Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00267
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: September 16, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00267
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
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Inside This Issue
10 Pages
Red Tide.................... 1 Community Rating
The Elections .............. 1 System .................... 5, 9
Power Bills .................. 1 How To Help Victims ... 6
Katrina ...................... 1 Carrabelle City ............ 7
Franklin Briefs ........ 2, 7 FCAN......................... 8
Editorial & Commentary Pay The Bills ............... 9
............................. 3, 4 Bookshop .................. 10




The Evil Among Us


RW/4a Ntw i e^k RtMk EVy 5e

BULK RATE
T h U.S. POSTAGE PAID
T he APALACHICOLA, FL
PERMIT #8



Franklin






Chronicle


By Sue Cronkite
Death is a part of earthly exist-
ence, and when an elderly person
dies after a long and productive
life, it can be beautiful even in the
midst of sadness. But when death
comes to a young person the en-
tire community resounds with
shock.
Such was the reaction when it was
learned that human remains had
been found off Tilton Road, the
route to the Box-R Ranch between
Apalachicola and Port St. Joe.
Pamela Kinney had been missing
since the night of Aug. 14. Imme-
diately the jump to conclusions
was that the body was that of the
missing 19-year-old. Rumors be-
gan flying like fumes from a
witches brew.
"We don't know that the remains
are those of Pamela," said Maj.
Chester Creamer of the Franklin
County Sheriffs Department.
"We're waiting for dental records
from Washington, D, C. We don't
have positive identification yet."
What Sheriff Mike Mock said ear-
lier was that there was a possibil-
ity that it was Pamela's body.
"We feel like it's her, but we can't
know forsure," su aid Maj.
Creamer. "We need to make sure
we don't speak out of turn or make
rush judgments." Pamela had
lived in Washington until two
months before her disappearance
and had begun a job at Subway
two days before she disappeared.
She lived with her grandmother.
Her father had dropped her off in
front of her grandmother's house.
"She was last seen after 10 p.m.
that night," said Ma]. Creamer.
The family became concerned and
started searching, but didn't re-
port her missing until the next
afternoon. "They were certain
something was wrong," said Maj.
Creamer. By then rumors were
flying. From one to another over
the communities in Franklin
County it was told that she had
been seen at various places. Who
could even guess whether she
might have left intentionally,.
though family merife&fs"insisted


she would not have disappeared
of her own accord.
It was reported that Kristen
Perezluha, a spokesperson of the
Florida Department of Law En-
forcement, said the crime scene
unit believed the skeletal remains
to be that of a black female.
The remains were taken to Medi-
cal Examiner Dr. David Stewart's
office in 'Tallahassee, where a
positive identification is expected
to be made soon.
"We all mourn for the family," said
Maj. Creamer. "Information which
would aid in an arrest or arrests
is needed," said Creamer. "Any
information, .however small is
checked out. We want to solve this
case. We intend to bring whoever
did this to justice."
When Pamela went missing she
was said to have been wearing a
white tank top and bluejean skirt,
and white flip-flops. "A pair of flip-
flops were found," said Maj.
Creamer. "But we don't know that
they were hers."
The Sheriffs Office gets phone
calls every day. "We're running
down every bit of information
and every rumor," said Maj.
Creamer. "We are glad to accept
any information. We'll do the run-
down on it, check it and see what
we learn. Anybody who's got any
kind of information, call and tell
us. Who knows what it will pro-
duce." Maj. Creamer said callers
to (850) 670-8500 should ask for
him or Lt. Ronnie Segree.
"We are working diligently," said
Maj. Creamer. "By all indications
we will solve this case. We can't
dismiss anything, even if it seems
to be rumor. What we need are
facts. We're checking everything
we learn."
Maj. Creamer urges anyone who
knows anything about what hap-
pened to Pamela Kinney to call the
Franklin County Sheriffs office.
"We need to find out what hap-
pened as quickly as possible," he
said.


Volume 14, Number 19 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


September 16 29, 2005


Red Tide Closes Bay

By Sue Cronkite


Two words that strike fear into
hearts along the Forgotten' Coast:
Red Tide. "This is the worst I've
ever seen," Joe Shields told
Apalachicola Rotary Club mem-
bers Tuesday. "There are no oys-
ter beds open in the bay. And I'm
afraid the Red Tide hasn't
peaked."
Shields works with the Division of
Aquaculture, Department of Ag-
riculture, Consumer Services. "We
arc under the national federal gov-
ernment program and we close the
hay when they tell us to. The rule
is to close the bay when there are
5,000 Red Tide cells per liter of
water. What we have now' is
70,000 to 180,000 cells per liter."
Shields said the first time he en-
countered Red Tide here was in
1995. "1 didn't know what it was,"
he said. "Then it started bloom-
ing maybe every other year. But
this year it's worse. I've never seen
it like this."
The Red Tide is killing fish right
and left. They are being washed
up on the beach. One local resi-
dent said he saw thousands of
dead flounder on the bottom of
West Pass. Asked about what is
being done to clear dead fish off
the beaches, one person said the
crabs are eating them. "They're
having a ball eating those dead
fish, just don't eat any crabs for
awhile," he said.
People are reporting respiratory
problems, not only on St. George
Island and along the coast, hut in
Apalachicola, Eastpoint,
Carrabelle, and Alligator Point.
Shields said vacationers to the
beach should go inside if they
have a problem.


Shields said the infestation has
been responsible for two dolphin
deaths. "St. Joe is having massive
fish kills," he added. "When waves
break the blooms apart, they re-
lease the cells like an aerosol. It
paralyzes fish and inhibits the gills
from taking in oxygen. It's hap-
pening to numerous species," said
Shields.



. '... .. .. OWPow er Bills

STo Go Up


Repairs to the causeway on Highway 98 between
Apalachicola and Eastpoint was a recent traffic-stopper.
Crews dumped rip-rap and rearranged the piles of rocks
moved by the recent unwelcome visit by Hurricane Dennis'
10- to 12-foot storm surge. Traffic backed up as piles of
dirt were moved from the north side of the causeway to
the south side, shoring up the barrier to high water.

THE ELECTIONS


Persistence

Pays Off For

Mel Kelly

A familiar face at gatherings and
forums for the mayoral and com-
mission seats on Carrabelle's gov-
erning board, Mel Kelly wound up
with the top job as mayor to gov-
ern her town.
Out of a total of 476 votes, Mel
Kelly received a winning total of
210. Former mayor Wilburn
"Curley" Messer received 131
votes and current commissioner
Raymond Williams received 105
votes in the race for mayor of the
growing Forgotten Coast commu-
nity.
In the race for the two-year com-
missioner seat Gathana
Parmenas came in first with an
even 200 votes. Jeanne Rodgers
received 124 votes and Ed
Saunders Jr. came in third with
109 votes.
For the two four-year commission
seats, Ray Tyre came in with a
total of 279 votes to win one of
the seats. The other commission
seat was won by Richard Sands
with 183 votes.
Runners-up included Tamara
Allen with 149 votes, Frank
Mathes with 148 votes, and Skip
Frink received 87 votes.
Winners are to be sworn in at the
Carrabelle City Commission meet-
ing Oct. 6, by current Mayor Jim
Brown.


Webb Wins In

Apalachicola

No newcomer to Apalachicola, but
new to politics, Valentina Webb
won seat number four on the
Apalachicola City Commission in
the Sept. 6 election. Webb de-
feated long-time Commissioner
Robert Davis.
With 57.7 percent of the vote,
Webb received a total of 321 to
Davis's 235 votes. A total of 556
votes were cast in the election for
commission seat number four.
Webb had electioneered over town,
sometimes visiting the same
homes twice. "I have been inter-
ested in how our town was gov-
erned from the first," said Webb:
"But I just didn't have the time
before to serve.
Webb; 41, graduated from
Apalachicola High in 1982, and
was later certified as a law en-
forcement officer and corrections
officer. She and her husband Tho-
mas Webb, Jr., have two children,
Thomas III, 20, and Ashley, 18,
both graduates of Port St. Joe
High School.
Webb has worked for the Florida
Department of Corrections for 16
years and is now a lieutenant at
the Franklin Work Camp. She and
her husband are youth pastors at
Covenant Word Christian Center.
Davis had served two four-year
terms on the city commission, af-
ter being elected in 1997 and
2001. Webb is to be installed at
the next meeting of the Apalach-
icola City Commission.


