Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00271
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: November 25, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00271
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text





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Franklin




rINCNI Chronicle


Decision Pending

On Bay Opening


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Volume 14, Number 24


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER November 25 December 8,2005


North Florida Medical Sues

Physician Assistant Larry Applebee

Over "Non-Compete" Clause


North Florida Medical Also
Requests Temporary and
Permanent Injunctive Relief
From Engaging in Medical
Services in Franklin County
and Damages, Costs and
Attorney's Fees
On May 26, 2005, Medical Direc-
tor Jessie Furlow, M.D., North
Florida Medical, and Joel Mont-
gomery, Chief Executive Officer
and President of North Florida
Medical, headquartered in Talla-
hassee, Florida, terminated Phy-
sician Assistant Larry Applebee
from his employment at the
Eastpoint office. On September 1,
2005, Attorney W. Kirk Brown
wrote to Mr. Applebee alleging he
was in violation of his employment
agreement with North Florida
Medical by "entering into the
medical services business within
two years of the date of termina-
tion from North Florida Medical


Center, Inc..." Mr. Applebee was
advised by Mr. Brown that "...Your
immediate compliance with the
non-compete agreement is de-
manded by North Florida Medical
Centers, Inc."
The agreement cited in the plead-
ings against Mr. Applebee is as
follows:
"As a condition of the employment
of the Provider by NFMC, the par-
ties agree that NFMC has built up
and established a valuable busi-
ness providing medical services,
at great expense to NFMC. The
parties further agree that by rea-
son of his/her employment, the
Provider will become familiar with
the business practices and pa-
tients of NFMC, and that NFMC
will sustain great loss and dam-
ages if during the term of his/her
employment or for a period of two
(2) years from the date of termi-
nation of his/her employment
with NFMC, the provider enters
into medical services business or


Random Acts Of Kindness

In Franklin County





-lion


4-



I i




Anxious to try on their new jackets, students at Brown
Elementary wait their turn as volunteers Elizabeth
Roper, Katie Wood, Mrs. Ruby and Debbie Flowers help
them try on the warm jackets. Anonymous volunteers
raised over $1,500 to buy jackets for children at Brown
Elementary that might not have had a new jacket this
winter season. Story on Page 7.

Special Meeting At Franklin
County Senior Citizens Center
Reviews Functions, Revenue
Sources And Identifies Problems
A nearly two hour meeting at the Franklin County Senior Citizens
Center, Carrabelle, developed a list of future functions revenue sources
and "problem areas" under the professional guidance of a facilitator,
Dr. Dan Demon on Saturday, November 19, 2005.
The facilitator explained at the outset that the purpose of the commu-
nity meeting was not to deal with the history of the Senior Citizens
Center, but to ascertain, through community involvement, functions
of the Center, and related matters. Several speakers from the esti-
mated 125 participants spoke to issues that resulted in the following
list of functions for the county Senior Citizens Center:
1. Serving meals for senior citizens.
2. Public events in which senior citizens would be invited.
3. Bible studies (non-denominational).
4. Skills training (such as computer technology, etc.).
5. Health screening.
6. Social gathering location.
7. Toufs (shopping, fishing, etc.).
8. Bingo, bridge, poker, etc.
9. Tutoring, mentoring programs.
Funding sources to cover expenses for operating the county Senior
Citizens Center included rentals of the Center, sponsored special
events, fees for services, government funding, foundation grants, fund-
ing appeals to the public (for tax deductibility) and the sale of books
(local history, recipes, etc).
Burt Ivy spoke of the need for more volunteers. "If you live in this
county, show upl Do something This is not about money, but partici-
pation," he reasoned in an impassioned plea. Another spoke of the
need for genuine leadership. Ms. Sue Reed, current President of the
Sr. Citizens Council, announced board meetings would be held on the
second Wednesday of each month. A special meeting of the Council
would be held on Wednesday, December 14th at 1 p.m. at the Sr.
Citizens Center, Carrabelle. For more information, telephone 697-3760
or Sid Winchester at 697-3927.


contacts the patients of NFMC.
Therefore, the Provider expressly
covenants and agrees that he/she
will not, during the term of his/
her employment with NFMC and
for a period of two (2) years im-
mediately following the termina-
tion (for any reason) of his/her
employment with NFMC, directly
or indirectly own, manage, oper-
ate, control, be employed by, par-
ticipate in, or be connected in any
manner with the ownership, man-
agement, operation or control of
any medical services business, or
contact any patient of NFMC for
the purpose of providing medical
services, within the primary and
secondary markets of the
Provider's primary practice loca-
tion. The primary market is de-
fined as the physical boundaries
of the zip code in which the pri-
mary practice is located. Second-
ary markets are defined as the
physical boundaries of any zip
code other than the primary mar-
ket from which NFMC patients
travel to receive medical services."
North Florida Medical "justified"
the non-compete provision in their
agreement with Mr. Applebee by
stating: "...It has substantial re-
lationships with specific prospec-
tive or existing patient and (North
Florida Medical, Eastpoint) ... has
established patient goodwill in its
geographic area. The contractu-
ally specified restraint is reason-
able necessary to protect NFMC's
(North Florida Medical) legitimate
business interests justifying the-
restriction."
Interestingly, those alleged busi-
ness interests have been bruised
lately when the Franklin County
Commission sent a letter of com-
plaint to the oversight agency
about North Florida Medical in
Eastpoint.
The letter, signed by the Chairper-
son of the Franklin County Com-
mission, Cheryl Sanders, stated
in part:
"The Board has the following con-
cerns:
1) The current Board of Directors
for the Eastpoint FQHC does not
represent the consumers of its
services. Our understanding is
that 51% of the Board of Direc-
tors of an FQHC must be consum-
ers (patients) of its services. North
Florida currently has only one
Board member from Franklin
County.
2) The facility does not foster, ad-
vertise or encourage indigent care
and specifically restricts access to
their services. Eastpoint only
qualifies patients one day a week
and those appointments are re-
stricted. Our local providers have
seen an increase in the numbers
of uninsured since the arrival of
North Florida in Eastpoint. Our
localEmergency Department has
noted a marked increase in non-
emergent care of those uninsured.
3) North Florida further restricts
access by not offering weekends
and evening hours as mandated.
4) North Florida has not provided
culturally competent care by fail-
ing to design specific programs for
our special population (the Sea-
food Industry).
Continued on Page 5


SInside This Issue
10 Pages
.Physician's Suit ............... 1
.Parade of Lights.............. 1
Senior Center Problems ... 1
Bears Invade .................... 1
Bay Opening Pending....... 1
Franklin Briefs ........ 2, 3, 5
Editorial & Commentary3, 4
Coastal Clean-up ............. 5
Newell Concert .............. 6
County Bills ................. 7
FCAN ............................... 8
Business Card Directory .. 9
Bookshop .................... 10


Parade Of

Lights On

Schedule

Timber Island Yacht Club (TIYC)
announces the Thirteenth Annual
Boat Parade of-Lights. This popu-
lar event will he held on the
Carrabelle River in Carrabelle FL
on December 10, 2005 beginning
at 7:00 P. M. The awards cer-
emony following the parade will be
held in the area between the
Franklin County Library and the
Gulf State Community Bank be-
ginning at 9 p.m.
There is no fee to enter and the
parade is open to any type or size
boat. Prizes, including cash and/
or trophies will he awarded in the
following categories:
Recreational 24 and under
Recreational 25 and over
Commercial 24 and under
Commercial 25' and over
Sailboat
TIYC is a civic organization dedi-
'qted to enhancing the lives of the
3(Juith of Franklin County. The
club sponsors a Youth Fishing
Tournament and conducts a
Youth Fishing Class each July.
For registration information, con-
tact Rusty or Amy Cohoon at 850-
697-8909 or 850-566-9992.


Downtown

Historic

Apalachicola
Annual

Christmas

Nov. 25th

The Historic Apalachicola Christ-
mas Celebration will light up
Apalachicola on November 25th.
From 4:30-8:00 p.m. the streets
of downtown Apalachicola will be
lined with luminaries and filled
with holiday spirit. Merchants will
be open late and the sounds of
carolers will echo through the
streets filling the evening with
Christmas spirit.
The highlight, of course, will be
the big guy himself Santa will ar-
rive on a shrimp boat at 4:30 p.m.
at the City Dock on Water Street,
across from City Hall. Santa will
hear children's Christmas wishes,
carolers will sing and the city tree
will be lit. Join us for an old-fash-
ioned Christmas celebration! For
more information contact the;
Chamber office at (850) 653-9419.


Bears Invading Eastpoint


There have been reports of these grizzly critters raiding
garbage cans and fruit trees in the Eastpoint area.
Recently, a report of a bear-sighting was made in Las
Brisas, Eastpoint. Joyce Estes took this picture of
another eating from one of the trees on their property
on Magnolia Road. Exposed garbage containers are sure
targets for these animals.


David Heil speaking before the Board
Commissioners, November 15, 2005.


of County


Publisher's Note: In a telephone conversation with a representative of
the Florida Department of Agriculture Tuesday afternoon, November 22nd,
the results of testing have not been received from the laboratory in St.
Petersburg. A detailed discussion of the testing was described by David
McLain of the Riverkeeper organization at the joint meeting of Riverkeepers
and St. George Island Civic Club on Thursday, November 17th at the
Eastpoint Fire Station, indicating that the technology of the testing pro-
cedure was dated and slow. The planned "split-test" had been "called
off' unexpectedly. David Heil's remarks were expressed as "hopeful".
McLain urged that the procedures be more streamlined and controlled by
the oyster industry, perhaps with a laboratory located in the Apalachicola
area.


By Richard E. Noble
Red Tide Update-David
Heil
David Hell from the Dept. of Agri-
culture spoke to the Board on
Tuesday, November 15th concern-
ing the present state of the Red
Tide and its subsequent closure
ofApalach-icola Bay to oystering.
"The actual water samples from
the Bay, in my opinion, are very
low in the west end of the Bay -
way below the level of five thou-
sand cells per liter. That is a very
good thing. The areas to the east
are very high 100,000 to 330,000
cells per liter. That is very high.
We are taking meat samples in
both the east and the west and it
is not impossible for me to believe
that from the low cell counts that
we have in the west end, that
Thursday or Friday morning a
portion of the Bay may open. I
don't know if that is going to hap-
pen because the samples are just
being shipped off today (Nov. 15,
Tuesday). That is just my hope."
Mr. Heil then went on to explain
that contrary to the impression
left-by Joe Shields at the last com-
mission meeting, if water and
meat samples from a particular
area of the Bay meet proper stan-
dards, the Bay will open one sec-
tion at a time if need be. "I'm
thinking that there is a good pos-
sibility .that the west end of the
Bay may be opened, but I can't
guarantee it," It was then ex-
plained that two months ago the
meat samples from the west end
of the Bay were less than twenty,
but the water samples had re-
turned to over 5000 cells per li-
ter, so consequently that portion
could not be opened as was
planned. "That same thing could
happen this time, we don't know.
The request that the County made
last meeting about looking into the
water discharges (water coming
down the river) is no magic silver
bullet but it certainly can not hurt
at all. We are pursuing that. The
letter that Joe Shields has drafted
will actually go out of the office
tomorrow."
"Why did it take two weeks for that
letter to get sent off? It should
have been sent off that day." said
Mr. Putnal.
"It was actually drafted (that day)
but it goes through a review pro-
cess that is unfortunately neces-
sary in our agency. I think the
County is preparing a letter also -
I hope. Your letter will be very in-
strumental, I think, (because it)
will speak to a lot of the economic
hardship. Our letter deals with the
science, but yours speaks a lot
more from the heart. I think that
is a good thing."
"Has this letter (from the County)
been sent?" asked Mr. Mosconis.
"It is part of the report that we are
signing tonight," said Mr. Mahan,
"We're not sending it to the Corps
of Engineers, were sending it to
the Water District. We are going
to ask the Water Management dis-
trict to approach the Corps of En-
gineers."
"That is the same response (ad-
vice) we got when we inquired,"
David Heil informed the Board.


'They will deal with the Corps as
a part of their routine business."
It seems that whether it is the
County or the Department of Ag-
riculture it takes two weeks to
draft a letter, I wonder how long it
will take to find someone in the
government who will be able to
read the letter?
"Let me ask you one question;
How many people have gotten sick
from the Red Tide?" asked Mr.
Crofton.
"Red Tide is handled the same way
in every state. It is closed when
you get five thousand cells per li-
ter and toxic meats. We have never
had an illness associated with the
commercial harvest because of
those practices. We have had nu-
merous illnesses from recre-
ational harvests front people who
are harvesting illegally. This year
we have only had four illnesses
associated with Red Tide. The Red
Tide affects all humans and all
mammals the same way. It is not
like the Vibrio Vulnificus that only
effects people with liver disease,
for example."
That is four out of how many
people who eat oysters-seven
million, two million?" asked Mr.
Crofton.
"I hope more than that," Mr. Heil
responded.
"Are you talking about raw oys-
ters or cooked?" asked Mr.
Crofton.
"It doesn't matter-raw or cooked
(can get people sick). The toxin
does not cook out."
"What we need you to do is give
us your assurance that you will
help us to open the Bay as rap-
idly as possible," said Mr. Crofton.
"I guarantee it. I will, and the Fish
and Wildlife Conservation will as
well."
"Well how did they open the Bay
in those other states wVhere all
those people were dead and float-
ing around? They open that up,
what's the trouble with us?" asked
Mr. Lockley.
'They went the extra effort to do
... extra testing. So they are now
open and in my opinion those
products are safe to eat."
(In Louisiana, we read about the
thousands of dead human beings
and animals floating in the flood
water; the oil and chemicals and
muck mixed in, due to flooded
refineries; the septic and sewage
treatment being mixed into the
flood waters from a city of millions;
garbage, human waste, human
remains, animal remains, oil,
chemicals and what not and
their oyster harvesting areas are
open?)
"Two laboratories," said Mr. Heil,
"that I can find that are certified
for the neurotoxin for the type of
Red Tide that we have-the Fish
and Wildlife in St. Petersburg and
the Texas Department of Health
in Austin. Those are the only two
that.have the FDA certified neu-
rotoxin shellfish certification."
"I thought that we were supposed
to do joint venture with the Dept.
Continued on Page 6


Health Council Recommends

Continuing Ambulance

Contract With Emergystat

A one year contract with the current ambulance service was proposed
and informally agreed to by the Board of County Commissioners and
Emergystat, the current provider. The agreement will be subject to a
review by the Franklin County Attorney Michael Shuler.
Susan Ficklen and Marilyn Walker, paramedics and former adminis-
trators have prepared a list of recommendations to be incorporated
into the contract.


MAvPY

THANICS6.V


I' N


I









Page 2 25 November 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


'~ ":".'


Franklin

Briefs

November 15, 2005

Present: Chairperson Cheryl
Sanders; Commissioner;
Jimmy Moscon is;
Commissioner Bevin Putnal;
Commissioner Noel Lockley,
Jr. and Commissioner Russell
Crofton.

Extension
Bill Mahan distributed a draft let-
ter to Douglas Barr. Executive
Director of the Northwest. Water
Management District, asking for
his help in working with the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers to in-
crease the amount of water flow-
ing down the Apalachicola River
in an effort to rid the Bay of Red
Tide.
"Dear Mr. Barr:
Franklin County is currently
in a state of economic disas-
ter due to the impacts of Hur-
ricane Dennis (Federal Disas-
ter Declaration #10137)
which destroyed or badly
damaged a number of our
coastal business, including
several oyster processing
plants. in addition to closing
the Apalachicola Bay to oys-
ter harvesting from July 9th
19th. In addition to the im-
mediate physical and eco-
nomic damage caused by
Hurricane Dennis, it also
"pushed" a portion of the FL
red tide bloom which has
been plaguing the SW Florida
coastal counties for months
into the Apalachicola Bay
area. Since then, the red tide
organism has made its way
into the bay closing the bay
to shellfish harvesting waters
on August 30. 2005.
As a result of this red tide
event, our 714 self-employed.
licensed, oystermen and
women, and hundreds of
other individuals employed in
our processing plants and
other oyster industry-related
jobs (out of a total county
workforce of 5.530). have
been unable to go to work as
a result of the bay closure. In
addition to the obvious seri-
ous economic hardship being' ,
faced by everyone'dependAnt
on oysters: for..their,:famrtlJes1.,-i:
income, there have been ma-
jor impacts on our local re-
tailers due to the extended
closure of the bay.
We realize that the red tide al-
gal bloom is a natural event.
However. we also know that.
red tide events in Apalachi-
cola Bay are uncommon and
when one does occur, it is
correlated with low freshwa-
ter flow from the Apalachicola
River system into the Bay.
Therefore, the members of the
Franklin County Board of
County commissioners dur-
ing their regularly scheduled
meeting on November 15,
2005, voted unanimously to
request your help as the Ex-.
ecutive Director of the North-
west FL Water Management
Director to work with U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers to
increase the amount of water
flowing down the Apalachicola
and into the bay in a effort to
rid the bay of the red tide al-
gae.
The members of the Board
greatly appreciate any help
you can provide to us and the
citizens of Franklin County
during this time of great hard-
ship."
Mi. Mahan also distributed a copy
of the new recreational grouper
fishing regulations as of October
31, 2005 in the federal waters of
the Gulf of Mexico.
UPDATES New Recreational Grou-
per Regulations Effective August 9.
2005 Federal Waters:
The following regulations have
been implemented under an in-
terim rule effective August 9,
2005- January 23. 2006. as modi-


fled by U.S. District Court Octo-
ber 31, 2005.
* Aggregate grouper bag limit re-
duced from 5 to 3 grouper bag
limit restored to 5 grouper effec-
tive October 31, 2005.
* Red grouper bag limit reduced
from 2 to 1 (included in the ag-
gregate bag limit)
* Recreational red grouper fish-
ing closed November 1 Decem-
ber 31 (fishing for other grouper
species allowed during this period)
Note the effect of the above rule
changes on the grouper interim
rule. as modified by U.S. District
Court. is that:
- During November-December
2005 the grouper bag limit is 5/0
(5 grouper, none can be red grou-
per).
- Effective January 1, 2006 the
grouper bag limit is 5/1 (5 grou-
per. 1 can be red grouper).
The interim rule was implemented
on August 9, 2005 and is in effect
for 180 days until February 5.
2006. It can be extended an addi-
tional 180 days (until August 4,
2006) or until replaced by the
recreational grouper regulatory
amendment.
Mr. Mahan also informed the
Commissioners of deadlines for
applications in several sponsored
programs.
Environmental Quality Incentive
Program (EQUIP) is a voluntary
program developed to provide in-
centives for agricultural landown-
ers to address natural resource
concerns on their land. EQUIP
provides technical and financial
(cost-share) assistance for envi-
ronmentally beneficial practices
and management. Wildlife Habi-
tat Incentives Program (WHIP) of-
fers financial and technical assis-
tance to install management prac-
tices on eligible non-federal lands
to address wildlife habitat resto-
ration. Wetland Reserve Program
(WRP) provides wetland restora-
tion and conservation easement
opportunities for landowners to
restore and protect wetlands im-
pacted by agricultural activities.
Applications are accepted
throughout the year. however,
only those applications received
by Dec. 15, 2005 will be consid-
ered for 2006 funding. For more
info, contact the USDA Natural
Resource Conservation Service at
850-674-8271 Ext. 104.

