Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00270
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: November 11, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00270
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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PICK UP OUR NEXT I
ON FRIDAY,
NOVEMBER 25, 20
IN THE NEWS STAP


ZtAi h NltW KftAAU EVy D

BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
The APALACHICOLA, FL
PERMIT #8



Franklin

ISSUE

)05
M Chronicle


Volume 14, Number 23 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER November 11- 24,2005



Franklin County Commission


Addresses Critical Letter About


North Florida Medical, Eastpoint


Miss Florida Seafood, Heather Osburn, and King Rets
Jerome Brown, at the 2005 Seafood Festival
Apalachicola on Saturday, November 5th.


First Newell Concert Of
The Season November 13th


The Ilse Newell Fund for the Per-
forming Arts will present the
opening concert of its 26th sea-
son at 4:00 p.m., E.S.T., on Sun-
day, November 13th, at Trinity
Episcopal Church, Apalachicola.
Stephen Mattingly, guitarist and
doctoral candidate at Florida State
university with Jeffery Wienand,
baritone, Barbi Risken, flute,
Evren Bilgenoglu, cello, will
present music composed for gui-
tar, instruments, and voice by
Franz Schubert (1797 1828).
Mr. Mattingly taught at an inter-
national guitar symposium in
Germany last summer. He also
'presented an extensive article on
Schubert's original chamber mu-
sic with guitar and he will offer
comments on the music during
the concert.


The Ilse Newell Fund is sponsor
by the Apalachicola Area histo]
cal Society, a 501-(c)3 education
incorporation in the State
Florida. A $2.00 donation is r
quested at the door for those n
holding season members
cards. For further information
call 850-670-8088.









MARG?^I^NB


Letter Cites Alleged Failure of North Florida Medical To
Provide Health Care to Indigent and Uninsured; County
Board Endorses Removal ofNorth Florida Medical From
SEastpoint
The Chairperson of the Franklin County Board of Commissioners,
Ms. Cheryl Sanders, has sent a letter to the Bureau of Primary Health
Care in Rockfield, Maryland, listing several complaints about the per-
formance of North Florida Medical in Eastpoint. The list includes:
failure of North Florida Medical to operate a board of consumers of its
services; restrictive policies in regard to indigent consumers; the lack
of weekend and evening hours; failure to design special programs for
the Seafood industries; failure to provide hospital privileges at Weems;
and the lack of a full-time physician.
The detailed letter, under date of October 25, 2005, and endorsed by
the Franklin County Health Council is as follows:
October 25, 2005
Dr. Donald Weaver
Bureau of Primary Health Care
5600 Fischer Lane Room 17105
Rockfield, MD 20857
Dear Dr. Weaver:
The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners has directed
that this letter be sent regarding the North Florida Medical FQHC in
Eastpoint, Florida. The Board believes neither the spirit nor the in-
o, tent of Section 330 of the Health Center Consolation Act of 1996 is
in being followed by North Florida in Eastpoint.
The Board has the following concerns:
1) THe current Board of Directors for the Eastpoint FQHC does not
represent the consumers of its services. Our understanding is that
51% of the Board of Directors of an FQHC must be consumers (pa-
tients) of its services. North Florida currently has only one Board
'- member from Franklin County.
2) The facility does not foster, advertise or encourage indigent care
and specifically restricts access to their services. Eastpoint only quali-
fies patients one day a week and,tfidse appointments are restricted.
Our local providers have seen an increase in the numbers of unin-
sured since the arrival of North Florida in Eastpoint. Our local Emer-
gency Department has noted a marked increase in non-emergent care
of those uninsured.

Lanark Citizens Initiative
SPresents Grievances To

SFranklin County Commission

Results of Lanark Water and Sewer "Town Meeting" Highly
Critical of Water Board
SPauline Sullivan appeared before the Franklin County Commission
on Tuesday, November 1, and presented a written report highly criti-
cal of the Lanark Water and Sewer Board. The "town meeting" gener-
ated a list of complaints and a vote of "No confidence" in the current
Lanark Water and Sewer Board.
Ms. Sullivan asked the Commissioners to provide guidance and scru-
tiny of the Lanark Board proposals for the last six years "to ensure
that changes are consistent with other communities." She complained
that copies of actual budgets of the water and sewer board were not
provided to her. She outlined the water and sewer income increases
to 67% while "there were disproportionate increases in salaries and
hourly wages (109%) life and health insurance benefits (114%) legal
and professional fees (198%), operative services (320%) contract fees
(166%) Sub/Ads/Dues (200%) and reserve funds (2300%)."
Moreover, "budget proposals do not reflect Florida Public Service
Commission's authorized range of common equity returns for water
and a wastewater utilities (8.57% to 9.85%), and that the district was
not an economically viable entity.
She also charged that published budget categories were not consis-
tent, limiting the ability of the citizens to identify expenditures. The
budget proposals did not reflect all common selling, general and ad-
ministrative categories such as fixed, variable and discretionary ex-
penses,
Ms. Sullivan accused the current Commissioners were not following
requirements of the Florida "Sunshine laws," She cited one example:
"...One resident said that a lease was presented for final
approval at the last district meeting October 18, 2005,
Commissioner Lawlor introduced the lease. However, no
lease terms were discussed nor previous minutes passed
out. The motion was made by Commissioner Millar and
seconded, ... by Commissioner Lawlor,"
She added that:
"A full board of commissioners was not making these de-
cisions,,." citing the Franklin County Commissions deci-
sion to request a special election to fill the vacant seat on
the Lanark board, She said, "There is a mistrust of com-
missioners and a loss of their credibility."
ed Ms. Sullivan closed with a request that the Franklin County Commis-
ri- sion investigate the processes associated with the Lanark board con-
al tracts and a recession of all transactions made without a full sitting
of board, She concluded with this written statement:
re-
ot "Our situation is dire and we request you exercise your
ip ex-officio rights to step-in and actively participate in
n, Lanark Village Water and Sewer District management until
we can elect a full board, and ensure compliance with
the intent of Florida's Sunshine laws. We have a right to
representative government. We ask that you ensure
Lanark residents have a voice that is heard regarding
water district operations..."
The Franklin County Commissioners approved a motion to have County
Attorney Shuler and Administrative Director Alan Pierce meet with
the Lanark Water and Sewer board to discuss options. Their report
would be presented to the Franklin County Commission at the No-
vember 15, 2005 meeting. There was some discussion about placing
a referendum question regarding the joining of the Lanark system
with the City of Carrabelle. Mayor Mel Kelly spoke briefly to that ques-
tion, indicating that no formal request has been made to the City of
Carrabelle on that question


3) North Florida further restricts access by not offering weekends and
evening hours as mandated.
4) North Florida has not provided culturally competent care by failing
to design specific programs for our special population (the Seafood
Industry).
5) North Florida is also mandated to have contracts with local agen-
cies to provide hospital, mental, as well as transportation services.
We are not aware of any such contracts.
6) Furthermore, no provider at Eastpoint has ever had hospital privi-
leges at our local hospital. Our understanding is that Health Centers
(FQHC) must provide for inpatient services either directly or through
contracted services. No such arrangements have been made. Our lo-
cal ER group has been gracious enough to admit on behalf of Eastpoint
patients.
7) We also understand that North Florida does not provide a full-time
physician a physician is there only 2 half days a week.
To summarize, because of the failure of North Florida to meet its ob-
ligations to provide health care to the indigent and uninsured, other
local providers and our local ER, who are not receiving federal sub-
sidy, are overwhelmed with indigent care. The Board respectfully re-
quests that North Florida be made to pay for the health care services
these other local providers are giving to indigents.
Finally, the Bureau should be aware that the Franklin County Board
of County Commissioners has appointed a Health Council which is
actively investigating ways to improve health care. The Council en-
dorses the removal of North Florida and recommends the county ap-
ply for the FQHC grant directly.
Please pass this letter on to any one who might have some responsi-
bility for oversight of North Florida. The Board believes that the cur-
rent situation is unacceptable.
If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Alan C. Pierce,
Director of Administrative Services, at 850-653-9783, ext. 161.
Sincerely,
Cheryl Sanders
Chairman

Boyd Announces Grant For

Franklin's Promise

Funding will improve social services for the people of
Franklin County


Congressman Allen Boyd (D-
North Florida) announced that the
U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services (HHS) awarded
Franklin's Promise Coalition, In-
corporated a $50,000 grant
through the Compassion Capital
Fund (CCF) to improve its infra-
structure so it can continue to
provide coordinated and effective
social services to the citizens of
Franklin County.
Franklin's Promise will use the
funds to build the infrastructure
necessary to assist Franklin
County in obtaining funding and
manpower to provide social ser-
vices to area residents. The grant
will focus on organizational devel-
opment; development of diversi-
fied funding sources; and commu-
nity involvement in order to iden-
tify needed programs and prevent


duplication of services in the area.
Franklin's Promise is a non-profit,
volunteer group of concerned citi-
zens, business partners, agencies,
organizations and churches who
want to make Franklin County a
better place to live for all its citi-
zens. The coalition provides a fo-
rum for networking to discuss the
issues facing the county and fa-
cilitates community members
working together to solve prob-
lems to meet the needs of the area.
Franklin's Promise Coalition
meets once a month on the third
Thursday of the month from 11:00
a.m. -1:00 p.m. The location of the
meetings alternate between
Carrabelle and Apalachicola. All
citizens are invited to attend the
meetings and can call 653-3930
for more information.


Panhandle Players To Aid


Food Pantry

Yes! The Panhandle Players can
perform on stage and give aid at
the same time! While the cast of
"Let's Murder Marsha" a comedy
by Monk Ferris are on stage per-
forming this farce other members
of the Panhandle Players will be
doing their part to benefit
Franklins Promise's Food Pantry.
Mugs with the Panhandle Player's
name and logo will be available for
a donation of $7.50 or more. The
Players have purchased a gross of
the mugs and all funds collected
will go directly to the Food Pan-
try. "Under normal conditions,"
said Liz Sisung, president of the
Panhandle Players, "the Pantry
provides a bag of groceries each
week to about 200 families in
Franklin County. In September
this number increased to 355.
While we don't have the numbers
for October we do know the need
is still great and whatever funds
we can provide will be put to good
use. When the Bay closes to oys-
tering the economic effect is felt
throughout the community. It be-
gins with the oystermen, but fil-
ters through to our restaurants,
shops and accommodations in-
dustries."
Let's Murder Marsha will be per-
formed Thursday through Satur-
day, November 17 through 19 at
8 p.m. with a Sunday 3 p.m. mati-
nee November 20 at the Dixie The-
atre, Apalachicola. Under the di-
rection of Barbara Siprell the cast
includes the always entertaining,
Margy Oehlert, Hank Kozlowsky,
Joe Shields, Linda Elsea, Robbie
Johnson, Liz Sisung with new-
comer to the Players Margaret
Cinestra. Tickets for this family


friendly show are $10 for adults
and $5 for children 12 and under
and can be purchased at the door
or from members of the cast and
crew. The box office opens one
hour before curtain and the the-
atre opens one half hour before
curtain. For further information
please call 670-8261.


GCCC's Gulf/
Franklin
Center To

Hold Job Fair

Gulf Coast Community College's
Gulf/Franklin Center will be hold-
ing a Job Fair on November 18
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 3800
Garrison Avenue in Port St. Joe.
The job fair will provide a forum
for Gulf/Franklin students, com-
munity residents and hurricane
Katrina evacuees to link with cur-
rent and potential employers in
the area. The fair will provide a
resource for helping the commu-
nity find jobs and offer students
employment opportunities. It is
also designed to assess the train-
ing needs of local businesses and
to gear the Gulf/Franklin Center's
services to better serve the com-
munity.
The Job Fair is open to all Gulf
and Franklin County residents
and students. For additional in-
formation, call Laura Ropelis at
227-9670 (EST), ext. 5503.


Seafood Royalty
,-'I :;".


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Page 2 11 November 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chroniclel


Franklin

Briefs

November 1, 2005

Present: Chairperson Cheryl
Sanders; Commissioner
Jimmy Mosconis;
Commissioner Bevin Putnal;
Commissioner Russell
Crofton and Commissioner
Noah Lockley, Jr.

Solid Waste Director
Van Johnson requested the Com-
mission to clarify their policy on
debris removal.
"It has become necessary for the
Board to clarify its policy on right-
of-way debris removal. At present,
the county does not have the per-
sonnel or trucks necessary to
keep up with the type and volume
of debris being placed at the curb
for pickup. Without a clear policy,
adding the new boom truck will
not be enough to help in this en-
deavor."
'While riding through the county,
I have observed single family resi-
dents with more than four (4) to
five (5) truck loads of debris piled
out front for pickup. This debris
is unrelated to any storm debris
and it would take one (1) truck a
whole day to pickup at one home
and a week to finish a neighbor-
hood. Also, in some areas, some-
one is apparently using a dump
truck to place debris on the right-
of-way. In other area's contractors
are pushing land clearing debris
to the curb.
"Because of this, I have, added lan-
guage to the Board's current.
policy that clarifies the types and
volume of debris to be picked up.
Attached, for your review and
adoption is a copy of the clarified
policy. Should the Board opt to
adopt, I will publish the policy for
four weeks with the local media."
The Commissioners approved the
changes. The complete policy is
published in a legal ad in this
Chronicle issue.
The Florida Department of
Transportation has grant funds
available to assist local commu-
nities with litter prevention and
education programs. In the past
the F.D.O.T., funneled the money
through the now inactive Keep
Franklin Beautiful Program. How-
ever, should the Board bring the
Keep Franklin County Beautiful
Program under its control, then
the Board could revive the pro-
gram and make application for the
Grant. An organization, such as
the River Keepers could then ad-
minister the program using the
grant funds. The River Keepers
are already doing some require-
ments of the grant, such as over-
seeing both the Great America
Clean Up and the Florida Coastal
Clean Up. The grant allocation for
Fiscal Year 05-06, will range from
$19,000 $22,000, depending on
how many communities apply.
Last year, Florida communities
received up to $24,000.
The Board approved the recom-
mended changes.
They approved a motion to bring
the Keep Franklin County Beau-
tiful Program under the Board
Auspices and to apply for the
F.D.O.T. Liner Prevention Grant
to administer the program. Also,
solicit the assistance of the River
Keepers to operate Keep Franklin
County Beautiful.
Mr. Johnson also asked the Board
to approve a grant application. "I
have for the Board's approval and
the Chairman's signature the
Small County Solid. Waste Man-
agement Grant for Fiscal Year 05/
06. The grant is an appropriation
from the State and administered
through the Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection. The pur-
pose of the award is to assist small
counties with their Solid Waste
Management needs. The grant
period is from October 1, 2005 -
September 30, 2006. The total
amount awarded for this Fiscal
Year is $191,176, the same as last
year's award."
The Board approved a motion to
accept that grant, authorizing the
signature of the chairman on the
application.