Fallout from fuel prices on the rise
means that power bills won't be
far behind. In Florida most of the
power for homes is generated by
natural gas- and coal-burning
power plants."Our cost for natu-
ral gas has tripled in less than four
years," said Progress Energy
spokesman C. J. Drake. "We ex-
pect coal prices to rise 20 percent
in 2006 and since late 2001 the
price we pay for oil has tripled."
"Nuclear has been the least vola-
tile of all of our fuels," said Drake.
Progress Energy's fuel adjustment
request with the Public Service
Commission will increase bills by
almost 11 percent.
For Progress Energy customers,
that means a household using
1,000 kilowatt-hours of electric-
ity a month would pay $10.53
more each month. Todd Brown,
PSC spokesman said he doesn't
expect customers to be very happy
to see the fuel adjustments.
"That'sjust the nature of the mar-
ket right now," he said. "They may
not like it, but it should be ex-
pected."
Power companies make no profit
off fuel rate adjustments, accord-
ing to Brown. "The increase is only
to cover what the company actu-
ally pays for fuel. If the estimate
they make for 2006 ends up be-
ing too high, it will be adjusted on
bills the following year. If it's too
low, the companies can collect the
difference the next year.
In what could be good news for
conservation-minded customers,
the increase is proposed as two-
tiered. The increase would be
lower for the first 1,000 kilowatt
hours and higher for electricity
used above that amount. Drake
said customers can blame the ris-
ing cost of oil, natural gas, and
coal when they see the increases
in their bills.



mNOW


-*--" -. .-.' - .- -- .-;' .. .- '- . : "


Empty oyster boats on the waterfront in Eastpoint offer mute testimony to the damage
being done by Red Tide to communities along the coast which depend on fishing, shrimping
and oystering for their livlihood.


"You can see thousands of dead
fish rolling through West Pass,
East Pass, and St. Vincent
Sound," said Shields. "Those who
eat oysters or shrimp can get toxic
shellfish poisoning, which results
in a tingling feeling, with accom-
panying sick stomach, sort of like
food poisoning from rotten food.
It's much more involved than what
you get from an ordinary bad oys-
ter. You can eat shrimp, but you
need to know where they come
from."
"The good news, if there is any
good news about Red Tide," said
Shields, "is that our oysters won't
die. They will keep taking in the
water and flushing it out. But
meanwhile our oystermen and
shrimpers are in dire straits."
The Red Tide we have here is
called karenia brevis. It is a mi-
croscopic.one-celled, plantlike or-
ganism which utilizes sunlight.
"The bloom reaches all the way
from Dixie County to Gulf County
and all the way out 10 to 20 miles
into the Gulf,",said Shields.


Katrina

Triggers

Fishery

Failure

U.S. Commerce Secretary Carlos
Gutierrez has announced a for-
mal determination of a fishery fail-
ure in the Gulf of Mexico due to
the devastation following Hurri-
cane Katrina. The announcement
describes the affected area as the
Florida Keys and from Pensacola
Fla., to the Texas border.
Apalachicola oystering has been
devastated and many of the fish-
ery products landed on the west
coast come from the Keys area.
Local fishermen have been left out
in the cold in this declaration.
The determination came in re-
sponse to a virtual fishery shut-
down in the affected states due to
major flooding, damage to fishing
boats and fishing pods, waterways
clogged with debris and closed
processing facilities.
"We are taking action now because
of the significant economic effects
of Hurricane Katrina on fishing
communities in the Gulf of
Mexico," Secretary Gutierrez said.
"Major commercial fisheries in the
Gulf of Mexico include finfish,
shrimp and oysters, with an esti-
mated value of almost $700 mil-
lion per year."
Although the extent of the dam-
age to Gulf fishing industries is
not yet known, fishing in the re-
gion has been essentially halted.
The National Oceanic and Atmo-
spheric Administration (NOAA)
will work with the states to assess
damage to the 15 major fishing
ports and the 177 seafood pro-
cessing facilities in Alabama, Mis-
sissippi and Louisiana. Based on
preliminary estimates, there are
432 federally permitted fishing
vessels in Alabama; 3,738 in
Florida; 1,033 in Louisiana, and
351 in Mississippi. Additional
fishermen hold state permits.
The action was made through pro-
visions of the Magnuson-Stevens
Fishery Conservation and Man-
agement Act, which makes federal
relief funds available to assess the


The Red Tide organism is always
with us, in the months it's not
blooming it rests on the bottom
as sediment, said Shields." People
say the infestation is because of
pollution in the bay," he added.
"That's not true. It's always been
out there and will always be out
there."
'Through advances in technology
by satellite imagery We can actu-
ally see the Red Tide bloom," said
Shields So far we can't eliminate
it. Dumping copper sulfate didn't
help. They tried dumping clay,
with the idea that maybe the or-
ganism would bind to the clay.
That didn't help and neither did
what was being done to all the
other creatur-es on the bottom."
Actually the organism covers hun-
dreds and thousands of miles,
Shields explained. "We don't un-
derstand how it functions, maybe
something like how a forest fire
clears out the underbrush. The
long term outlook is that the fish
population does recover. The
short term is negative. There is no


impacts, restore the fisheries, pre-
vent future failure, and assist fish-
ing communities in recovery ef-
forts after a natural disaster, and
the Inter-jurisdictional Act, which
makes funds available for direct
assistance to fishermen to allevi-
ate harm resulting from a natu-
ral disaster.
The Administration will work with
Congress and affected states to
identify on-the-ground needs and
develop an emergency plan to
meet those needs. Once funds are
in place for the disaster assistance
plan, NOAA will notify fishermen
with information about how to
apply for relief.
After Hurricane Ivan struck the
Gulf Coast last year, $9 million in
aid was appropriated to repair the
oyster industries in Ala., Fla.,
Miss., La. In 1997, $10 million in
relief aid was appropriated to re-
cover from damage caused by
hurricanes Hugo and Andrew.
"Working with the Gulf States,
NOAA will continue efforts to as-
sess fishing industry damage and
long-term impacts to the marine
environment," said Bill Hogarth,
director of NOAA's Fisheries Ser-
vice.
NOAA's Fisheries Service has
made contact with all of its 132
employees and contractors in the
Gulf of Mexico region. The
agency's facilities in Pascagoula,
MS, sustained significant damage
due to high winds and flooding
and are currently undergoing en-
gineering assessments. In the
immediate wake of the hurricane,
the agency responded to reports
of marine mammal strandings.
NOAA currently is working to pro-
vide marine enforcement agencies
in the Gulf States with immediate
recovery funding.
NOAA Fisheries Service is dedi-
cated to protecting and preserv-
ing our nation's living marine re-
sources and their habitat through
scientific research, management
and enforcement. NOAA Fisher-
ies Service provides effective stew-
ardship of these resources for the
benefit of the nation, supporting
coastal communities that depend
upon them, and helping to pro-
vide safe and healthy seafood to
consumers and recreational op-
portunities for the American pub-
lic.


oyster mortality. They filter out the
toxins as they come in.
As to how long the infestation of
Red Tide is expected to last,
Shields said "We've.had it as long
as two months, but it's usually
about two weeks." When asked
what hurricanes do, Shields said
they produce some scouring of the
bottom.
Another Rotarian asked Shields if
a large flush of water from the
river could kill out the Red Tide.
"We'd have to have a 21 ft. river to
do that. It can hiadle declining
amounts of salinity. It also tends
to die off when the water, tempera-
ture drops to 48 degrees," said
Shields.
As to when the Red Tide dimin-
ishes and Apalachicola Bay can
open to shellfish harvesting again,
Shields said, "We can only specu-
late and hope. I have no way of
knowing."


The National Oceanic and Atmo-
spheric Administration, an agency
of the U.S. Commerce Depart-
ment, is dedicated to enhancing
economic security and national
safety through the prediction and
research of weather and climate-
related events and providing en-
vironmental stewardship of our
nation's coastal and marine re-
sources. Through the emerging
Global Earth Observation System
of Systems (GEOSS), NOAA is
working with its federal partners
and nearly 60 countries to develop
a global monitoring network that
is as integrated as the planet it
observes.