Solid Waste Department
Van Johnson informed the Board
of County Commissioners of pro-
ceeds for the Bay Aid project.
"Donations and money receiye.d;
from the sale of T-shirts have
starird r-nming n;.'suppo6'irig'the
Boards Bay Aid project. The funds
are on deposit at a local bank and
are awaiting disbursement. Also,
donors are requesting the Board
establish a process to quickly get
the monies out to the affected
people. Therefore, the Board
needs to appoint members of the
Bay Aid Committee to oversee the
disbursement of funds."
Chairperson Sanders asked staff
to provide data on the rental of
Fort Coombs Armory since the
County took possession of the


building. Since July 2004, to date.
The Armory has rented out a to-
tal of 33-times, with fees totaling
approximately $11,000. For 2006'-
over 10 events have already been
reserved at the facility.

Franklin County Health .
Council
The Health Council report to the
County Commissioners delivered
at the November 15th meeting was.
as follows:

Old Business-Ambulance
Issue
"We understand the Board's di-'
lemma in that the recommended
proposal from Bay Medical was
more expensive that what was'
budgeted for this year. We feel that'.
the best corimp3romise is to con-
tinue contracting with Emergystat
for this fiscal year, but not to make
a 3 year commitment. In turn;,
please try arid understand our
dileima as well. Many of the-
Council members are in the
healthcare arena and have direct :
contact with.Emergystat and have
had numerous problems with the'
service they 'provide. Susanr"
Ficklen and Marilyn Walker, who"
have both worked as paramedics
and in administrative positions -
with ambulance' services, com-
pared each contract line by line '
and have prepared a list of rec-
ommendations for Emergystat','
that the Board can refer to when '
negotiating the new contract."

Old Business-Dr. Sanaullah
The Health Council has not had a '
meeting since the last commission
meeting'when Dr. Sanaullah
made his request for land to build
his clinic. I have asked Dr
Sanaullah to come and present
his idea in further detail at bur,
meeting this Thursday. We would
like to try and find a way to incor-'
porate his project into our
broader, long term plan foi a new
healthcare delivery system. We
feel it is prudent to listen to the
recommendations that are pro-"
duced from the financial feasibil- ,
ity study. The first order of busi-
ness: legally and definitively, who
owns this 25 acre parcel? The
County or the Board of Educa-<
lion? We need this information.
first and foremost.

New Business-AHCA
Closes Gadsden Hospital
When AHCA closed the Gadsden,.
Hospital on Friday, November 4th:
I was inundated with phone calls
and emails about what would hap-
pen to Weems since the Gadsder n
Community Hospital is consid-,
ered the center of operations for -I
SDaSee, .I:didspeak with represen.v'
tatives foro AII.CA, and they.said
thAiath'e coir6-ratio!isar epaparate ,
and that there would not be an
interruption in Weems ability to
bill out and receive payments.
AHCA has not cited Weems for any
deficiencies. So we are not in ir-
mediate danger of our hospital
closing at least from AHCA's view-
point. Now, of course. the public
speculates about the financial
health of DaSee, and that is a
separate issue that could jeopar-
dize Weems. That is why we are
investigating a more financially
stable health care delivery system
for our County.


: ew Business-Regional
health Delivery
I had a lunch meeting with Gulf
County Commissioner, Bill Will-
iams, and Congressman Boyd's
Health Aide, Bobby Pickles on Fri-
day, November 11th Congress-
man Boyd's view is that if Wakulla,
Franklin and Gulf Counties could
agree on a regional plan for health
care delivery, it would be much
easier for us to be awarded grant
money than as a single county out
there on our own competing. I
want to organize a workshop be-
tween our Health Council and the
Gulf and Wakulla Health Coun-
cils so we can all communicate
our intentions and concerns to
each other. I feel we need to do
this before the Congressman's
next regional meeting that is be-
ing held in January. Does the
Board have any objection or con-
cern with this idea? The Board did
not have any objection to the idea.

New Business-Formal
Introductions/Contract
Signing
On November 1st, the Council in-
terviewed four impressive candi-
dates for our part-time adminis-
trative position. Each candidate
had different strong points to of-
fer. After a lengthy discussion, we
offered the position to Becky
Gibson, and she accepted. So I
would like to formally introduce
the Board and staff to Becky
Gibson. (We have the contract pre-
pared for Chairperson Sanders to
sign today.)
The Planning and Zoning Com-
mission met on Tuesday,. Novem-
ber 8. 2005 with recommenda-
tions.
The Board approved the recom-
mendations on November 15.
2005:

Critical Shoreline
Applications
1. Approve (unanimous) consid-
eration of a request to construct
a Single Family Private Dock on
Lots 5 & 6. Block M. Peninsular
Point, 1529 Alligator Drive. Alli-
gator Point, Franklin County.
Florida. This application meets all
slate and local requirements. Re-
quest submitted by Elva Peppers,
agent for Wendy Chandler, owner.
2. Approve (unanimous) consid-
eration of a'request to construct
a Single Family Private Dock on
Lot 6, Block 57, Unit 5, 333 Bruce
Street, St. George Island, Franklin
County. Florida. This application
meets all state and local require-
ments. Request submitted by
Docks 4 Less, agent for Maribel
Kadel,rowne,r -
3. Approve (unanimous) consid-
eratidon66f a ~re~f'uest to constrrT' "'
a Single Family Private Dock on
Lot 5, Block 57. Unit 5, 335 Bruce


Street, bt. George Island, Franklin
County, Florida. This application
meets all state and local require-
ments. Request submitted by
Docks 4 Less, agent for Clint
Kadel, owner.
4. Approve (unanimous) consid-
eration of a request to construct
a Single Family Private Dock on
Lot 13, Block 5, Carrabelle River
Subdivision, 301 River Road,
Carrabelle. Franklin County,
Florida. This application meets all
state and local requirements. Re-
quest submitted by GEA. Inc.,
agent for Aaron Wray. owner.
5. Approve (unanimous) consid-
eration of a request to construct
a Single Family Private Dock on
Lot 4, Bay Vista, 768 Mill Road,
Carrabelle. Franklin County,
Florida. This application meets all
state and local requirements. Re-
quest submitted by GEA, Inc.,
agent for Cynthia Murphy, owner.
6. Approve (unanimous) consid-
eration of a request to construct
a Single Family Private Dock at
2234 Highway 98 West.
Carrabelle. Franklin County,
Florida. This application meets all
state and local requirements; Re-
quest submitted by Barney
Crutchfield, owner.

Final Plat Approval

7. Approve (unanimous) consid-
eration of a request for Final Plat
approval of a 5 lot subdivision
named "Crooked River Lighthouse
Estates" lying in Section 36,
Township 7 South, Range 5 West,
Carrabelle. Franklin County,
Florida. Request submitted by
Steve Watkins III, Esq.. agent for
Crooked River LLC. applicant.
8. Approve (unanimous) consid-
eration of a.request for Final Plat
approval of a 14 lot,subdivision
named "Rivercrest Phase 2" lying
in Section 26. Township 8 South.
Range 8 West. North of
Apalachicola. Franklin County.
Florida. Request submitted ,by
GEA. Inc. agent for Jim Sineath.
applicant.
9. Approve (unanimous) consid-
eration of a request for Final Plat
approval of a 4 lot subdivision
named "Island Breeze" lying in
Section 28, Township 8 South,
Range 6 West, Eastpoint, Franklin
County. Florida. Request submit-
ted by GEA, Inc., agent for Steve
Lowe. applicant.

Director of Administration
Alan Pierce reported to the Board.,
"the current road paving program
is beyond the contract date. but
there is no penalty clause. The
county has set aside $2 Million
Dollars for-additional' paving.-Thal
money hasbeen obligated by the
county commission for the follow-
ing projects: $1 Million for the.
county's share of rebuilding Alli-
gator Point Road, and $1 Million


tor the county's required match
for two state grants: paving C-30A
and paving Lake Morality.
"I had been anticipating talking to
the Board about preparing a list
of roads to be paved, but until the
Board completes the current pav-
ing project, and until the three
priority roads are completed, the i
Board should not begin additional I
paving. 1
'"The parking lot for the Health 1
Department was never bid out to
C.W. Roberts. While the Board did
approve it, nobody contacted the
Mental Health Clinic to get their
final approval. I have contacted
the Clinic, and sent them a copy
of the layout. If they approve it. i
the county road department can
then prepare the site, so that it
can at least be used as a parking
lot even before it is paved."
The Board signed documents from
Office of Court Administrator to
the expenditure of $300,000 for
courthouse renovations. These
are the relating renovations the
Clerk recommends and the Chief
Judge agreed to.
The notice for architects to sub-
mit Request for Proposals/Quali-
fications for the courthouse reno-
i vations will be opened by the
SBoard at the Dec. 6 meeting.
Applications for the County Engi-
Sneer have been advertised and the
applications are due in the Plan- !.
'ning Office by Dec. 5..
SA request from. Eastpoint Sewer [:
Sand Water District.to lease a 150'
Sx 150' space in the corner of the
SRoad Dept yard for a fourth water
Swell that would provide service to
Sthe new school was discussed. I
SThe District will undertake all ex- ;
penses associated with the use of '
the property. will create access
through a forestry road, and if
upon, a survey, it is determined
that the existing county fence
Around the road department is,
actually fifteen off the property
i line. then the water line will also
be outside the fence. In exchange,
the, District will provide the county
With a commercial water tap for
the Road Department.
Bald Point State Park will be hold-
ing a public workshop to discuss
the management plan for the
Park. The workshop is scheduled
for Tuesday. Dec. 13, at the Mis-
sion by the Sea Churchon Alliga-
tor Point; from 7-9. p.m.
Ms. Lori Switzer was recom-
mended to be the SHIP Coordina-
tor by Mr. Moron. She is a con-
tract employee, meaning she does
not receive county benefits. In
Order for her to get paid, she needs
to have a contract. Mr. Moron.rec-
I'..mn:n-ncwl sh-hli be ,paid'$i88.33.3
' 'per mpnthi 'and, he:recommepnd
SC ti d o P 3-
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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


25 November 2005 Pape 3


EDrromAL & COMMENTARY


Briefs from Page 2

the Board approve the contract for
her position. She is supervised by
Mr. Moron, and her services are
paid out of the SHIP administra-
tive funds. The Board approved.
At a Board of Adjustment meet-
ing in October, an applicant rep-
resenting a project on St. George
Island was seeking a variance
from setbacks for a development
in the commercial district. Upon
hearing critical comments made
about the request, the applicant
announced he could re-design the
project to avoid the need of the
variance. The BOA then tabled the
item. Four weeks' after the BOA
meeting the applicant has deter-
mined that he still has to seek a
variance, and thus he missed the
Nov. BOA meeting. The applicant,
Mr. Turner Brock, is seeking di-
rection from the Board on whether
he needs to go back to the BOA,
and get the denial he anticipates,
or whether the county commis-
sion would hear from him directly.
The matter was referred to the
Board of Adjustment.
"At the last Board meeting, the
Board requested the Clerk's Of-
fice analyze certain issues related
to the airport. However, the Board
minutes are not clear as it relates
to the actual lease payment. The
Airport Advisory Committee rec-
ommended the lease payments be
raised to $1500 a month, but the
minutes do not reflect the Board
actually voting on it, or when it
would take effect. The existing
lease appears to give the Board the
latitude to raise the lease pay-
ments after 30 days notice. Since
the Advisory Committee has rec-
ommended the lease,be raised. I
recommend the Board notify
AIATC that the lease payment is
$1500 a month effective for the
month of December 2005. The
Board approved.
Update from the Planning and Zon-
ing Commission:
"The Commission, along with its
regular business, has been devel-
oping a definition for hotel/motel.
At my suggestion, but supported
by the Commission, we have been
developing a definition that will
separate the kind of hotel/motel
that could he built in C-2 and C-
4, from the kind of hotel/motel
that could be built in C-3. The
logic behind the separation is that
it can be argued that short term
accommodations in the general
business district, which is C-2 or
C-4, could be different from ac-
commodations in the C-3 district.
The C-2/C-4 districts are largely
on St. George Island, and U.S. 98
frontage. In these locations, the
Commission has thought it appro-
priate to be very restrictive in the
definition of a hotel/motel. In the
C-3 districts, which are less nu-
merous and have in the past been
in locations that have water ac-
cess, the idea is to allow hotel/
motels that have accommodations
more suitable for taking advan-
tage of the natural resources. The
General result will be that C-2/C-
4 hotel/motels will be really di-
rected at short term visitors, and
C-3 will allow longer stays with
more amenities.
The direction the Commission is
headed is for C-2/C-4 hotel/mo-
tels to prohibit kitchen and laun-
dry facilities in rooms, restrict the
room size to 750 square feet or
smaller, require common 24 hour
lobbies, etc., but for C-3 hotel/
motels to allow kitchen/laundry
facilities, and to allow for residen-
tial type uses and accommoda-
tions to take advantage of the ac-
cess to water and other natural
resources in the county. In fact,
in order to qualify for C-3 zoning,


the project would have to provide
a certain amount of amenities that
utilize the natural resources, like
boat storage, boat ramps, hiking
trails, etc.

Dear Run Estates
There was a public hearing con-
cerning a zone change for a prop-
erty in the Deer Run Estates. Par-
cel 1, lot 19 located at the corner
of Oak Street and Craig Street east
of Lanark Village, Franklin
County. The request was that this
property be rezoned from R-l
Single Family Residential to R-1A
Single Family Residential Subdi-
vision District. Mr. Mahaffey has
been before the Board on this is-
sue several times.
"As I said in the last meeting we
had, the reason I bought this
property was because I needed
storage for all my boats and ev-
erything. My other house is right
on the water. Because of all the
hurricanes and everything, I got
tired of moving them back and
forth. So I bought this property
with intentions of splitting it in
half not three times as your ordi-
nance on subdivisions states. Be-
fore I bought this property I came
over and went over everything
with the people in planning and
zoning. They told me what I
needed to get and I have supplied
them with all of that. All that I am
asking you to do is to treat me like
all these other people that you see
on that plat. You split their prop-
erty for them. I'm not going to
build anything on this property. I
just want to split it; I'm going to
keep one half of it for storage and
I'm going to sell the house. It is a
huge financial burden on me the
way that it is sitting right now. It
is costing me about three grand a
month to own this property. And
that is all that I have to say."
"Did this go before Planning and
Zoning?" asked Mr. Crofton.
"Yes it did."
"What was their recommenda-
tion?"
"Denial," offered Mr. Pierce, "Mr.
Mahaffey's request came in after
others had requested changes in
the general area." Mr. Pierce went
on to explain that neighbors from
the surrounding area had pro-
tested the request at previous
meetings, and some had written
letters in protest to the request.
At a previous meeting on this re-
quest the subdivision ordinance
under which Mr. Mahaffey was
making his request was also
brought into question. The infer-
ence was that the ordinance had
not been designed for the purpose
that Mr. Mahaffey was requesting.
"If this will solve all of this," in-
terjected Mr. Mahaffey. "I would
agree to not build anything else
on that lot. I do not want to build
another house on this lot. I sim-
ply want to split it, where I can
sell the house that is there and
keep the storage shed. I don't want
to build a house there."
It was then pointed out by the
County's interim attorney, Mr.
Yonclas, that general zoning de-
cisions should not be made on the
basis of individual property
owner's promises. The property
could be sold. A general policy rule
should apply generally.
"If you agree to what I am ask-
ing," said Mr. Mahaffey. "The
property will be split into two half
acre parcels. Half acre parcels can
not be further divided. One acre
can be divided into three, but a
half acre parcel can not be fur-
ther divided." His point being that
the fear expressed that the prop-


I,0V &f- POST OFFICE BOX 590
-- EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
> 850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
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r'9-1 e-mail: hoffer531 @gtcom.net
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 14, No. 24


November 25, 2005


Publisher Tom W. Hoffer
Director of Operations Andy Dyal
Contributors Dawn Radford
........... Carol Noble
........... Richard Noble
........... Skip Frink
Advertising Design
and Production Artist. Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate Jerry Weber

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis Apalachicola
Skip Frink Carrabelle
David Butler Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins................. Eastpoint
Barbara Revell .. Lanark Village
Richard Harper St. George Island
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All contents Copyright 2005
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


erty could be resold and then fur-
ther divided was unfounded.
Mr. Pierce gave the details sup-
porting Mr. Mahaffey's last alle-
gation. It would be true that if the
property were divided in two, it
then could not be further divided.
A motion was made to approve Mr.
Mahaffey's request by Mr..
Lockley. Mr. Putnal seconded the
motion. Commissioners
Mosconis, Crofton and Sanders
opposed. The motion was denied.

