.









K~'


FOREWORD BY PAT SAJAK

(81) Vanna Speaks. By
Vanna White. Introduction
by Pat Sajak. Published by
Warner Books, 1987. Hard-
cover. After years of silence
on WHEEL OF FORTUNE,
Vanna speaks! The game
show beauty who turns let-
ters for a living tells you in
her own words how she
made it from smalltown
cheer leader to big time ce-
lebrity. Sold nationally for
$15.95. Bookshop price =
$6.95.


(117) Railroads Trium-
phant: The Growth, Rejec-
tion and Rebirth of a
Vital American Force by
Albro Martin. Hardcover.
Oxford University Press,
428 pp. Sold nationally for
$25.00. Author of UNION
PACIFIC, Maury Klein,
praised this book: "A mas-
terful overview by the dean
of American railroad histo-
rians, written with charac-
teristic wit." Martin argues
in this book that the rail-
roads were and are "the
most fundamental innova-
tion in American Life." The
railroads created small
town America just as surely
as the automobile created
the suburbs. Thoughtful
and colorful, this book illu-
minates the impact of rail-
roads upon our lives.
Bookshop price = $12.95.


(302) The Encyclopedia of
2Old-Time Radio. The De-
finitive Encyclopedia of
!American Radio from its be-
:ginnings in the 1920s until
the early 1960s. This newly
'revised volume by John
.Dunning is a rich and in-
'formative account of radio's
:golden age. Here are some
1,500 radio shows pre-
sented in alphabetical or-
'der. The great programs of
'the 30s, 40s and 50s are all
here, with a complete
broadcast history, major
cast members, theme song
and many "umbrella en-
tries" with essays and cap-
sule biographies of major
broadcasters. This is a gi-
ant 822 pp directory that
you will find difficulty put-
ting down. Truly a wonder-
ful read. Published by Ox-
ford University Press, 1998.
bold nationally for $60.00;
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Heart Surgery from Page 7

August 30: Once back on floor 16, Tom is doing work by
phone to Florida and asking for coffee. Best news is that
he is engaging in absolutely charming behavior toward a
beautiful nurse from the University of Iowa. "S far VERY
good."


41,,


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A Hancock stented Porcine valve, introduced in 1970.



NOW-
is the time to
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the Franklin
Chronicle I


(62) New. The Creek War of
1813 and 1814 by H. S.
Halbert and T. S. Ball; Ed-
ited by Frank L. Owsley, Jr.
University of Alabama Press.
This standard account of
one of the most controver-
sial wars in which Ameri-
cans have fought is again
available with introductory
material and bibliography
revised. This facsimile re-
production of the 1895 origi-
nal provides a full and sym-
pathetic account of the In-
dians' point of view. Sold
nationally for $29.95.
Bookshop price = $22.95.
370 pp. Paperback.


VINSTH
AMERICAN TELEVISION
IN THE KENNEDY YEARS






(124) The Expanding Vista
by Mary Ann Watson. Hard-
cover, Oxford University
Press, 273 pp. This is the
story of American television
in the Kennedy years begin-
ning with the ground-
breaking first "TV debates,"
and ending with the
muffled drums and a united
population still trying to
comprehend the unthink-
able death of its President,
united electronically in na-
tional mourning. Watson
has written an engaging
and insightful look at
American television in the
Kennedy years and the lives
of many Americans, and
how the medium emerged.
Here is also a documented
yet memorable telling of the
story fading rapidly from
the American mind. Origi-
nally sold nationally for
$22.95. Bookshop price =
$12.95,


L


;









Pane 10 23 December 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


the Chronicle Bookshop


Mail Order Service *

P.O. Box 590
Eastpoint, FL 32328












The St. Joe Company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle






"\ !
.,.: : :