Dubious

Benefit From

Katrina

As the monster storm Katrina
moved through the Gulf of Mexico
toward the Louisiana, Mississippi,
Alabama coastal area, it may have
given the Forgotten Coast a back-
handed favor.
The Red Tide plaguing Gulf wa-
ters, said to be the worst since
1971, was caused by warmer sur-
face water temperatures brought
on by a hot summer. Cynthia Heil,
senior research scientist at the
state Fish and Wildlife Research
Institute, said that may be what
has made this year's bloom par-
ticularly bad.
Smelly dead fish and eyes burn-
ing from a dip in the Gulf has had
local residents and St. George Is-
land tourists complaining. But the
lethal Red Tide can do a great deal
of damage to crabs, redfish, trout,
snook, jacks, mullet, and bait fish.
Not only the fishing industry, but
Franklin County's beaches, im-
portant to the local economy and
quality of life, have been affected.
While maybe not as bad as areas
farther south along the Gulf
Coast, still Red Tide is scary.
Many blame a recent local outcrop
of respiratory ailments on winds
blowing across the Red Tide out-
break.

Continued on Page 10


w




)0"









Page 2 16 September 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle'


Franklin

Briefs

September 6, 2005
By Richard E. Noble

Trash Along Highway 98
If you have noticed that there are
huge piles of debris along the side
of the roadway all along highway
98 throughout the County re-
maining from hurricane Dennis
and you are wondering why it has
not been picked up, you are not
alone. You may have noticed that
some of the piles are marked with
a red "X" and some with a green
"X". This all has to do with the
payment procedure whether the
County pays or whether FEMA
pays. This, of course, involves a
long confusing story of bureau-
cracy in action. You can be as-
sured that your Board of County
Commissioners is working on it -
and trying not to pay, wherever it
is possible. Nevertheless, a little
snafu such as this does bring one
to thoughts of great compassion
when thinking of New Orleans and
the surrounding area. My good-
ness, the bureaucratic paperwork
alone may take decades. "I'm just
concerned about all that debris on
highway 98," said Commissioner
Saunders. "If we have another
storm we are going to be in big
trouble."
It seems that there is such a thing
as FEMA eligible debris and FEMA
ineligible debris. So for all of you
who thought that debris is all de-
bris, be forewarned.

Bill Mahan, County
Extension
"I suppose that everyone has
heard by now that we have a red
tide once again," said Mr. Mahan.
He also reported that there was a
huge wash-up of dead fish out at
the State Park. Mr. Crofton com-
mented that there were "millions"
of dead fish outside the park also,
"Everything that is under eight
inches is dead," offered Commis-
sioner Crofton. "... catfish, floun-
der, whiting, trout, menhaden,
eels ... why I have never seen so
many eels in my life. That is go-
ing to start smelling real bad, and
I don't know what to do with that,"
A discussion followed as to how
such a mess was cleaned up. The
conclusion drawn from past ex-
periences was that this was a job
for Mother Nature. "The fish wash
up above the waterline; then dry
out rather quickly and Mother
Natur'4 takes -care of the rest'
Alan Pierce reported. It was ex-
plaine'd that there is equipment
that the County could buy to rake
up the beach, but such equipment
is expensive and up until this
point in time the County has con-
sidered rno such investment.

Public Hearings on Land
Use Changes
Parcel 1 had several lots in Block
3, unit one East, St. George Is-
land, Franklin County, Florida,
requesting to be rezoned from a
C-2 rating (commercial business)
to a C-4 rating (commercial resi-
dential Mixed Use) The C-4 rat-
ing allows for the Skinny-mini
option. These lots were in or
around the Fini's area. The re-
quest was approved without any
public opposition.
Parcel 2 consisting of four lots in
Block 7, Unit One West, St. George
Island, Franklin County, Florida
requesting to be rezoned from C-
2 to C-4, were also approved with-
out any public comment or oppo-
sition. These properties were in
the Islander restaurant area.
Parcel 3, two lots in Block one,
Unit One West, St. George Island,
Franklin County also requested C-
2 to C-4 and were approved. These
properties are west of Harry A's.
Parcel 4- Four lots, Block 2. Unit
One West. St. George Island,
Franklin County were also ap-
proved to be rezoned from a C-2
status to a C-4 rating.

Insurance
"A lot of people are pretty upset
because the insurance companies
are canceling their insurance,"
offered Mr. Putnal, "and the only
way that they can get insurance


is through the State; and to build
here is just something that they
can't afford, 1 think that we are
going to have a lot of people in this
county without insurance in the
future. They don't want to insure
anybody in Florida anymore."
"That's right," responded Alan
Pierce,
"You talking about flood insur-
ance, here?" inquired Mr.
Mosconis.
"We're talking about any kind of
insurance," responded a choir of
Board members and knowledge-
able county employees.
'This is something that we have
really got to try and solve about
this insurance thing." Mr. Putnal
continued. "Could we write some-
body a letter and ask them to force
these big insurance companies to
sell these people here insurance
"I'll tell you," informed Alan Pierce,
"If you think that it is bad now,
wait until the repercussions of
hurricane Katrina are felt
throughout the system. Not to in-
sult any insurance company
people who may be here, but your
insurance companies want to in-
sure low risk. Insurance compa-
nies are in business to make
money. They really aren't inter-
ested in anything that is high risk
- like coastal development. It is a
massive national problem that is
only getting worse," This blunt
talk by Alan Pierce does make one
wonder what options the Nation
has for those "high risk entities"
in all areas of the insurance net-
work housing, ownership and
development; business, large and
small; healthcare, the poor and
the rich? If insurance companies
can only make a profit handling
the low risk applicants, who is
going to be fool enough to insure
the rest of us who may be consid-
ered "high risk"? Isn't this policy
on the part of insurance compa-.
nies much the same as saying;
"We will only insure businesses
who take no risks and are estab-
lished and sound; that we will only
insure homes that are free from
potential disasters; and that we
will only insure people who are in
the best of health," Maybe we all
ought to cancel our insurance
policies and send our premiums
directly to the Red Cross, Doctors
Without Borders and the Salva-
tion Army.
"You know Jimmy," continued Mr.
Putnal in response to a statement
made by Mr. Mosconis. "There are
people, right here in this county,
who have been paying their insur-
ance premiums for years, and
years, and years; and now, all of
a sudden, these insurance com-
panies just because they can't
make a pile of money they are
cancelling their coverage; That j
ain 'rV'nht"
M.1'Ilosconis then went on to'ex-
plain that even if you are lucky
enough to get insurance it may
take you years to collect on dam-
ages after a storm. He told of a
relative of his who is still trying to
collect on a claim made to an in-
surance company over a year ago-
And Ms. Saunders explained, in
response to Mr. Putnal idea of
pressuring insurance companies,.
that such a policy was put in place
in the past. One year of contin-
ued service and sales was de-
manded of the insurance compa-
nies by the State of Florida. "That
year is now up," she explained.


"And now the insurance compa-
nies are canceling everybody."

Apalachicola Airport -
Tommy Luster
"The Airport committee had a
meeting, and the majority of the
citizens informed them that they
did not want the airport to expand
though we know that it must but
the main thing is that we did not
want it expanded solely by (the
authority of) two employees which
is what has been tried. We did not
anticipate the people who came
here last week which sounded
like a good idea to me, Housing
out there seems like a very good
way to keep the airport small and
keep a lot of noise from out there
is what we want. There are 7,687
registered voters in this county,
I'm willing to wager that not one
percent of them has any use for
that airport. Any money that is
being brought in out of grants is
coming out of taxpayers' money. I
know that everybody thinks that
it is free money, but I pay more
federal taxes than I. do County
taxes. It is coming out of my
pocket. And we don't want it. Any
of that money (grant and federal
money) could be used in a lot bet-
ter way low income housing,
cleaning up after this storm a
lot of better things can be put into
use by that money."
"You can't take Federal money
that has been directed towards
airports and move it to county
roads," Commissioner Crofton in-
formed Mr. Luster.
'Then send it to Louisiana and let
them use it on their airport," said
Mr. Luster.
'They never. had a problem with,
the airport out in Louisiana," Mr.
Crofton replied.
Ted Mosteller of the airport com-
mittee then came to the podium.
'The overlay is simply for the pro-
tection of the neighbors (out at the
airport). The rumors that have
been floating around lately are
completely erroneous, completely'
lies, I have been attacked person-
ally, and, I don't appreciate it. I
have been assigned the job of air-
port manager, as far as that goes
the job is being done already. As
far as expansion, the Board has
assigned that we should live
within our boundaries. The air-
port extension was killed. We need
to create jobs, and that is expan-
sion. Do we want that twelve hun-
died acres to just lay out there
and ruin?"
"I can assure yqu," interrupted
Mr. Mosconis, "if we get some jobs
out there, that is not going to
make anybody mad. Generating
revenue; ... generating tax rev-
enue ... that is kind of a no
brainer, Let'sjust stick to that and
we can get some authority on
that."
"May I say one more thing?" asked
Mr. Mosteller, "The idea of this
road has been on the books for
some twenty years. The idea of
that road is to get the airport traf-
fic out of the Gulf Colony. This
road helps the county." Mr.
Mosteller then pointed out that
because of the airport, six million
dollars was brought into this
county last year and that if there
were no airport 95% of those mon-
ies would not have been spent
here.