South Shoal PUD
Amendment-Steve.
Watkins
Developer and long time resident
of Alligator Point, Steve Fling had
propositioned the County with a
proposal regarding his develop-
ment on Alligator Point. Repre-
senting Mr. Fling was attorney
Steve Watkins who made his pub-
lic presentation.
"I'm Steve Watkins for South
Shoal Development. The basic
outline of the project is; Mr. Fling,
on behalf of South Shoal, has
agreed to relocate Alligator Drive
by building, to DOT specifications,
a new road through his project. It
would be dedicated to the County.
He would also build two parking
lots to promote the beach
renourishment. Once that is done
that would be dedicated to the
County also. He is also going to
be building a residence for a
Sheriffs deputy. That has already
been put on the table, as well as a
substation for the voluntary fire
department. That's been the pro-
posal ... There is also a ten inch
water-main that will be con-
structed and dedicated to the
County along the right-of-way of
the new Alligator Drive. There
would be an abandonment of the
old Alligator Drive, with the
County maintaining the right of'
ingress and egress, along that ...
portion that has been abandoned.
The proposal by the County is that
it would meander with the high
water line. That is a substantial
risk to Mr. Fling because we don't
know if that right-of-way is going
to be there in the next few years.
We also don't know if there will
he a beach renourishment. There
is no guarantee that is going to
happen. So he (Mr. Fling) would
be accepting responsibility for
whatever is left of the right-of-way
to keep it from eroding into his
property. Mr. Fling has been a
resident of Alligator point for thirty
years. This is the first time that I
have ever heard anyone coming
forward to make this kind of pro-
posal to the County to solve a
problem at substantial financial
risk-if the weather doesn't hold
out, if there is no beach
renourishment; and that buffer in
front of the right-of-way.
"One other issue that we have dis-
cussed is about the volunteer fire
department. They (the volunteer
fire dept.) do not have a problem
with becoming a part of the PUD.
They do not lose ownership of the
fire station." Mr. Watkins went on
to explain that their investment
would be secure. The discussion
then turned to the concerns of two
property owners who are worried
about their road access when the
new road is built and the old road
is abandoned. There was also ex-
pressed a concern by the County's
attorney with regards to maintain-
ing public access to ensure grant
qualifications for the beach
renourishment program. This
problem would be connected with
the road abandonment.
Ken Osborne president of the Al-
ligator Point taxpayers association
then stepped forward to offer his
group's concerns.
"We filed, the last time this came
up, a letter for the record-that
we would like to be kept in the


; record-of our objections and our
objectives that we would like to
see accomplished in this. Those
boil down to two key items. The
i first of those is that this (proposal)
doesn't solve the road problem."
Mr. Osborne then went over to a
,map of the proposal and pointed
, out a twelve to fourteen hundred
foot section of the road that would
still remain a problem to the
County. "So Mr. Putnal (County/
road problem) will be back again
the next storm we get from the
south."
Mr. Osborne then explained the
kind of road that he and his group
would like to see constructed in
that area the road would he con-
structed on pilings to prevent
washout. "This developer is dou-
bling the density. And we went
through a lot of give and take to
get that first density where it is.
He is getting seventeen waterfront
lots instead of seventeen beach
view lots across a road." Mr.
Osborne made the point that in
his evaluation Mr. Fling's proposal
was not all that generous. "You are
exchanging County land for
County land," he suggested in a
couple of instances. His point be-
ing that Mr. Fling was actually
getting a good deal more than
what he was giving-even the ten
inch water main was only twenty
dollars per foot additional cost
from what he would be required
to do in servicing his own devel-
opment. "And yet, we are not say-
ing: Don't do this. We will live with
it but (he-Mr. Fling) should share
some of this kind of money. This
Council has the responsibility to
get value for value. And then we,
have the issue of the fire station,
I have had all types of personal
assurances: I have had e-mails
and we just ask one simple
thing-We want a (written) state-
ment in there that says:
We won't move this fire station or
sell it until a substation to house
a fire truck is in place. That is all
we want."
'The developer will be building a
fire substation," said Mr. Watkins,
"It is (written) in the former PUD.
He will build a substation," Mr.
Watkins added with emphasis.
"Well if Steve Fling says that he
will build a substation, I believe
that he will," said Mr. Osborne.
"But who's to know if Mr. Fling is
going to own this thing two
months from now? You see prop-
erties flipping back and forth here
- you ought to know what is hap-
pening. How do we know as a
community that we are going to
bedealing with Steve Fling? If it
is not written into. he;PUp, what
you got is just-trust me-that's
all we've got." Steve Fling was then
asked by Ms. Sanders to step for-
ward.
Mr. Fling gave his assurances that
the fire station promise and a
house for a deputy sheriff would
be built at his expense to satisfy
the on going needs of the commu-
nity.
"Could we get that statement
(above guarantees) written into
the agreement?" asked Mr.
Osborne, 'That's all that we are
asking. We have to be protected
because I don't know if I'm going
to be dealing with Mr. Fling in the
future, I don't think that the com-
munity is asking too much-to
agree to what you are saying-but
asking you to, please, put it into
writing in the ordinance. And then
the other issue is the road."
"I think this commission knows
my dedication to the community.
South Shoal Development Group
will do whatever we can do to help
that road," promised Mr. Fling.
The bottom line is that Mr. Fling's
road relocation project will take
care of approximately 1500 ft. of
the County's Alligator Point road
problem. But 1200 to 1400 feet of


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beachfront or shoreline road will
still remain at risk to the County.
Two other speakers voiced their
concern with some sort of guar-
antee from the developer with re-
gards to the fire station and the
new substation.
After a discussion on several
points that would have to be dealt
with and clarified in the future a
motion was made to approve the
proposal by Mr. Putnal. It was sec-
onded by Mr. Mosconis and then
passed without objection.

Ronnie Davis-C-l
Zoning-Two Mile
Mr. Davis had a letter that had
been sent to the Commission for
a response. He received no re-
sponse. Ms. Sanders said that she
had not received any such letter.
Mr. Davis then read his letter,
The letter dealt with the C-1 prop-
erty owners at Two Mile and in
Eastpoint who requested a rezon-
ing of their C-1 property status.
C-1 zoning requires that only sea-
food related businesses be allowed
in any area designated as C-1.
This is an old zoning requirement
with a long history. It was estab-
lished by seafood business own-
ers to protect the seafood indus-
try arid insure its longevity. To-
day with the virtual collapse of the
local seafood industry many of
these C-1 property owners are
seeking relief from the mandate
of this C-1 zoning. What was once
an advantage and a protection to
these property owners has since
become a noose around their
neck. Many seafood workers are
opposed to any change to this zon-
ing status. They fear that if this
zoning were changed they would
have no place to dock their boats
or unload their catch-thus, in ef-
fect, putting them out of business.
Months ago these C-l property
owners submitted a proposal for
a new type of C-1 zoning that in
addition to seafood would permit
some sort of residential construc-
tion above their seafood related
businesses, A public discussion
was held relating to such a pro-
posal, but no decision was made.
"We aren't going out of business;
we are out of business," stated Mr.
Davis who has been in the sea-
food business all of his life and
whose mother and father, before
him, were both seafood dealers.
"We are in a hardship situation.
My question is; "What are you all
going to do about it to help us out?
Even the Armed Services makes
allowances for hardship dis-
charges, You going, to dp any of
this for us? While (others) are sell-
ing out and making big profits, the
Two Mile and Eastpoint C-1 prop-
erty owners simply asked to be
able to be allowed to make another
use of their property-like a gas
station that sells groceries in or-
der to give them enough money
to operate the C-1 business. We
were met with such opposition
that we were accused by leaflets
that we were killing the
oystermen.
"The Planning and Zoning Com-
mission," Allen Pierce explained,
"has felt that the particular use
that these property owners would
like are the kinds of uses that the
Planning and Zoning Commission
has been opposed to-those are
residential uses and hotel uses.
So, I will tell you right now that
we have a built in conflict."
A .rather circular conversation
then took place that ended right
back where it had started. The
question remained: Should the
Board grant these C-l property
owners additional uses besides
seafood or not?
"We would like to see some
changes," Mr. Davis petitioned.
"We would sure like to stay in


business, and pay our bills and
feed our families."
"I tell you what, this decision is
bigger than all of us. Let's put this
(the ordinance suggested by the
C-1 property owners) on the bal-
lot and let the people decide," sug-
gested Mr. Putnal. 'That's what
they do with issues like this. If it
is too hard to make a decision, you
put it on the ballot and let the
community decide."
"May I address that?" Mr. Patrick
Floyd, attorney for the C-l prop-
erty owners asked, "Some of my
group have felt that maybe their
point has not been understood.
What we really wanted to do was
be able to say thank-you for help-
ing us. But we're not there yet.
The issue is this; are we going to
preserve the few existing commer-
cial seafood businesses that are
on the Eastpoint waterfront and
the Two Mile waterfront or are we
going to let it continue to die? The
time is running out ... What is the
choice here? Don't change the
zoning; don't do anything? The
consequence of that is to let it go
on down and let it go into non-
existence. In order to preserve
this, you are going to have to take
some action. In order to preserve
this area (seafood) and possibly
bring it back, you are going to
have to do something.
"We just want the help that other
people have been getting. Some-
thing has to be done. You have
had people up here who have shed
tears over it, that have poured
their hearts out-you know where
they are. These are people who
have been here for a long time:
they want somehelp. You can't to
it by sitting there and just saying
we're not going to change the zon-
ing; we're not going to do any-
thing. That is a death warrant for
this particular area. This is not an
ordinance that has been adver-
tised, and it certainly can be
changed some. So what has to be,
done is to put it to a motion, to
advertise the ordinance, to put it
to the staff, have them make the
changes that they deem neces-
sary, get input from you folks and
move it forward to a point where
it can be advertised for an ordi-
nance. That is what we would like
to have. Thank you."
"I'd like to say something here if I
can." requested Mr. Waverly
Smith. "You know, I know this boy
sitting here (Ronnie Davis) I've
oystered with him. He's been here
thirty years; I've been here sev-
enty. I've seen this industry go up
and down, up and down, up and
down. This industry is not' fin-
ished; You know what is going to
finish this industry? It is when the
oysterman can't bring his oysters
to a dock and unload them be-
cause Pe ain't got no ramp to bring
them in on. Every time one of
these people come in here and
buys some land, they put a fence
around it. There is no place over
at Two Mile where we can unload.
And there is not but one little
place over at Eastpoint. It is very
simple to solve this problem. If
these land owners want to change
this thing, all they got to do is
build us a nice ramp at Two Mile
and a nice ramp at Eastpoint and
by golly if someone would buy us
some- land to build an oyster
house on they can have that
beach.
"But until they do, you don't need
to destroy one industry to make
another one. You see you got the
fishing industry here and you got
the tourist industry moving in.
We've lived all these years on sea-
food. But now this land has got-
ten real valuable and I don't blame
this poor boy from wantin' to sell
his land. We can't even unload
anywhere now, There's no land-


Continued on Page 5


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Pa e 4 25 November 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


How Ownership
Of Land Is

SF Transferred
By Robert E. Wharrie
DEED-Deeds are used to transfer owner-
ship of land (or "real property" or realty) from
one owner to another. The deed must be in
writing and it must describe the land being
transferred. It must be signed by the person
transferring the land, (the "Grantor" or "First
Party") and the signature of the Grantor must
be witnessed by two people who sign the deed as witnesses. The
Grantor's signature must be acknowledged by a notary. The names of
the Grantor, the Grantee (or "Second Party"), the witnesses, and the
notary must be stamped or printed legibly on the deed. The deed must
be recorded in the Official Records of the county in which the real
property is located.
PROBATE PROCEEDINGS-If the sole owner of real property dies,
there is nobody to sign the deed to transfer ownership to anybody
else. Then it becomes necessary to go through probate proceedings in
court. For small estates with no creditors, an Order of Summary Ad-
ministration may be obtained from the Court to show that ownership
of the property has changed. For larger estates it may be.necessary to
file a Petition for Formal Administration to appoint a Personal Repre-
sentative of the estate. The Personal Representative will have the power
to. sign a deed to transfer ownership of the property to those who are
entitled to it according to the terms of the owner's last will and testa-
ment or to the owner's heirs according to the laws of intestate succes-
sion, if there is no will.
JOINTLY OWNED REAL PROPERTY-If two or more persons own
the property "with rights of survival" and one of them dies, the de-
ceased person's ownership interests in the property passes automati-
cally to the surviving co-owner(s). All that is necessary is to record a
certified copy of the decedent's death certificate in the county official
records. The recorded deed shows any title searchers that the joint
owner is deceased and the property is now owned by the surviving
ownerss. If the death certificate has the cause of death on it, it cannot
he recorded in the public record. Therefore, a "short form" death cer-
tificate without the cause of death must be recorded.
HUSBAND AND WIFE-If a married couple own the property together,
they own it as "tenants by the entireties," meaning that each of them
own all of it. If one of them dies, the surviving spouse .still owns all of
it. Again, all that is necessary is to record a death certificate for the
deceased spouse.
LIVING TRUST-If ownership of the property is deeded to a trustee of
a properly drafted and executed living trust, the trustee has the power
to deed it to the beneficiaries designated in the trust or to continue to
hold the property in trust for their use and benefit.
LIFE ESTATE WITH POWERS-A deed can be worded so that the
owner retains a "life estate" in the property and deeds the "remainder"
to another person. The life estate means that the owner can live there
or collect the income from the property. Upon the death of the life
estate owner, the life estate is extinguished and the remainderman
owns the property outright. The deed also specifies that in addition to
the life estate, the owner retains the right to deed the property back to
himself or any other person, or to sell the property and keep the pro-
ceeds of sale without the signature of the remainderman. Upon the
life estate owner's death, all that is required is to record his death
certificate to show that the property belongs entirely to the remain-
derman.
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, CONTACT:
Robert E. Wharrie, P.A.
Robert E. Wharrie, Esq. or C. Byron Stout, Ill, Esq
S 1, Telephoine (727) 346-9555 Fasittiil (727)'34'6-00:1OO 3:
., ,550P,38th Avenue North,-St. Peter,.hurg Fldfida 337 O: '":


Boyd Praises Defense Bill

Requiring Accountability

In Iraq

Senate bill will shed light on war in Iraq
'Congressman Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) applauded the Senate pas-
sage of'the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2006 (S
1042), requiring more accountability on operations in Iraq. Among
'other things, the legislation will require the Administration to submit
quarterly reports to Congress on the progression of the U.S military
mission in Iraq and an explanation of an exit strategy for completion
of the mission
The Senate defense bill requires the Administration to submit quar-
terly, unclassified reports to Congress on the progress in Iraq and
criteria for success. These reports will include details on the number
of Iraqi battalions that must be able to fight independently before U.S.
troops can withdraw, allowing Iraqi forces to begin taking responsibil-
ity for their country's security. The legislation also calls on the Ad-
ministration to tell Iraqis to make the compromises necessary for po-
litical progress.




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"Our armed services, military families, taxpayers arid the government
have invested so much in our .promotion of democracy, and we all
deserve a sound and timely plan for ending our mission and bringing
our troops home," Boyd stated. "I'm pleased the Senate passed the
defense bill to include important oversight measures that are abso-
lutely necessary for appropriate accountability in Iraq."