IFAS Extension
Bill Mahan reported on Red Tide.
FL Red Tide Report: "According to
samples collected on 10-27, red
tide cell counts/liter in the


Apalachicola Bay System Shellfish
Harvesting Areas ranged from a
high of 166,667 at West Pass to a
low of 333 at Catpoint. However,
all of the oyster meat samples are
still above the required <20 mouse









TA I


units/100 grams of meat (Picka-
lene Bar 67.96 mu, SW Greene
Point 45.1 mu and Catpoint was
48.14. Alligator Harbor reopened
to clam harvesting on 10-15-05.
Attached, please find a copy of a
draft letter to Sherman Wilhelm
requesting The Division of
Aquaculture's assistance with col-
lecting a split sample of oyster
meats with one set of samples
being sent to the FWC St. Peters-
burg Lab and the other set being
sent to The Texas Department of
Health for an independent confir-
mation of the mouse bioassay re-
sults."
Monarch Tagging Program: "Last
week I worked with staff members
of the ANERR to conduct our an-
nual monarch tagging program.
Last week we collected, tagged,
and released more than a 1,000
monarchs. We also recaptured
several tagged individuals. All of
the data we collected will be sent
to The Monarch Watch Program
at the University of Kansas."
Sugar Cane "Give-Away:" "The
UF-IFAS North FL Research &
Education Center--Quincy is hav-
ing its Annual Sugar Cane Give-
Away, on November 7th from 8:30
- 12:00 p.m. This year 18 variet-
ies of cane (16-syrup & 2-chew-
ing) will be available. Each regis-
tered 'person is allowed to cut 20
stalks, of each variety. The regis-
tration fee is $5.00. For additional
information contact the UF-IFAS
Gadsden County Extension Pro-
gram at 850-875-7255."

Administration Director
Mr. Alan Pierce informed the
Board that the Planning Office
received six applications for the
Grant Writer/Administrator posi-
tion. "Will set up interviews for
next week."
Mr. Pierce informed the Board
that last legislative session placed
additional requirements for local
governments in their comp plans,
specifically for capital improve-
ments or transportation
concurrency. The legislature also
provided some funds for the ad-
ditional work to be done. The
Board accepted the $15,000
grant.
A copy of DEP permit for Bluff
Road Boat Ramp was given to the
Board. Awaiting word from Preble-
Rish on Corps Nationwide permit.
The bids are being advertised next
week according to David Kennedy.
The Board approved 3 proposals
from Preble-Rish in keeping with
their status as county engineers.
The three proposals are:
A) Engineering services for Lake
Morality Road
B), Eiigineering services for CR-
30A:-
C) Engineering services for the
feasibility study for Alligator Point
Road
Mr. Larry Troy and Mr. Ron
Bloodworth are interested in help-
ing the county get a boat ramp on
St. George Island. "I have asked
them to review the area on the
east side of old bridge. They be-
lieve there is room for a boat ramp.
This is the area that the Reserve
would support a boat ramp be-
cause the east side of the bridge
is not in the Aquatic Preserve and
it also has deep water." The Board
approved to have Preble-Rish de-
sign and permit a boat ramp for
this location.
The Board was informed that the
Fish and Wildlife did approve the
$250,000 grant to improve the
boat tamp and mooring facility at
Battery Park. The City of
Apalachicola will take the lead on
project.
The Board was informed that Mr.
Paul Osterbye, owner of
Carrabelle Wayside RV Park is
willing to assist the county in de-
veloping and a public fishing pier
at Carrabelle Beach.
The Board was informed that in a
recent analysis done by Rural
Development, there are 10 vacan-
cies in the subsidized housing in
Franklin County.
The Board was provided a copy of
feasibility study grant submitted
to OTTED for $75,000. The feasi-
bility study will analysis the fea-
sibility of a seafood industrial park
and the amount of water access
necessary to maintain the seafood
industry. The City ofApalachicola
has also submitted a request to
OTTED to fund a feasibility study
to improve the city facilities at
Scipio Creek Boat Basin.


Inform Board that the owners of
1296 Alligator Drive would like to
receive part of the Alligator Point
Drive if the road is going to be re-
located. They are adjoining South
Shoal and the road will move from
the front of 1296 to the back and
it would be consistent-to allow this
property owner the same benefit
as South Shoal. Board direction
to turn this over to the attorney
for review. The Board approved
the recommendation.
The Board approved a Resolution
to renew the Enterprise Zone Des-
ignation in Franklin County, re-
appoint the Committee members,
and alter the boundary slightly
around Carrabelle. This action will
be to extend the Zone and the
Committee from Dec 31, 2005,
until Dec. 31, 2015.
The Board was informed that it
received a response from Fish and
Wildlife regarding the easement
requested by Mr. Dakie Ward on
behalf of DSW Holdings.
The Board accepted the roads in
Village Green Phase II contingent
upon the engineer's final inspec-
tion. These are four cul-de-sacs
built to county standards about
eight months ago, but for some
reason the test results of the com-
paction were not provided to the
county until now. The plat has
been recorded, but there is a let-
ter of credit that needs to be re-
leased if the roads are satisfactory.
The Board was informed that the
public meeting sponsored by the
City of Carrabelle to discuss the
future of Senior Citizen Center
program has been rescheduled to
Nov. 19 from Nov. 12. It is still at
the Senior Center, and still at
10:00 a.m.
The Board acted to have Preble-
Rish investigate and recommend.
guidelines for filling of lots on St.
George Island. Since Hurricane
Dennis caused such extensive
flooding on the Island, some prop-
erty owners have brought in ad-
ditional fill to protect and against
future.flooding, and some of this
fill has the potential to cause both
flooding of other property not
filled, and flooding of Island roads.
Board direction on the selection
of an architect to design the modi-
fications to the courthouse.
Preble-Rish does not directly pro-
vide architectural services. They
can and have teamed with archi-
tects in the past, but the county
is not obligated to use Preble-Rish
as an organizer for architectural
services. Basically, the court-
house renovations require an ar-
chitectural firm, not an engineer-
ing firm.

By Richard E. Noble

Unemployed Oystermen
and the Red Tide
The County Commission meeting
on Tuesday, November 1 was
once again standing room only.
The largest contingent of specta-
tors (or participants) was from the
local seafood industry, the major-
ity of whom were oystermen and
fisherman who have been put out
of work due to the lingering "Red
Tide".
I think it could be considered safe
to say that most seafood workers,
dealer's and other involved par-
ticipants in the harvesting and
proliferation of local seafood prod-
ucts consider the 'Red Tide" to be
nothing more than another part
of a contrived conspiracy on the
part of the "Government" and its
varying agencies to put them out
of business,
The "Government involved in this
conspiracy is that of the United


Open at 7 am. everyday
Serving Breakfast
Lunch & Dinner


States and the state of Florida
despite the obvious "Red" Tide
inference. Although one Commis-
sioner did point out at this weeks
meeting that this whole thing was,
in fact, "Communism". I am more
inclined to believe that Capitalism
is more likely the culprit in this
case.
To believe there is an actual con-
spiracy designed to eventually
eliminate the seafood industry in
the United States takes very little
imagination on my part. Unfortu-
nately, as I have said before, I was
once involved in the local seafood
industry and consequently my
judgment on this issue has been
polluted." But, I will do my best
to remain objective and maintain
my journalist anonymity.
I have been trying to get up to
speed on what Red Tide actually
is:
"Among the thousands of species
of microscopic algae at the base
of the marine food chain are a few
dozen which produce potent tox-
ins," I have discovered surfing the
Internet under Red Tide. "The
impacts of these phenomena in-
clude mass mortalities of wild and
farmed fish and shellfish, human
intoxications or even death from
contaminated shellfish or fish, al-
terations of marine tropic struc-
tures through adverse affects on
larvae and other life history stages
of commercial fisheries species,
and death of marine mammals,
seabirds, and other animals."
The Red Tide seems to be a mis-
nomer. The scientific acronym is
HAB (harmful algal bloom). "One
major category of impact occurs
when toxic phytoplankton are fil-
tered from the water as food by
shellfish such as clams, mussels,
scallops and oysters, which then
accumulate the algal toxins to lev-
els which can be lethal to humans
or other consumers ... Typically,
the shellfish are only marginally
affected, even though a single
clam (or oyster) can sometimes
contain sufficient toxin to kill a
human.. Most HAB research ac-
tivity has focused on shellfish,
fish, and zooplankton, but many,
other organisms are being affected
by toxins in ways that we can only
guess at right now. Where for-
mally a few regions were affected
in scattered locations, now virtu-
ally every coastal state is threat-
ened, in many cases, over large
geographic areas and by more
than one harmful or toxic algal
species. Few would argue that the
number of toxic blooms ... have
all increased dramatically in re-
cent years in the United States
and around the world. Disagree-
ments only arise with respect to
the reasons for this expansion.
Possible explanations include: a)
species dispersal LhroLIgh cu.r-
rents, storms, orer ,ier iatural
mechanisms; b) nutriment enrich-
ment of coastal waters by human
activities; c) increased aquacul-
ture operations which can enrich
surrounding waters and stimulate
algal'growth; d) introduction of
fisheries resources (through
aquaculture development) which
then reveal the presence of indig.-
enous harmful algae in waters
formally "free" from HAB prob-
lems; e) dispersal of HAB species
via ship ballast water or shellfish
seeding activities; f) long-term cli-
matic trends in temperature, wind
speed, or isolation; and g) in-
creased scientific and regulatory
scrutiny of coastal waters and
fisheries products and improved
chemical analytical capabilities
that lead to the discovery of new
toxins and toxic events.
"One of the explanations.given for
the increased incidence of HAB
outbreaks is that these events are
a reflection of increased pollution
and nutrient loading in coastal


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waters. Some argue that we are
witnessing a fundamental change
in the phytoplankton species com-
position of coastal marine ecosys-
tems throughout the world due to
the changes in nutrient supply
ratios from human activities.
There is no doubt that this is true
in certain areas of the world where
pollution has increased dramati-
cally ... The potential stimulatory
influence of anthropogenic nutri-
ent inputs on HAB incidence is
certainly one of the more press-
ing unknowns we face.
"Laboratory studies of the stimu-
latory effects of chemicals con-
tained in effluents or terrestrial
runoff are also needed ... a long
term study of the Inland Sea of
Japan, where visible Red Tides
increased steadily from 44 per
year in 1965 to over 300 per year
a decade later, matching the pat-
tern of increased, nutrient loading
from pollution. Japanese authori-
ties instituted effluent controls in
the mid-1970's, resulting in a 50
percent reduction in the number
of Red Tides-that has persisted
to this day." But after all is said
and done... "Our level of knowl-
edge about each of the many HAB
species varies significantly, and
even the best studied remain
poorly characterized with respect
to bloom or population dynamics
... there are no predictive models
of population development, trans-
port, and toxin accumulation for
any of the major harmful algal
species in the United States."
But, according to the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Commission what is
happening in the rest of the world
is not what is happening here in
Florida. According to their report:
Did pollution cause this Red Tide?
"No, we know from angler reports
and water samples they collected
and provided to FWRI in early
January 2005 as well as from sat-
ellite imagery of high chlorophyll
areas offshore that was ground-
truthed with live water samples,
that the current Red Tide started
approximately 20 miles offshore
of Pinellas County, in a region
beyond the reach of coastal nu-
trients ... There is no evidence of.
a direct link between Florida Red
Tides and nutrient pollution."
Why haven't scientists solved the
Red Tide problem in Florida?
"There is evidence that Red Tides
have always existed in Florida's
waters. Scientists who study Red
Tides globally consider Florida
Red Tides to be unique because
they are natural events which ex-
isted long before Florida was
settled. In other areas of the world,
Red Tides caused by different spe-
cies of algae than in Florida have
been linked with coastal,pollution;;
however,~not in.Florida; Red Tides
in Florida are related to weather
patterns and water currents, sea-
water chemistry, and biology.
Currently research is being con-
ducted on many aspects of Red
Tide ... but solving the natural
phenomena of Red Tides may not
be possible, even if scientists bet-
ter understood their function and
role in coastal ecosystems."


Why doesn't Red Tide occur every
year?
"Red Tide cells prefer higher, more
oceanic salinities (24 36.6 parts
per thousand) and cannot grow in
fresh water or at salinities much
below 24 parts per thousand in
nature. This salinity restriction
generally keeps Red Tide out of
the rivers and upper bays char-
acterized by lower salinities ... an
abrupt change in water tempera-
ture of three to five degrees Fahr-
enheit over a small depth change
can act as a physical barrier to
Red Tide cells (which can not
swim up through the area of tem-
perature change), trapping the
cells at depth in the cooler bot-
tom layer."
So whether Communist or Capi-
talist inspired, there really is such
a thing as Red Tide and its inci-
dence of occurrence is increasing
not only in Apalachicola Bay but
all over the world, Why this is
happening is being scrutinized by
the scientific community. Their
results are minimal due to a tra-
ditional lack of funding and po-
litical initiative. Opposition most
likely being stimulated by varying
economic enterprises, public and
private, who would tend to gain
from a lack of insight and public
knowledge with regards to the
exact origin of this Red Tide
phenomena.

Joe Shields
Mr. Shields of the Department of
Agriculture courageously stepped
up to the microphone, passing by
row after row of red-faced, stiff-
backed, unemployed oystermen
with their arms folded defiantly
across their chests. "Good morn-
ing commissioners. I told you that
I would come back every two
weeks for an update. As of the
31st.(of Oct.) we collected samples
that range from 333 cells per liter
to 23,000 cells per liter, It is de-
clining. All of the meat samples
that we collected last week range
from forty-five to sixty-eight
mouse units that needs to be be-
low twenty. A secondary bloom
has been identified along patches'
from Mobile County Alabama to
Franklin County. It is still off-
shore. The water is between 62
and 68 degrees. Conditions are
still prevalent for its continued I
growth, and we are still sampling i
twice a week, every week."
"Joe, let me ask you something,"
asked commissioner Mosconis.
"Have you ever involved the Corps
of Engineers in this process? If
you have water coming down (the
river) don't that push the Red Tide
out of the Bay?"
"It certainly could. Definitely, the
river does have an influence -
fresh'water-would kill off those
(Red Tide) organsins It would bd',
verynice'if the river-was at fifteen'
or sixteen feet right now."
"Have you checked with the Corps
of Engineers to see if their inven-
tory of water is up?"
"We have not worked with that
agency at this time."
Continued on Page 5


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Association membership is required. MW/000023 Exp. 06/06


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St. George Island Toll Free: 800-344-7570
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RAY BAY:
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floors, granite countertop, cher-
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St. George Island Realty
235 E. Gulf Beach Dr.
St. George Island, FL 32328

LAND FOR SALE:
One acre BAY FRONT! Fantastic
view across St. George Sound.
White sandy Bay beach. Private
location on a quiet street with nice
homes. MLS#108381. $850,000.

Plantation 1.10 Acre! High & dry
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Convenient beach access & close
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( I


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the United States


% Congress should
adopt an energy

policy that is less dependent

on foreign oil,

you could be a

REPUBLICAN.

Join today. Call 850-927-2336.

PAID FOR BY THE FRANKLIN COUNTY REPUBLICAN
COMMITTEE. NOT AUTHORIZED BY ANY CANDIDATE
OR CANDIDATE COMMITTEE.