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Gary Shiver Trailer Park
Dilemma
Mr. Shiver appeared before the
Board once again to express the
urgency of his idea for solving the
problem of the displaced poor in
Franklin County. Due to the sale
of many of Franklin County's
older, privately owned trailer
parks, many poorer citizens of the
county have been left with no
place to live. Their trailers are too
old to be moved; they have very
little money; and there is "no room
at the Inn" nor are there other
campgrounds available. The
county has been listening to Mr.
Shiver's appeals, and this week,
Alan Pierce attached a memo out-
lining the problem and some pos-
sible alternatives:
"In response to the County's re-
cent discussions relating to af-
fordable housing. I offer the fol-
lowing as potential strategy to
advance the issue in Franklin
County.
"Community Land Trust First,
I suggest that the County look at
creating a community land trust.
These trusts essentially are not-
Sfor-profit organizations that se-
cure land for the purpose of build-
ing affordable housing for the
community. Success of these land
trusts is tied to the acquisition of
property and the ability to limit the
appreciation of the homes that will
ultimately be built on the prop-
erty. In short, without the land
trust model, any affordable hous-
ing that would be introduced into
Franklin County would only ben-
efit the first generation family that
acquired the property. Later when
that affordable housing unit is
sold, it would no longer be main-
tained as affordable housing be-
cause it would be sold at a mar-
ket rate. Gulf County has moved
forward with establishing such a
community land trust and I would
appreciate the Board's direction
relating to creating such a trust
in Franklin County. I know that
the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of
'Commerce and several lending
institutions in addition to The St.
Joe Company have an interest in
this topic and I believe that we
:should support such an effort.
There is supposed to be a work-
shop on Sept. 14 with represen-
tative from the Gulf County afford-
able housing program making a
presentation.
"Incentives In order to relieve
the County's housing crisis, the
Board should consider providing
some type of incentive to develop-
ers and land owners to create af-
fordable housing. Recall in the
update of the Comprehensive
Plan, the Commission acknowl-
edged that incentives were impor-
tant and identified several strate-


gies including expedited permit-
ting, reduced permit fees and den-
sity bonuses. Relating specifically
to density bonuses, there may be
an opportunity to create an ordi-
nance that would reward a land
owner with density in return for
donation of land for affordable
housing. The land owner could
then transfer that density award
to other land so long as it meets
the requirements established by
the Board. I would like the author-
ity to work with the County attor-
ney to research the issue and draft
a proposed ordinance for consid-
eration by the Board of County
Commissioners. Board action.
"Surplus Lands Another strat-
egy is to identify surplus state
property in the County for the
purpose of securing the property
for affordable housing. Specifi-
cally. I would like to work with the
Division of State Lands to deter-
mine if the state has any property
which they would consider
surplusing for the sole purpose of
provide affordable housing. While
I am not optimistic that such sur-
plus land is available. I would like
to at least make the attempt.

Department of
Transportation
Jimmy Rodgers from the Depart-
ment of Transportation appeared
before the Board to discuss the
DOT's project for the restoration,
of Highway 98. The first project
had to do with sod. This project
was to begin on the 7th, and con-
tinue for thirty days. The contract
was for $750,000. This is a tem-
porary repair to protect the south-
ern shoulder of Highway 98.
The second project dealt with an
innovative idea, a matting tech-
nique, to protect the water-side
shoulder of a highway. The idea
consists of a type of huge "articu-
lated" matting. The matting con-
tains concrete domes that are
woven together by fiberglass and
stainless steel cables a carbon
fiber type cable that will be corro-
sive resistant. These will mat the
shoulder over a filter fabric. "The
real savior of this system is this
fiber fabric, in my opinion," said
Mr. Rodgers: This filter fabric is
somehow wedged into the shoul-
der to protect and hold the dirt in
place. The concrete mats are pri-
marily used to weight down the
filter fabric and hold the fabric in
place.
The protective road presentation
was then interrupted by Mr.
Putnal, "Have you all had any dis-
cussion on moving the road?"
"You've got to keep in consider-
ation that this is Florida, admon-
ished Mr. Mosconis, "You've g6t
to have a scenic by-way."


"Well, we can still have that and
also have another road off that
beach," said Mr. Putnal.
"Commissioner Putnal, I think we
got sticker shock just like you did.
When we thought about this, we
thought about the idea of relpocat-
ing the road inland, just a few
hundred feet maybe ... The cost
runs up into the hundreds and
hundreds of millions of dollars for
the right-of-way and the construc-
tion of the road."
"But the State owns most of that
land, though."
"No Sir ... it is usually privately
owned. No I'm sorry you are cor-
rect, the Forestry owns a lot of that
land."
"In fact that whole road (through
the woods) is owned by the State.
You all haven't talked to them
(Forestry Dept.)?"
"We have not had any formal dis-
cussions with them, We have had
informal discussions in the past.
We are considering that."
Mr. Rodgers then went on to ex-
plain that the DOT's first priority.
was to secure Highway 98, then
get down this protective shoulder
matting; then possibly they could
get into discussing the additional
or alternative road scenario. I hate
to sound like an alarmist but this
does sound a little like the Mis-
sissippi delta project out in Loui-
siana. This alternate escape route
out of Franklin County has been
suggested as a "no brainer" for at
least thirty years now and the
"man" from the DOT is just being
exposed to the "possibility" of a
discussion on the matter.
The road repair to Highway 98 is
estimated to be approximately 50
million dollars. Mr. Rodgers sug-
gested that this new innovative
technique should protect the
highway for fifty years into the
future, Therefore the cost will only
be one million dollars per year.
Mr. Putnal then asked Mr.
Rodgers to ask his bosses if they'
could at least improve the forest
road between Eastpoint and
Carrabelle. Mr. Rodgers suggested
that the DOT may be able to work.
with the Forestry Dept. and pos-
sibly donate some asphalt to them
so that could service that road.

Ken' Osborne Alligator
Point
"I'm Ken Osborne the president of
the Alligator Point taxpayers as-
sociation. I had the roughest
meeting this Saturday that I have
ever had with people who are an-

Continued on Page 7


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 September 2005 P2~YP ~
-I-'--


EDrrORIAL & COMMENTARY


Progress Energy Donating

$100,000 To Hurricane

Katrina Relief Efforts

Company also will match donations from employees and
retirees
Progress Energy announced Sept. working with Cleco Corp., a cen-
9 it is donating $100,000 to the trial Louisiana-based electric util-
American Red Cross for Hurricane ity, to rebuild the electrical infra-
Katrina relief efforts. In addition, structure and restore service to
the company will match all con- customers.
tributions to the Red Cross from Progrs E y
its employees and retirees. Progress Energy (NYSE:PGN),
headquartered in Raleigh, N.C., is
"Hurricane Katrina has devas- a Fortune 250 diversified energy
tated the Gulf Coast, and in many company with more than 24,000
places, it will take years to rebuild megawatts of generation capacity
the infrastructure needed to re- an $9 billion in annual revenues.
turn people to their homes," said The company's holdings include
Bob McGehee, chairman and CEO two electric utilities serving more
of Progress Energy. "During the than 2.9 million customers in
2004 storm season, we saw first- North Carolina, South Carolina
hand the generosity of people from and Florida. Progress Energy also
the Gulf Coast and all over our includes nonregulated operations
country." covering competitive generation,
energy marketing, natural gas
Approximately 900 Progress En- production and fuel extraction.
ergy line and service personnel, For more information about
damage assessment teams and Progress Energy, visit the
support staff are in Louisiana as- company's website at http://
sisting with power restoration ef- www.progress-energy.com.
forts. Progress Energy crews are wwwproress-energy.com.