Boyd Announces
Application Period For

Homeland Security Grants

Congressman Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) announced that the De-
partment of Homeland Securit~'s Office of State and Local Govern-
ment Coordination and Preparedness (SLGCP) will be accepting grant
applications through December 14, 2005, to allocate funds to en-
hance our nation's homeland security. Through the Emergency Man-
agement Performance Grant (EMPG) Program, the state of Florida
has been allocated approximately $7.5 million to improve state and
local emergency preparedness response and recovery capabilities.
The State Administering Agencies in Florida can apply for and distrib-
ute the allocated funds for the state of Florida through the EMPG
Program Florida's State Administering Agencies can be found at http:/
/www.ojp.usdoj.gov/saa/fl.htm. The actual grant awards will be made
at a later date.
SLGCP is the federal government's lead agency responsible for pre-
paring the nation against terrorism by assisting states and local au-
.thorities to prevent, deter and respond to terrorist acts. SLGCP pro-
vides a broad array of assistance to America's first responders through
funding, coordinated training, exercises, equipment acquisition and
technical assistance.
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Office of State and Local Government Coordination and Preparedness
Emergency Management Performance Grant Application Period
November 14, 2005 December 14, 2005


A Little Balance If You Please

-Here we go again. There seems to be a small group of Tallahassee
"experts" who continually condemn the re-enacted presence of An-
drew Jackson every year there are announced plans for Springtime
Tallahassee. These quasi-historians can t seem to place Mr. Jackson
into a balance in American history, only emphasizing a partial chap-
ter in his service to the United States of America. The General was
among a few who saved our young Republic from the British by whip-
ping the strongest army at that time. Jackson's leadership contrib-
uted to the survival of the United States when the British had just
ransacked the nation's capital, and very seriously threatened the se-
curity of the United States. The victory at New Orleans was very nec-
essary to the security of the United States even though a peace treaty
with the British had been negotiated.
Yes, we can disagree about Jackson's policies toward the Indians and
others in earlier and later years but these policies did not exclusively
originate with him. In the modern era, we do not completely condemn
Franklin Roosevelt for the incarceration of Japanese Americans. Some
steps toward reconciliation have been taken, both in placing the events
in historical context and making amends to rectify bad policy. A little
balance is needed here among those who condemn outright all the
deeds of our historical figures.
Tom W. Hoffer
Publisher


Boyd Praises
Bill Denying
Funds For
Apalachicola
River

Dredging
Congressman Allen Boyd (D-
North Florida), a member of the
House Appropriations Committee,
today voted in favor of the Con-
ference Report on the Energy and
Water Development Appropria-
tions Act for fiscal year 2006 (HR
2419) which continues the prohi-
bition of dredging along the
Apalachicola River. This legisla-
tion is the first time in almost a
decade that the House of Repre-
sentatives did not include money
for Apalachicola River dredging as
requested by the President.


Congressman Boyd has been a
staunch advocate for ending the
dredging along the Apalachicola
,River. -ln both the 107th-and
108th Congresses, Congressman
SBoyd introduced legislation to end
navigational dredging of the
Apalachicola River. The Restore
the Apalachicola River Ecosys-
tems (RARE) Act would have
changed the federal authorization
of the Apalachicola-Chattahoo-
chee-Flint (ACF) River system to
end navigational dredging on the
Apalachicola River from the
Florida-Georgia border to the Gulf
of Mexico, while also directing the
Corps of Engineers to complete a
plan for the restoration of the
river's ecosystem.
The Apalachicola was recently
listed as one of the nation's most
endangered rivers by American
Rivers. Dredged sand is often
dumped along the river's banks,
leaving piles as high as a four-
story building. The large amounts
of sand have choked sloughs and
,cut off the water supply to sur-
rounding habitat.


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Library Happenings

By Judi Rundel
The Franklin County Public Library will hold its annual Holiday Party
on December 4th from 3:00 5:00 p.m. at the Eastpoint Firehouse.
This is a pot-luck dinner with gift exchange (limit $5.00) for our Friends,
volunteer and library staff, FROG, WITH-IT!, and TIGERS participants.
RSVP to 670-8151 or 697-2366 if you plan to attend.
The Book Social will meet at the library's Carrabelle location on Thurs-
day, December 1st at 5:30 p.m. to discuss Janet Fitch's book "White
Oleander." The following week, Thursday, December 8th the group
will meet again at 5:30 p.m. to view the movie version of the book and
discuss the differences. For more information, call Carolyn at 697-
2366.
The Franklin County Public Library's programs-FROG, WITH-ITI and
TIGERS are offered at no cost to participants. Registration however is
required. For information about the Library and any-of its programs,
please call 697-2366, 670-8151, or 653-2784 or view the Library's
website located at www.franklin.lib.fl.us.


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNEk NEWSPAPER


25 November 2005 Paee 5


Briefs from Page 3

ing. So if they want that land let
them provide a landing for us.
That is what I say."
"This boy who is talking right
now," said a Mrs. Raffield a local
oyster harvester, "about his ter-
rible situation. Well, he has been
out of business for several years
and he hasn't starved yet. Now
this thing that they got goin' now
is just another step to get condos
on our beaches-up and down the
waterfront. Now the people of
Franklin county do not want a
waterfront covered in condos, ho-
tels or whatever it is that they
want. It is bad for our County. We
don't like it; we don't want it. Now
there are lots of other things that
they could do with their land be-
sides sticking a damn condo on
it." The audience erupted into ap-
plause and amens. "Now, I know
this man, Mr. Davis. He has
oystered. I got no quarrel with him
whatsoever. I know he wants to
use his land. You see everybody
keeps sayin'-Well, you got to un-
derstand, it is my land-it is true


it is your land, but you can't use
that land if it is detrimental to the
rest of the County." Amen, amen.
"Now I can't go here to the Court-
house and put up a prostitution
house. So how can they go and
take our waterfront and stick con-
dos all over it. Look at Pensacola.
it used to be beautiful beaches out
there. You can't even see it (the
beach) now. If you let one of them
in (condos); you let the rest of
them in. Now I know he (Mr.
Davis) is not going to starve to
death arid none of the rest of them
are going to starve to death. So
you can put up your poor mouth
all that you want to, but all that I
am getting is that you want to ruin
the County. And I... AM ... Against
... it!" Mrs. Raffield went to her
seat amidst the sound of ap-
plause.
"I want to put this on the ballot,"
repeated Mr. Putnal.
A man named Tony Johnston a
property owner at Two Mile then
came to the podium. "You know it
is not all just about oystering. God
bless you and I'm the last to say
that I want to see condominiums
along the water there, and that's
my water, I pay the taxes on it.
It's my property. I came here. I
bought a Grouper boat and you
all don't want to know what has
happened to that. I think that
what people are missing is that we
want to keep seafood downstairs,
just like it is right today. We are
actually trying to save the seafood.
Without that Apalachicola is not
Apalachicola. I'm probably the
largest property owner on Two
1Mile channel and I'll be the Ilrst
person to tell you-save the sea-
ood..-But,-we' have got to have
some soil of help. I don't have any


seafood houses on my property
and I lost my house with Hurri-
cane Dennis. What is your sug-
gestion? What do you suggest that
I do? I pay my property taxes
there. We just came here to ask a
little support. You tell me, what
am I to do?"
"Commissioners," interrupted at-
torney Shuler, "we're not here to
answer rhetorical questions. If he
has a request for the Board for a
specific action; he's making a dec-
laration."
"Well, it is very late and a number
of us are very tired," Mr. Pierce
interjected in somewhat of an
apology for the County attorney's
abruptness. "But, the County has
been in support of the C-1 district
and it has been in support of al-
ternative uses. Pete Wilson is here
who did go through the process
and got something other than
what has been traditionally out
there. He has a restaurant; he has
a guide service; he has a raw bar;
he has a number of things in that
one building. Is it as far as he
would like us to go? Well no, but
the county has made an effort to
expand the uses. The only thing
that the County has not yet done,
because it is so controversial, is
that residential and hotel use."
"Yes, but you know that (Pete Wil-
son) is in violation," added Mr.
Crofton.
"Yes, he had rental units up-
stairs."
"Okay," said Mr. Crofton, "But
that is a zoning violation."
"Does your staff have any sugges-
tions," asked Mr. Mosconis of Mr.
Pierce. They did not.
"That hotel and residential is like
a cancer that is eating this County
alive." offered Mr. Putnal.
"We can not seem to find a way
for the hotel/motel designation to
be compatible with the C-1 dis-
trict," said Mr. Pierce.
"They need to think of compatible
uses," offered attorney Shuler.
"If we can get unloading facilities
available ... if we actually find in-
terior seafood locations and we
have government sponsored un-
loading facilities then the argu-
ment will probably even become
more intense-why do we need
C-1 zoning then?" offered Mr.
Pierce.
"Can we buy the land?"
"You have made a legislative re-
quest for three million dollars. We
will have to wait and see if the leg-
islature will give us that money."
Ms. Sanders then asked att)orner
Shuler what he would rei-on-i
mend. Mr. Shuler recommended
that no action be taken. '


"Now wait a minute. That's n6o
fair," interrupted Mr. Mosconis2,
"Forget about the hotel and con-'
dos, let's look at some alternatiVe'
uses, including obviously seafood,
because that is the historical use,i
for it."
"That is not what they are propos-.'
ing Commissioner," Attorney'
Shuler argued.
"I don't care about what they are-
proposing. They are not speaking,
for everybody who owns real-es-;
tate over there and in Eastpoint."
"If someone came in there with a"
tourist orientated idea, like a res-,,
taurant-which we have already,
approved for C-1, yes they would
have to get a special exemption ..'
said Mr. Pierce.
"So they could be doing something'
like that?" suggested Mr,
Mosconis.
"Yes, other uses that would fall
under the category of tourist ori-
entated uses; a restaurant would'
be one; a guide service would be
another. There are other uses that.
could go in there besides a,
straight seafood house without,
changing the ordinance."
"We have tried to write all those
Special exemptions in. It has alflr
been rejected,'" said Mr. Johnston.
"We're not standing herejust say-,
ing condominiums. We're just say-
ing help us. 'We are open to what-
ever you all can come up with. We
have the only deep water dockage'
between Apalachicola and St. Joe.
It really shouldn't be just wasted'"
on residential,"
A Mr. John Carroll then stood up
in the back of the room and asked
if the County WQuld be interested
in trading with him, He suggested
that he might be willing to trade
one hundred feet of his property
on the Two Mile channel for some
county property adjacent to his.
"Would the Board be interested in
something like thatt" he asked.
"Of course," Mr. Mosconis said-
with a big smile, "I will tell you, I
would highly recommend and I,
will make a motion that we direct
Alan (Pierce) to get together with
Mr. Carroll and pursue this idea."
A motion was offered and ap-
proved unanimously.

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Physician's Suit from Page 1

5} North Florida is also mandated
to have contracts with local agen-
cies to provide hospital, mental,
'as well as transportation services.
W'e are not aware of any such con-
,acts.
'6) Furthermore, no provider at
SEastpoint has ever had hospital
privileges at our local hospital.
p ur understanding is that Health
Centers (FQHC) must provide for
,inpatient services either directly
ti through contracted services. N6
such arrangements have been
made. Our local ER group has
"Ieen gracious enough to admit on
behalf of Eastpoint patients.
'7) We also understand that North
.Florida does not provide a full-
time physician a physician is there
only 2 half days a week.
STo summarize, because of the fail-
'tie of North Florida to meet its
obligations to provide health care
to the indigent and uninsured,
other local providers and our lo-
cal ER, who are not receiving fed-
eral subsidy, are overwhelmed
with indigent care. The Board re-
spectfully requests that North
,Florida be made to pay for the.
health care services these other
local providers are giving to
indigents."
The Commission's letter also re-
viewed the appointment of a new
SHealth Council which is actively
investigating ways to improve
,county health care. The Council
endorsed the removal of North
Florida and recommended that
Franklin County apply for the
grant directly.
Lam Applebee answ\'ered the com-
plaint by filing his Answer on Oc-
tober 27, 2005. He has denied
certain claims by the plaintiff
North Florida Medical Centers,
:Inc. that they have "legitimate
':business interests justifying (the
non-compete provision) in the
agreement. North Florida Medical
Centers, Inc., claims that the
"...contractually specified re-
straint is reasonably necessary to
.protect NFMC's legitimate busi-
ness interests justifying the re-
,.striction." Others may argue;that
because Franklin County is in a
remote and rural area, medical
' services are very limited and 'due
'to several natural disasters in re-
cent months, incomes of residents
Shave fallen dramatically, helping
to curtail medical services.
Moreover, Mr. Applebee, the de-
fendant in this legal action, alleges
that North Florida Medical Cen-
ter, Inc. is stopped from their le-
gal action because "he is not pro-
viding medical,-services wh'ieh
c&'Dmpet:* vfh iPlain i El's practlcei
Mr. Applebee p:,ointed out that hIn
aereemerif with' North 'Florida
Medical w\as to provide pediatric
care to newborns through eigh-
teen years of age, adult primary
care, outpatient and inpatient
care and medical services. In his'
current position at Florida Coastal
Cardiology, Mr. Applebee has fo-
cused on cardiac care and inter-
nal medicine.
Moreover, Larry Applebee asserted
in his answer brief, North Florida
is stopped from bringing legal
action because the employment
agreement violates public policy
and adversely affects the public
health, safety arid welfare as set
forth in Chapter 542.335 (g) and
(h) Florida Statutes.
The statutory.section defines le-
gitimate business interests, begin-
ning with pleading and proving
such interests. In subsection (g),
in determining the enforceability
of a restrictive covenant a court
shall not consider any individual-
ized economic or other hardship


county.


offers a
rs
to

lis one


that might be caused to the per-
son against whom enforcement is
sought. Also, the Statute requires
the Court consider the effect of
enforcement upon the public
health, safety and welfare.
The U.S. Dept. of Health and Hu-
man Services has determined
there is a shortage of health pro-
fessionals in Franklin County,
"The health care needs of the citi-
zens of Franklin County substan-
tially outweigh the interests of the
Plaintiff' (North Florida Medical
Centers, Inc.) Citing a Florida Dis-
trict Court of Appeals case, the
brief concluded, as such, "this
covenant is violative of public
Policy and cannot be enforced."
Mr. Applebee also claimed North
Florida Medical Centers, Inc.
breached their agreement by fail-
ing to reimburse Mr. Applebee's
expenses under their employment
contract. He further asserts that
the "non-compete" restriction is:
overly broad, overly vague "...and
does not serve a legitimate busi-
ness interest of North Florida
Medical Centers, Inc."
Lawyers for North Florida Medi-
cal Centers, Inc. have requested
a Hearing on the temporary in-
junction issue ".'.on an expedited
basis." A court date has been es-
tablished for Monday, January 23,
2006 at 9:00 a.m. in Judge's
Chambers or the courtroom if
available.
North Florida Medical Centers
operates medical offices in
Wewahitchka, Wakulla County
(Panacea), Quincy, Greenville,
Mayo, Cross City, Perry and
Eastpoint.
Among the various contract pro-
visions involving the agreement
between North Florida Medical
Centers, Inc. and Mr. Applebee,
is a "productivity expectation." It
states:
"NFMC is regulated by the Bureau
of Primary Health Care (BPHC)
and is required to meet or exceed
various performance goals. One of
these goals is a specific number
of patient encounters (visits) per
year for each full-time provider.
In order to comply with BPHC ex-
pectations the Provider (medical
.physician or physician assistant)
is expected to build his/her prac-
tice to a level that meets or ex-
ceeds 6,000 (3.2) visits per diag-
nostic hour worked) patient visits
per year within twenty-four
months."
In another contract provision 3.1
states that the agreement shall be
effective on or after November
2003 and shall continue through
October 31, 2004 unless earlier
terminated pursuant to section
6... This agreement shall be auto-
mli-icall\ ,e\xended for additional
one \ ear terms unles-ir either party
gives sixty (60) days notice that
this Agreement will not be ex-
tended.


Operation
Safe Ride to
Target
Speeders Over
The Holiday

Weekend

Colonel Chris Knight, Director of
the Florida Highway Patrol, an-
nounced that the next phase of
Operation Safe Ride, a long-term
FHP enforcement campaign that
focuses on varying traffic themes,.
will target unlawful speed viola-
tors. "There's an erroneous belief
that it's okay to drive 10 to 15
miles per hour over the posted
speed limit. We want to make clear


available either. Please make
plans to pick up records either
before that date or after.

SABRE Gate Construction
Drivers are reminded to use cau-
tion when entering or exiting via
the Sabre Road Gate while con-
struction is ongoing for their own
safety and for the safety of the
construction workers on duty.

Retiree Activities Office
Volunteers Needed
The Retiree Activities Office is
seeking volunteers to assist with

Continued on Page 6


Board of County Commissioners

FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA


Debris Removal Policy


It shall be the policy of the Board of County Commissioners of Franklin County,
Florida, that Franklin County shall provide for right-of-way debris removal within
both the unincorporated and incorporated area of the county. Provided that resi-
dents in such areas place eligible debris within 15 feet of the curb (within the right-
of-way):


1. The following debris shall be ELIGIBLE for pickup by the county:
a) Yard Trash: Tree trimmings, bushes, leaves, grass clippings, pine straw, etc.
b) Yard Debris: Yard furniture, fences and broken lumber.
c) Household Goods: Rugs, furniture, small appliances, mattresses and
appliances such as refrigerators, freezers, stoves, washers and dryers.

2. The following debris shall be INELIGIBLE for pickup by the county, whether
placed or pushed to the curb by the property owner/resident or a private contrac-
tor:
a) Construction Debris: Material used in the construction or repair of a
structure or building (shingles, cut boards, sheet rock, bricks, tin, etc.).
b) Demolition Debris: Material created by the physical deconstruction of a
structure or building (walls, roofing, flooring, concrete slabs, outbuildings,
etc.).
c) Land Clearing Debris: Flora debris from improved or unimproved residential
or commercial property including, but not limited to trees, shrubs, plants,
and other similar woody materials and vegetative matter severed from the soil.
d) Tree Cutting Debris: Debris created by the cutting and/or removal of trees,
limbs, stumps and soil.
e) Household Hazardous Waste: Paint, old gas, used oil, pesticides, lawn
chemicals, etc.
f) Special Waste: Used tires, old car batteries, car parts, abandon vehicles,
vessels and clothes.
g) Large Volume: Unreasonable amounts of debris from improved residential
property with a single family residence. A pile of debris, regardless of
eligibility that measure more than six (6) cubic yards or any piece or segment
of debris that exceeds four (4) feet in length or six (6) inches in diameter.