(317) Green Empire, The St. Joe Company and the
Remaking of Florida's Panhandle. By Kathryn Ziewitz
and June Wiaz. The St. Joe Company owns nearly one
million acres, mainly in northwestern Florida, where un-
developed coastal and riverside landscapes boast some
of the state's most scenic and ecologically diverse areas.
The company is a powerful force in the real-estate devel-
opment of northwest Florida, with access to the most in-
fluential people in government. In Green Empire, Kathryn
Ziewitz and June Wiaz explain how St. Joe is poised to
permanently and drastically alter the landscape, envi-
ronment, and economic foundation of the Panhandle, the
state's last frontier.
Based on hundreds of sources-including company ex-
ecutives, board members, and investors as well as those
outside the company-this factual and objective history
describes the St. Joe Company from the days of its
founders to the workings and dealings of its present-day
heirs. For all readers concerned with land use and growth
management, particularly those with an interest in
Florida's fragile wildlife and natural resources, Green
Empire will generate important debate about an often-
overlooked part of the state and will invite public scru-
tiny of its largest landowner.
"Green Empire is written tor those interested in natural
'history, planning, and Florida's history and for those, like
ius, who simply want to peek ahead to imagine the future
Florida Panhandle. Readers with an interest in Florida's
Wildlife and natural resources will find attention paid to
the Panhandle as a center of biodiversity and to implica-
tions of developing real estate in such an area. Followers
pf the stories of Disney and Arvida will find common play-
ers and patterns in the St. Joe story, and those inter-
,sted in neotraditional or "New Urbanist" planning maybe
interested to see how these principles are faring in
Florida's latest real estate frontier. Students of Florida's
political history will find the St. Joe story an important
part of understanding how the state came to look the
Yvay it does demographically and physically.
"Green Empire draws on the combined tradition of envi-
ronmental and corporate histories. Its target audience is
Floridians, especially residents of Northwest Florida. But
because the state is such a tourist mecca, we hope it will
also find a wider than regional audience. To some extent,
Florida is a state that belongs to all Americans, and many
non-Americans, because her natural heritage and built
environment together draw so many and probably always
will."
University of Florida Press, 2004, 364 pp. Paperback.
Bookshop price = $24.95.


r-------------------------
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(316) Claude Pepper & Ed Ball, Politics, Purpose, and
Power. By Tracy E. Danese. The power struggle between
Claude Pepper and Ed Ball in the mid-twentieth century
in large part determined the future of Florida. This lively
account of their interlocking careers-both dominated by
a personal quest for power, money, and purpose-
illuminates the historical role of these two forceful per-
sonalities.
Ed Ball, brother-in-law of Alfred I. duPont and trustee of
the duPont empire, was at one time the single most pow-
erful businessman in the state. Claude Pepper, a senior
U.S. senator was the state's heir to the liberal legacy of
New Deal politics. By mid-century, the duPont-Ball em-
pire controlled a major part of the Florida business and
political establishment-but not Claude Pepper.
What follows is an account of their long-standing rela-
tionship in the Florida political process. It gives a picture
of working politics that often remains at the fringe of his-
torical accounts of the grander issues. Still, it is a dimen-
sion of politics that lubricates the workings of the whole
as it goes about the process of governance.
University of Florida Press, hardcover, copyright 2000,
301 pp. Sold nationally for $34.95. Bookshop
price=$32.00.


T - -., %


(318) Home To War, A His-
tory of the Vietnam Vet-
erans' Movement. By
Gerald Nicosia. An epic nar-
rative history that chroni-
cles, for the first time, the
experience of America's
Vietnam veterans who re-
turned home to fight a dif-
ferent kind of war.
The courageous Americans
who served in Vietnam
fought two wars: one on the
other side, of the world and
one when they returned
home. The battle abroad
took place in war-scarred
Asian hamlets, rice Daddies,


Please Note
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normally. Some of our books are publishers" closeouts. overstocks.
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and jungles where thou-
sands of Americans risked
life, limb, and spirit in a
conflict few of them filly
understood. The second
war began when the same
soldiers came home to fight
another fight, this one for
the hearts and minds of
their countrymen, and for,
their own health, sanity;
and peace of mind.

Published by Crown, hard-
cover, 690 pp. Sold nation-
ally for $35.00. Bookshop
price=$30.00. Due to the
weight and length of this
work, please include $6.00
for shipping and handling.
Advance Praise for Home To
War:
"Home to War is a superbly
researched book that
needed to be written. It sets
forth in Compelling detail a
whole other dimension of
America's tragic war in Viet-
nam, which, until now, has
never been completely cap-
tured." General Harold G.
Moore, Author of We Were
Soldiers Once and Young.
"Gerry Nicosia has an un-
common understanding of
the struggle of veterans to
give meaning to their war
and to redeem themselves.
Home to War is a powerful
history of our times." Gloria
Emerson, National Book
Award recipient for Winners
and Losers.
"Home to War illuminates
the efforts of the men who
fought not just in- the
jungles of Vietnam, but also
when they returned to
America. We should he
grateful to Gerry Nicosia for
documenting this struggle
in a meaningful and heart-
felt way." Director of Platoon
and Born on the Fourth of
July.