Library Happenings

By Judi Rundel
The Franklin County Public Library's Advisory Board will meet on
Monday, September 19th beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Carrabelle
Branch. The public is welcome to attend.
The Friends of the Franklin County Public Library will hold a special
visioning meeting/community forum regarding a new library building
in Eastpoint. The meeting will take place on Saturday. September
24th, beginning at 9:30 a.m., at the First United Methodist Church,
317 Patton Drive, Eastpoint. Brunch will be served. For further infor-
mation, please call 670-8151.
The Franklin County Public Library's programs FROG, WITH-IT!
and TIGERS are offered at no cost to participants. Registration'
however is required. For information about the Library and any of its
programs, please call 697-2366, 670-8151, or 653-2784 or view the
Library's website located at www.fcpl.lib.fl.us.


Letter To The Editor

A recent article in the St. Petersburg Times referred to 1.5 million,
pounds of fish killed and rotting on Gulf beaches since the Red Tide'
bloom turned lethal in June.
The article should open the eyes of quite a few people. But the dead
fish picked up on the beaches are probably less than 10 percent of
what was killed by water degradation/red tide from recent red tide
episodes.
A seafood company in the Panhandle that produces cigar minnows, .
Spanish sardines and other bait fish for the recreational fishing in-
dustry has seen their production drop by 95 percent from last year
and the previous five years.
In years gone by, a red tide in Apalachicola Bay and St. Joe Bay were
indeed rare occurrences. Now they are common.
Florida's waters are being degraded to a point where we might find
ourselves with a fish disaster on our hands. The rippling effect of
such would cause severe economic harm to the state budget and all
programs the budget supports. The communities depending on fish-
ing and the people depending on fishing would be forever devastated.
There needs to be more common sense concerning development along
the coast of Florida, particularly areas on the west coast where coastal
waters are relatively shallow and are subject to more damage from
red tides.
We are not convinced the black water and brown water seen in parts
of the state over the past few years is really red tide. Maybe it is, but
maybe it isn't, and to sweep the problem under any political rug will
hurt all industries and all of us who love Florida.
We don't need a million dollars tossed at the problem to help it go
away. We need a joint task force of all state/federal environmental
agencies in the state to address the problem under a protocol to pre-
vent any turf battles.
There should be one goal and the chairman of the task force should
force the agencies to cooperate or remove them from the Task Force.
Keep the personalities and egos at bay and work to solve the water




on Mt, POST OFFICE BOX 590
,- oR EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
d 850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
Facsimile 850-670-1685
"-4 I( e-mail: hoffer531 @gtcom.net
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 14, No. 19


September 16, 2005


Publisher Sue Cronkite
Director of Operations Andy Dyal
Contributors Dawn Radford
............ Carol Noble
............ Richard Noble
........ Skip Frink
Advertising Design
and Production Artist Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate Jerry Weber

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis Apalachicola
Skip Frink Carrabelle
David Butler Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins ................. Eastpoint
Barbara Revell Lanark Village
Richard Harper St. George Island
Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue would
cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the Chronicle
for price quotes if you seek several different or similar
issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2005
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


degradation problem. This is not a political party issue, it is an issue
affecting the lives of all of us who live or visit this state.
It is time to stop doing business as usual.
Bob Jones, Executive Director
Southeastern Fisheries Association
1118-B Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(850) 224-0612
BOBFISH@aol.com


The Clerk Of The

Circuit Court

Your Public Trustee


Q: I have three small children, and I rely on child
support from their father to provide for them. Un-
MARCIA JOHNSON fortunately, he is not always prompt getting the
money to me. Is there anything I can do to ensure that I get support
payments on time?
A: According to F.S. s. 61.13016, at the request of the custodial par-
ent, the Clerk of the Court may suspend a non-custodial parent's
Florida driver's license when child support.payments become delin-
quent. The Clerk's Office can only request license suspension or pri-
vate cases, DOR handles IV-D cases.
For the custodial parent to qualify for this program he or she must
have:
1. An order for child support in the State of Florida payable in your
county;
2. He or she must not be under contact with the Department of Rev-
enue;
3. The non-custodial parent must be at least 15 days delinquent; and
4. The non-custodial parent must have a valid Florida driver's license.
The custodial parent must provide the following information regard-
ing the non-custodial parent to the Clerk's office in order to perform
this enforcement action:
Date of birth
Social security number
Last known address
A written request asking for the license to be suspended due to
delinquency
The Clerk's office will then send a 'Notice of Intent to Suspend Driver's.
License" through the United 'States postal service to the non-custo-
dial parent. Upon receiving the notice, the non-custodial parent has
three options in order to avoid the license suspension:
1. Pay the delinquency in full.
2. Enter into a written agreement for the repayment of the delinquency
with the custodial parent.
3. File a "Notice to Contest Driver's License Suspension" if there is a
disagreement regarding the amount or if there is a claim, of mistaken
identity.
If the non-custodial parent does not respond and 20 days have passed
from the date of the notice, the Clerk's office will mail a request to the
Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles to suspend
the non-custodial parent's driver's license. The license cannot be re-
instated until the custodial and non-custodial parents enter into a
written agreement or the delinquency, with applicable-fees, is paid in;
full.
If you have any-questions or comments about this column, please
forward them to: Marcia Johnson. Clerk of the Court, 33 Market
St. Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320.



Inside Out

By Chip Ballard Ballard-2005

Country Music Just Isn't Country Anymore
With some things, to get to the best, one must go backwards. Many of
today's youth who claim to be country music fans wouldn't recognize
a real country song if it rode up beside them on the Wabash Cannon-
ball, picking a dobro and yodeling Jimmie Rodger's "Blue Yodel No.
2."
I've listened to country music since I was big enough to turn the dial
on'a radio, and I can tell you the tunes that poured from country
music radio stations in those days were a far cry from what is played
today: Today's country is little more than pop rock of the seventies
and bad rock at that.
It's hard for me to listen to contemporary country. Every second or
third song is silly. I can just see the singer, as he leaves the studio,
blushing and hanging his head.
On their tenth anniversary album, in a song called "Nobody Wants To
Be Country," the Statler Brothers sang:





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"Nobody wants to be country, everybody wants to go pop:
They've traded in their saddle and all by to straddle the road that'll
take 'em to the top.
They put their steel in hock, add a little rock and wind up some-
thing they're not;
Nobody wants to be country; they want to go pop.
Elvis must bear sizable chunk of the blame for that fact.
After he burst into the national spotlight in 1956, a whole generation
of country singers suddenly forsook their roots and decided to "go
pop." Even the countrified Conway Twitty went pop for a while. Twitty,
however, had the good sense to realize his country roots were too
deep to defy and quickly climbed back over onto his own side of the
fence.
Elvis was a country boy, too, but the difference in him and Conway-
and the hordes of other country boys who aspired to go pop-was that
Elvis's musical interests were more far-reaching. On Saturday nights
he listened to the Grand Ole Opry, but on other nights he sneaked
into all-night gospel sings that featured such groups as The Blue Ridge
Quartet, The Blackwood Brothers, The Sunshine Boys, and The States-
men-and he studied the performances of flamboyant front men like
Ace Richman, Laverne Tripp and Hovie Lister. In the afternoons after
school, Elvis would go into black music stores, hunch down in a booth
with his collar up and listen to rhythm and blues. From a combina-
tion of country, southern gospel and the rhythm and blues of the
Deep South, Elvis developed his unique style that became known as
rock 'n roll.
Elvis's talent was so natural, his stage presence so charismatic, that
his performance seemed effortless. As a whole generation of wannabes
tried to follow in his footsteps, one might assume that to find any
honest country music one would have to go back before Elvis. If not
for a few country singers who have remained true to their roots, and
themselves, that might be true.
But George Jones is still with us. He was country before Elvis got
here, he stayed country while Elvis was here, and he has remained
country since Elvis left the building. Jones is truly one of country's
great singers, a legend in his own time. Another country music leg-
end, Merle Haggard, is still rolling down America's highways in his big
Silver Eagle, making great music, along with George Strait, Allan Jack-
son, Randy Travis, and a few others.
But for the best, the purest country music, we must indeed go back
before Elvis to the 1940s and early 50s. For a. taste of the real thing
we must listen to Hank Williams, Sr. (including the "talking songs" he
recorded as Luke the Drifter) and Lefty Frizzell. As I step back and
really listen to Lefty, I must agree with Hank Williams, Jr. that Lefty
Frizzelljust might be the most underestimated talent in the business.
Hank, Jr. led the force that had Lefty, however belatedly, inducted
into the Country Music Hall Of Fame.
If you doubt Junior's assessment of Lefty's excellence, listen to the
CD of Lefty singing the songs of Jimmie Rodgers. The quality of Frizzell's
voice, his styling, the precision of his phrasing, his yodeling and vocal
gymnastics will give any country music fan chills.
Hank and Lefty toured together for years. Each was so popular they'd
flip a coin to see who would perform first: At the end of the show
they'd do a number 'together. I'd have loved to have been there. What
a shame those two never recorded an album together.
Williams died an old man at 29. Frizzell lived to the ripe old age of 47.
But in their short, troubled lives, each man wrote some of country
music's greatest songs, and recorded enough music to delight coun-
try fans forever.
Chip Ballard is a writer and an educator living in Zolfo Springs. He
welcomes your e-mail at chipkyle746@earthlink.net.