I W


__ _


I _


F








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


11Nvebr205*Psw3


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


The Clerk Of The

Circuit Court,

Your Public Trustee
By Marcia Johnson
Q. I've heard much about Article V, Revi-
sion 7, of the Constitution. How has Article
V affected the budget and operations of the
Clerk differently from that of other consti-
tutional officers?
A. The Legislature enacted a "peer review" budget process for Clerks
for their court-related budget, The reviews are conducted by the ex-
ecutive council of the newly formed "Clerks of Court Operations
Corporation" set up by the Legislature. The Corporation's activities
are funded through the Dept. of Financial Services from court-related
revenues generated by the Clerks.
Before Article V, all of the Clerk's budget was funded from the County.
SNow, the court budget is funded strictly from statutory fees and fines
collected by the Clerk, and the County funds County Commission,
Official Records, and other non-court functions. Our budgets must
be limited to the core, court-related duties of the Clerks specified in
ES. 28.33(4)(a. The Clerk must estimate the amount of revenues to be
collected and 1/3 of that revenue must be sent to the State General
Revenue fund. A Clerk may only retain part of the state's 1/3 share of
revenue or draw money from the trust fund if the Corporation certi-
fies that all requirements have been met and the Clerk is meeting
approved performance standards. The Clerk is the only county con-
stitutional officer being tasked with meeting performance standards.
The Corporation's executive council identifies Clerks who are eligible
for a subsidy from the state trust fund. Also, each Clerk has a budget
cap which is calculated by increasing the previous year's budget by
the percentage of revenue growth projected.
Each Clerk's current year budget is rebased prior to calculating the
budget cap for the following year. This process consists of recalculat-
ing what the maximum budget should've been based on the actual
revenue growth and inflating tis figure by the projected revenue growth
for the next fiscal year. Right now, the Clerk is required to file reports
on assessments and collections as well as timeliness on entering cases
and docketing events and paperwork. It seems sometimes the actual
work to he performed gets behind due to the amount of reports that
are required to prove the staff is complying with performance stan-
dards set. It may be a vicious cycle, but the Clerk's office has been
and will remain accountable.
If you have any questions or comments about this column, please
forward them to: Marcia Johnson, Clerk of: the Court, 33 Market
St., Suite 203. Apalachicola, Florida, 32320.




Stay the Course

By Willie Norred
SThe young soldier had breathed his last breath a few minutes earlier.
The national media was alerted to his death. The word went out. The
media labeled his death a milestone in our war on terror. The young
soldier's death marked two thousand combat deaths in Iraq.
Senator Patrick Leahy. the liberal senator from Vermont, was ready
for this sad event. He faced to the floor of the U. S. Senate with a
message that can only be described as a "cut and run" policy. He was
followed by Senator John Kerry. Senator Kerry added nothing to the
"cut and run" words of Senator Leahy. Senator Teddy Kennedy was
caught off guard. It was.several hours later before he could find his
way to the Senate floor to offer his "cut and run" speech.
President Bush was in the oval office when advised of the young
soldier's death. In a very somber tone, President Bush expressed sin-
cere condolences on behalf of the nation to the family of the fallen
warrior. He added that we can honor this fallen soldier and his com-
rades by our resolve to stay the course and finish the job in Iraq.
Some say that the presence of our military in Iraq fuels the insur-
gency and the radical Islamists terrorist around the world. I say these
people are suffering from the chronic illness of forgetfulness. Our
military was not in Iraq in 1993 when terrorist tried to destroy the
World Trade Center and in 2001 when they did. We were not in Iraq
when the USS Cole was attacked while moored in peaceful waters.
The simple truth is that the terrorist want to kill Americans. They
don't like us or our way of freedom. They do not value life as we do.
Our nation's resolve to stay the course in Iraq and make the sacrifices
necessary to win the war on terrorism are not easy decisions. It will be
a long struggle. But we will win as we have before. We know that
freedom is not free and is worth defending when and wherever it is
challenged.
Milestone? It will be a milestone when the terrorists are defeated and
the streets of New York, Washington, D. C., Chicago, San Francisco
and throughout this nation are safe. It will be a day when our chil-
dren can attend school without fear and our families can share the
blessings of freedom in peace. And yes, it will be a day when all of our
young men and women in the military are home with us. That my
friends will be a milestone.




V' POST OFFICE BOX 590
Ri~ EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
S850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
I Facsimile 850-670-1685
"nt1r e-mail: hoffer531@gtcom.net
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 14, No. 23


November 11, 2005


Publisher. Tom W. Hoffer
Director of Operations Andy Dyal
Contributors Dawn Radford
........... Carol Noble
*............ Richard Noble
........... Skip Frink
Advertising Design
and Production Artist Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate Jerry Weber

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis Apalachicola
Skip Frink Carrabelle
David Butler .. Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins .............. Eastpoint
Barbara Revell .. Lanark Village
Richard Harper St. George Island
Back Issues
For current subscribers; back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue would
cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the Chronicle
for price quotes if you seek several different or similar
issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2005
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


Repeated attempts to notify Waste Management to
empty this dumpster at the Chronicle compound seem to
fall on deaf ears. The waste has been building yet the
pickup is slow. Similar complaints have been heard at
the Carrabelle City Commission meeting from city officials.


Recreational Red Snapper

Closed November 1st

Recreational red snapper fishing closed on November 1 and does not
open until April 14, 2006 in Florida waters and April 21 in federal
waters. The recreational quota of 4.47milllon pounds was expected to
be reached by November 1, 2005. Under the law, sale ofrecreationally
caught red snapper from Florida waters and federal waters out to 200
miles is ILLEGAL.
The Commercial red snapper annual quota of 4.65 million pounds is
divided into a spring season (beginning February 1) and an all season
beginningg October 1). The spring season quota is 3.10 million pounds,
and the fall season quota is the remaining annual quota 1.55 million
pounds adjusted for any over or under harvest during the spring sea-
son. During each season, the commercial fishery is open from noon
on the first until noon on the tenth of each month, until the season
quota is filled.
For commercial fishing, the unharvested spring quota will be added
to the 1.55 million pound fall quota that began October I, giving a
total of 2,312,797 pounds available for the full quota. The total an-
nual quota for commercial fishing is 4.65 million pounds. The com-
mercial fishery opens on the first day of the month and closes at noon
on the tenth day of the month until the annual quota is reached. The
operator of a vessel with a valid reef fish permit and a Class 1 or Class
2 red snapper license having red snapper aboard must have landed
and sold such red snapper prior to noon, local time, on the tenth day
of the month that is still open for harvesting.
Bob Jones
Executive Director
Southeastern Fisheries Association


Alert! Jury

Duty Scam

Could Lead

To Identity

Theft

Has anyone called recently letting
you know that you missed jury
duty?
Warning, it could be a scam.
Clever thieves continue to deceive
innocent victims with intentions
of stealing an individual's identity,
and the jury duty scam is one of
the latest.
Other states are reporting that a
person claiming to be a Clerk's
Office employee is calling innocent
people telling them that a jury
summons in their name has gone
unanswered, and that an arrest
warrant has been issued. The
caller then suggests he or she can
verify the arrest warrant if the
unsuspecting person will provide
some personal identifying infor-
mation, such as social security
number, birth date, or credit card
number. Much of this information
can easily be used to commit iden-
tity theft.
"While this scam has not reached
Franklin County, if you ever ex-
perience this type call, hang up
and call my office immediately,"
stated Hon. Marcia M. Johnson,
Clerk of the Court. "The Clerk's
Office does not call summoned
jurors. Please do not give out your
personal information to anyone
you don't know."


It is only natural that a person
may be inclined, to give out per-
sonal information under the
threat of an arrest, but in reality,
court officials will never,request
personal information over the
phone.
This scam has been reported in
many states, and many more in-
nocent victims could be at risk if
they are not aware of this threat.
About the Clerk's Office
The Clerk of the Circuit Court was
established as a public trustee by
the Florida Constitution in 1838.
The Clerk of the Circuit Court
serves as the Clerk of Courts, the
Clerk of the Board of County Com-
missioners, Auditor, Recorder and
Custodian of all County Funds.
For more information contact:
Marcia M. Johnson, Clerk of
Court at 653-8861 ext. 103.


Boyd Secures

Funds For

Oyster

Industry

Congressman Allen Boyd (D-
North Florida), a member of the
House Appropriations Committee
voted in favor of the Conference
Report on the Agriculture Appro-
priations Act for fiscal year 2006
(HR 2744). In this legislation, Con-
gressman Boyd secured $446,000
or research of post harvest oys-
ter treatment (PHT). These funds
will allow the University of Florida
to continue research of various
PHTs.


Inside Out

Transportation & Toothaches
By Chip Ballard @ Balard-2005
The toothache just naturally got me think-
S" ing about transportation: horse-and-bug-
gies, buses, trains, planes, and automo-
I biles. To the average person in pain, there's
little doubt that the invention of the auto-
Smobile is the undisputed dividing line be-
Stween the good old days and everything
After.
The earliest ancestor of the modern auto-
mobile was the Fardier, a three-wheeled, steam-powered, 2.3 mph'
vehicle built in 1771 by Nicolas Joseph Cugnot for the French minis-
ter of war. But this machine was never put into production because it
was so cumbersome and much slower and harder to operate than a
horse-drawn vehicle.
Another Frenchman, Amedee Botlee, in 1873 built an improved 12-
passenger steam car. But since the speed of steam-engine powered
machines still could not match that of the horse and buggy, the in-
vention of the practical automobile had to wait for the invention of a
workable internal combustion engine, which was built by Gottlieb
Daimler and Carl Benz in Germany in 1886. It had a 1.5 horse-pow-
ered, two-cylinder gasoline engine, a four speed transmission and
traveled at 10 miles per hour. The first automobile to be produced in
quantity was the 1901 Curved Dash Oldsmobile, which was built in
the United States by Ransom E. Olds.
But modern automobile mass production and the use of the modern
industrial assembly line are credited to Henry Ford of Detroit, Michi-
gan, who had built his first gasoline-powered car in 1896. Ford began
mass production of his Model T in 1908, and by 1927, when it was
discontinued, over 18 million had been sold.
In 1905, on President Theodore Roosevelt's first ride in an automo-
bile, his chauffeur was stopped by a police officer for going ten miles
an hour, Though Roosevelt swore he'd never ride in a car again, he
later became the first president to own a car as well as the first to
drive one.
The traitorous tooth that got me started on this contemplation of cars
was an upper molar on the left side of my face. Sometimes the pain
would shoot up and wrap around my cheekbone and squeeze, then
loop on up and lasso my eyeball, and pull tight. Other times the pain
would creep down into my jaw and chin. I couldn't tell which tooth
was causing the pain because my whole head hurt. When I'd had
enough, I got in my car and drove to a dentist.
I remember my grandmother telling me about the days before auto-,
mobiles when rural dentists in horse and buggies rode circuits and
might not pass your way but once a month, if that often. She told me
about a man whose tooth abscessed so badly the infection ate through
his jaw and made a hole in his cheek. Rather than endure that kind of
agony, some people yanked out their own teeth with pliers.
Often it was no easier finding a doctor. Life spans were short. Not only
did the miracle drugs we have today not exist, most people could not
have gotten to them if they had.
The automobile changed everything. The most revolutionary inven-
tion since the wheel, it changed the entire economy and the national
way of life. Not all the change is good. The automobile has spoiled
cities and small towns alike as neighborhoods are crushed as high-
ways come crashing through. It has polluted the environment and
caused shortages in natural resources. Some say they wish the auto-
mobile had never been invented. But, those people never lay awake
with an infected tooth eating through their face with no way to get to
a dentist.
Chip is a writer and educator living in Zolfo Springs. He welcomes
your e-mail at chipkyle746@eaithlink.net.


Currently, there is no national
standard for the post harvest
treatment of oysters to prevent
Vibrio vulnificus (V), responsible
for one death and three illnesses
in North Florida last year. How-
ever, the Interstate Shellfish Sani-
tation Conference has adopted
resolutions requiring 20 percent
of all oysters to receive PHT by
2006. This funding will provide the
much-needed research, evalua-
tion and practical application of
the different PHT methods, in-
cluding pasteurization, pressur-
ization, irradiation and cryogen-
ics, to help reduce health risks in
oyster processing plants.


Card Games

And Fund-

Raising

By Sue Cronkite
Raising fun and funds at the same
time is the aim of the St. George
Island Yacht Club in holding a
Casino Night at the St. George Is-
land Fire Station on Saturday,
Nov. 26, from 6 p.m. to midnight.
The Casino Night is being held to
raise money for the annual Christ-
mas Fund program, headed by
Sister Sheila of the Martin house.
The Franklin County Christmas
fund benefited by $10,000 from
the Casino Night last year, said
Sherry Buettner.
"Sister Sheila gets a special thank
you for her caring and continued
support of, and for, this commu-


nity, as well as working so closely
with the Yacht Club in ensuring
these funds are properly distrib-
uted within our county," added
Buettner.


Donations and gifts are being col-
lected again this year from local
Franklin County merchants and
businesses for the Silent Auction.
The Yacht Club members hope to
get the figures up to $15,000 this
year. Everything from paintings,
to vacation trips, motel rooms,
curios, useful items, you name it,
is being gathered to auction off on
Casino Night.
Last year's proceeds for the
Christmas Fund helped support
families in special need, especially
youngsters, making their holidays
happier. The distribution of the
funds last year included $7,182
for items to those on family Christ-
mas lists provided by Sister Sheila
at the Martin House; $1,040 for
coats and jackets; $261 for socks;
$261 for gift certificates for shoes;
$580 for heaters for nursing home
residents; $219 for special meals
for nursing home residents, and
approximately $627 in private
Special funds distribution.
This year has been humbling for
many people, in many ways, es-
pecially in Franklin County. There
are many here in dire need of help
and assistance, especially during
the holiday season. "Help us help
our own," said Buettner. "Come
have fun to raise funds, at Casino
Night, Saturday, Nov. 26, St.
George Island Fire Station. Every-
one is invited, everyone is encour-
aged to participate."


Carrabelle Beach: "Pierson Home, 159 Quail Run Dr.
Extraordinary opportunity to own approx. 3.5 acres cleared and land-
scaped with two ponds plus a 3BR/2BA mobile home! Home boasts
wet bar,.workshop, only .01 mile to Carrabelle Beach. Land backs up
to Tate's Hell Forest. $424,500. MLS#108460.
Select Land Value
Carrabelle-Lot 16 Angler's Harbor, .09 acre MOL. Upscale community in
heart of Carrabelle with brick-paved streets, community pool and deep water
access. $380,000. MLS#108382.

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St. George Island Apalachicola Carrabelle Port St. Joe
123 W. Gulf Beach Dr. 71 Market St. 108 Ave. A, Ste. B 401 Reid Ave.
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850-653-2555
www.prudentialresortrealty.com
An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.