3. The removal of ineligible debris shall be the responsibility of the property
owner/resident and it shall be promptly removed and transported to the Franklin
County Central Landfill, on State Road 65, Eastpoint, Florida for final disposal.

4. Residents are encouraged to utilize Amnesty Days at the Landfill every third
Wednesday of the month and Yard Trash Amnesty every Monday.


Date Adopted: November 1, 2005
Effective Date: November 1, 2005


Karen's Deli
:-' .O
Dine In and Take Out .
Boar's Head Subs '
Blue Bell Ice Cream '
Homemade Salads '. '
191 U.S. Highway 98 .
Eastpoint, FL 32328 -
(Behind Car Wash):i '
Phone: 670-8717 t -.


/I\


Bayside Realty Inc.
877-577-7177 Toll Free
850-697-3919 Phone
850-697-9607 Fax
Residential & Waterfront Properties
JAMES N Serving you in Wakulla and Franklin Co
BAY












front 3BF/2.BA home with a long pier to docK. This beauty o
screen porch downstairs with a 31 x 11 screen porch upstairs
g wonderful Giulf views. There is a great room large enough
formal and informal dining, as well as a full living room.
'-in-law suite downstairs and a 3-car garage. Callto see t
MLS#io5(pS4. $,275,o000.00.

Freda White Moore-Licensed Feal Estate BroKer
Beth Barber--ealtor
Petra MyricK-RePaltor
160 Laughing Gull Lane Carrabelle, FL 32322


Ax A*-~. -


Operation

Coastal

Clean-Up

According to Franklin County
Sheriff Mike Mock, on Tuesday
morning, November 15, 2005, the
Drug Task Force, along with the
Franklin County Sheriffs Office
Patrol Division made fifteen drug
arrests in their continuous at-
tempt to keep drug dealers and
drug users off the streets of
Franklin County. The Sheriffs Of-
fice executed warrants on the fol-
lowing individuals for their part in
the sale and/or purchase of ille-
gal drugs. These individuals are
now being held in the Franklin
County Jail Facility on the follow-
ing drug ,charges:
Daniel Albert Dillon, Sale of Con-
trolled Substance (methadone
pills)
Charles Freeman, Sale of Con-
trolled Substance (crack cocaine)
Lance Flowers, Sale of Controlled
Substance (crack cocaine)
Luther Glass, Writ of Attachment
(Child Support)
Michelle Hinson, 2 counts-Sale
of Controlled Substance (crack co-
caine)
Corlinda Lattimore, Sale of Con-
trolled Substance (crack cocaine)
Michelle Myers, 2 counts-Sale
of Controlled Substance (crack co-
caine)
Timothy Wade Patterson, Sale of
Controlled Substance (cannabis)
Andrew Polk, Sale of Controlled
Substance (crack cocaine)
Michelle Provenzano, Sale of
Controlled Substance (powder co-
caine)
Charles Russell, Capias for (FTA
for Poss. Less 20 Grams Can-
nabis)
Crystal Sand, Purchase of Con-
trolled Substance (powder co-
caine)
Greg Starkey, Purchase of Con-
trolled Substance (crack cocaine)
William Strong, Sale of Con-
trolled Substance (crack cocaine)
Kenneth Turner, Sale of Con-
trolled Substance (crack cocaine);
and Writ of Attachment (child sup-
port) out of Leon County
Sheriff Mock wants to send a clear
message to the community of
Franklin County that he still in-
iteridsito do everything'within his
power to deter the sale, use and
abuse of drugs in thiscounty.


that this belief is not only wrong,
but dangerous. Motorists must
recognize that speeding increases
the likelihood of a crash and its
severity," said Colonel Knight.
FHP troopers will continue to con-
duct speed and traffic law enforce-
ment as part of their daily enforce-
ment efforts as well as participate
in special operations such as this
one, which is scheduled for No-
vember 22-23, 2005.
This enforcement initiative is the
fifth phase of Operation Safe Ride,
which features varying traffic en-
forcement themes in response to
statewide needs. The initial phase
of Operation Safe Ride was con-
ducted February 26 27, 2004,
in response to a growing concern
over the frequency of aggressive
driving violations throughout
Florida. Operation Safe Ride will
be conducted in all ten FHP field
troops throughout the state. The
operation's goals are: to increase
compliance of posted speed lim-
its; and to reduce the number of
speed-related deaths and injuries
in the state.
All available FHP personnel will
participate in Operation Safe Ride,
including troopers and supervi-
sors normally assigned to non-
patrol functions. Unlawful speed
violators wit be tracked using ra-
dar, Vascar, video cameras, mo-
torcycles, and unmarked patrol
vehicles. Troopers piloting FHP
aircraft will also be used to spot
violators from the air and then
direct troopers on the ground to
pull them over and initiate appro-
priate enforcement action. En-
forcement efforts will be focused
on every interstate, Florida's turn-
pike, and other major state roads
in Florida where speeding and
aggressive driving are prevalent.


Tyndall Eye

MPF Closure December 5
The Military Personnel Flight Cus-
tomer Service office will be closed
Dec. 5 for server upgrades. Iden-
tification card services will not be










Paye 6 25 November 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Bay Opening from Page 1
of Agriculture and the River Keep-
ers and do a split sampling two or
three weeks ago? What happened
to that?" asked Ms. Sanders.
"Texas was willing to participate
with us in a split sampling up
until the point where the Food and
Drug administration suggested to
them that two samples was not
nearly enough to actually compare
results. The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration suggested to the
Texas Department of Health that
we need to do five, maybe ten
samples in order to do statistics
with overlapping confidence. That
blew Texas's mind and they said;
We're not going to participate."
"What happened to Dolphin Island
Alabama?"
'That is another option... Dolphin
Island is an FDA laboratory. They
do have a test that they can run
for the neurotoxin shellfish poi-
soning. It is not a certified lab by
FDA. It is not the method that is
approved for shellfish manage-
ment but it is certainly a lab that
we could always use for any type
of screening, if we needed to."
"But you say that the FDA don't
recognize what they do?" asked
Mr. Mosconis.
"No. Their method has not been
approved by the FDA."
A motion was then made to use
the Dolphin Island lab, even with
its limitations, to do the screen-
ing. The motion was approved. -
"We can't do it this week, but we
can do it Monday of next week.
We will open it (the Bay) in sec-
tions, just like we close it in sec-
tions. If we get good water samples
in the west, good water samples
at Indian Pass, which we have,
and ifwe get less than 20 mouse
units in the sample we took to-
day, barring that the water
samples in those areas doesn't go
back up over five thousand we
will open that area."
"This is all very confusing," said
Ms. Sanders.
"I think the more we talk about
this the more confused that it
gets," offered Mr. Putnal. "Mr.
Shuler did you ever find a legal
firm for us who can investigate
this stuff and let us know who's
lyin' and who's tellin' the truth?
We got some people who are starv-
ing to death out there that needs
to go td work."
Mr. Mosconis then asked Mr. Heil
where the state of Florida was in
regards to meeting requirements
that had been set concerning the
levels of tolerance for Vibrio
Vulnificus.


850-697-2376
Fax: 697-4680


IVibrio Vulnificus is a bacterium
in the same family as those that
cause cholera. It lives in warm
seawater and is part of a group of
vibrios that are called "Halophilic"
because they require salt. V.
Vulnificus can cause disease in
those who eat contaminated sea-
food or have an open wound that
is exposed to seawater ... The bac-
teria is a naturally occurring ma-
rine organism that thrives in shal-
low, coastal waters in temperate
climates throughout most of the
world. Vulnificus may concentrate
in clams, oysters, scallops and in
finfish. It has been isolated from
seawater, sediments, plankton
and shellfish located in the Gulf
of Mexico, the Atlantic Coast as
far north as Cape Cod, and the
entire U.S. West Coast.]
"We do have some challenges in
front of us," said Mr. Heil It has
been determined ... that we will
have forty percent reduction by
December 31, 2006. If we don't
have that, then we have to ask our
industry to post-harvest treat
more products-clean the vibro
out of them before they sell them
to market-December 31, 2008
we must see a sixty percent in ill-
ness reduction in vibrio along the
Gulf Coast. If we don't do that then
we have to start regulation. That
would mean only allowing prod-
ucts to be post-harvest treated;
only allowing harvest during the
winter months; or anything else
that we can come up with to meet
that sixty percent reduction in the
Gulf. We are making strides. In
2004 we actually had a forty-five
percent reduction in vibrio. That
sounds great. I'm encouraged. But
when you look at it, we have had
forty-five percent reductions be-
fore, when we were doing nothing
about it. So, we will just have to
wait and see if we get illness re-
duction. We will meet our reduc-
tion goal for 2005 because the
exposures will he lower; we will
not be harvesting much (due to
disasters and Red Tide). In the
entire nation so far we have only
had ten Vibrio illnesses. That is
at least half the amount that we
have by this time every year on
the average."
There are two obvious prob-
lems with regards to these
Vibrio shellfish regulations.
First, percentages do not
make sense when dealing
with such small numbers. As
Mr. Heil pointed out, a forty-
five percent reduction could
happen with no regulations or
post-harvest treatment.
The second fallacy in relation to
this regulation program is that
Vibrio is caused by eating raw
oysters. Vibrio is not caused by
eating raw oysters; it is caused by
ingesting Vibrio contaminated


St. George Island
United Methodist Church


You ARE INVITED TO
SUNDAY WORSHIP 9:30A.M.


201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
'Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org Pastor: Ray Hughes


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


X








zrtnitp

850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


% ,,



jfirgt 3apti t Qfburid
St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!


Sunday Bible Study
Worship & Praise
Sunday Night
Wed. "Power Hour"


10:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.


"Walking in Christ"


P.O. Drawer JJ Carrabelle, FL 32322


Air-Con of Wakulla, LLC
HEATING AND COOLING
850-926-5592
* Installation
* Service
* Repair
Gary Limbaugh, owner Lic # CAC1814304
Serving Franklin and Wakulla Counties since 1988


water. A person can be infected
with Vibrio and not eat any shell-
fish or seafood from the Gulf of
Mexico or anywhere else. All that
he has to do is swallow some
Vibrio contaminated water or have
some Vibrio contaminated water
seep into an open wound or cut.
In the United States 60 percent of
all V. Vulnificus cases are caused
by wound infection; exposing pre-
existing wounds or open sores to
seawater or acquiring a wound
while engaging in a marine related
activity ... Coastal recreational
activities that may produce wound
infections include swimming,
wading, boating and fishing ...
So, 60 percent of Vibrio cases
come from swimming, wading,
boating, and fishing and only 40
percent come from eating shell-
fish, If we had ten cases last year
and we stopped all of those that
were caused by eating shellfish,
we would still have six people in-
fected with Vibrio. We would have
only reduced the disease by 40
percent.
Although there have been no stud-
ies done on this, it could be that
if we could keep recreational fish-
ermen, who may also be suffer-
ing from aids, liver problems, dia-
betes or kidney disorders out of
Gulf waters we might have a bet-
ter chance of controlling this
Vibrio Vulnificus "pandemic".
In April of 2003, California en-
acted a state-wide ban on the sale
of raw oysters harvested from the
Gulf of Mexico from April through
October each year, unless they are
processed to reduce levels of
Vibrio Vulnificus to non-detect-
able (post-harvest processed oys-
ters). These post-harvesting pro-
cesses include; freezing, heat cool
pasteurization and high hydro-
static pressure.
That is very interesting, especially
when you consider that, accord-
ing to SafeOysters.org, these pro-
cesses may not kill all bacteria
and viruses, it is not recom-
mended that high-risk patients
eat raw, post harvest processed
oysters either. So, the state of
Florida could post harvest process
100 percent of its oysters and if
people with liver problems, can-
cer, gastric disorders, aids/HIV,


chronic renal failure, alcoholism,
and hemochromatosis/hemolytic
anemia, diabetes and kidney
problems continue to eat even
post-harvest processed oysters, or
swim, wade, fish, water ski and
play in Vibrio contaminated wa-
ter with cuts or open wounds,
there could he just as many dead
or more Vibrio victims as if no
oysters were processed at all.
The best, and possibly the only
realistic method of reducing inci-
dence ofVibrio Vulnificus is edu-
cation of those most susceptible
to these infections and the gen-
eral dissemination of the true
facts in relation to this disease to
the general public. As has been
recently quoted on the national
scene-"Half the truth is still a
lie."

Tyndall Eye from Page 5
the various tasks associated with
running the office. The RAO is an
all-volunteer organization that
provides assistance and informa-
tion to Tyndall's retiree commu-
nity on retiree-related issues.
Those interested in volunteering
should contact the office by e-mail
at tyndall.RAO@tyndall.af.mil or
phone at (850) 283-2737.
Remembering Troops
Abroad
According to guidelines issued by
the Military Postal Service Agency
(MPSA), Americans who want to
send support to troops spending
the holidays in Operations Iraqi
or Enduring Freedom are running
out of time. Mailing deadlines is-
sued by the MPSA range from Nov.
12 for parcel post to December 10
for first-class mail. Any American
can log on to aafes.org or call 877-
770-4438 to show their support
for America's deployed troops
through "Gifts from the
Homefront." "Help Our Troops
Call Home" phone cards are also
available at aafes.orq or 800-527-
2345. From there, gift certificates
and phone cards can be sent to
individual service members (des-
ignated by the purchaser) or dis-
tributed to "any service member"
through the American Red Cross,
Air Force Aid Society, Fisher
House or USO.


,'ivdvertsemlent
Homeowners with
money worries

may qualify for
Slow-nterest loans
"'Smar/ Money" by Kimer{I r Ro.rs
LOANS: Direct lender played? Late house pay-
loosens its requirements for ments?Financial Problems?
homeowners who need Medical bills? IRS liens?//
money now. does/;l?/naer,'
Have you been turned down If you are a homeowner
for a loan? Do you need more with sufficient equity, there's an
than $10,000 for a/y reason? excellent chance you will qual-
Are you paying more than 'ify for a loan- l.ua/I/' ui//,
10% interest on any other 24/how,::
loans or credit cards? You can find out over the
If you are a homeowner and phone-and free of charge-
answered "yes" to any of if you qualify. Honey Mae
these questions, they can Home Loans is licensed by
tell you over the phone and the Florida Department of
ir//out obl/gatio, if you Financial Services. Open7 days
qualify. a week to serve you.
High credit card debt? Less- a week to serve you.
than-perfect credit? Self em- 1-800-700-1242ext. 223



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FIBERGLASS & MARINE SUPPLIES
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850-697-3428 www.boallhansport.net



Penelope's Pet Stop

PROFESSIONAL FURMINATOR
PET GROOMING SHED-LESS
~ AND PET SITTING TREATMENT

Mf S IEK
45 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320
ACROSS FROM THE GIBSON INN
850-323-0036 850-653-2257 pe elopepetstopaloL.comn



Cook Sm" 191.
U Insurance
S AGENCY
A Gulf State Community Bank Company
www.cookinsuranceagency.com
(800) 822-7530
73 Avenue E /( ) 205 NW Avenue A
Apalachicola, FL Carrabelle, FL
(850) 653-9310 (850) 697-3473
SERVING THE COAST SINCE 1913



TWO CRACKED POTS PLANT NURSERY

Sagos Camellias Century Plants
'- Bulbs *- Custom Pots
DISCOUNTS ON PRE-ORbERSI
LANDSCAPE SERVICES AVAILABLE!
Located corner of
1st St. & Ave. A, Eastpoint, FL


Newell Concert Series

Begins 20th Season
Guitar Chamber music by Franz Schubert was featured at the first
concert of the 20th season of the Ilse Newell Fund for the
Performing Arts, organized by Apalachicola Area Historical Society,
on Sunday, November 13. 2005, at Trinity Church, Apalachicola.

-- HSHK^. -.- .



The performers pictured here are (from left to right) Ms.
Barbi Risken (flute), Stephen Mattingly (guitar), Zlatina
Staykova (cello) and Even Bilgenogul (viola).
.:, w m


)4~
~p~
'' *
,
..j,..
r
~8~:
'~F


I


Baritone Jeffery Wienand also performed at the concert.



I. i r... .
,;F.


A stunning array of refreshments was made available to
concert goers, catered by Renee Bacot and Carolyn
Parker.


The first concert of the 20th season was dedicated to
the memory of founders George Chapel and Bill Greer.


JOHN'S Licensed & Insured
^ JV ~MS RG0050763
CONSTRUCTION RC0051706
Quality Craftsmanship For Over 40 Years
SERVING FRANKLIN COUNTY SINCE 1982
Specializing in Custom Homes-Remodeling
Additions-Repairs-Vinyl Siding


I I I


00"c- ia











The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


25 November 2005 Page 7,


Random Acts of Kindness

In Franklin County


By Geri Moore

On a chilly Monday morning, with
drizzling rain, 69 children from
Brown Elementary School in
Eastpoint got a lot warmer with
jackets donated to the school. An
anonymous group of citizens from
Franklin County have gotten to-
gether for the past 7 years and
donated money to buy jackets for
children who might not have had
a new jacket otherwise. Brown
Elementary became the main
project because many of the do-
nors attended the school while
they were growing up.