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PaP 4 4 16 SIentemher 2005


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


Insurance On Storm Repairs


Not Simple

By Sue Cronkite
Before adopting an attitude of"oh,
well, all those people whose homes
were destroyed by hurricanes
Dennis or Katrina surely had in-
surance," a homeowner ought to
take a close look at exactly what
his or her insurance policy actu-
ally covers, and what percentage
of replacement of the damaged
home can be expected.
Recent changes to Florida law re-
lated to the hurricane deductible
provided in your homeowners
policy is not simple. Whether it is
easy to understand or not, the law
is specific. In the past, hurricane
deductibles applied to losses from
each hurricane individually.
Under the new law, the full
amount of the hurricane deduct-
ible will apply only once each cal-
endar year. The effect on policy-
holders is that once the hurricane
deductible is exhausted, the
policy's All Other Perils deductible
will apply to any other hurricane
losses incurred within that year.
This means that if a homeowner
suffers one hurricane loss, the
hurricane deductible will be ap-
plied to that covered loss. If losses
are suffered from subsequent
hurricanes during the same cal-
endar year. the deductible for the
additional hurricane losses will be
the greater of the remaining dol-
lar amount of the calendar year
hurricane deductible, or the All
Other Perils policy deductible that
is in effect at the time of the sub-
sequent hurricane.
It is important also to note that
the homeowner is now required
to report any hurricane loss, re-
gardless of the amount of dam-
age, so that the insurance com-
pany may consider that amount
when adjusting claims for subse-
quent hurricane losses during the
calendar year. Also, the home-
owner must document all repairs
and keep copies of'receipts.
On how to help the homeowner
understand how the coverage
works an example used figures on


$20,000 of damage. "Hurricane A
occurs on a set date and causes
$20,000 of damage to the covered
home. If the policy limit is
$150,000 and if the hurricane
deductible is 2 percent of the
policy limits, the amount of the
deductible would be $3,000. The
amount the company would pay
would be $17,000 ($20,000 minus
$3,000, or $17,000).
"Application of deductible with a
second hurricane during the cal-
endar year, and if the hurricane
deductible was used up with the
first hurricane, is explained in this
way: After Hurricane A has come
and gone, another hurricane
slams Florida and causes $10,000
of damage to the covered home,
the All Other Perils deductible
kicks in.' The All Other Perils de-
ductible on the damage would be
$1,000.
Because it is the second hurricane
causing damage to the home and
the hurricane deductible was ex-
hausted in the first hurricane loss,
the All Other Perils deductible
would apply. The insurance com-
pany would pay $9,000 ($10,000
minus $1,000 equals $9,000).
Another example discusses the
possibility of $2,500 in damage
from the first hurricane, and the
loss is below the hurricane de-
ductible of $3,000, with $500 of
the hurricane deductible remain-
ing. When the next hurricane
comes along and causes $10,000
damage, the All Other Perils de-
ductible kicks in so the home-
owner would receive $9,000 on
the second hurricane's damage
($10,000 minus $1,000 equals
$9,000).
Also, according to Florida Statute
627.701, a homeowner may qualify
for optional hurricane deductibles
equal to $500 or two percent.
Those who have questions are
urged to contact their agent.


P&Z Mulls Hotel/Condo

Questions


The main topic of the Franklin
County Planning & Zoning Com-
mission on Tuesday, Sept. 13 was
the Commercial Hotel/Condo Re-
sort question. There seems to be
no end to the discussion. With
several ways to look at how to
permit and govern guidelines to
construction, the topic has come
up recently in several civic meet-
ings.
Also considered was a review of
Critical Shoreline Applications,
including a request to construct
a Single Family Residential Dock
and boat ramp on Lot 4, New River
Harbor in Carrabelle. The appli-
cation has met all local and state
requirements, according to a P &
Z report. The request was to be
submitted by GEA, Inc, agent for
Tamara Ramsey, applicant.
Under consideration at the same
meeting was a request to con-
struct a Single Family Pier at 1693
US Highway 98, Carrabelle. The
application has met all local and
state requirements, according to
the P&Z report. Request submit-
ted by GEA, Inc, agent for Coastal
View Development, LLC, appli-
cant.
The P&Z also considered a request
to re-zone Lots 1 & 2, Block 4, Unit


1 East, St. George Island, from C-
2 Commercial Business to C-4
Commercial Mixed Use. Request
submitted by GEA, Inc, agent for
Shamshad Sanaullah, applicant.
A request for Sketch Plat approval
of a 4 lot subdivision was consid-
ered. The subdivision, named "Is-
land Breeze" would be on a 4.31
acre parcel lying in Section 21 &
28, Township 8 South, Range 6
West, in Eastpoint. The request
was submitted by GEA, Inc, agent
for Steve Lowe, applicant.
Final plat approval was consid-
ered for a 4 lot subdivision called
Red Fish Run, adding one extra
lot. The parcel lies in Section 21
& 28, Township 8 South, Range 6
South, Eastpoint. The request was
submitted by R.T. Spohrer, owner.
Also considered was a request to
modify an existing PUD Ordinance
named 'Tucker's Landing PUD" a
parcel of land lying in Section 27,
Township 8 South, Range 8 West,
Apalachicola. Request submitted
by Inovia Consulting Group, agent
for Tuckers Landing LLC, appli-
cant.
The group also received a report
from the zoning administrator and
the Alligator Point Water District
Letter.


Elvis Lives In Local Writer's


Novel
Diane Thomas, who divides her
time between St. George Island
and the Georgia mountains north
of Atlanta, has written a coming
of age novel about the dreams of
an Elvis fan. The book is called In
the Year the Music Changed.
Thomas's novel pairs an earnest
young singer named Elvis Presley
with a teenage girl who yearns to
become a poet, in a year-long ex-
change of letters that "rocks their
lives".
In the book, the Elvis fan is iso-
lated at school by her intelligence
and the harelip scar that disfig-
ures her mouth and troubled at
home by undercurrents in her
parents' marriage. She writes to
Elvis who answers her and enlists


her to teach him how to "talk
good".
Their year-long correspondence
chronicles the girl and Elvis' com-
ing of age, both as artists and as
individuals. The young singer's
responses to the poetic letters ex-
pose his fierce innocence in the
year before his star bursts forth,
and provide a glimpse into the
grassroots history of rock and roll.
Set in the twilight days of the seg-
regated South, the book offers a
study of a nation on the brink of
momentous change. The book is
published by Toby Press, of New
Milford, CT. Thomas, former At-
lanta Constitution entertainment
editor, Atlanta magazine staff
writer and freelancer, divides her
time between the Georgia moun-
tains and St. George Island.


GENERAL CONTRACTORS
RG0055056





Tractor Work Foundation Pilings
* Aerobic Sewage Treatment Systems Commercial Construction
Marine Construction Utility Work-Public &
Septics Coastal Hauling Private


Bow Wow

Benefit For

Katrina

Victims

The Franklin County Humane,
Society is holding a Bow Wow Ben-
efit on Sunday, Sept. 25, at Harry
A's at 5 p.m. to help furry victims
recover from the fury of Hurricane
Katrina's devastation along the
Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama
Gulf Coast.
"All proceeds benefit the work of
the Franklin County Humane So-
ciety in helping the animals left
behind after New Orleans -was
evacuated," said Susan Bickel,
president. "We are taking a van
load of dog and cat food to help
those less fortunate.
"The sight on television of those
dogs and cats being left behind i1
the evacuation was heartbreak-
ing," said Bickel. "One woman s
seeing-eye dog was left behind,
with her begging for it to be al-
lowed to go with her."
Tickets for the benefit at Harry A's
are $15 plus a donation of dog or
cat food. "Let's fill the van with
Kibble," said Bickel.
Entertainment begins at 5 p.m.,
with smooth jazz by the Don Juan
Band from 5 to 7. Dinner is to be
served at 6 p.m., "with plenty of
good stuff to eat and drink," said
Bickel. "At seven a slave auction
and silent auction will be held,"
'she added.
Corporate sponsors include Harry
A's arid Franklin County 'Coast
Line newspaper. "The Himane
Society needs help," said Bickel!
"So, let's have a party."