11 November 2005 Paioe 3"-


........... = -rv "








Page 4 11 November 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


From Southeastern Fisheries Association

Hurricane Relief Slow To

Materialize For Industry

So far, not much assistance has trickled down to the commercial fish-
ermen or fish houses and processors who were so badly hammered
by two natural disasters. A few shrimp boats have been contracted to
help in water sampling and some boats (we don't have a number)
have been contracted to remove debris from the shrimping grounds
in certain parts of the Gulf.
The seafood industry in Florida and the Gulf has been decimated. In
Florida the bulk of offshore shrimpers have their boats tied to the
dock because of high fuel costs and low prices in the market. The
oyster industry has -been brought to its knees by red tide and the
devastation of the Louisiana oyster resources. Spiny lobster traps have
been flung all over the shoreline in South Florida. Commercial fishing
for grouper has been closed in the Gulf until January 1. The red tide
has killed the baitfish fishery in the Panhandle and the clam resource
in Cedar Key has been wiped out. The current dilemma has thou-
sands of jobs in jeopardy.
If aid is coming to the fish houses and other entities that form the
infrastructure of the industry, not much information has been re-
leased by those in charge. There has been, talk of large appropria-
tions being made by Congress but no particulars on how the money is
getting to the fishermen, who are hurting so badly.
Letter to Dr. William Hogarth, National Marine Fisheries
Service, Washington, D.C.
November 4, 2005
Happy Friday Bill:
At the end of the week I wanted to let you know that as far as I can
discern, there has been NO financial help from the federal govern-
ment for our fishermen and dealers here in Florida who were ham-
mered by a series of hurricanes.
I AM NOT BLAMING YOU FOR THIS, but you are the only person I
know of in the federal government who has a handle on all fisheries In
the Southeast and who possesses extensive corporate knowledge on
our particular situation.
Please don't think I am being parochial but I believe if this kind of
repeated natural disasters had happened in other parts of the coun-
try, the financial aid would have been delivered swiftly.
We have fishermen who can't pay for food and shelter especially the
hard hit oyster industry. We have shrimp boats tied to the dock not
only from excessive fuel prices and ever expanding imports but the
spate of hurricanes have caused many restaurants and retailers to
cut back.on purchases because of lack of customers. Our spiny lob-
ster fishermen had their traps blown away TWICE and yet no finan-
cial help has come their way and most recently, just when we thought
the fishermen could start making some money in the stone crab fish-
ery, along comes Hurricane Wilma and blows thousands of stone crab
traps into oblivion. Our bait fish production in the Panhandle has
been reduced 95% due to red tides and hurricanes. Many of the char-
ter boats have been severely damaged as well as some of our infra-
structure.
I think it is shameful how the commercial fishing industry is being
treated but my saying that doesn't mean a whit unless someone at
your level starts speaking out and ramping tip the bureaucracy to
help citizens in need.
I plan on writing you every Friday to give a report on whether any-
thing has been done to assist us or not for that week.
With deep respect I remain, ; ;,,,,. ..
Bob Jones, Executive Director
Southeastern Fisheries Assn.
1118-B Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
850-224-0612
www.southeasternfish.org


Early Spring
Registration

At GCCC

Early registration for the spring
2006 semester at Gulf Coast Com-
munity College will be conducted
November 28 to December 2, 2005
from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Thursday and 7:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m. on Friday in the Office
of Admissions and Records on
campus.
Early registration at the Gulf/
Franklin Center is 6 p.m. (EST)
Monday through Friday.
Early registration at the Tyndall
Air Force Base is November 16
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.rh., Monday
through Friday.
Registration for the North Bay
Center is November 28 to Decem-
ber 2 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day through Thursday and 8 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Friday.
All registration fees for the spring
term must be paid on or before
January 2, 2006. All day and
evening classes begin January 5,
2006. For more information, call
(850) 872-3892.

Seascope

Kingfish Tournament
Cancelled
For the second time this year we
have had to cancel the Kingfish
Tournament. At the October meet-
ing of the Board, it was decided to
permanently cancel this fund rais-
ing event for this year. In its place,
the Board is considering hosting
a midway or carnival type event


early next year. Various members
were assigned to investigate loca-
tions as well as available compa-
nies. The final decision will be
made at the November meeting.

Boat Parade of Lights
The annual Boat Parade of Lights
is scheduled for December 10,
2005. The Board is currently con-
sidering hosting a party after the
event. Members were assigned to
find a suitable location for the
party and to choose the three
judges for the event.
Florida Travel and Life magazine
plans a November/December is-
sue featuring boat parades across
Florida. We have been asked to
participate and have submitted
photographs and a short story of
our parade. Many thanks to Rod
Gasche for providing us with the
photos he has taken of this event
over the past four years.
Next meeting: November 14, 2005
at 6 p.m. at the Episcopal Church.


The Franklin Chronicle joins you and your community
in honoring those who have served our nation in the
past, and those who serve today, We salute you.


Sales
Associates
From Collins
Realty Attend
Annual Ret atid
To Share
Successes
Mason & Marilyn Bean and Ed &
Sandy Mitchem,' realtors, with
CENTURY 21 Collins Realty on St.
George Island, recently attended
the annual Century 21 Real Es-
tate LLC 'Top Agent Retreat", held
at the Hilton Waikoloa Village lo-
cated in Waikoloa, HI on August
26 28. The day and a half con-
ference provided the #1 & #2 Sales
Teams for the Century 21 north
and central Florida region the
chance to expand their real estate
knowledge with educational ses-
sions and network with peers from
CENTURY 21 offices from around
the nation.
Ken Jennings, all time champion
of the Jeopardy television game
show offered attendees a few
"Words of Wisdom from the Quiz
Master" as the events featured
guest speaker.
CENTURY 21 Collins Realty is a
full service real estate brokerage
company specializing in Residen-
tial, Commercial, Fine Homes,
and Recreational properties, lo-
cated at 60'E. Gulf Beach'Dr.: on
St. George Island, FL.


UMCOR
Relief Report:
Dennis And

Red Tide

The Franklin County United
Methodist Churches have received
money to provide assistance to
local residents who have lostjobs
and/or property because of Hur-
ricane Dennis or the red tide that
,followed. Dr. John Sink is coordi-
nating this relief effort. In a re-
'port dated October 22, Dr. Sink
shared the following information:
98 households representing 267
people have applied for assis-
tance. Forty-seven of those house-
holds are in Apalachicola and 51
in Eastpoint.
Some interesting demographics
he reported: 38% of the people
applying reported they had no
church affiliation, 66% are con-,
sidered low income, 35% unin-
sured or underinsured and 12%
were single parents. Following the
guidelines the pastors set, finan-
cial assistance in the amount of
$6,168.82 has been approved. The
money requested will go for rent
(43%), utilities (55%), and trans-
portation (2%). The relief volun-
teers were scheduled to receive
more applications this week. If you
are interested in helping with this
project please: do6tadt Rickd' ifsL1,'
Rushing.


Saluting Service And Sacrifice

By Congressman Allen Boyd (D-FL)
Each November 11th our country comes together to remember our,
veterans who have served and sacrificed in the name of freedom. These
men and women in uniform selflessly stood in harm's way as the
guardians of our most fundamental freedoms-life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness. With approximately 71,000 veterans in North
Florida alone, Veterans Day gives us the opportunity to express our
collective gratitude and appreciation for their noble service to our
country. We must also take this opportunity to renew our commit-
ment to the men and women who have worn the uniform in defense of
this great nation.
As a combat veteran myself, I understand the sacrifices veterans make
to defend our country. Leaving family and friends behind is not easy,
but protecting and serving America and all that it stands for makes
this a meaningful and noble sacrifice. Now is the time for the federal
government to recognize this sacrifice and fulfill our moral obligation
to those who have fought for freedom and democracy.
Unfortunately many government leaders have failed to keep the promise
we made to our veterans by inadequately funding veterans programs.
Earlier this year, the Administration laid out a budget proposal that
was about $338 million below what the Congressional Budget Office
estimated was needed for fiscal year 2006. While Congress rejected
the Administration's slight it is glaringly clear that this Administra-
tion does not have the best interests of our veterans at heart. Un-
questionably, difficult choices are before the public and Congress with
respect to the nation's budget priorities, and I have been a staunch
advocate for budget reform and fiscal responsibility. However, we can-
not promote fiscal restraint on the backs of the men and women who
serve our country.
Sadly, the funding problems for veterans programs do not stop there.
In June, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Jim Nicholson, acknowl-
edged that the Department of Veterans Affairs was short $1 billion for
covering veterans' healthcare needs this year. Congress was able to
close the funding shortage by providing $1.5 billion for veterans'
healthcare needs this year. However, these funds were appropriated
after much time and effort was spent connecting the VA's huge mis-
take, one that could have been avoided with appropriate candor and
accountability.
In addition to fighting for adequate funding for veterans programs, I
am also working to enact a new GI Bill of Rights for the 21st Century.
In 1944, we honored the Greatest Generation though a Bill of Rights,
and in each major military conflict since, we have honored the service
of our soldiers through a new GI Bill. The new GI Bill of Rights fo-
cuses.on improving veterans' healthcare, including mental healthcare.
to meet the needs of our returning troops, This bill would also end the
Disabled Veterans' Tax, which prevents disabled veterans from re-
ceiving military retiree and veterans' disability benefits concurrently.
I have workedwith my colleagues in Congress to score a partial repeal
Sof this tax, but the remainingdisabled military retirees should be
allowed to receive all of their promised benefits.
We must never shrink from our duty to care for America's defenders
We should be held accountablefoi~ our promises to them. By ending
the unfair taxes, on military families and disabled military retirees
and improving veterans' healthcare to keep up with the growing num-
ber of veterans, we can honor our veterans through action and tan-
gible assistance instead of empty words and promises. This Veterans
Day, as we show our respect for the men and women who bravely
answered the call to duty, let us also recognize their service by pro-
viding our nations' heroes with the respect, benefits and services they
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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


11 November 2005 Page 5


Briefs from Page 2

"This is just more evidence of how
they cut off our water supply and
kill our Bay," offered Mr. Putnal.
"The question is; do they have the
inventory of water up there and
in this type situation can they give
us some? They may not have any,
I don't know, but somebody needs
to find that out."
"Yeah, I can't speak to that ques-
tion, sir," responded Joe Shields,
"Do you have anybody who can
find out and give us some an-
swers?"
"It's possible ... Yeah ... I could
look into it for you."
"This is a basic question," asked
Mr. Crofton. "This Red Tide is the
reason the Bay is closed?"
"Yes sir."
"Okay, what is the problem with
the Red Tide? What does it do if
somebody eats the oyster?"
"Neurotoxin shellfish poisoning
can result from the consumption
of raw oysters that are laden with
that Red Tide toxin. When the
cells break apart they release a
toxin. If you eat a shellfish that
has that neurotoxin in it, you can
suffer from tingling sensations in
your hands and feet, a numbness
... it affects your nervous system;
that is why it is a neurotoxin,
There have been four related neu-
rotoxin shellfish poisoning this
past year. It does not kill you. but
it could. They have not reported
any deaths from it, but it could. It
is based on how much you eat, if
you consumed enough of it and
your previous or current medical
condition."
"That would be, probably a liver
ailment."
"Certainly, that could contrib-
ute..."
"So there have been four people
in Florida that were affected by
eating raw oysters?" continued
Mr. Crofton.
'That were reported."
"So as I see it, the Bay is closed
because of four people."
"No, the Bay is closed because the
National Shellfish Sanitation Pro-
gram, under the Food and Drug
Administration states that all
States dealing with shellfish har-
vesting have to have this rule-
these guidelines. They tell us that
it is 5000 cells per liter and mouse
units below twenty. The Food and
Drugs Administration manages all
States that deal with shellfish."
"Well who are they protecting?"


"The public."
'Those four people."
"The public."
"Well, we can go on and on, but
you know, if you use that logic
then you are trying to protect four
people who know that they have
a liver disease. And if they know
that they have a liver problem and
that (eating an oyster) is going to
affect them, that's their problem.
But if you use that logic, then the
government should stop people
rom manufacturing cars be-
cause, you know, when they get
onto the roads they are going to
get killed. Somebody could have
an accident, you know. (applause
from the audience) A lot more than
four a year." (In fact, traffic acci-
dents claim nearly as many
American lives each year, as were
lost in fifteen years of combat in
Vietnam--41,975 on average.)
"I think that there is a lot of cor-
ruption going on, interjected Mr.
Putnal, "I'll tell you why I'm say-
ing that. We have been lied to be-
fore. About four or five years ago
we went to Arizona. Everybody
was on our side before we got
there. But once we got there, our
own people from this State -
spoke out against us to try and
get us shut down. There is some
corruption in government, I know
that. I don't know where it is com-
ing from but eventually we will
find it."
"Joe, let me ask you a question,
so that I can understand it," asked
Ms. Sanders.
"You ain't goin' to understand it,"
advised Mr. Putnal.
"I know, I know, but let me ask it
anyway. (Laughter throughout the
audience) Your count is down?"
"In parts of the Bay, yes ma'am."
"You can not open up the Bay
until all the counts are down?"
"AND ... we get good meat
samples. It is a two fold test with
the neurotoxin."
"We've got a report here that says
(Bill Mahan's report from the IFAS
Extension) Red Tide is not even
present in two or three areas, very
low in another three areas, but
that's the Red Tide. You're saying
that it's the count in the meat. Is
that what you are saying?"
"That is the final test, yes. That is
what the public is going to con-
sume."
"Have you taken (meat tests) in
these areas where the Red Tide is
not present?"
"Yes. We have four meat sampling
stations throughout Apalachicola
Bay."


"And your meat samples are still
coming back with positive Red
Tide?"
"Yeah."
"If we could get more fresh water'
coming down the river wouldn't it
knock this Red Tide out?" asked
Mr. Mosconis once again.
"Sure ... yes ... absolutely."
"Don't you think that it is worth-
while pursuing that with the
Corps of Engineers?"
"Ah... Yeah. I said that I would do
that, sir. I will."
The discussion then turned to a
north wind blowing out the Red
Tide.
"That (allowing fresh water to
come down the river) worked be-
fore," offered Mr. Putnal who then
talked of the wind. "It blew for
three or four days at twenty miles
an hour out of the north (recently)
and the results that they gave,
from this office over here, was that
the count was double what it was.
That is telling me that it (the Red
Tide) is coming out of Tallahas-
see." (Laughter and applause from
the audience.)
"All I know is ... these people got
to get to work," admonished Ms.
Sanders.
"Well, if you can keep the Bay
closed long enough, everybody will
quit oystering then these people
can do whatever they want to,"
offered Mr. Putnal.
"Is there anything that we here at
the County Commission can do,
Joe?
"Ah, not that I can think of."
"Are we going to try to do this in-
dependent sampling?" asked Ms.
Sanders.
"Yes, we are. We are going to do
it, even if I have to pay for it my-
self," said Mr. Putnal, "And, Mr.
Shuler, I think that we ought to
look for a legal firm that we can
call on to go to work for us, be-
cause we've got to get this Bay
opened somehow, Look for the
best legal firm that you can find
that has already filed against the
State or the Federal government
-if you can,"
Dave McLain of the Riverkeeper's
organization volunteered to assist
in finding a second lab and work-
ing in cooperation with Mr.
Shields on gathering and coordi-
nating samples. This would be for
the purpose of double checking
Red Tide and oyster. meat
samples.
"We need to write a letter to these
people to get some water coming
down that river," Mr. Mosconis
repeated( .for a third time.


A motion was then made to write
a letter to the Corps of Engineers
to get more fresh water coming
down the river. The motion was
approved unanimously.
Speakers from the audience then
came forward,
"My name is Robert Millender and
I have been working on this bay
for the last forty-five years. What
they are doing to us right here is
absolutely ridiculous. For the last
hundred years we have been get-
ting oysters out of this bay and
we have never had a problem un-
til they opened that place up
there. Ever since they got there
we have had problems in this
bay."
"What place you talking about,
Robert?" asked Mr. Mosconis,
"That DEP out here where they
donate samples. We have never
had any problems; we have never
Heard of anybody dying until they
opened that place out there. Right
now, when Katrina hit New Or-
leans, they showed all that pollu-
tion and waste going into that bay
and the water out there-and they
have never shut down that bay out
there to oystering. They get those
oysters, bring them over here,
shuck them out, put them in
Apalachicola cans and sell them
off. That is not right. I have never
seen the water out here in our Bay
as green and as pretty as it was
this past week. They have Alliga-
tor point open for claiming. A clam
is just like an oyster. I think that
we are getting the run around and
something needs to be done. We
are getting tired of it. There are
people here who are fixin' to lose
their homes. That is not right!f'
"It's corruption, Robert," advised
Mr. Putnal. A second speaker
came to the podium.
"I called Mark Berrigan's office the
other morning, and they still don't
have the money to pay us for re-
laying. Last week we got paid for
one day from the week before. The
comptroller's office has not yet
sent the checks for the last two
weeks to us. Leroy (Hall) is going
to get lynched when he can't pay
everybody. Somebody needs to
step up the pace on that and see
if we can't get our money sent to
*us."
The conversation then turned to
the emergency SHIP Program re-
lief funds designed to help
oystermen with some of their bills
during this emergency. Mr. Mo-
ron (SHIP Coordinator) related
some of the problems he was fac-
ing and gave some reasons for the
slow processing and distribution
of these monies.
Several other members of the au-
dience repeated the complaints
" against the slow movement within


the SHIP program. It was noted
that many of the oystermen have
now been out of work for over four
months.
"We are working as fast as we
can," offered Mr. Moron. "There
are guidelines and we must fol-
low them. We have to verify all the
information from each individual.
It might seem slow, but I have to
be very careful in issuing any
money."
A representative of the Red Cross
then explained why their services
have also slowed. This was fol-
lowed by Ms. Sanders comment-
ing on not hearing any more about
emergency unemployment com-
pensation from representatives in
Tallahassee.
Mr. Moron (SHIP) was then asked
how many people he has been able
to help so far. He informed them
that they had helped approxi-
mately twenty to twenty-five with
utility bills and ten to fifteen with
mortgages. He went on to list sev-
eral other reason for the inability
to move things along more expe-
ditiously.
At this point a rather large gentle-
man spoke up from his seat in the
audience.
"I think that we ought to have an
Adopt an Oysterman program.
Then I could go over and live at
his house for a week," he said
unfolding one huge arm from his
chest and pointing a finger over
to Mr. Moron. "I'll bet after just a
day or two, he would be able to
get some of these people to get
some of this work done." The au-
dience erupted into laughter once
again. Another oysterman sug-
gested that if the salaries of all
those involved in dispensing this
emergency money were cut off
until they got the money dis-
pensed, it would all be done by
the morning.
Mr. Putnal closed off the discus-
sion by asking the question of how
they could be harvesting oysters
out in Louisiana with all the pol-
lution that has affected that area
from Hurricane Katrina.
"Why, if Katrina had struck here
in Apalachicola Bay we would
have been shut down here for the
next ten years," he said, 'This is
all just another example of gov-
ernment being so corrupt. They
are doing away with our seafood
industry. The mullet fishermen
here had to quit; the shrimpers
had to quit; the oystermen are in
trouble; now they're going to stop
the Grouper fishing so they can
haul this old rotten stuff from
South America and Mexico in
here."