UARII


Removal

Aftershock

The Seminoles' Struggles to Survive
in the West, 1836 1866


The University of Tennessee Press/Knox-
ville, hardcover, 225 pp, 1994.
Although Native Americans have a special
place in the history of the United States,
Indian historiography is far from being
comprehensive. Throughout .the centuries
of Indian-white relationships, all branches
of government have devoted attention to the
relevant issues. Legislative hearings and
acts, court cases, treaties, and wars involving Indians have been promi-
nent in America's past, but the omissions in historical writings are
both numerous and obvious. Until very recently, high school and col-
lege history textbooks gave little attention to Native Americans. The
inhabitants of Indian Territory, especially, were generally excluded or
mentioned only briefly in those accounts, whereas cavalrymen and
cowboys were.discussed at length. As a result, much of the realities of
the relations between the United States and Native Americans have
remained unknown or misunderstood, and Native American histori-
ography is poorer for such omissions and imbalances.
This book focuses on this hitherto neglected era in Native American
history and places the Seminoles in their correct historical position
as a Native American tribe. By examining the Seminoles' adjustments
during their first decades in the West in light of federal Indian policy,
it concludes that after thirty years of struggles, caused largely by the
faulted policies of the federal government, these Indians were a
"stricken, divided, and beggared people scattered over hundreds of
miles." For this tribe, the federal government's program of placing it
in a western land away from white settlers, where it could he nur-
tured toward civilization and Christianity, was not only a shortsighted
policy but also an illogical and inhumane one. Without the stubborn-
ness and determination of these early tribal members, no western
Seminole tribe would have existed in 1990. Truly, the mere survival of
the early Seminoles earned them special distinction as a tribe.
Published by University of Tennessee Press, 1994, 225 pp., hard-
cover. Sold nationally for $28.95. Bookshop price=$24.00.


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(319) The Seminole Wars,
America's Longest Indian
Conflict. By John Missall
and Mary Lou Missall. The
Seminole Wars were the
longest, bloodiest, and most
costly of all the Indian wars
fought by this nation. This
illustrated history is the
first book to provide a com-
prehensive overview of all
three wars. Seminole War
authorities John and Mary
Lou Missall examine not
only the wan that were
fought between 1817 and
1858 but also the events
leading up to them and
their place in American his-
tory Employing extensive
research that makes use of
diaries, military reports,
and archival newspapers,
they shed new light on the
relationship among the
wars, the issue of slavery,
prevalent attitudes toward
Native Americans, and the
quest for national security
Although fought in Florida,
the Seminole Wars were a
major concern to the nation
as a whole. The first war, led
by General Andrew Jack-
son, was Dart of an attempt
to wrest Florida from Spain
and had international
repercussions that led to a
lengthy congressional in-
vestigation. The second,
which lasted seven years,
took the lives of more than
1,500 soldiers and resulted
in the forced removal of
more than 3,000 Seminole
Indians from Florida and
the deaths of countless oth-
ers. The third war, fought
on the eve of the Civil War,
was an attempt to remove
the final remnants of the
Seminole Nation from their
homes in the Everglades.
Underlying these conflicts
was the nations thirst for
aggressive territorial expan-
sion and the dangers of an
inflexible government policy.
The Missalls describe the
wars as both a military and
a moral embarrassment-a
sad and important chapter
in American history that
has been overshadowed by
the Civil War and by Indian
wars fought west of the Mis-
sissippi.
From the Forward, by the
series editors: "During the
past half century, the bur-
geoning population and in-
creased national and inter-
national visibility of Florida
have sparked a great deal


of popular interest in the
state's past, present, and
future. As the favorite des-
tination of countless tour-
ists and as the new home
for millions of retirees and
other migrants, modern
Florida has become a demo-
graphic, political, and cul-
tural bellwether."
"Unfortunately, the quan-
tity and quality of the litera-
ture on Florida's distinctive
heritage and character have
not kept pace with the Sun-
shine State's enhanced sta-
tus. In an effort to remedy
this situation-to provide
an accessible and attractive
format for the publication of
Florida-related books-the
University Press of Florida
has established the Florida
History and Culture series."
Raymond Arsenault and
Gary R. Mormino, Series
Editors. University of South
Florida, St. Petersburg. Uni-
versity of Florida Press,
copyright 2004, 258 pp.,
hardcover. Sold nationally
for $29.95. Bookshop
price=$25.00.







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(21) Outposts on the Gulf
by William Warren Rogers.
University of Florida Press,
Hardcover, 297 pp. In this
book, Rogers traces.and
documents the economic,
social and political emer-
gence of the Gulf coast port
ofApalachicola and the pris-
tine barrier island, Saint
George. From the earliest
times, both the island and
Apalachicola have become
intertwined. The account of
the machinations of contro-
versial developer William Lee
Popham is the first phase of
area development, later
leading to the controversial
struggles of the 1970s when
environmentalists arid sea-
food industries fought to
determine the ecological and
economic fate of the Bay
area. The Chronicle has
obtained a fresh.supply of
newly reprinted volumes
at an attractive price.
Available elsewhere for
$35.95 plus shipping and
handling. The Chronicle
Bookshop price is much
cheaper at $25.00 per
volume.


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