County's

Engineers

Differ With

Private

Consultant

Over

Eastpoint

Las Brisas

Raising of the road bed in Las
Brisas will causeflooding,
according to Inovia
Consulting Group
While the county engineers,
Preble-Rish, advised Alan Pierce
that the proposed rising of the
road bed in Las Brisas would not
cause flooding, Inovia Consulting
Group disagrees.
On August 17, under signature of
Jim Waddell, project engineer, he
wrote to the Franklin County
Planning office about his meetings
with Mr. Steve Hufstetler, owner
of the Eastpoint Dollar General
Store, and representatives of the
Northwest Water Management
District, Florida Dept. of Environ-
mental Protection and Preble--
Rich, Inc. concerning the cou n ty'-s
plan to elevate the cul-de-sac por-
tion of the roadway, He wrote, in
part:
"In Summary:
* The existing swale system in the,
subdivision is in a state of failure
* It is questionable as to whether
the project drainage can be re-
stored to meet State water quality
standards.
* It is premature to move fori ard
with paving of the road without
knowing the extent of jurisdic-
tional wetlands on the site and
how the limits of wetlands might
affect the roadway improvements
for proper friction of drainage fa-
cilities within the existing ease-
ments. It is our understanriilg
that the NWFWMD is coordinat-
ing the delineation to be coiti-
pleted by FDEP.







S.. 4 .--




jfirst Saptist Cb4urcb
St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and


worship the living Christ!


Sunday Bible Study
Worship & Praise
Sunday Night
Wed. "Power Hour"


10:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.


"Walking in Christ".


* Design of the drainage facilities
must be considered in the design
of the roadway improvements,
particularly if the improvements
associated within the drainage
easements are to be integrated
into the drainage facilities associ-
ated with the roadway.
Based on the above information,
I cannot recommend to my client
that he not object to the elevation
of the cul-de-sac portion of the
road at this time.
The comments contained herein
are the opinion of this firm based
on my understanding of the in-
put from those in attendance at
the meeting. Should you have any
questions regarding this informa-
tion, please call at any time.
On August 26th, Mr. Wadell com-
municated again with the plan-
ning office. He said,
"May this letter serve as a follow-
up to my correspondence to you
dated August 17, 2005 concern-
ing the subject project.
* Based on a review of furnished
information and data indepen-
dently collected by this firm, it is
my opinion that raising of the road
bed in Las Brisas as illustrated in
the County Engineer's plans dated
October'04 and August 13, 2005
(provided to us by the Engineer)
will deplete storage capacity in the
drainage basin, exacerbate block-
age of historic and proposed
drainage patterns, and cause
flooding.
* Data necessary to assure that
the roadway as designed will meet
applicable regulatory criteria bus
not been obtained, including lim-
its of jurisdictionalwetlands and
a geotechnical investigation for
the stormwater design. My earlier
correspondence documents FDEP's
determination that the existing
drainage system is in a state of
failure with regard to meeting
water quality criteria. If this data
has been collected since our meet-
ing in the field, I would appreci-
ate a copy to review:"



Boyd Praises

Aid For

Victims Of

Hurricane

Katrina

Legislation will provide
federal fundsfor recovery,
ease rule restrictions for .
hurricane victims, and
facilitate flood insurance
claims
Congressman Allen Boyd (D-
North Florida) today'voted in fa-
vor of a second emergency spend-
ing bill (HR 3673) to provide $51.8
billion for Hurricane Katrina re-
lief. Congressman Boyd also sup-
ported legislation to relax student
aid repayment rules (HR 3169 &
HR 3668), hasten federal welfare
finds to states (HR 3672), and in-
crease the Federal Emergency
Management Agency's (FEMA)
borrowingauthority to pay federal
flood insurance claims.
The emergency supplement bill
(HR 3673) will provide federal
funds for recovery efforts and di-
saster relief on the Gulf Coast, al-
locating $50 billion to FEMA, $1.4
billion to the Department of De-
fense and $100 million to Army
Corps of Engineers. This is the


The Franklin Chronicle


DRIVER LICENSE AND VEHICLE INSPECTION CHECKPOINTS
AUTHORIZATION

OUINCY DISTRICT
Members in Troop H, Quincy district, are hereby authorized to conduct driver licensevehicle
inspection checkpoints during daylight hours at the following locations(s):
DATE(S) LOCATIONS)
GADSDEN COUNTY
05-01-05-09-01-05 SR 10(US 90), SR 12, SR 65, SR 267, Fantana Trail
0Q.2-05- 0948-0$5 SR 269, CR 65, CR 157, CR 159, Fantana Trail
L09-05-09S-105 CR 161, CR 270, CR 270-A, CR274, Fantam Trail
-16-05 -09-22.05 CR 268, Brickyard Road, Joe Adms Road, Selman Road, Fantana Trail
0>-23-05-09-29M5 SR 10(US 90), SR 12., SR 65, SR 267, Fanta Trail
0IL-30M-09.-3-05 SR 269, CR 65, CR 157, CR 159, Fantana Trail

DATE(S) LOCATIONS(S)
LIBERTY COUNTY
0; -01-05-09-01-05 SR 267, SR 12, Camel Lake Road, Myer Amn St, River Road, CR 67
OS-O0-os 09-085 SR 65, CR 67A. CR 379 (Hoecake Rd.), Joe Chason Rd., Turkey Creek Rd.
09-09.05-09-15-05 SR 67CR, CR 270 (MLK Rd.), CR 2224 (Blue Springs Rd.), Freeman Rd.
OS-16-05-09-22-05 SR 20, CR 1641 (Dempsey Barron Rd.), White Springs Rd., Pea Ridge Rd.
S-23-05- 09-29-05 SR 267. SR 12, Camel Lake Road, Myes Ann SL, River Road, CR 67
oS-30.05- 09-30-05 SR 65, CR 67A, CR 379 (Hoecake Rd.), Joe Chason Rd., Turkey Creek Rd

DATES) LOCATIONS(S)
WAKULLA COUNTY
09.01-05-09-01-05 SR 30(US 98), SR 375, SR 61(US 319), SR 267, and Cjer Posey Road.
09.02-05 09-OS- SR 363, SR 369, SR 377, SR 372 CR 375
09.09-05- 091-s 05 SR 299, SR 385, CR 61, CR 370, CR 373, Trice Lane
09.16-5 -09-22.05 CR 372, CR 372A, CR 372B, CR 373A, CR 365
09.2305 09-29-05 SR 30(US 98), SR 375, SR 61(US 319), SR 267, and Cajer PoseyRoad.
09.30-05 09-3-05 SR 363, SR 369, SR 377, SR 372 CR 375
S DATE(S) LOCATIONS(S)
FRANKLIN COUNTY
S9-oi-0s5-09-01-5 SR30, SR30A, SR 65
C 9-02-5 09-805 SR 384, SR67, SR377
C9-09-05-09-15-05 CR370, CR 157, CR 59
C9-16-05-09-22-05 CR 374, CR 30A SR 300 (Saint Geotge Island Causeway).
09-23-05-09-29-05 SR 30, SR 30A, SR 65
09-30-05-09-30-05 SR 384, SR 67, SR 377


second emergency supplemental
bill of federal money for relief and
recovery efforts. Last week, Con-
gress passed a $10.5 billion emer-
gency spending bill for Hurricane
Katrina relief.
'This funding proves that Con- '
gress is committed to providing
whatever is needed to help our
Gulf Coast'neighbors recover and'
rebuild in the aftermath of Hurri-
cane Katrina" said Congressman
Boyd."We are respond ing to what'
is certain!lyone of the largest di-l'
saster.'rspO'ose efforts in'out"
:natidn's'history. At this time we'
must focus:on the people and ri6t
the process'-This is an expensive
and difficult task, but we will see
it through. These funds will help
with the rescue and clean-up ef-
forts."
Congress also passed the Pell
Grant Hurricane and Disaster
Relief Act (HR 3169) and the Stu-
dent Grant Hurricane and Disas-
ter Relief.Act (HR 3668).to allow.
the Education Department to
waive the repayment requir'e-
ments for Pell Grant recipients
and other federal student grant
assistance for those students.
whose attendance is interrupted
due to a major disaster such as
Hurricane Katrina. In order to
qualify for these waivers, students
must have lived, worked or at-
tended schools in an area desig-
nated by the President as a major
disaster.
In addition, the House passed leg-
islation that makes a number of
changes to current law in order
to facilitate aid to families affected
by Hurricane Katrina through the
Temporary Assistance for Needy
Families (TANF) program. The
TANF Emergency Response &
Recovery Act (HR 3672) will speed
welfare funds to the states and
reimburse states for the TANF
benefits they provide to families
who relocated as a result of Hur-
ricane Katrina. This bill will also
relax work rules and benefit time
limits for recipients affected by the
hurricane.