Ambulance. Service
Two bids were made to the County
for emergency ambulance service.


One from the current provider
Emergystat and the other from.
Bay Medical Services of Panama
City.
Emergystat was considered first
by the Board, 'They have a sub-
sidy of $17,000 per month for two
paramedic units. twenty-four
hours a day, seven days a week,"
advised Alan Pierce. "So that is
$17,000 dollars per month ... Next
is Bay Medical. Bay Medical is
.slightly different. They are look-
ing at providing a management
service for a County run ambu-
lance service. Their annual bill is
$84,000. That would be to man-
age a County system. They are not
providing the employees. They are
proposing that the County hire the
employees. Their main proposal
would be for a County employed
system that would be managed by
Bay Medical, They would manage
the timing (for employees), the
maintenance, the billing, the am-
bulance system."
"I make the recommendation that
we turn this over to our commit-
tee for their recommendation
Healthcaree committee)," sug-
gested Mr. Mosconis. The motion
was approved.
Mr. Putnal then made a motion
to exempt the hospital from their
County property taxes for the next
two years. Mr. Mosconis sug-
gested that such a motion should
be tied in with the stipulation that
the hospital updated their rent
payments to the County. They
recently owe the County
140,000. "This is just something
to help relieve the financial bur-
den on these folks," suggested Mr.
Putnal. A number of additional
problems relating to the hospital
were then brought forward and it
was decided to withdraw the mo-
tion until more information was
gathered. It was suggested that
Mr. Lake the hospital administra-
tor be asked to appear before the
Board at the next scheduled meet-
ing.


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and are subject to change or cancellation (in whole or in part) without notice. Scenes may include artists' renderings and may be of locations or activities not on the property.The developer reserves the right to modify the plans, materials, features and amennies descnbed and depicted herein at any time without notice. No guarantee is made that the fea-
tures, amenities and facilities depicted by artists' renderings or otherwise described herein will be provided, or if provided, will be of the same type, size or nature as depicted or described. All home sites may be subject to setbacks, easements and other restrictions. St. Joe does not guarantee the obligations of unaffiliated builders who may build and JOE
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12.








Paop 6 11 November 2005


Eastpoint
Library Close

To Reality

By Sue Cronkite
A building for the bursting-at-the-
seams Franklin County Library
inches closer and closer to reality
irith each speech and request,
according to Eileen Annie Ball, li-
brarian. "We'll get there," she told
Philaco Woman's Club of
Apalachicola members recently.
"The momentum has begun, and
we hope it will keep rolling right
along."
If Ms. Ball sounds confident, she
has a right to be, according to
Joyce Estes, president of the
Franklin County Friends of the i
Library. "Since it was begun in
1992, the active programs
mapped out by her keep winning
national and state awards for their
effectiveness."
In describing the new library
building, to be constructed on Bay
Shore Drive in Eastpoint, Ms. Ball
said it is to be "large enough for
future expansion." The building is
to be located across from
Sportsman's Lodge, on 11 acres,.
which includes wetlands, with 4-
5 acres of buildable property. "We
want to build without messing up
the wetlands," said Ms. Ball.
"They're an environmental plus."
"We've been trying to buy Indian
Creek," she added. "We don't need
to wait, the land needs protect-
ing." When approached, Ben
Watkins said there is enough up-
T~nd for the new library. A match-
ing funds grant of $500,000 can
be.obtained, said Estes. Watkins
is selling the land to the library
for $150,000, then he will give the
money back to go toward the
matching grant, said Estes, "and
pay for the appraisal. We can't use
'the cost of the appraisal on the
matching grant."
The vision of the new library in-
cludes areas where kids can romp
along the swamp bank, with natu-
ral trails. "We're trying to get
people to give their wetlands back
to Indian Creek," said Estes. "I'm
in it for the long haul," she added.
"To me it's a God thing."
The new building is to have ac-
cess from Bay Shore Drive and
from Hickory Dip. "The backside
of the property goes up to Hickory
Dip," said Estes. In the plans are
nature walks mapped out by the
Estuarian Reserve. "We'll have a
park and an outdoor theatre," said
Ball. "We're looking for architects
who'll donate their work."
"Our library is used a lot by local
youngsters and adults and also by


many winter visitors from the is-
land," said Ball. "We're proud of
what we have," said Estes. "But
we must have more room. We
need money to get this building
off the ground."
As a part of the community, the
Franklin County Library admin-
isters several prize-winning pro-
grams, including one known by
the acronym FROG, which is
geared to family learning with the
aim to strengthen family bonds
and empower families to reach
their goals.
"Working in collaboration with the
library's award-winning WINGS
and FROG programs. TIGERS
provides youth ages 10-21 with
positive, motivating, educational,
cultural, and enriching activities
to inspire individual growth and
increase and improve awareness.
self esteem, life skills, basic skills,
employability and positive deci-
sion-making," said Ball.
"If that sounds like a mouthful,
the program, begun in 1994, is ba-
sically an effort to help prevent
teen pregnancy, and is adminis-
tered under a work-force grant,"
said Ms. Ball. She should know
how to encourage people to im-
prove their lives by reading and
learning, she has won national
awards for the library programs,
including being named national
"Library of the Year" by the New
York Times in 1992. With many
of those awards came money,
which is being used for the help-
ing efforts, said Ms. Ball.
"Right now, the primary focus of
the Friends of the Franklin
County Public Library, is to build
a next library in the town of
Eastpoint." said Ball. Joyce Estes
is president of the Friends, Chris-
tine Hinton is vice president, Cliff
Butler, treasurer, and Elaine
Rosenthall secretary. The youth
program fiscal agent for the
Friends include Butler, president;
Marian Morris, Vice President;
and Hinton, treasurer.
In addition toserving as the fiscal
agent for grant programs, the
Friends group, helps supplement
the library's budget, conduct
fundraisers, and provide support
for library-related activities.
Encouraged by the success of
building a new library in
Carrabelle, which began with a gift
of $50,000 by Jackie Gay, which
she won in a Paul Newman
gumbo-cooking contest, backers
of a new main library building are
making a major effort.
"We are bursting at the seams,"
said Ball. "We operate out of a
storefront building with 1700
square feet. The new building has
5,000 square feet. So much of the
library's growth has to do with the
programs." Evidence of the suc-
cess of the library youth and fam-


St. George Island
United Methodist Church

You ARE INVITED TO

SUNDAY WORSHIP 9:30A.M.


201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org Pastor: Ray Hughes


f 1irut raptist ECurd)
: St. George Island
'; 501 E. Bayshore Drive
,e 850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor
. Join us as we praise and
.worship the living Christ!

SSunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 7:00 p.m.
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


QW ~tcnr m~Rci~ &-Rortga~ i~- J0,


Allyn Jasper,
Realtor


Absolutely ~ lP I
Gorgeous!!!:
Fantastic view of the
Bay! One year old cus-
tom built. One of the
nicest homes in the area. MUST SEE THIS ONE!!! Custom cabi-
nets throughout the house! Elevator, generator. Lots of glass!
Screen porch. Deck off the master bedroom. $1,200,000.


Office: (850) 697-9000
Toll-Free: (800) 613-5962
Cell: (850) 899-0582


314 St. James Street
Carrabelle, FL 32322
Fax: (850) 697-4311


Medical News

You Can Use

From the Department of
Health and Human Services
Centersfor the Disease
Control and Prevention
National Immunization
Program

1. Why get vaccinated?
Influenza ("flu") is a very conta-
gious disease.
It is caused by the influenza vi-
rus, which spreads from infected
persons to the nose or throat of
others.
Other illnesses can have the.some
symptoms and are often mistaken
for influenza. But only an illness
caused by the influenza virus.is
really influenza.
2. Inactivated Influenza
vaccine.
There are two types of influenza
vaccine:
An inactivated (killed) vaccine,
given as a shot, has been used in
the United States for many years.

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU











TIrtnttv

850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A:M.
10:30 A.M.


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NOW OPEN IN CARRABELLE
LUNCH BUFFET Sun.-Fri.
SUPPER BUFFET Mon.-Fri.
HOBO'S ICE CREAM
1593 West Highway 98-Carrabelle
697-2776
"Wofth Driving 100 Miles For "
Open 6 days 11:00 a.m. 9:00 p.m.
Closed Tuesday
Thank you forgetting us serve you!


ily programs can be seen by visit-
ing the present library and watch-
ing the enthusiastic activities of
neighborhood youth.
Awards won by library-sparked
efforts include the Friends of Li-
braries USA national award for
dedication, commitment, and
support of a small public library,
and the American Public Library
Association's Excellence in Small
and/or Rural County Public Li-
brary Service Award.
Additional awards include the
American Library Association's
Excellence in Library Service to
Young Adults, which was listed
among the nation's top five library
youth programs, the Betty Davis
Miller Award for youth program
excellence, recognition from
Horizon's online magazine as one
of the top ten innovative libraries
in the United States, and recog-
nition from Florida Gov. Jeb Bush,
for providing outstanding family
literacy program services.


A live, weakened vaccine was li-
censed in 2003. It's sprayed into
the nostrils.
Influenza viruses are constantly
changing. Therefore, influenza
vaccines are updated every year,
and an annual vaccination is rec-
ommended.
For most people influenza vaccine
prevents serious illness caused by
the influenza virus. It will nor pre-
vent "influenza-like" illnesses
caused by other viruses.
3. Who should get
inactivated influenza
vaccine?
Influenza vaccine can be given to
people 6 months of age and older.
It is recommended for people who
are at risk of serious influenza or
its complications, and for people
who can spread influenza to those
at high risk (including all house-
hold members.):
People at high risk for complica-
tions from influenza:
*All children 6-23 months to age.
* People 65 years of age and older.
* Residents of long-term care fa-
cilities housing persons with
chronic medical conditions.
* People who have long-term
health problems with:
-heart disease -kidney disease
-lung disease -metabolic dis-
ease, such as diabetes
-asthma -anemia, and
other blood disorders
* People with certain conditions
(such' as neuromuscular disor-
ders) that can cause breathing
problems.
* People with a weakened immune
system due to:
-HIV/AIDS or other diseases af-
fecting the immune system
-long-term treatment with drugs
such as steroids
-cancer treatment with x-rays or
drugs








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A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


L.A 'q" v ,AA


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3771 Crawfordville Highway, 2 Miles South of Traffic Light, Crawfordville, FL
(850) 926-8215 or (850) 926-2664


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13 MONTH CDAPY*




13 MONTH CD i


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TREASURY

CHECKING


ALTHA 25463 NORTH MAIN STREET 850.762.3417
APALACHICOLA 58 4TH STREET 850.653.9828
BLOUNTSTOWN 20455 CENTRAL AVENUE WEST 850.674.5900
BRISTOL 10956 NW STATE ROAD 20 850.643.2221
CARRABELLE 912 NORTHWEST AVENUE A 850.697.5626
MEXICO BEACH 1202 HIGHWAY 98 850.648.5060
PORT ST. JOE 418 CECIL G. COSTIN JR. BOULEVARD 850.227.1416


*APY is Annual Percentage Yield. APYs are accurate as of 10/24/05. Fees may reduce account earnings.
For the 13 month CD, the minimum balance to obtain the stated APY is $500 and will require a checking or NOW account such as The Bank's Free
Checking or Treasury Checking accounts. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal.
For Treasury Checking, the minimum balance to open this account is $50. 3.25% Annual Percentage Yield (APY) will be paid on balances of
$50,000 and up; 2.75% APY on balances between $25,000 $49,999; 2.25% APY on balances between $5,000 $24,999; 0.15% APY on balances
less than $5,000. After account opening, the APY and interest rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Treasury Checking accounts are
limited to individuals and non-profit entities.


Email: allynj@florida-beach.com


* People 6 months to 18 years of
age on long-term aspirin treat-
ment (these people could develop
Reye Syndrome if they got influ-
enza).
* Women who will be pregnant
during influenza season.
People who can spread influenza
to those at high risk:
* Household contacts and out-of-
home caretakers of infants from
0-23 months of age.
* Physicians, nurses, family men-
tors, or anyone else in close con-
tact with people at risk of serious
influenza.
4. When should I get
influenza vaccine.
The best time to get influenza vac-
cine is in October or November.
Influenza season usually peaks in
February, but it can peak any time
from November through May. So
getting the vaccine in December,
or even later, can be beneficial in
most years.
5. Some people should talk
with a doctor before
getting influenza vaccine.
Some people should not get inac-
tivated influenza vaccine or
should wait before getting it.
* Tell your doctor if you have any
severe (life-threatening) allergies.
allergic reactions to influenza vac-
cine are rare.
-Influenza vaccine virus is grown
in.eggs. People with a severe egg
allergy should not get the vaccine.
-A severe allergy, to any vaccine
component is also a reason to not
get the vaccine.
-if you have had a severe reaction
after a previous dose of influenza
vaccine, tell your doctor.
* Tell your doctor if.you ever had
Guillain-Barre Syndrome (a se-
vere paralytic illness, also called
GBS). You may be able to get the
vaccine, but your doctor should
help you make the decision.


''


The Franklin Chronicle
6. What are the risks from
inactivated influenza
vaccine?
A vaccine, like any medicine,
could possibly cause serious prob-
lems, such as severe allergic re-
actions. The risk of a vaccine
causing serious harm, or death is
extremely small.
Serious problems from influenza
vaccine are very rare. Theviruses
in inactivated influenza vaccine
have been killed, so you cannot
get influenza from the vaccine.
7. What if there is a severe
reaction?
What should I look for?
* Any unusual condition, such as
a high fever or behavior changes.
Signs of a serious allergic reac-
tion can include difficulty breath-
ing, hoarseness or wheezing,
hives, paleness, weakness, a fast
heart beat or dizziness.
What should l do?
* Call a doctor, or get the person
to a doctor right away.
* Tell your doctor whatihappened,
the date and time it happened,
and when the vaccination was
given.
* Ask your doctor, nurse, or health
department to report the reaction
by filing a Vaccine Adverse Event
Reporting System (VAERS) form.
Or you can file this report through
the VAERS web site at
www.vaers.hhs.gov, or by calling
1-800-822-7967
VAERS does not provide medical
advice.
8. The National Vaccine
Injury Compensation
Program
In the event that you or your child
has a serious reaction to a vac-
cine, a federal program has been
created to help pay for the care of
those who have been harmed.