Deborah Huckeba, principal of
Brown Elementary and Terry
Hilton the school's secretary were


the main volunteers at the school
and provided a list of names of
children who might appreciate a
nice warm jacket this winter.

Over $1,500 was raised this year
for the jackets. All contributors
wish to remain anonymous in-
cluding the several businesses
that donated. It is with the true
spirit of giving that these people
from Franklin County donated
their time and their money.

There was even enough money left
over to buy 90 pounds of nice
warm socks for the elderly in lo-
cal nursing homes. The children
of Brown Elementary will be deco-
rating the many packages that
these socks will be delivered in.


Piles of jackets await the students from Brown
Elementary to come and get their new warm jackets.
Sixty-nine students were lucky enough to be selected to
receive jackets offered to them by Franklin County citi-
zens who insist on remaining anonymous. This is the 7th
year that the group has donated money for jackets for
students at Brown Elementary. Most of the donors
attended the school themselves and this is their generJ
ous way of giving back to the community.


Pay The County Bills

The County Finance Department listed $288,383.92 in recommended
disbursements from the County General Fund, all approved at thq,!
outset of the November 15, 2005 meeting. The list is as follows: ,


ACS GOV'T FINANCIAL SYSTEM
11/15/2005 14:
BANK VENDOR
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT


Volunteers, B.T. Hinson, Elizabeth Roper, Debbie
Flowers and school principal Deborah Huckeba sort
through the jackets trying to find the right jacket for
the right child. Monday morning 96 children received
jackets donated by anonymous. citizens of Franklin
County. ''


Geri Moore

Joins

Chronicle


Staff

The Chronicle has employed a'
highly experienced photographer
and writer to join their ranks. She!
has been photographing Franklin
County since the 1970s and has"-:
recently moved to Eastpoint, es-
tablishing her own photography
business.

Here is a sampling of Geri's per-
sonal history.

"I have inherited my grandfather's
love of photographs. My grandfa-
ther and his twin brother were
both amateur photographers.'
used to follow my Gramps every-,
wlhere even (" rr i 'Iis <-'I i-
Si. i i',,f


OUR DEPOSIT RATES



JUST GOT






BIGGER.





SAPY...


4.50



13 MONTH CD



5 2 APY*




3.25 %
% i _









TREASURY

CHECKING



ALTHA 25463 NORTH MAIN STREET 850.762.3417

APALACHICOLA 58 4TH STREET 850.653.9828

BLOUNTSTOWN 20455 CENTRAL AVENUE WEST 850.674.5900

BRISTOL 10956 NW STATE ROAD 20 850.643.2221

CARRABELLE 912 NORTHWEST AVENUE A 850.697.5626

MEXICO BEACH 1202 HIGHWAY 98 850.648.5060

PORT ST. JOE 418 CECIL G. COSTIN JR. BOULEVARD 850.227.1416



*APY is Annual Percentage Yield. APYs are accurate as of 11/7/05. Fees may reduce account earnings.
For the 13 month CD, the minimum balance to obtain the stated APY is $500 and will require a checking or NOW account such as The Bank's Free
Checking or Treasury Checking accounts. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal.

For Treasury Checking, the minimum balance to open this account is $50. 3.25% Annual Percentage Yield (APY) will be paid on balances of
$50,000 and up; 2.75% APY on balances between $25,000 $49,999; 2.25% APY on balances between $5,000 $24,999; 0.15% APY on balances
less than $5,000. After account opening, the APY and interest rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Treasury Checking accounts are
limited to individuals and non-profit entities.


nTHmEBAN


ment when he would let me, his
darkroom was set up down in the
root cellar off the kitchen on our
farm in NH. I used to stand on a
stqol and watch all his magic be-
gin, as the photographs would
appear out of nowhere when
placed in trays of liquid. I was in
my teens when Gramps passed
on, and let photography drop from
my life at that time also. I picked
up the camera again, some 20
years later, after a journey to Ari-
zona when I found myself living
at the Grand Canyon. You can't
live in the Grand Canyon area and
not have a camera! I went to a
pawnshop in Flagstaff. AZ and
bought a Canon AE for $125.00. I
didn't know an aperture from a
shutter speed, but I had a cam-
era. That first year. I got a cover
on Northern Arizona Magazine
and did a series of postcards for a
Navajo Dancing troupe. The
Benally Family Dancers."

"In 1986 father passed on. After
almost 6 years of living in a cab
over camper on the back of my

GMC pick up truck and traveling
all over the southwest. I came
home to Florida for my father's
funeral. I stayed when I realized I
did not want to leave my mother
alone. I entered the Parade Maga-
zine Photography contest with one
of the photographs I had taken of
the Benally FaIiil\ The one I took
of the father I'-'I,- Benally with
his eagle wings,on, crouched on
the edge of the Grand Canyon
became one of the coveted 100
winners competing with thou-
sands of entries \ uirlid'.irh- I used
that prize money to take my first
photography class at the local
community college. It was there
that I; was.in.trduced to infrared
jil, -i.1 p l,.l. .ersiapJby,4 a l;a.apas-
sion began. 11 you.ar'- rn, i I. iili, r
with infrared film, i ,... ..1 --1 t,-it-
online: www.earthdancerimages.
corn. You are welcome to go visit."

"Once back in Florida, all of my
jobs centered on photography. I
worked at camera shops, man-
aged one-hour photo labs, and
worked at the local newspaper-,
the Winter Haven News Chief as
a photographer."

"2004, the year of the storms for
central Florida. The eyes of four
hurricanes passed over Polk
County and all four storms
caused much damage to my
hometown of Winter Haven."

My roof took the worst of the
storm, donating shingles with
each passing storm until I was
down to the bare wood. I sold the
house and moved here, to
Eastpoint in February 2005. 1 love
this area and have been coming
here to take photographs since the
early 70's. I have good friends
here, people I consider family.


002395
000239
002157
002366
001670
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000214
002172
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002281
.03884
000860
000320
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002420
002418
002426
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001721
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002085
002210
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001993
000753
000329
000179


AT&T
A.I.P. PRODUCTS IN
AIRnGA SOUTII
ALLEGRA PRINT & IM
ALLTEL
AMERIGAS
AMERIGAS
APALACHICOLA ACE H
APALACHICOLA STATE
APALACHICOLA STATE
APALACHICOLA STATE
ARAMARK
BAYVIEW TRAILER PA
BCC LOCAL HOUSING
BCC ROAD AND BRIDGE
BENEFICIAL FINANCE
BOATWRIGHT/SHAWN
BROWN/ALLISON
BRYCO ENTERPRISES
C&C CONSTRUCTION
CAPITAL CITY BANK
CAPITAL HYDRAULICS
CAT V CHARTERS
CENTURION TECHNOLOGY
CERTIFIED PLUMBING
CHASE
CIEGA, INC.
CITY OF APALACHICO
CITY OF CARRABELLE
CLERK OPERATIONAL
COLLINS CONSTRUCT
COUNTRYWIDE
DELL MARKETING L.I
DEMCO, INC
DIRT BUSTERS
DORIS ROLSTAD
EASTPOINT WATER &
ELAN FINANCIAL SER
FILING SOURCE INC
FLORIDA LIGHTING S
FLORIDA RESEARCH,
FLORIDA SHORE & BE
FRANKLIN AMERICAN
FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC
FRANKLIN COUNTY HI
G&N PAINTING-
GADSDEN COUNTY BOA
GANDER AUTO PARTS
GOOSBY CONSULTANT
GREE TREE
GREEN TREE
GT COMMUNICATIONS
GULF COAST AGGREGP
GULF STATE
GULF STATE
GULFSIDE I.G.A. (1
HAZEL MCKINNEY
HICKS/SABRRINA
HILL MANUFACTURING!
J. V. GANDER DISTR
JACKSON AUTO PARTS
JOSEPH JAMES
KETCHUM, WOOD & BE
KING'S ELECTRICAL
LATHEM TIME SYSTEM
LEITZ OFFICE PROD1
LEON CO BCC
LEON COUNTY BD OF
LIBERTY COMMUNICA'
LITTON LOAN SERVI6
LOCKLEY/BELINDA
MARKS INSURANCE CC
MEDIACOM
METEORLOGIX
MORON, MICHAEL
NE-RO TIRE & BRAK]
NEXTEL PARTNERS II
PAGE/LISA
PAPERDIRECT, INC.
PARKER SERVICES,
PAT THOMAS & ASSO(
PEAVY & SON CONSTI
PILAR TO POST
POLORONIS CONSTRUE
POUNCEY/PAULA
PROGRESS ENERGY F]
QUALITY WATER SUP]
QUILL CORPORATION
RCI PAWN
REDDY ICE-ALBANY
RING POWER CORPORI
SARAH BRASWELL
SARAH VINSON
SEVEN TRENT LABOR
SHADE TREE TOWING
SKYLINE ENGINEERII
SMALL COUNTY COAL
SPEARS SMALL ENGID
SPIRIT SERVICES CC
ST.JOR RENT-ALL,
STELLA BRYANT
SWITZER/LORI
TAYLOR'S BUILDING
THE APALACHICOLA
THE LIBRARY STORE
TIRE DISPOSAL SE
TOMARK SPORTS
UNITED STATES POS'
VIKING OFFICE PRO]
VULCAN, INC.
WAKULLA COUNTY BOP
WARD/LAURA
WARREN EQUIPMENT
WASTE MANAGEMENT C
WASTE MANAGEMENT C
WATER MANAGEMENT E
WILDERNESS COAST
WOYS OYSTER RADIO
ZEE MEDICAL SERVICE


Check Register
CHECKS DATI

33734 11/15.
NC. 33735' 1/15,
33736 11/15,
MAGINGO 33737 11/15
33738 11/15,
33739 11/15.
33740 11/15,
IARDWAR 33741 11/15
I BANK 33742 11/15,
SBANK 33743 11/15
SBANK 33744 11/15,
33745 11/15
ARK 33746 11/15/
ASSIST 33747 11/15
GE FUND 33748 11/15.
E 33749 11/15.
33750 11/15.
33751 11/15
LLC 33752 11/15
33753 11/15
33754 11/15
S 33755 11/15
33756 11/15
OGIES 33757 11/15
G & 33758 11/15
33759 11/15
33760 11/15
OLA 33761 11/15
E 33762 11/15
ACCOUN 33763 11/15
ON 33764 11/15
33765 11/15
P. 33766 11/15
33767 11/15)
33768 11/15
33769 11/15
SEWER 33770 11/15
RVICES 33771 11/15
33772 11/15
SPECIAL 33773 11/15
INC. 33774 11/15
EACH 33775 11/15
33776 11/15
: HEALT 33777 11/15
SALTH D 33778 11/15
33779 11-/15
ARD OF 33780 11/15
33781 11/15
ENTPR 33782 11/15
33783 11/15
33784 11/15
33785 11/15
ATES LL 33786 11/15
33787 11/15
33788 11/15
APALACH 33789 11/15
33790 11/15
33791 11/15
I COMPA 33792 11/15
RIBUTOR 33793 11/15
S & ACE 33794 11/15
33795 11/15
JRGERT 33796 11/15
LLC 33797 11/15
MS 33798 11/15
JCTS 33799 11/15
33800 11/15
CO COM 33801 11/15
riONS 33802 11/15
CING I.P 33803 11/15
33804 11/15
3MPANY 33805 11/15
33806 11/15
33807 11/15
33808 11/15
2 SVC, 33809 11/15
NC 33810 11/15
33811 11/15
33812 11/15
INC. 33813 11/15
C. INS. 33814 11/15
RUCTION 33815 11/15
33816 11/15
CTION 33817 11/15
33818 11/15
'LORIDA, 33819 11/15
PLY 33820 11/15
33821 11/15
33822 11/15
33823 11/15
AITION 83824 11/15
33825 11/15
33826 11/15
BATORIE 33827 11/15
33828 11/15
NG 33829 11/15
ITION 33830 11/15
NES & T 33831 11/15
3MPANY 33832 11/15
INC. 33833 11/15
33834 11/15
33835 11/15
SUPPLY 33836 11/15
TIMES 33837 11/15
INC. 33838 11/15
ERVICES 33839 11/15
33840 11/15
TAL SER 33841 11/15
OUCTS 33842 11/15
33843 11/15
ARD OF 33844 11/15
33845 11/15
33846 11/15
3F 33847 11/15
3F PC 33848 11/15
SERVICE 33849 11/15
PUBLIC 33850 11/15
33851 11/15
CE COMP 33852 11/15


GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
FUND RECAP:
'FUND DESCRIPTION

`'001' '"GENERAL 'FUND"''`-:,j ","* ,
120 FINE AND FORFEITURE
137 FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC LIBRARY
140 ROAD AND BRIDGE
142 MOSQUITO CONTROL
163 ENHANCED 911 FUND
170 AIRPORT FUND
180 AFFORD.HOUSING ASSIST TRUST
304 LANDFILL TIPPING FEE FUND
TOTAL ALL FUNDS


BANK RECAP:
BANK NAME

BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
TOTAL ALL BANKS
Debbie Flowers, and her family
have always been more than kind.
to me, and I appreciate them very
much."

"In October I opened "Affordable
Family Photography" in Eastpoint
next to the Post Office. In Novem-
ber, I find myself here, at the
Franklin Chronicle ready to explorer
Franklin County with my camera
and my pen and find interesting
things to pass on to everyone. I
am looking forward to meeting
everyone.


Affordable Health & Life Insurance


* Freedom of Doctors, Hospitals

* Cannot be singled out for rate

increases or cancellation

Call Licensed Agent:

JESSIE HILL, JR.

850-926-6575 or 866-343-6575

Visit approved website: www.jessiehillhr.mw-ins.com
Mid-West National Life Insurance of Tennessee;
Home Office: Oklahoma City, OK

Association membership 4 required. MW/000023 Exp. 06/06


Phone: 850-927-4777
St. George Island Toll Free: 800-344-7570
www.sgirealty.com

_- --ltc l ,


5 SHELL HARBOR:
Elegant Bayfront Living!
Unbelievable water views.
Deep, beautifully wooded 1.19
acre lot gives great privacy. 4
Master BR & 4.5 BA. Open &
screened porches & decks.
Private dock! MLS #107238.
$1,100,000.


A BREEZE:
Spectacular Gulf view. 4 BR
home built 2002. 2 screened
porches. Great location across
from bike path. Has beautiful
heated pool. Produces excellent
rental income & is PRICED
RIGHT! MLS#108662. $749,900.


I


FRANKLIN COUNTY
GL540R-V06.60 PAGE 1,
E AMOUNT

/05 106.72
/05 205.91
/05 53.83
/05 1.012.37 ''"
/05 229.53
/05 500.00
/05 1,260.03 ],
/05 72.20
/05 244.61
/05 1,285.28
/05 359.89
/05 499.84
/05 1,350.00
/05 5.908.13
/05 13,582.58
/05 846.00
/05 14.55
/05 410.00 "
/05 3,412.00
/05 2.350.00
/05 831.80
/05 624.50
/05 120.00
/05 361.00
/05 28.15
/05 1,270.70
/05 1,274.29
/05 1,402.57
/05 263.05
/05 15,791.57 : ,
/05 125.00
/05 1,285.28
/05 192.44
/05 699.06
/05 140.00
/05 24.95
/05 298.55
/05 1,133.84
/05 8,217.95
/05 84.00
/05 59.00
/05 300.00
/05 1,245.63
/05 134.00
/05 49,053.00.
/05 -1;-837.50'
/05 8,510.88
/05 138.51
/05 690.50
/05 1,252.48
/05 1,076.65
/05 7,677.98
/05 1,117.06
/05 594.91
/05 360.36
/05 109.29
/05 375.00
/05 453.95
/05 066.75
/05 17,548.73
/05 69.96
/05 1,100.00
/05 6,.633.68
/05 475.00
/05 185.50
/05 327.59
/05 3,546.60
/05 4,211.11
/05 116.55
/05 1,763.82
/05 230.00 -
/05 1,500.00
/05 20.70
/05 687.00
/05 250.00
/05 1,784.10
/05 353.25
/05 500.50
/05 162.83
/05 2,870.00
/05 3,210.00
/05 1,792.65
/05 300.00
/05 10,431.41
/05 180.00
0/5 6,159.22
/05 379.87
/05 2,156.04
/05 210.00
/05 108.00
/05 10,523.14 >'
/05 24.96
/05 750.00
/05 15,691.17
/05 240.25
/05 138.00
/05 1,430.00
/05 623.14 ''
/05 436.43
/05 1,654.00
05 24.95
/05 1,833.33
/05 621.94 ,
/05 910.00
/05 41.36
/05 3,458.00
/05 583.00 i'
/05 2,032.04
/05 1,277.29
/05 2,570.87
/05 3,652.77
/05 600.00
/05 832.07
/05 202.62
/05 26.26
/05 107.07 1'.
/05 :25,000.00 4 .
/05 99.00
/05 210.45 '





288,383 .92 '

28 0,303.92 'i -
: ,: o .

2 1 2-" '


28",3 :92" '



288,383.92 ,'


208,303.92 <*-


HAIR
NAILS
PEDICURE SPA
WAXING
FACIALS
BODY WRAPS
TANNING

CONNIE ROEHR
NAILTECH
ANGELA CREAMER
STYLIST

407 HWY 98
EASTPOINT, FL 32328
850-670-5220

0% ^ -0% ON


St. George Island Realty
235 E. Gulf Beach Dr.
St. George Island, FL 32328


LAND FOR SALE:
Large Plantation Beach Front! Over
100 front feet on Gulf. Spectacular
view! Good vegetation for integrat-
ing into natural landscaping plan.
MLS#107768. $2,450,000.

Sunset View Bay Front! View across
marsh/canal to Bay cannot ever be
obstructed. Full acre/Plantation.
High & dry uplands. 50' directly on
Bay. ML.S 103547. $665,000.

VIEW and VALUE! Only one lot
from the corner of Pine & 6th St. St.
George Island. Good uplands & a
great value with a view of the Gulf
of Mexico! MI.S#107926. $399,000.


-IOW


Franklin Chronicle.,;*.i

I.
4


U._


I I I -


I i


a

r











n.vva, R o 7rTn' ir-mher E2005


riag e zz InVLeIJLPJm- -


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


CFFlorida Classified



FCAN Advertising Network



Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience


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The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper

with the FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-1687, fax: 850-670-1685.


Dougherty & Calhoun Counties, GA


Row Cropland
Pecan Orchards
Woodlands


Announcements


Help Wanted


Is Stress Ruining Yoir Life? Read DIANETICS by Ran L
Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send 579 to Dtanretc, 3102 MOVIE EXTRAS, ACTORS & MODELS! Slake S75-S2501
N Habana Ave. Tampa FL 33607 day All ages and faces wanted' No exp Required FTiPTi
(800)8151-9046


Auctions

ABSOI.tTE AUCTION Lakefrom subdivision on Watts Bar
Lake off 1-40, Kingston. TN Saturday, Nov 19, 1200 Noon
Furrow Auction Company. (800)-4FURROW or
Vu. Irrov com TN Lic a62

ACTION DECEMBER 3RD 10:15 A.M. DOOLY COUNTY/
PINE RIRST. GEORGIA 100 -/- ACRES OFFERED DIVIDED *
TWO FARMS / TWO HOMES TREMENDOUSLY IRRIGATED
CROPLAND PEACHSTATE AUCTION GROUP, -INC.
rww- land'auctioncom or(S66)3007653 GAL 2550.

Auction 134+/.Acres. Farmland- Divided 3bdr.2bahome.development
potei. al ThonmaCo.GA Nov 25. 100am.1 0B P Roell Auctions.
Inc (900)321-8388 wu-w rowellaulions corn GAL AU-C002594

OCALACOM/RES. High visibility & desirable locations 501 Spring
Lake Rd & 103 SE Tuscav illaAve Tranon Driggers Walt Driggers.
Lic Real Estale croker(377)347-4437

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE SSS Buy Direct From Manufacturer.
20 colors in stock with all Accessories Quick turn around
Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.

'Business Opportunities

ALL CASII CANDY ROUTE Do you cam S800/day? 30 Mla-
chines. Free Candy All for 59.995 (588)629-9968 B02000033
CALL US We vull not be undersoldt

A CASH COW! 90 VENDING MACHINE UNITS/ YOU OK LO-
CATIONS ENTIRE BUSINESS S10,670 HURRY!
(800)836-3464 #B02428
INTERNATIONALINVESTMIENTBAN KING FinnHas Middle Mar-
ketBusinessesForSale. Interested nBuyingOrSellingABusiness,Call
(877)217-8231

For Sale

Ilonda powered Generators at everyday low prices! Ready for
immediate shipmecn 3,000 kw to 15.000 kw Call
(881)483-8722 or (177)807-8722 24 hours


Health


OXYGEN USERS: Enjoy more freedom' Travel without canis-
ters, Oxlife's lgigtweight. Oxygen concentrators run off your
car & in your home US A- made Warranted (800)780-2616
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HelpWanted

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay & Benefits
for Experienced Drivers, 0/0. Solos, Teams & Graduate Stu-
dents Ilonuses Available. Refrigerated Now Available.
(888)MORE PAY (838-667-3729).

S/E & 3-Stale Run: TiT Drivers HOME WEEKENDS, Mileage
Pay, Benefits, 401K Trainees Welcome. Miami area- exp, req 21
mmn ageiClass-A CDI. Cpress Truck Lines (800)545-1351

ACT NOWO DRIVEIS- Flathed. Bulk Tank and Refrigerated
Divisions Performance based pay. Experienced Operators In-
dependent Contractors or Company Drivers CDL Instruction
Program. available (800)771-6313 wwwnrineinceom.

Driver- NO' IIIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS for Central
Florida Local & National OTR positions Food grade tanker. no
hazniat. no pumps,'great benefits, compctilive pay & new equip-
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opportunity i oda.y (800)741-7950

CDLA OTR DRIVERS TEAMS 50 CPM SOLOS .34 CPM 100%
DROP & HOOK IIEALTIH IIENEFII'S ASSIGNED IQUIPMEN'I
REQUIRE- I YEAR OTR HAZMAT.& DOUBLES (321)202-4406.

'EAMS! 51'000 sign on bonus:ea, Approx S1100/wk, 2yrs
OTI. No DU'I)DWI Ja\. FL area Excellent Equipment! Excellent
Lanes' Great Benefits' Home Weekends! (888)216-0180
twtc~callkpoto

Cotiimpai Drivers. 5 32- 41 per mile 1/2 raise e\cry six months
Lease purchase. 0 0 90ipm National Carriers 11e Elite fleet
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Real Estate

WESLITE RN.orh Carolia bMoiitins Cool Air. Vtie.Stearms. Homes.
Cabins. Acreage FREE BROCIIlURE OF MOUNTAIN PROPERTY
(S00)642-5333 RealtOf\Murphy] 7PeachleeStl Murphy,N C 2S906
\w reltvonrmumhv cont


Now Hiring for 2005 Postal Positions S17.50-S5900+/hr.
Full Benefits'Paid Tramming and Vacations No Experience Nec- Tennessee Waterfrunt Sale! 2.4 Acre Waterfront 54.900!
essary (800)584-1775 Reference # 5600. Dockable Building Lots from S14.9001 Cabin Package 554,900
Call NowI (366)770-5263 Ext 8


S600 WEEKLY Working through the government part-time.
No Experience. A lot of Opportunities, (800)493-3688
Code J-14

Company and 010 Needed 87 cents per mile all Dead head paid
i fsc Call Don Saltsman CTC Trucking Inc (321)639-1522

DRIVERSWA\NTED Avragedispalchis2,100miles'3-PayPackages
to choose from 'Late model Equipment 'No I lrz-Mat *No East-Coast
' 10Oi No-Touch Freight weekly Advances *Di reel Deposit *weekly
(same ewek) Seitlements Solos and Owner Operators Welcome Re-
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Drieiny record. Call SniiihwayLogisics, Inc (3001282-1911 ex 115

OWNERSOP'ERATVIORS *Sl.000lSIGN-ON BONUS 'Refriger-
ated '*S Regional *Home Weekly *Weekly Settleients *Top
Percentage Pay Fuel Surcharge 'Dedicated Dispatcher 'Own
Lightweight Late-Model Truck. Call Cammy @ (800)237-8288
Drier- NOW HIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS forCentral Florida
Local& Nadonal OTRpositions Foodgradetanker.noha.mat,nopumps,
great benefits, competitive pay & new equipment. Need 2 years exprin-
ence Call Bynum Transportforyouropportunity today (800)741-7950

Equipment For Sale

.SAWMI. 11.Srormi onlyS2.795.00 ConveryourLOGSTOVALUABLE.
I.UML'IIR with your Norwood portableband sawmill. Logskidders also
available. v-w nonroodindustries com-Freeinformation
(800)57B-1363ex1300N


Instruction


Heavy Equipment Operator CERTIFIED. Hands on Training
Job Placement Assistance. Call Toll Free (366)933-1575 AS-
SOCIATED TRAINING SERVICES, 5177 Homosassa Trail,
Lecanto. FI 34461.

Legal Services

ALL Accidents & Injury Claims. AUTOMOBILE. BIKE/BOAT
BUS, ANIMAL BITES, WORKERS COMPENSATION, WRONG-
FUL DEATH. NURSING HOME INJURIES 'Protect Your Rights"
A-A-A ATTORNEY Referral Service (8001733-5342

NEED A LAWYER? All Criminal Defense & Personal Injury
"Felonies 'Domestic Violence 'Misdemeanors *DUI 'Traffic
-Auto Accident 'Wrongful Death. "Protect Your Rights" A-A-
A Attorney Referral Service (800)733-5342.

DIVORCES275-S350-COVERS children, etc. Only one signa-
ture required *Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays (800)462-
2000, ext600 (8am-7pm) Alta Divorce, I.l.C Established 1977

ARRESTED-NEEDA LAWYER? AllCriminal Defense. *Felo-
nies *Misdemeanors *DUI *Automobile Accident *Domestic
Violence *Wrongful Death. "Protect Your Rights" A-A-A At-
torney Referral Service (800)733-5342 24/7.

Miscellaneous

CREDITREPAIR-29yearscexperencelicensed andbonded Oheprice
clean credit for life Lee Harrison Credit Restoration. Call
(903)S35.1667 forfrecinformation package, ww- I Hcreditrcoair com
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EARN DEGREE online from home *Medical, 'Business. *Para-
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CALL NOW 1866)500-4056


Real Estate


NEW LOG CABIN-NC Mlountains New shell on secluded
mountain site S89.900. lardwood forest Great fall colors
Paved road Near parks & lakes. Acreage & financing available
(828)247-0081.

Mountain, Lake, and Vacation Properties available in North-
east Georgia and Western NC Contact Exit Realty
(877)203-5151 www.cxitn corn


WHIITEWATER LIVING IN TIE TENNESSEE SMOKIES
Gated Waterfront Community Rtserfront and Mountain Views
Available. Prices Startlig Low as 546.90. Final Phase .nLited
Lots Call Now' No Closing Costs.Buy Direct From Developer
SAVE' THOUSANDS SSS (8001559-3095 ext 327
www rivercrest cor *Some restrictions apply

Pre-construction condos and Land opporrtuitiies. IMMEDI-
ATE SIX-FIGURE EQUITY units availble. (Florlda. Georgia.
Nhssisslpp, Texas, Nevada) sww beachclubinvestmenrs corn
(877)BCI-5020 Financing Options wwi allpmie corn FREE
NO Obligation Financial Analysis

North Carolina Gated Lakefroai Communni) 1 5 acres plus,
90 miles of shoreline, Never before offered with 20% pre-
deelopmenrt discounts, 90% financing Call (800)709-5253

East Alabama Mountain Property For Sale One hour west of
Atlanta in Piedmont. AL Great for enjoyment or investment
19 5 acres-S6,142 down S510;Monthly Information Call -
Glenn (850)545-4928

GEORGIA PROPERTIES FORSALEPARCELS RANGE FROM
3 to 1000 ACRES ALL DEEPLY DISCOUNTED 1031 'r\X Ex-
CHANGE WELCOME VISIT PEACH STATE AT
ww farmandtimber corn or Call (866)300-7653
i,
BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. ESCAPE THE IEAT IN THE
COOL BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN
NC Homes. Cabins, Acreage & Investments Cheiokee Moaun-
tain Reult GMAC Real Estate. Murphy
w*\ cherokeemounailnrealtv coin Call for Free Brochure
(800)841-5868

ASHEVILLE NC. MOUNTAINS GRAND OPENING! Large
Mountain Properties, spectacular long range views of surround-
ing Pisgah National Forest, minutes to downtown Ashdesle
and the Blue Ridge Parkway Only 65 carefully sculpted
homesites offered in 175- acre gated community wt Club-
house. outside hearth, and' nature trail Pre-Construction Pric-
ing. Huge savings. Excellent financing' This extraordinary
opportunity won't last long! Call Now (8881670-5263

NC MOUNTAIN 2.87 acres on mountain top. crew. trees, water-
fall & large public lake nearby, paved private access, S19.500
owner ( 666)7s)-855 35 o- NC77 rmni

Serene NMountain Golf Homesite 569,9110. Bealhtakmg views
Upscale golf communityset amid Dye designed 18 hole course
in Carolina Mountains Near Asheville NC A sanctioned Golf
Digest Schools teaching facility' Excellent financing Call
toll-free (866)334-3253 x 993 ww cherokeevalleysc com

TENNESSEE/KENTI'CKY LAKEFIONT IAND New com-
munity on the TNKYV border Just 1-1;2 hours to Naiherlle
Spectacular views of Lake Barklcy I to 6 acres from the S40s
No time requirement to build Call (366)33d-4966

ASIEVII.LE NC AREA- MOUNTAIN ACREAGE Spectacular
gated riverfront mountain community bordering Pisgah Nat'l
Forest, i .. -i i i the S50s Community
lodge-! -.., -" '. .i Call (66)1292-5762 '

C .I L...' i, 1 hIe. Fi a,. th Caro-
Carolina Lifestyle Inc wwwv coastalcirollnallifestvle info

GEORGIA 11OT LOTS Slaning at S7.500- Hot Springs Vil-
lage, Arkansas No Credit Check Owner Financed. 209% down\
GA Coast & MIalnl VWaterfont Pre-Con-truction Realtor
(877)468-5687


NEW .MEXI-CO -16 acres S24.990 Scenic region, views, can-
yons. trees. rolling hills. c-idlife Enjoy hunting. hiking, horses.
great climate Power, great access 100% financing Call
(9141232-5100

Mountain IHome. Arkansas. Mountain lots S4095 each Water,
Electric. Paved Streets Ready to build on Large fresh afterr lake
w/access Call 364 617 0817 or 864-247-1539

Irnveslnlcnt lots 5,000 increasingrin value the monthii on paved roads
ith al! tilitiesFSOaOs4iJI l.aI 1 i


Real Estate


ESCAPETO YELLOWTOP MOUNTAIN. Western NC. Easy
Access. Paved Roads, Privacy. Gated. Awesome views' Acreage
w/creeks & log cabin shell from 589.900. Financing Available.
-(828)247-0081.

Unique 6,000 sq. ft. Lake Lanier home. private-2ac. 325 ft on
lake, exquisite gardens, waterfalls, boat dock, 50mi. NE of
Atlanta. GA 1S.500,000: Doris, Savage RE, (770)861-8525.

GRAND OPENING SALE Phase2. Lake View Bargains! Water
access from S34,900 w/ FREE Boat Slips. PAY NO CLOSING
COSTS! Sat & Sun 12/10 & 12/11. Huge pre- construction
savings on beautifully wooded parcels at 34,000 acre lake in
Tennessee Enjoy unlimited water tecrearton. Surrounded by
state forest Lakefront available. Excellent financing! Call now
(800)704-3154 x 701.

NC MOUNTAIN LOG CABIN on mountain top. unfinished
inside. view, trees, waterfall & large public lake nearby, no
traffic. 589.900 owner (866)789-8535 wwwNC77.com.

"TENNESSEE LAKE PROPERTIES" Located on pristine
Norris Lake, TVA's fist reservoir. Lakefronls. lake & mountain
views, homes and land CAl.L Lakeside Realty (423)626-5820
www lakesiderealrv-in corn

OWNA LAKEFRONT RETREATPrivatecommunity ontheTN.KY
border Just I- 1 hourstoNashville SpectacularviewsofLake Barkley
I to 6 acres from tie $40s New to Market. Call (866)339-4966

TN \\ EEKENDRETREATACREAGENewlak community close
Chananooga& Knoxville. Limited numbherofprivateboatslips Commu-
nit) lake access and amenities 1'2 -acres from S40K Call
(566)292-5769

Si.o000 DISCOUNT! Grand Openingl Ocala area- ThePreserseat Oak
lill Upscaleequestrian community of to 21 acreparcels Private.gated.
trails Discountendsl2lIS/05 Broker/Owner (352)330-0o22

OWN A PRIVATE MOUNTAIN RETREAT Spectacular gated
riverfrontniountaincommunitynearAsheville.NC 1-8 acrebuildingsries
frontmhe S60s. BordersNational Forest Community lodge& river walk
Call (66)292-5762

Coastal Southeast Georgia Large wooded water access. marsh vie.
lakefront, andgolforiented homesitesfrom the mid 70's Live oaks, pool,
tennis.golf (877)266-7376 www cooperspoint cor

Miami Waterfront Pre-colastrucion 10% down,.2 vyearbuildoul GA
Coastal WaitrfrontPreconstnicton I tphaseassignableJGA Lots 6.0O-.
RVlotsS 15k. Rcallor/(877)468-Sb7

NEW MEX ICO acres 24,990 Scenic region, views, canyons, trees,
rollinghills, wildlife Enjo hunting. hiking, horses,greatclimate. power.
great access. 100% financing Call (914)232-5100

SEASON CI.OSE.OUTTSAI.E INTII ETENNESSEESMOKIESGated
WaterfrontCommunirv Rivcrfrontand Molntain Views Available Prices
Staring LowasS4.6,900 Final Phase Limited Lots Call Now'Ask about
our lot" home pkg Buy Direct frolr the Deseloper SAVE THOL-
SANbSSSSS(800)55o-3095 eot327,lwc rivercrresi cim


Sales


,5.500 Weekly Goal Potential If someone did it. so can you' 2-3
.,-.eJ ,, ..-.eir I 1. Benefits Available. Call Catherine-
i r.i~. ?;s...... a so


Steel Buildings


3-WEEK IIUII.IING SALE! "l.st Chance'" 20,2n No. S?95
25x30 55700 30x40 58300 40sO6 S12.900 Others Meet.
140 M PH Higher available One end mncludrd Pioneerr
(S00)68-422

IMMER STEEL. B:II.I1NG CLEARANCE SA1.LE All Szes
Must Go 25x20. 30x40, 40\60. 40\80 other sizes available
FREE slipping if ordered by November 14th 18001)78-1343


ULnique 6,000 sq. ft. Lake Lanier home. private.2ac. 325 it on lake. a -'r
exquisite gardens, waterfalls. boat dock, 50mi NE of Atlanta. GA
S 1.500,000 Doris,Savage RE. 1770)861-8525


THE





The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits,_Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE
411


AUCTIONS


Ronnie Reagin, Auction Coordinator
Rowell Auctions, Inc.
800-323-8388
10% Buyer's Premium GAL AUlC002594


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homeowners who need
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if you qualify. Honey Mae
Home Loans is licensed by
the Florida Department of
Financial Services. Open 7 days
a week to serve you.
1-800-700-1242 ext. 228


VR State Plan Public Meetings
Come share your thoughts on the ways to improve
Florida's Vocational Rehabilitation Program.