Continued on Page 7








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


11 November 2005 Page 7


By Sue Cronkite
Kids covered the playground at
the Apalachicola ABC Charter
School for the annual Fall Festi-
val. Huge air-filled slides, bounc-
ing moon-walk, hotdogs, cotton
candy, face-painting, and a tar-
get where students aimed a big
ball at the head of Principal Don
Hungerford were popular with
students, their younger brothers,
sisters, parents, and grandpar-
ents.
Youngsters removed shoes and
stood in line shoeless to climb
high and shoot down the huge


Art Little, St. George Island, poses with a bottle (
special BBQ sauce, named after a stuffed racoon, a
fund-raiser yard sale.


An interior view of the St. George Methodist Ci
fund-raiser for hurricane recipients in Mississ
Louisiana and southern Florida. The yard sale r
nearly $5000 on Saturday, October 29th.


Southern
Shrimp
Alliance
Welcomes
? ITC Decision
A Upholding

Tariffs
The Southern Shrimp Alliance
welcomes the unanimous deter-
S mination by the International
Trade Commission (ITC) that the
U.S. shrimp industry would con -
tinue to be injured by dumped
church imports of shrimp from India and
Thailand if antidumping duties
sippi, were removed.
raised
The ITC spent ten months inves-
tigating the ability of Thai and In-
dian companies to produce and,
export shrimp after the December
2004 tsunami and the effects of
these exports on U.S. shrimpers.
The, termination confirms that


of his
at the


popular slide. Ian Finch was a pic-
ture of pure bliss as he gnawed a
sucker. Principal Don Hungerford
hunkered down behind the target.
A group of boys gleefully pulled
back a giant slingshot to aim for
Mr. Hungerford's head, usually
missing. The face-painting table
was popular, with Victoria Nichols
sporting a painted butterfly face.
There were also witches, prin-
cesses, cats, and other creative
artwork painted on youngsters.
Ellie Finch takes her turn on a
regular, but highly exciting, slide
while another toddler and her fa-
ther watch.


antidumping duties will remain in
effect until companies in India and
Thailand and four other countries
engage in fair trade and stop
harmful pricing practices.
"The ITC properly concluded that
the tsunami did not significantly
impact the ability of the shrimp
industries in India or Thailand to
produce and export to this mar-
ket," stated Joey Rodriguez, Presi-
dent of the Southern Shrimp Alli-
ance. "While the Southern Shrimp
Alliance sympathizes with the tsu-
nami survivors, U.S. trade laws
must be enforced until violators
play by the rules of free trade."
In January 2005, the U.S. shrimp
industry won its antidumping
cases, confirming that the indus-
try has been injured by illegally
dumped shrimp imports from six
countries: Brazil, China, Ecuador,
India, Thailand, and Vietnam. The
year long investigation resulted in
trade-weighted antidumping du-
ties of 17.22 percent on shrimp
imports from the six countries


ST.JAMES
BA Y


Stress
Disorder
Workshop At

GCCC
The Lifelong Learning Office of
Gulf Coast Community College
will host a Post-traumatic Stress
Disorder (PTSD) workshop, spon-
sored by the department of Veter-
ans Affairs on November 18 from
9 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the Gibson
Lecture Hall on the second floor
of the Student Union East build-
ing.
The workshop is designed for
troops returning from Iraq and
Afghanistan, many of whom will
serve as National Guardsmen and
Reservists. The general informa-
tion about PTSD may also be ap-
plicable to other issues, such as
the trauma experienced by hurri-
cane evacuees.
Upon completion of this training,
participants will be able to iden-
tify the symptoms of PTSD, treat-
ment components of effective
PTSD therapy, format and struc-
ture of group based exposure. In
addition, medications to comple-
ment PTSD therapy will also be
discussed.


found to be in violation of U.S.
trade laws.
Between 2000 and 2003, the Gulf
and South Atlantic shrimp indus-
try and related businesses lost
$4.4 billion as the wholesale price
of dumped shrimp imports
dropped 31 percent. The U.S.
shrimp industry lost thousands of
jobs and hundreds of business as
it was forced to compete against
the unfair pricing of six countries.
Since antidumping duties have
been assessed on dumped shrimp
imports, U.S. shrimpers have seen
modest price increases. Imports
from non-target countries have
also increased supply to meet U.S.
demand for shrimp.




Mstetmet
subscibe o th


Bayside Realty Inc.
877-577-7177 Toll Free
850-697-3919 Phone
850-697-9607 Fax
Residential & Waterfront Properties.
Serving you in Wakulla and Franklin County.


This home sits in a quiet and scenic setting on the New River. 3B/ZBA split
plan with French doors leading to decKs off the master and guest bedroom. A
24xio' screen porch overlooks the river which leads to the Gulf of Mexico. The
house and I acre come with a docK and boat lift. House amenities include "on
demand" tankless water heater, oaK cabinets, vaulted tongue and groove ceilings,
and whirlpool tub in master bath. This acre offers 127 of river frontage. Adjacent
river front I acre tract also available for purchase. MLS#IO57q. $615,000.0o.
Freda White Moore--Licensed Peal Estate BroKer
Beth Barber-- ealtor
Petra "Pete" MyricK-P-ealtor
160 Laughing Gull Lane Carrabelle, FL 32322


The cost for the seminar is $20
for students with valid ID, $30 for
members of the Bay County Men-
tal Health Association or National
Association of Social Workers and
$40 for non-members. Three con-
tact hours are approved for clini-
cal social workers marriage and
family therapists, mental health
counselors and nurses.
For additional information, call
Sherrie Lock at (850) 872-3819.


J


*1
'i


Medical News from Page 6


For details about the National
Vaccine Injury Compensation Pro-
gram, call 1-800-338-2382 or
visit their website at
www.hrsa.gov/osp/vicp.
9. How can I learn more?
* Ask your immunization provider.
They can give you the vaccine
package insert or suggest other
sources of information.
* Call your local or state health
department.
* Contact the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC):
* Call 1-800-232-4636 (1-800-
CDC-INFO)
-Visit CDC's website at
www.cdc.gov/flu.







HAIR
HAIR 7
NAILS
PEDICURE SPA
WAXING
FACIALS
BODY WRAPS
TANNING
CONNIE ROEHR
NAILTECH
ANGELA CREAMER
STYLIST
407 HWY 98
EASTPOINT, FL 32328
850-670-5220
00ON
I 1


Fall Festival Draws Crowds Post-
To ABC School Traumatic


Board of County Commissioners
FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA


Debris Removal Policy

It shall be the policy of the Board of County Commissioners of Franklin County,
Florida, that Franklin County shall provide for right-of-way debris removal within
both the unincorporated and incorporated area of the county. Provided that resi-
dents in such areas place eligible debris within 15 feet of the curb (within the right-
of-way):

1. The following debris shall be ELIGIBLE for pickup by the county:
a) Yard Trash: Tree trimmings, bushes, leaves, grass clippings, pine straw, etc.
b) Yard Debris: Yard furniture, fences and broken lumber.
c) Household Goods: Rugs, furniture, small appliances, mattresses and
appliances such as refrigerators, freezers, stoves, washers and dryers.

2. The following debris shall be INELIGIBLE for pickup by the county, whether
placed or pushed to the curb by the property owner/resident or a private contrac-
tor:
a) Construction.Debris: Material used in the construction or repair of a
structure or building (shingles, cut boards, sheet rock, bricks, tin, etc.).
b) Demolition Debris: Material created by the physical deconstruction of a
structure or building (walls, roofing, flooring, concrete slabs, outbuildings,
etc.).
c) Land Clearing Debris: Flora debris from improved or unimproved residential
or commercial property including, but not limited to trees, shrubs, plants,
and other similar woody materials and vegetative matter severed from the soil.
d) Tree Cutting Debris: Debris created by the cutting and/or removal of trees,
limbs, stumps and soil.
e) Household Hazardous Waste: Paint, old gas, used oil, pesticides, lawn
chemicals, etc.
f) Special Waste: Used tires, old car batteries, car parts, abandon vehicles,
vessels and clothes.
g) Large Volume: Unreasonable amounts of debris from improved residential
property with a single family residence. A pile of debris, regardless of
eligibility that measure more than six (6) cubic yards or any piece or segment
of debris that exceeds four (4) feet in length or six (6) inches in diameter.

3, The removal of ineligible debris shall be the responsibility of the property
owner/resident and it shall be promptly removed and transported to the Franklin
County Central Landfill, on State Road 65, Eastpoint, Florida for final disposal.

4. Residents are encouraged to utilize Amnesty Days at the Landfill every third
Wednesday of the month and Yard Trash Amnesty every Monday.

Date Adopted: November 1, 2005
Effective Date: November 1, 2005


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Page 8 11 November 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


FFlorida Classified


FC 1N Advertising Network


Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience

of 1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!


The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper

with the FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-1687, fax: 850-670-1685.


Announcements -

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read DIANETICS by Ron
L. Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send 57.99 to Dianetics,
3102 N. Habana Ave., Tampa FL 33607.


Auctions


Auction-Magnolia Plantation, 5900'/- acres, near Albany,
GA. Income producing, hunting preserve, abundant water.
irrigated ro.crops, pecan orchards. Saturday. November26,
10 a.m. Rowell Auctions, Inc. (800)323-8388
w-vw rowellauctions con GAL AU-C002594.
OCALA COM/RES. High visibility & desirable locations.
501 Spring Lake Rd. & 103 SE Tuscawilla Ave. Tranzon
Driggers Walt Driggers, Lic. Real Estate Broker
(877)347-4437.
EstatcAnction 170+/-Acres. Outstanding agricultural tract.
Merchantable timber. Colquitt Co., GA. November 17, 10
a.m. 10%B:P. Rowell Auctions, Inc. (800)323-8388
www rowellauctions com GAL AU-C002594.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE SSS Buy Direct From Manu-
facturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick turn
around! Delivery Available Toll Free (888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

ALL CASII CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines, Free Candy All for S9,995. (888)629-9968
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A CASH COW! 90 VENDING MACHINE UNITS/ YOU
OK LOCATIONS ENTIREBUSINESS -S10,670 HURRY!
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Health

OXYGEN USERS: Enjoy freedom! Travel without canis-
ters, Oxlife's lightweight.Oxygen concentrators run offyour
car & in your home. U.S.A.- made Warranteed
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HelpWanted

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced Drivers, O0O, Solos. Teams &
Graduate Students. Bonuses Available. Refrigerated Now
Available. (888)MORE PAY (888-667-3729).
CDLA OTR DRIVERS TEAMS .50 CPM SOLOS .34
CPM 100% DROP & HOOK HEALTH BENEFITS AS-
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IIAZMAT & DOUBLES (321)202-4406.
ACT NOW DRIVERS- Flatbed, Bulk Tank and Refriger-
ated Divisions Performancebased pay. Experienced Opera-
tors Independent Contractors or Company Drivers. CDL
Instruction Program available. (800)771-6318.

92 cpm + fuel surcharge, Zero Down Lease Purchase SI
Buyout. No Credit Check. Pete's Freightliners, KW &
Internationals. No I laz Mat Required. CALL (800)528-3675.
S/E & 3-State Run: T/T Drivers. HOME WEEKENDS.
Mileage Pay, Benefits, 401K. Trainees Welcome. Miami
area- exp. req. 21 minage/Class-ACDL Cypress Truck Lines
('800)545-1351.
Driver- NOW HIRING QUALIFIED DRIVERS for
Central Florida Local & National OTR positions. Food grade
tanker, no hazmat, no pumps, great benefits, competitive pay
& new equipment. Need 2 years experience. Call Bynum
Transport for your opportunity today. (800)741-7950.
.MOVIE EXTRAS, ACTORS & MODELS! Make Si5-
S250/day. All ages and faces wanted! No exp. Required. FT/
PT! (800)851-9046.
Now Hiring for 2005 Postal Positions S17.50-S59.00+/hr.
Full Benefits/Paid Training and Vacations No Experience
Necessary (800)584-1775 Reference# 5600.
5600 WEEKLY Working through the government part-
time. No Experience. A lotofOpportunities. (800)493-3688
Code J-14.


Legal Services


DIVORCES275-S350*COVERS children, etc. Only one
signature required! *Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000. ext.600. (8am-7pm) Alta Divorce, LLC.
Established 1977.


GENERAL CONTRACTORS
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Tractor Work
*Aerobic Sewage Treatment Systems
Marine Construction
Septics Coastal Hauling


Miscellaneous

EARN DEGREE online from home. *Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Computers. Job Placement Assistance. Com-
puter & Financial aid if qualify. (866)858-2121
www onlinetidewatertech corn

Real Estate

NEW LOG CABIN-NC Mountains. Newshell on secluded
mountain site. S89,900. Hardwood forest. Great fall colors.
Paved road. Near parks & lakes. Acreage & financing
available. (828)247-0081.
WESTERN North Carolina Mountains Cool Air, Views,
Streams, Homes, Cabins, Acreage FREE BROCHURE OF
MOUNTAIN PROPERTY (800)642-5333.Realty OfMurphy
317 Peachtree St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www reallyofmurphy com
BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. ESCAPE THE
SIEAT IN THE COOL BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL MOUN-
TAINS OF WESTERN NC. Homes, Cabins, Acreage &
Investments. Cherokee Mountain Realty GMAC Real Estate,
Murphy wvw cherokeemountainreally com Call for Free
Brochure(800)841-5868.
Tennessee Waterfront Sale! 2.4 Acre Waterfront 59,900!
Dockable Building Lots from $14,900! Cabin Package
S54,900. Call Now! (866)770-5263 Ext. 8.
WIIITEWATER LIVING IN TE I TENNESSEE
SMOKIES Gated Waterfront Community Riverfront and
Mountain Views Available, Prices Starting Lowas $46.900.
Final Phase Limited Lots Call Now! No Closing Costs.Buy
Direct From Developer SAVE TI OUSANDS SSS
(800)559-3095 ext 327 vswwv riverrerst corn *Sonic rcstric-
tions apply.
NEW MEXICO -20 acres S24,990 Scenic region, views,
canyons, trees, rolling hills, wildlife. Enjoy hunting, hiking,
horses, great climate. Power, great access. 100% financing
Call (914)232-5100.


NC. IOUNTAINS 2.87 acres on mountain top, view, trees,
waterfall & large public lake nearby, pa ed private access,
S19,500 owner (866)789-8535 ww.NC77.com.


TENNESSEE/KENTUCKY LAKEFRONT LAND New
community on the TN/KY border. Just 1-1;2 hours to
Nashville. Spectacular views of Lake Barkley. I to 6 acres
from the S40s. No time requirement to build. Call
(866)3394966.