December 1
11AM- IPM
Millhopper Branch, Alachua County Library
3145 NW 43rd Street
Gainesville, Florida

December 1
5PM- 7PM
Columbia Counr Library
308 NW Columbia Avenue
Lake Cir), Florida' '
y. .'.- .. -.. '.-'
If you would like to send us your comment please se-adits'at:
vrplan(avr.doe.state.fl.us or call I.. '6-51.-3092. ',


Please note that the following accommodations will be provided' American Sign Language
Interpreters, Assistive Listening Devices,
Large Print, Disk, and Braille materials


GENERAL CONTRACTORS
RG0055056


Tractor Work
* Aerobic Sewage Treatment Systems
Marine Construction
Septics Coastal Hauling


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25 November 2005 Page 9


A L.OCA LLY OWNED NEWSPA PER


' ne r raniKilln nIIVUIIile I FIF kA l


UAMAKNOCKERS

f ar-t-Q

7MO KIN Z oOD '

(VA 1,4PA U1A J Phone: 850-926-4737 Fax: 850-926-4750
3123 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 11-11/11-25
r -------------------q
I Affordable Family Photography I
I 850-670-5004 or 850-323-0464

GRAND OPENING SPECIAL!
I I
I ONLY $25 WITH THIS AD
2 5x7s and 9 wallets
Must call for appointment
347 Highway 98 Next to Eastpoint Post Office
10-14/10-28/11-11/11-25
L------ -------------

HOME TOWN BP & DELI
113 ST. JAMES AVENUE, JUST OFF
HIGHWAY 98 IN CARRABELLE 697-5111
Friendly atmosphere and the
best chicken and burgers in town!
We now sell LIVE BAIT
Now serving 7 days a week full breakfast
11-25/12-09



Unique e

Nails

& more

P.O. Box 736 347 Highway 98* Eastpoint, Florida 32328
Phone: (850) 670-4000
11-25/12-09


l, I [. ,"-."' ; As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on TV. -.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


THE LOAN CORPORATION
No Lender Closing Cost Mortgages From 1.49%
(5.448% APR) Cut Your Loan Payment in Half!
Loan Amount Lender Closing Cost Low Payment
$250,000 $0.00 $687
$500,000 $0.00 $1,373
$750,000 $0.00 $2,060
$1,000,000 $0.00 *$2,746
THE FED MAY RAISE RATES AGAIN SOON LOCK-IN TODAY
FREE No Obligation Approval-We Are a Direct Lender
**Refinance** 800-936-9864 **Purchase**
Rates subject to chlluge and may not be available at commitment or closing Property investors & foreign nationals also quality.




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FRANKLIN

CHRONICLE
The Chronicle is published every other Friday.
Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County
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850-670-1687


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chroniclepages is an
efficient way to promote your business to the public and save money
at the same time. These ads are strictly business cards magnified
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insertions. Send your business card or copy to: Franklin Chronicle,
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check for $15.00 will guarantee position in the next issue.
.. .. ** ,t


Stacy Wili//ms, Stylist
TAKING CARE OF MEN AND WOMEN'S HAIR CARE.
ALSO DO MANICURES & PEDICURES.
P.O. Box 977 347 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL 32328
Phone: (850) 670-1772
11-25/12-09



SANDBANKS CAFE
Highway 319 Sopchoppy, FL
Country Buffet
Seafood, Steaks & More!
Open Tuesday thru Sunday
Call us at: 962-2920 11-25/12-09








CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) I l e No
Dateorl his Nolice 11/14/05 InvoiceNo. 12941
Descriplioll oflVehicle Make Chevy Model S-10 color White
agNo. )D330YI Year 1989 state IL Vi VNo I GCIlS141.XK8178713
lo Owner: Wayne B. Messer lo l.ien Holder
P.O. Box 215
Carrabelle, FL 32322

You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
11/07/05 at the request of CPI) that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Pa', oicil b, irt. above date of notice in the amount
$ 230.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of'$ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien
of the lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Siatute 713.78.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 12/15/05 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be:sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of
the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay
the charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219



RECREATIONAL VEHICLE
FOR SALE


1992 Georgie Boy, 33 feet long with Ford V-8
engine at 46,000 miles, in very clean condition.
Shown at 33 Begonia Street, Eastpoint. Sleeps
five; microwave stove, gas operated stove, color
TV, refrigerator plus the usual shower/toilet
amenities; lots of cabinet space. Four extra tires.
$16,000.


Timmons General Merchandise

MINI DOLLAR STORE
850-92-B6173
Store Hours: Monday Saturday: 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
3336 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL
ACROSS FROM GULF COAST I'UMBER
11-11/11-25


4 IKilVThRB U1LT IXUOCKS
DECKS SEAWALLS WALK-OVERS
Y" BOAT LIFTS NEW AND REPAIRS
FREE ESTIMATES
Reid Hicks, Owner: (850) 519-7396
Dallas Barrack, Project Manager: (850) 519-7181
LICENSE #06-1429 INSURED 11-25/12-09


SUMMERS@THE BRIDGE

Dine in or take out.
Tuesday Sunday 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Highway 98 East Carrabelle, FL
At the end of the bridge.


Phone: 697-FOOD


(3663)
11-25/12-09


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) I ie No
IaltcorthisNotice 1 1/14/05 Inlvlcc No 12358
I)cLe.Iplion)Iti o'Veicle: Make Toyota M iodel SW C(olo (I ccn
la No. No Tag Ye., 1995 Siat IL vn No JT3VNS9W85X084125
lo o ner: I)annl y Ray Talbert io Icn Holder:
215 4th Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320

You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
11/17/05 at the request of ICSO that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. i cy the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle ill be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 230.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20(.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sullicient to redeem the vehicle from the lien
of the lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 12/15/05 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of
the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay
the charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


Want to purchase minerals
and other oil/gas interests;
Send details to :
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, Colorado 80201



RunYor A Sateid


2x2 Rates
Statewide $1200
Regional or National
Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


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Statewide $2400
Regional Placement
also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


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.. .. -. .. *
The St. Joe Company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle
:. '. -, .. .-

:\


,IIi I I WI t4I "j ,A IL 111 "'I I Ia& ,
(317) Green Empire, The St. Joe Company and the
Remaking of Florida's Panhandle. By Kathryn Ziewitz
and June Wiaz. The St. Joe Company owns nearly one
million acres, mainly in northwestern Florida, where un-
developed coastal and riverside landscapes boast some
of the state's most scenic and ecologically diverse areas.
The company is a powerful force in the real-estate devel-
opment of northwest Florida, with access to the most in-
fluential people in government. In Green Empire, Kathryn
Ziewitz and June Wiaz explain how St. Joe is poised to
permanently and drastically alter the landscape, envi-
ronment, and economic foundation of the Panhandle, the
state's last frontier.
Based on hundreds of sources-including company ex-
ecutives, board members, and investors as well as those
outside the company-this factual and objective history
describes the St. Joe Company from the days of its
founders to the workings and dealings of its present-day
heirs. For all readers concerned with land use and growth
management, particularly those with an interest in
Florida's fragile wildlife and natural resources, Green
Empire will generate important debate about an often-
orerlooked part of the state and will invite public scru-
tiny of its largest landowner.
"Green Empire is written tor those interested in natural
.history, planning, and Florida's history and for those, like
us, who simply want to peek ahead to imagine the future
Florida Panhandle. Readers with an interest in Florida's
wildlife and natural resources will find attention paid to
the Panhandle as a center of biodiversity and to implica-
tions of developing real estate in such an area. Followers
of the stories of Disney and Arvida will find common play-
ers and patterns in the St. Joe story, and those inter-
ested in neotraditional or "New Urbanist" planning maybe
interested to see how these principles are faring in
Florida's latest real estate frontier. Students of Florida's
political history will find the St. Joe story an important
part of understanding how the state came to look the
way it does demographically and physically.
"Green Empire draws on the combined tradition of envi-
ronmental and corporate histories. Its target audience is
Floridians, especially residents of Northwest Florida. But
because the state is such a tourist mecca, we hope it will
also find a wider than regional audience. To some extent,
Florida is a state that belongs to all Americans, and many
non-Americans, because her natural heritage and built
environment together draw so many and probably always
will."
University of Florida Press, 2004, 364 pp. Hardcover.
Sold nationally for $34.95. Bookshop price=$32.00.
---------------------
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'. i


FO CHRlISTMAS


(316) Claude Pepper & Ed Ball, Politics, Purpose, and
Power. By Tracy E. Danese. The power struggle between
Claude Pepper and Ed Ball in the mid-twentieth century
in large part determined the future of Florida. This lively
account of their interlocking careers-both dominated by
a personal quest for power, money, and purpose-
illuminates the historical role of these two forceful per-
sonalities.
Ed Ball, brother-in-law of Alfred I. duPont and trustee of
the duPont empire, was at one time the single most pow-
erful businessman in the state. Claude Pepper, a senior
U.S. senator was the state's heir to the liberal legacy of
New Deal politics. By mid-century, the duPont-Ball em-
pire controlled a major part of the Florida business and
political establishment-but not Claude Pepper.
What follows is an account of their long-standing rela-
tionship in the Florida political process. It gives a picture
of working politics that often remains at the fringe of his-
torical accounts of the grander issues. Still, it is a dimen-
sion of politics that lubricates the workings of the whole
as it goes about the process of governance.
University of Florida Press, hardcover, copyright 2000,
301 pp. Sold nationally for $34.95. Bookshop
price=$32.00.





W .y '.
i~~ r


IT,
rir !C.


(318) Home To War, A His-
tory of the Vietnam Vet-
erans' Movement. By
Gerald Nicosia. An epic nar-
rative history that chroni-
cles, for the first time, the
experience of America's
Vietnam veterans who re-
turned home to fight a dif-
ferent kind of war.
The courageous Americans
who served in Vietnam
fought two wars: one on the,
other side, of the world and,
one when they returned
home. The battle abroad
took place in war-scarred
Asian hamlets, rice Daddies,

SPlease Note
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funded by bank check. To offer the lowest possible
must be prepaid. We do no billing and do not accept

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and jungles where thou-
sands of Americans risked
life, limb, and spirit in a
conflict few of them filly
understood. The second
war began when the same
soldiers came home to fight
another fight, this one for
the hearts and minds of
their countrymen, and for,
their own health, sanity;
and peace of mind.
Published by Crown, hard-
cover, 690 pp. Sold nation-
ally for $35.00. Bookshop
price=$30.00. Due to the
weight and length of this
work, please include $6.00
for shipping and handling.
Advance Praise for Home To
War:
"Home to War is a superbly
researched book that
needed to be written. It sets
forth in Compelling detail a
whole other dimension of
America's tragic war in Viet-
nam, which, until now, has
never been completely cap-
tured." General Harold G.
Moore, Author of We Were
Soldiers Once and Young.
"Gerry Nicosia has an un-
common understanding of
the struggle of veterans to
give meaning to their war
and to redeem themselves.
Home to War is a powerful
' history of our times." Gloria
Emerson, National Book
Award recipient for Winners
and Losers.
"Home to War illuminates
the efforts of the men who
fought rot just in the
jungles of Vietnam, but also
when they returned to
America. We should he
grateful to Gerry Nicosia for
documenting this struggle
in a meaningful and heart-
felt way." Director of Platoon
and Born on the Fourth of
July.


TheIninlO n i

/ An .n Lno .rge Indin Lionfllil
Fa a .4 .


i .


Removal

Aftershock

The Seminoles' Struggles to Survive
in the West, 1836 1866
By Jane F. Lancaster
The University of Tennessee Press/Knox-
ville, hardcover, 225 pp, 1994.
Although Native Americans have a special
place in the history of the United States,
Indian historiography is far from being
comprehensive. Throughout the centuries
of Indian-white relationships, all branches
of government have devoted attention to the
relevant issues. Legislative hearings and
acts, court cases, treaties, and wars involving Indians have been promi-
nent in America's past, but the omissions in historical writings are
both numerous and obvious. Until very recently, high school and col-
lege history textbooks gave little attention to Native Americans. The
inhabitants of Indian Territory, especially, were generally excluded or
mentioned only briefly in those accounts, whereas cavalrymen and
cowboys were discussed at length. As a result, much of the realities of
the relations between the United States and Native Americans have
remained unknown or misunderstood, and Native American histori-
nAranhv is poorer for such omissions and imbalances.
This book focuses on this hitherto neglected era in Native American
history and places the Seminoles in their correct historical position
as a Native American tribe. By examining the Seminoles' adjustments
during their first decades in the West in light of federal Indian policy,
it concludes that after thirty years of struggles, caused largely by the
faulted policies of the federal government, these Indians were a
"stricken, divided, and beggared people scattered over hundreds of
miles." For this tribe, the federal government's program of placing it
in a western land away from white settlers, where it could he nur-
tured toward civilization and Christianity, was not only a shortsighted
policy but also an illogical and inhumane one. Without the stubborn-
ness and determination of these early tribal members, no western
Seminole tribe would have existed in 1990. Truly, the mere survival of
the early Seminoles earned them special distinction as a tribe.
Published by University of Tennessee Press, 1994, 225 pp., hard-
cover. Sold nationally for $28.95. Bookshop price=$24.00.


to wrest Florida from Spain
and had international
repercussions that led to a
lengthy congressional in-
vestigation. The second,
which lasted seven years,
took the lives of more than
1,500 soldiers and resulted
in the forced removal of
more than 3,000 Seminole
Indians from Florida and
the deaths of countless oth-
ers. The third war, fought
on the eve of the Civil War,
was an attempt to remove
the final remnants of the
Seminole Nation from their
homes in the Everglades.
Underlying these conflicts
was the nations thirst for
aggressive territorial expan-
sion and the dangers of an
inflexible government policy.
The Missalls describe the
wars as both a military and
a moral embarrassment-a
sad and important chapter
in American history that
has been overshadowed by
the Civil War and by Indian
wars fought west of the Mis-
sissippi.
From the Forward, by the
series editors: "During the
past half century, the bur-
geoning population and in-
creased national and inter-
national visibility of Florida
have sparked a great deal
of popular interest in the
state's past, present, and
future. As the favorite des-
tination of countless tour-
ists and as the new home
for millions of retirees and
other migrants, modern
Florida has become a demo-
graphic, political, and cul-
tural bellwether."
"Unfortunately, the quan-
tity and quality of the litera-
ture on Florida's distinctive
heritage and character have
not kept pace with the Sun-
shine State's enhanced sta-
tus. In an effort to remedy
this situation-to provide
an accessible and attractive
format for the publication of
Florida-related books-the
University Press of Florida
has established the Florida
History and Culture series."

Raymond Arsenault and
Gary R. Mormino, Series
Editors. University of South
Florida, St. Petersburg. Uni-
versity of Florida Press,
copyright 2004, 258 pp.,
hardcover. Sold nationally
for $29.95. Bookshop
price=$25.00.


'Ta es of Old

Fforida





S'-.
er-.








Castle, 1987,.477 pp.,
hardcover. One hundred
..- -.: -








years ago, Florida was a wil-
derness of swamp and
beach, dense forest and
abundant wild game. Un-
discovered, except for a few
pioneer sportsmen and
hearty farmers and ranch-
ers, the state was still a
frontier. Here is a collection
of original articles and sto-
ries of "Old Florida" the vast
canvas of nature, prior to
the coming of the condo-
minium. Illustrated with
rare drawings, photographs
and engravings, this book
will recreate a paradisethat
can never be again,
Be 'kshop price=$19.95.

(319) The Seminole Wars,
America's Longest Indian
Conflict. By John Missall
and Mary Lou Missall. The
Seminole Wars were the
longest, bloodiest, and most
costly of all the Indian wars
fought by this nation. This
illustrated history is the
first book to provide a com-
prehensive overview of all
three wars. Seminole War
authorities John and Mary
Lou Missall examine not
only the wan that were
fought between 1817 and
1858 but also the events
leading up to them and
their place in American his-
tory Employing extensive
research that makes use of
diaries, military reports,
and archival newspapers,
they shed new light on the
relationship among the
wars, the issue of slavery,
prevalent attitudes toward
Native Americans, and the
quest for national security
Although fought in Florida,
the Seminole Wars were a
major concern to the nation
as a whole. The first war, led
by General Andrew Jack-
son, was Dart of an attempt


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