Real Estate

TENNESSEE MOUNTAIN ACREAGE New lakeside
community close to Chattanooga & Knoxville. Community
lake access, boatrampand amenities. Limited number private
boat slips. 1/2+ acres from S30k. Call (866)292-5769.
ASHEVILLE NC AREA-MOUNTAIN ACREAGE Spec-
tacular gated riverfront mountain community bordering
Pisgah Nat'l Forest. 1-8 acre building sites ffom the S50s.
Community lodge/ recreation center & river walk. Call
(8661292-5762.
Coastal Georgia gated community, deep water access,
ancient oak trees, golf, tennis, proposed pool and fitness I
acre homesiies from the mid 70's. (877)266-7376.
WWW COOPERSPOINT COM
PanamaCity Beach, FL Hibiscus-OverlookingSt. Andrews
Bay Brand New 2 two-bedroom condos S425,000 orboth for
5770,000- Make offer Immediate 5100.000 equity
wwvw beachclubinvestments com (877)BCI-5020.
Pre-construction condos and Land opportunities. IM-
MEDIATESIX-FIGUREEQUITY units available. (Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, Texas, Nevada)
wwv beachclubinvestments com (877)BC1-5020 Financing
Options www allpointe com FREE NO Obligation Finan-
cial Analysis.
North Carolina Gated Lakefront Community 1.5 acres
plus, 90 miles of shoreline. Never before offered with 20%
pre-development discounts, 90% financing. Call
(800)709-5253.

Steel Buildings

BUILDING SALE! "Last Chance!" 20x26 Now $3995.
25s30, 55700 30x40, S8300. 40x60, S12,900. Many
Others Meets 140 M.',ll. higher available. One end
included Pioneer (800)668-5422.

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Foundation Pilings
Commercial Construction
Utility Work-Public &
Private


Marshall Marine

Fiberglass & Transport

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FIBERGLASS & MARINE SUPPLIES
FIBERGLASS REPAIRS & PAINTING
7205 S.E. Ave. B Highway 98 Carrabelle
850-697-3428 www.bodlhinsport.net




CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE


Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b)


File No.


Date of this Notice 10/17/05 Invoice No. *10257
Description of Vehicle: Make Toyota Model Camry Color Gold
TagNo.NoTag Year 1993 State FL VinNo. 4T1SK12E5PU313206


To Owner: Adrienna Nelson
692 C.C. Land Road
Eastpoint, FL 32328


To Lien Holder:


You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
10/25/05 at the request of Mr. Millender that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 230.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien
of the lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 11/24/05 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of
the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay
the charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


NEW Opbional
Mulri-CD Changer


Presenting the acclaimed Bose" Wave music system:
* Forbes FYI says, "you'll think you're 'Excitement Guarantet
listening to a...sound system that for 30 days, risk free.
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e lets you listen

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ivative products at:
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02005 Bose Cporatan. Palent rights issued and/i hencrln, le Ls)noti design Is also a renlstered Irdemark ol Bose Corporation, nanng and fren
shiprng oiler nol lo be crnled with any other onter or aplied to p evlas purchases, and subject to change without notice. isk Iree refers lo 30-day Irial 1
only and does not induce reum shining. Delivery is subject to produd aMilatbllly Quoe rein rdnied wt i erriss in: Thons Jackson. Fbers FW, Wiler 2M)4.

CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 10/25/05 Invoice No. 12349
Description of Vehicle: Make Lincoln Model Town Car Color Silver
Tag No. No Tag Year 1996 State FL VinNo. ILNLM81WZRY772485

To Owner: Roger V. Crowford To Lien Holder:
82 Market Street, Apt. A
Apalachicola, FL 32320


You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
10/25/05 at the request of Buy Rite Drug that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 230.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien
of the lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 11/30/05 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of
the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay
the charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


Penelope's Pet Stop

PROFESSIONAL FURMINATOR
PET GROOMING SHED-LESS
?. AND PET SITTING TREATMENT


45 MarketStreet Apalachicola, FL 32320
ACROSS FROM THE GIBSON INN
850-323-0036 850-653-2257 penelpeepetstop@aoL.com



R MS N "MAINE
|\l VI' M SSUPPLY, INc.
81'ECr ELECTRONICS Adult & Children's Boots Anchor Retrieval
o Systems Rope Frozen Bait Team Fish
ICOM RADIOS Line Deep Sea & Flat Rods and Reels *
FURUNO Live Bait and Crab Traps Fishing Tackle *
GARMIN Fiberglass & Paint Supplies Trailer Parts












850-926-6181
Ir f#I///A PERFORMANCE SPRAY-ON BED LINERS
FULL LINE OF
WREC* HECKn AUTO ACCESSORIES
3140 COASTAL HWY.
WWW.MIKESPAINTANDBODY.COM CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327


MARINE SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES TRAINED MECHANICS

O YAMAHA

MIKE'S MARINE SUPPLY
P.O. BOX 429 HWY. 98 PANACEA, FL 32346
PHONE: (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693 FAX: (850) 984-5698
www.mikesmarine-panacea.com
HOURS: MON., TUES., THURS., FRI: 8:00 6:00
WED.: 8:00 1:00 SAT.: 8:00 5:00
PRO-LINE GHEENOE BOSTON WHALER
PONTOON BOATS SEA PRO G-3



....ggg Cook f 3

SInsurance
SdaAGENCY

A Gulf State Community Bank Company
www.cookinsuranceagency.com
SAveueE (800) 822-7530 W .Avue A
73 Avenue-E .'. 2 /,, '"' ",05 N\V Avetue A '
Apalachicola, FL ( ..) Carrabelle, FL
(850) 653-9310 (850) 697-3473
SERVING THE COAST SINCE 1913



UPHOLSTERY UNLIMITED

Furniture Repair & Upholstery

25% OFF
II
with this coupon only


S850-926-2746
L--------------J
I ________--


IXIE '
THEATRE


A Not For Profit
Theatre


----' APALACHICOLA, FL .

& Garlick
Environmental
Associates
Presents

The 3rd Annual Apalachicola

Jazz, Elues & rl k festival
with the


Saturd


Tem Stewart Jazz Trio

lay, November 12 at 8:00 p.m. -
Tickets $20 for Reservations call -
850-653-3200
www.dixietheatre.com S4
Schedule subject to change


RECREATIONAL VEHICLE
FOR SALE


Im_ I


1992 Georgie Boy, 33 feet long with Ford V-8
engine at 46,000 miles, in very clean condition.
Shown at 33 Begonia Street, Eastpoint. Sleeps
five; microwave stove, gas operated stove, color
TV, refrigerator plus the usual shower/toilet
amenities; lots of cabinet space. Four extra tires.
$16,000.


9 I


~
CS~


. r"










The- Franrkin C'hroniclP


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


11 November 2005 Page 9-


Timmons General Merchandise

MINI DOLLAR STORE

850-926-6173

Store Hours: Monday Saturday: 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

3336 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL

ACROSS FROM GULF COAST LUMBER
11-11/11-25


r--- ----------------- q

I Affordable Family Photography I
I 850-670-5004 or 850-323-0464

GRAND OPENING SPECIAL!
I I
ONLY $25 WITH THIS AD

2 5x7s and 9 wallets
IMust call for appointment

347 Highway 98 Next to Eastpoint Post Office
10-14/10-28/11-11/11-25
1._-----------------J






PUBLIC AUCTION

Prime Building Materials-NOV. 12, 2005
Osceola Heritage Park/County Fairgrounds, Kissimee, FL

HUGE AMOUNT OF SHINGLES: GAF, OwensCoring, Tamko, CertainTeed, Elk
100's of WINDOWS: Simonton, Metal Industries, hundreds to choose from
FLOORING: Marble and Travertine Tile; HARDWOOD FLOORING
CLAY ROOFING TILE: Monier, Lifetile and Hudson. Various colors
SIDING: By Wolverine; HARDWOOD DECKING
CEMENTS AND COATINGS: By Tropical and Karnak
ROOFING FELTS: GAF, Johns Manville, Tamko
ROOFING MEMBRANES: GAF, Johns Manville, Tamko, Polyglass
ROOF LOUVERS AND VENTS: GAF, Solar Group, Lomanco
SAUNAS, STEAM SHOWERS, SHOWER ENVIRONMENTS
Visit Our Website www.peakauction.com
To Pre-Register, View Updates, Maps & Directions to Site!
GATES OPEN'AT 8:00 A.M.; AUCTION STARTS 9:00 A.M.
PREVIEW FRIDAY, NOV. 11 FROM 12-6:00 P.M.
TERMS: Buyer's Premium. Checks and Credit Cards welcome. For exact terms call (816) 474-1982 or visit
our website. Sale day selections take precedence over all written material.
All purchases must be removed by NOON, Monday, November 14, 2005.
Please be advised that the auction is not a.safe place for small children.

,4" ]A 1 Phone: 816-474-1982; Fax 816-474-4405
PE A www.peakauction.com
AUTONEERIN PeakAuctioneeringAB2108
AUlJUIO-NEEIIi Richard PeakA U1229; Phil GraybillAU2852
BUILDING MATERIAL SPECIALISTS






Now is the time to

subscribe to the


FRANKLIN


CHRONICLE

The Chronicle is published every other Friday.
Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County
are $16.96 including taxes for one year, or 26
issues. The out-of county rate is $22.26 in-
cluding taxes.


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The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronice pages is an
efficient way to promote your business to the public and save money
at the same time. These ads are strictly business cards magnified
to 2 columns by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two
insertions. Send your business card or copy to: Franklin Chronicle,
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Ru orA ttwd


2x2 Rates
Statewide $1200
Regional or National
Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


2x4 Rates
Statewide $2400
Regional Placement
also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


Want to purchase minerals

and other oil/gas interests.

Send details to :

P.O. Box 13557

Denver, Colorado 80201


UAMAKNOCKERS





aMOKRN tqOOD



Phone: 850-926-4737* Fax: 850-926-4750
3123 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 11-11/11-25


Pay The County Bills

$790,120.52 was dispensed by the Franklin County Commission at
the October 31, 2005 meeting. Here is the list of bills supplied by the
Finance Office.


ACS GOV'T FINANCIAL SYSTEM
10/31/2005 15:


,^ TRUECGr


The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits,_Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE







Scientists report that ZYPRE@A has been associated with
ideelopigit Diabetes. Death, ,Hy Xglyce.ita,. .taocidops,
land/or Pancreatitis. As,.a- result the man-ufacturer,.:has:;
announced a proposed settlement. Call us today toll free at
1-877-746-4369 to discuss youir potential ZYPREXA claim.
Available 7 Days a Weekl
THE FOX LAW FIRM.P.C. 1-877-RING-FOX
Principal Office-Dallas, Texas
WWW FOXF1RM COM
Consult your physician before discontinuing any medication
Zyprexais a registered trademark of Eli Lilly and Company


I~


C-Af4 i^H s As seen


FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T. .

ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS


(800) 794.7310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW

for Structured Settlements!


Advertisement

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Franklin Chronicle
Post Office Box 590
Eastpoint, Florida 32328
850-670-1687


Check Register


BANK VENDOR
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
.03822 A.I.A.T.C.
'002366 ALLEGRA PRINT & IMAGING
001670 ALLTEL
.03823 AMC MORTGAGE SERVICES
002172 APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE
002281 ARAMARK
001536 BAKER JR./WILBURN L.
000554 BAY MEDIA SERVICES
002414 BLACKLIDGE EMULSIONS INC
.000194 BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD 0
,002420 BOATWRIGHT/SHAWN
002418 BROWN/ALLISON
000547 C.W. ROBERTS CONTRACTING
002404 CABBAGE GROVE MINING CO
.03824 CAPITAL CITY BANK
.03825 CAPITAL CITY BANK
001994 CAPITAL TRUCK. INC.
002290 CLARK-MUNROE TRACTOR CO
001448 COMMERCIAL SUPPLY
001734 COMP USA, INC.
000643 CROOM'S INC
002340 CROWN TROPHY DOTHAN
002422 D & T VENTURES
001849 DELL MARKETING L.P.
000442 DEPT OF AGRICULTURE & CO
002300 DEWADE/CLARENCE
.03826 EMERALD COAST FEDERAL
002265 FIRST CALL TRUCK PARTS I
001259 FLEET SUPPLY
001921 FLORIDA COMBINED LIFE IN
000832 FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC HEALTH
; 002284 G&N PAINTING '
.001830 GANDER.AUTO PARTS
000184 GIBBS/IORIS S.- -. "
.03827 GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC
001900 GT COMMUNICATIONS '
002285 GULF COAST AGGREGATES LL
.03828 GULF STATE
001358 HARBOR ELECTRIC SUPPLY,
000635 HARRIS,JR./JAMES A.
002417 HICKS/SABRINA
000395 HOLLEY, INC.
000273 HUNT INSURANCE GROUP
000144 J. V. GANDER DISTRIBUTOR
002329 JOHNSON/MARCIA M.
.03829 KAREN SYKES
000211 KETCHUM, WOOD & BURGERT
001805 KING'S PLUMBING
002038 LATHEM TIME SYSTEMS
000429 LEITZ & REED OFFICE PROD
001503 LIBERTY COMMUNICATIONS
001600 LOCKLEY JR/NOAH
002419 LOCKLEY/BELINDA
00Q149 MILLER MARINE, INC.
002330 MOCK/MIKE
001440 MOORE'S BACKPLOW TECHNIC
002406 MORON, MICHAEL
002390 NATIONAL ASSN OF COUNTIES
002358 NORTHRIDGE APPRAISAL COM
000286 OFFICE OF THE STATE ATTO
002136 OLLIE HARRELL'S TIRE SER
.03830 ORIGEN FINANCIAL LLC
.03831 ORIGEN FINANCIAL LLC
002421 PAGE/LISA
002423 PANHANDLE KEY & SAFE
002160 PAUL'S PEST CONTROL, INC
002103 POUNCEY/PAtjLA
.03832 PROGRESS ENERGY INC
001972 QUALITY WATER SUPPLY
002374 RAMSEY'S PRINTING PRODUCE
002394 REDDY ICE-ALBANY
00241.5 RENTAL MAX
000168 RING POWER CORPORATION
002405 ROBIN JONES TRUCKING COR
002410 RUNDEL/MICHAEL
000217 SCOTT/WILLIAM E.
000729 SHULER/THOMAS M.
000132 SPIRIT SERVICES COMPANY
001642 ST.JOE RENT-ALL, INC.
001929 STANDARD INSURANCE COMPA
002186 SUWANNEE RIVER SUPPLY, I
000175 TAYLOR'S BUILDING SUPPLY
001851 TERMINIX
000205 THE APALACHICOLA TIMES
001269 TIRE DISPOSAL SERVICES
000241 TOMMY'S GLASS & MIRROR C
002278 URS CORPORATION
.03833 VANDERBILT MORTGAGE
002416 VARNER PLUMBING INC
001036 VIKING OFFICE PRODUCTS
002215 WARD INTERNATIONAL TRUCK
001725 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF PC
000179 ZEE MEDICAL SERVICE COMP
GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
FUND RECAP:
FUND DESCRIPTION

001 GENERAL FUND
120 FINE AND FORFEITURE
137 FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC LIBRARY
140 ROAD AND BRIDGE
141 LOOT ROAD PAVING
142 MOSQUITO CONTROL
170 AIRPORT FUND
180 AFFORD.HOUSING ASSIST TRUST
TOTAL ALL FUNDS


BANK RECAP:
BANK NAME .4
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
TOTAL ALL BANKS


FRANKLIN COUNTY,
GL540R-V06.60 PAGE 1


CHECK DATE

33591 11/01/05
33592 11/01/05
33593 11/01/05
33594 11/01/05
33595 11/01/05
33596 11/01/05
33597 11/01/05
33598 11/01/05
33599 11/01/05
33600 11/01/05
33601 11/01/05
33602 11/01/05
33603 11/01/05
33604 11/01/05
33605 11/01/05
33606 11/01/05
33607 11/01/05
33608 11/01/05
33609 11/01/05
33610 11/01/05
33611 11/01/05
33612 11/01/05
33613 11/01/05
33614 11/01/05
33615 11/01/05
33616 11/01/05
33617 11/01/05
33618 11/01/05
33619 11/01/05
33620 11/01/05
33621 11/01/05
33622 11/01/05
33623 11/01/05
33625 11/01/05
33626 11/01/05
33627 11/01/05
33628 11/01/05
33629 11/01/05
33630 11/01/05
33631 11/01/05
33632 11/01/05
33633 11/01/05
33634' 11/01/05
33635 11/01/05
33636 11/01/05
33637 11/01/05
33638 11/01/05
33639 11/01/05
33640 11/01/05
33641 11/01/05
33642 11/01/05
33643 11/01/05
33644 11/01/05'
33645 11/01/05
33646 11/01/05
33647 11/01/05
33648 11/01/05
33649 11/01/05
33650 11/01/05
33651 11/01/05
33652 11/01/05
33653 11/01/05
33654 11/01/05
33655 11/01/05
33656 11/01/05
33657 11/01/05
33658 11/01/05
33659 11/01/05
33660 11/01/05
33661 11/01/05
33662 11/01/05
33663 11/01/05
33664 11/01/05
33665 11/01/o05
33666 11/01/05
33667 11/01/05
33668 11/01/05
33669 11/01/05
33670 11/01/05
33671 11/01/05
33672 11/01/05
33673 11/01/05
33674 11/01/05
33675 11/01/05
33676 11/01/05
33677, 11/01/05
33678 11/01/05
33679 11/01/05
33680 11/01/05
33681 11/01/05
33682 11/01/05
33603 11/01/05


AMOUNT


30.00
554.36
221.19
1,309.97
97.37
136.81
150.00
3,766.67
48.00
75,362.86
395.00
395.00
27,823.26
1,152.70
1,461.70
2,000.00
481.82
1,800.00
236.89
39.99
14,200.00
70.37
33,100.00
4,507.94
1,122.69
210.00
1,011.08
329.00
304.71
7,086.98
,184.00
1,837.50
,.,740.01
"--18, 457.00
2,000.00
63.88
9,485.28'
2,000.00
486.70
41,724.00
395.00
721.00
1,657.26
20,895.48
27,047.00
2,000.00
1,858.69
S225.00
62.57
08.93
689.50
61.65
'395.00
657.33
404,574.00
150.00
37.04
380.00
400.00
1,660.91
105.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
453.75
149.90
60.00
205.00
3,520.61
55.75
60.00
88.00
5,688.50
2,539.14
4,292.01
244.32
213.96
6,264.00
417.77
68.90
576.00
407.52
1,495.46
271.00
80.00
1,653.00
405.38
29,354.42
2,000.00
105.00
860.09
1,263.08
824.17
237.70
790,120.52


DISBURSEMENTS
211,123.50
445,094.78
1,549.40
51,322.16
27,823.26
163.85
29, 38442
23,659.15
790,120.52



DISBURSEMENTS

790,120.52
790,120.52


25 years of experience

making dreams come true.

Let us help you find the property of your

dreams in the St. George Island and

Apalachicola Bay area.

m J lm "-& ,' :. . .. .. .


1155 'a","a'a" "--- s -, ,
Apalachicola: Investment/Starter Home. 2 Shorewood Court, Apalachicola:
Newer home in quiet neighborhood cur- Cozy Apalachicola cottage near the
rently leased long term. Good invest- water. Features include 2BR/2BA, heart
ment. MLS#105521. $135,500. pine floors, large front porch, and more.
MLS#107458. $190,000.

"New Look, Same People"
Suncoast Realty & Property Management, Inc.
224 Franklin Boulevard St. George Island, FL 32328
800/341-2021 850/927-2282 www.uncommonflorida.com


QUALITY DOCKS & BOAT LIFTS Soup Kitchen
Marine Construction Specialist Since 1967 Offered Each
e- ef^ Environmental P t t s

Monday

Each Monday from 3 to 9 p.m.,
the Wheelhouse Raw Bar in
50-670-DOCK (3625) nApalachicola is providing a free
meal to local residents who are in
187 Hwy. 98 Eastpoint need. The "soup kitchen" is re-
questing food and health item (no
License #04-0104 money) donations to help with this
--.--- ------ much needed project. The list of
needed items includes: spaghetti
STJOHN'C Licensed & Insured sauce, cheddar cheese, elbow
J IH. S RG0050763 noodles, hamburger meat, self-
CO STR CTIN RC0051706 rising flour, lard, milk, Kool-aid,
CONSTRUCTION C00576 water, juice, sugar, green beans,
corn, fruit, butter, cups, plastic
Quality Craftsmanship For Over 40 Years tableware, plates, toothpaste,
SERVING FRANKLIN COUNTY SINCE 1982 toothbrushes, diapers, shampoo,
soap, sanitary supplies, clothes,
Specializing in Custom Homes-Remodeling washing soap, bleach, and vita-
mins. Contact Melanie Covell
Additions-Repairs-Vinyl Siding (653-3692) or Shannon Allen
50-6 7-237 (370-6274) for further informa-
50-697-2376 ,- T ,,, tion.


P.O. Drawer JJ Carrabelle, FL 32322
ax:697-4680


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SHOP NOW0


The St. Joe Company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle


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(317) Green Empire, The St. Joe Company and the
Remaking of Florida's Panhandle. By Kathryn Ziewitz
and June Wiaz. The St. Joe Company owns nearly one
million acres, mainly in northwestern Florida, where un-
developed coastal and riverside landscapes boast some
of the state's most scenic and ecologically diverse areas.
The company is a powerful force in the real-estate devel-
opment of northwest Florida, with access to the most in-
fluential people in government. In Green Empire, Kathryn
Ziewitz and June Wiaz explain how St. Joe is poised to
permanently and drastically alter the landscape, envi-
ronment, and economic foundation of the Panhandle, the
state's last frontier.
Based on hundreds of sources-including company ex-
ecutives, board members, and investors as well as those
outside the company-this factual and objective history
describes the St. Joe Company from the days of its
founders to the workings and dealings of its present-day
heirs. For all readers concerned with land use and growth
management, particularly those with an interest in
Florida's fragile wildlife and natural resources, Green
Empire will generate important debate about an often-
overlooked part of the state and will invite public scru-
tiny of its largest landowner.
-"Green Empire is written for those interested in natural
history, planning, and Florida's history and for those, like
us, who simply want to peek ahead to imagine the future
Florida Panhandle. Readers with an interest in Florida's
wildlife and natural resources will find attention paid to
the Panhandle as a center of biodiversity and to implica-
tions of developing real estate in such an area. Followers
of the stories of Disney and Arvida will find common play-
ers and patterns in the St. Joe story, and those inter-
ested in neotraditional or "New Urbanist" planning maybe
interested to see how these principles are faring in
Florida's latest real estate frontier. Students of Florida's
political history will find the St. Joe story an important
part of understanding how the state came to look the
way it does demographically and physically.
"Green Empire draws on the combined tradition of envi-
ronmental and corporate histories. Its target audience is
Floridians, especially residents of Northwest Florida. But
because the state is such a tourist mecca, we hope it will
also find a wider than regional audience. To some extent,
Florida is a state that belongs to all Americans, and many
non-Americans, because her natural heritage and built
environment together draw so many and probably always
will."
University of Florida Press, 2004, 364 pp. Hardcover.
Sold nationally for $34.95. Bookshop price=$32.00.


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Sturned.


(318) Home To War, A His-
tory of the Vietnam Vet-
erans' Movement. By
Gerald Nicosia. An epic nar-
rative history that chroni-
cles, for the first time, the
experience of America's
Vietnam veterans who re-
turned home to fight a dif-
ferent kind of war.
The courageous Americans
who served in Vietnam
fought two wars: one on the
other side, of the world and
one when they returned
home. The battle abroad
took place in war-scarred
Asian hamlets, rice Daddies,

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may be temporarily out of stock, in which case a second shipment
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normally. Some of our books are publishers' closeouts, overstocks,
remainders or current titles at special prices. Most are in limited supply
and at these prices may sell out fast. If any book is sold out your
money will be refunded by bank check. To offer the lowest possible
prices all orders must be prepaid. We do no billing and do not accept
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ireat


FOPR CiPISTMAS


(316) Claude Pepper & Ed Ball, Politics, Purpose, ai
Power. By Tracy E. Danese. The power struggle between
Claude Pepper and Ed Ball in the mid-twentieth centu
in large part determined the future of Florida. This live
account of their interlocking careers-both dominated 1
a personal quest for power, money, and purpose
illuminates the historical role of these two forceful pe
sonalities.
Ed Ball, brother-in-law of Alfred I. duPont and trustee
. the duPont empire, was at one time the single most pov
erful businessman in the state. Claude Pepper, a seni
U.S. senator was the state's heir to the liberal legacy
New Deal politics. By mid-century, the duPont-Ball ei
pire controlled a major part of the Florida business ai
political establishment-but not Claude Pepper.
What follows is an account of their long-standing rel
tionship in the Florida political process. It gives a pictu
of working politics that often remains at the fringe of hi
torical accounts of the grander issues. Still, it is a dime
sion of politics that lubricates the workings of the who
as it goes about the process of governance.
University of Florida Press, hardcover, copyright 200
301 pp. Sold nationally for $34.95. Books.h
Sprice=$32.00.




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Removal

Aftershock

The Seminoles' Struggles to Survive
in the West, 1836 1866
By Jane F. Lancaster
The University of Tennessee Press/Knox-
ville, hardcover, 225 pp, 1994.


of Although Native Americans have a special
m- place in the history of the United States,
Indian historiography is far from being
nd comprehensive. Throughout the centuries
of Indian-white relationships, all branches
of government have devoted attention to the
a- relevant issues. Legislative hearings and
re acts, court cases, treaties, and wars involving Indians have been promi-
is- nent in America's past, but the omissions in historical writings are
n- both numerous and obvious. Until very recently, high school and col-
)le lege history textbooks gave little attention to Native Americans. The
inhabitants of Indian Territory, especially, were generally excluded or
mentioned only briefly in those accounts, whereas cavalrymen and
cowboys were discussed at length. As a result, much of the realities of
)0, the relations between the United States and Native Americans have
op remained unknown or misunderstood, and Native American histori-
noranhv is poorer for such omissions and imbalances.
This book focuses on this hitherto neglected era in Native American
history and places the Seminoles in their correct historical position
as a Native American tribe. By examining the Seminoles' adjustments
during their first decades in the West in light of federal Indian policy,
it concludes that after thirty years of struggles, caused largely by the
faulted policies of the federal government, these Indians were a
"stricken, divided, and beggared people scattered over hundreds of
miles." For this tribe, the federal government's program of placing it
in a western land away from white settlers, where it could he nur-
tured toward civilization and Christianity, was not only a shortsighted
policy but also an illogical and inhumane one. Without the stubborn-
ness and determination of these early tribal members, no western
Seminole tribe would have existed in 1990. Truly, the mere survival of
the early Seminoles earned them special distinction as a tribe.
Published by University of Tennessee Press, 1994, 225 pp., hard-
cover. Sold nationally for $28.95. Bookshop price=$24.00.


'Tales ofi O

fontida


and jungles where thou-
sands of Americans risked
life, limb, and spirit in a
conflict few of them filly
understood. The second
war began when the same
soldiers came home to fight
another fight, this one for
the hearts and minds of
their countrymen, and for,
their own health, sanity;
and peace of mind.
Published by Crown, hard-
cover, 690 pp. Sold nation-
ally for $35.00. Bookshop
price=$30.00. Due to the
weight and length of this
work, please include $6.00
for shipping and handling.
Advance Praise for Home To
War:
"Home to War is a superbly
researched book that
needed to be written. It sets
forth in Compelling detail a
whole other dimension of
America's tragic war in Viet-
nam, which, until now, has
never been completely cap-
tured." General Harold G.
Moore, Author of We Were
Soldiers Once and Young.
"Gerry Nicosia has an un-
common understanding of
the struggle of veterans to
give meaning to their war
and to redeem themselves.
Home to War is a powerful
history of our times." Gloria
Emerson, National Book
Award recipient for Winners
and Losers.
"Home to War illuminates
the efforts of the men who
fought not just in the
jungles of Vietnam, but also
when they returned to
America. We should he
grateful to Gerry Nicosia for
documenting this struggle
in a meaningful and heart-
felt way." Director of Platoon
and Born on the Fourth of
July.





SAmrenia Lon e l Idlan (onft l


(320) Tales of Old Florida,
Edited by Frank Oppel and
Tony Meisel. Published by
Castle, 1987, 477 pp.,
hardcover. One hundred
years ago, Florida was a wil-
derness of swamp and
beach, dense forest and
abundant wild game. Un-
discovered, except for a few
pioneer sportsmen and
hearty farmers and ranch-
ers, the state was still a
frontier. Here is a collection
of original articles and sto-
ries of "Old Florida" the vast
canvas of nature, prior to
the coming of the condo-
minium. Illustrated with
rare drawings, photographs
and engravings, this book
will recreate a paradise that
can never be again,
Be -kshop price=$19.95.

(319) The Seminole Wars,
America's Longest Indian
Conflict. By John Missall
and Mary Lou Missall. The
Seminole Wars were the
longest, bloodiest, and most
costly of all the Indian wars
fought by this nation. This
illustrated history is the
first book to provide a com-
prehensive overview of all
three wars. Seminole War
authorities John and Mary
Lou Missall examine not
only the wan that were
fought between 1817 and
1858 but also the events
leading up to them and
their place in American his-
tory Employing extensive
research that makes use of
diaries, military reports,
and archival newspapers,
they shed new light on the
relationship among the
wars, the issue of slavery,
prevalent attitudes toward
Native Americans, and the
quest for national security
Although fought in Florida,
the Seminole Wars were a
major concern to the nation
as a whole. The first war, led
by General Andrew Jack-
son, was Dart of an attempt


to wrest Florida from Spain
and had international
repercussions that led to a
lengthy congressional in-
vestigation. The second,
which lasted seven years,
took the lives of more than
1,500 soldiers and resulted
in the forced removal of
more than 3,000 Seminole
Indians from Florida and
the deaths of countless oth-
ers. The third war, fought
on the eve of the Civil War,
was an attempt to remove
the final remnants of the
Seminole Nation from their
homes in the Everglades.
Underlying these conflicts
was the nations thirst for
aggressive territorial expan-
sion and the dangers of an
inflexible government policy.
The Missalls describe the
wars as both a military and
a moral embarrassment-a
sad and important chapter
in American history that
has been overshadowed by
the Civil War and by Indian
wars fought west of the Mis-
sissippi.
From the Forward, by the
series editors: "During the
past half century, the bur-
geoning population and in-
creased national and inter-
national visibility of Florida
have sparked a great deal
of popular interest in the
state's past, present, and
future. As the favorite des-
tination of countless tour-
ists and as the new home
for millions of retirees and
other migrants, modern
Florida has become a demo-
graphic, political, and cul-
tural bellwether."
"Unfortunately, the quan-
tity and quality of the litera-
ture on Florida's distinctive
heritage and character have
not kept pace with the Sun-
shine State's enhanced sta-
tus. In an effort to remedy
this situation-to provide
an accessible and attractive
format for the publication of
Florida-related books-the
.University Press of Florida
has established the Florida
History and Culture series."

Raymond Arsenault and
Gary R. Mormino, Series
Editors. University of South
Florida, St. Petersburg. Uni-
versity of Florida Press,
copyright 2004, 258 pp.,
hardcover. Sold nationally
for $29.95. Bookshop
price=$25.00.


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