St. George Island
United Methodist Church


You ARE INVITED TO

SUNDAY WORSHIP 9:30A.M.


201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org Pastor: Ray Hughes


Congress addressed the antici-
pated shortfall in funds available
to pay victims of Hurricane
Katrina for damage to their homes
with the passage of the National
Flood Insurance Program En-
hanced 'Borrowing Authority Act
(HR 3669). This bill temporarily
increases to $3.5 billion, from
$1.5 billion, the amount of money
that FEMA'can borrow from the
Treasury to pay flood insurance
'dlaimsn' under the National Flood
Insurance Program. The increased
borrowing authority will remain in
effect thirogh Sept. 30, 2008.

6th Annual

Estuaries Day

Celebration

The Apalachicola National Estua-
rine Research Reserve will hold ad
open house, 2:00 p.m. to 6:30
p.m., on Friday, September 23rd.
The event will be hosted by the
Reserve and Friends of the Re-
serve.
Events include touch tanks, arts
and crafts, oyster tonging game,
announcement of poster and art
contest winners, door prizes for
adults, beekeeping demonstra-
tions and the shark awareness
program.
Foot traffic will enter the Reserve,
located at 261 7th Street, Apa-
lachicola, at the front gate. All
parking is to be at the city marina
outside the gate. Children must
be accompanied by an adult for
entry into the Reserve.



THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


Trinittp

850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


25 years of experience
making dreams come true.
Let us help you find the property of your
dreams in the St. George Island and
Apalachicola Bay area.


The A-Frame: Three bedroom, three bath home located Saltwater Cowboy: Two bedroom, one bath, Gulf view
on St. George Island. Enjoy the Gulf & Bay views from home located in the St. George Island Plantation. Situ-
one of the higher lots on the island. Unique modified A- ated on one acre, this home features tile floors, updated
Frame home has floor to 2-story-ceiling windows. Guest appliances, a'deck overlooking the Gulf and much more.
apartment, 9x16 workshop, office/studio, storage area $899,000. MLS#105649.
& outdoor shower on lower level. No-fuss yard, great
water. $599,000. MLS#105603. "New Look, Same People"
Suncoast Realty & Property Management, Inc.
224 Franklin Boulevard St. George Island, FL 32328
800/341-2021 850/927-2282 www.uncommonflorida.com


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 September 2005 Page


COMMUNITY RATING SYSTEM
PROGRESS REPORT

Franklin County, Florida
120088 NFIP Number


Publisher's Note: Only a few brief paragraphs have been deleted
in this republication of the Community Rating System Progress
Report required by state government. The Chronicle is providing
these excerpts in the interest of informing the public about the
"state of readiness" of Franklin County in the face of natural di-
sasters such as the hurricane Katrina. Copies of the complete
report are available at the Planning Office, Apalachicola.


1. Name of the CRS Floodplain Management Plan1.

Franklin County Local Mitigation Strategy

2. Date Adopted.

April 5, 2005
3. Have any revisions been made to the plan, or are revisions underway at this time
to ensure compliance with both DMA2K and CRS requirements as implemented in
the 2002 CRS Coordinator's Manual? If so, what is the expected date of completion
for these revisions?

The Franklin County Local Mitigation Strategy was updated during 2004. No
current revisions are underway.

5. Summarize any floods that occurred during the year (if any).

On June 11, 2005, Tropical Storm Arlene came ashore near Mobile, Alabama.
This storm caused erosion at Alligator Point that severely damaged Alligator Drive.
On July 10, 2005, Hurricane Dennis came ashore near Navarre, Florida,
approximately 120 miles northwest of Apalachicola. The winds did not exceed tropical
storm force in Franklin County, and there was not much rain, but there was a storm surge
of approximately 10 to 12 feet This storm surge destroyed approximately 100 houses in
Franklin County and damaged 200. The storm also destroyed approximately 3,000 feet
of Alligator Drive and-washed out U.S. Highway 98 between Eastpoint and Carrabelle.

6. What impact did the floods have on the repetitive loss area?

The high storm surge destroyed several repetitive loss structures in Franklin
County.


8. Were any objectives not reached or is implementation behind.schedule? If so,
state why.

Not all objectives were reached during this year. Overall implementation is on
schedule.

9. Should new projects be started or should any of the recommendations or
objectives be revised.

It is not recommended that any new projects be started or-any objectives be
revised. .

10. Progress Reportdiscussed and/or made available at a public meeting. (This
submittal must include documentation that the report was submitted to the,
governing body, ie. meeting minutes, released to media, made available to the
public and/or prepared by the.same planning committee that prepared the plan.)
For purposes of this report, the governing body is the governing body of the
respective community, i.e. commission, council, etc. Workinggroup minutes are not
sufficient.

This progress report was presented to the Franklin County Board of County
Commissioners on Tuesday, September 6, 2005. Copies of the report were also provided
to the local newspaper and radio station.
- : For more information, contact: Mark C. Curenton Phone: (850) 653-9783


2005
ELEMENTS OF THE
FRANKLIN COUNTY LOCAL MITIGATION STRATEGY

1. Propose viable alternate routes to the Florida Department of Transportation for
relocating Highway 98 away from coast in areas where it is repetitively damage.

This project is still pending.

2. Protect CR 370 (Alligator Point access road) from storm surge.
During the winter of 2004-2005 the Corps of Engineers never moved any sand
from the Apalachicola River to renourish the beach at Alligator Point.
With funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency Hurricane Ivan
damage reimbursement, the County was proceeding with a design to extend the existing
revetment eastward to protect CR 370. During Hurricane Arlene on June 11, 2005,
CR370 was damaged by the storm. One month later, on July 10, 2005, Hurricane Dennis
destroyed approximately 3000 feet of the road. Franklin County is investigating its
options in rebuilding the road, including relocating the road further inland. No decision
has been made on what course of action to follow.

3. Integrate County tax appraiser's records and 911 system into GIS to allow up-to-
date analysis of property in hazard zones and improve emergency response.
The Franklin County Property Appraiser's office is working on having their
property maps digitized. They expect to complete this project by July 1, 2005. This will
provide a base map of the County for a GIS system.
The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve has received a grant to
work in partnership with the Franklin County Planning Department to implement a GIS
system in the County. This grant will pay for hardware and software for a GIS system
and also provide an employee in the County office for approximately six months to set
the system up and train County employees on the system.
The final system will integrate information from Property Appraiser's records, the
911 system, the County Planning Department, and the National Estuarine Research
Reserve into an overall GIS system. .

4. Build a new emergency operations center out of storm surge area.

This project is pending until funding is acquired and an alternative site is chosen.

5. Develop and maintain ability to use alternate evacuation routes to Highway 98.

The County has paved Twin Lakes Road with funds from a Community
Development Block Grant. This road runs parallel to and north of Highway 98 and can
be used as an alternative evacuation route through Eastpoint.
S During Hurricane Dennis, on July 10, 2005, Highway 98 between Eastpoint and
Carrabelle was washed out by the storm surge. Buck Siding Road and North Road
throughh Tate's Hell State Forest were used as an alternative route between Carrabelle and
Eastpoint.

6. Relocate Alligator Point fire station from storm surge and high wind hazard area

The St. Joe Company has offered a site in the SinummerCamp development for a
new fire station.

7. Extend sewer lines west of Apalachicola (Brownsville area), especially to areas
with septic tanks vulnerable to repetitive flood damage, with County assistance.
A private developer extended a sewer line along Highway 98 in the Two-Mile
area to serve "Steamers", a restaurant. There are several more development proposals
along the north side of Highway 98,at the west end of Two-Mile that would require the
extension of sewer lines to them before they could be permitted. It is anticipated that the
developers will pay for this sewer line extension.
There has been no progress on extending the sewer lines in the Brownsville area.

8. Raise bridge on Highway 67, an evacuation route for Carrabelle, where it floods
at Crooked River.

The bridge has been raised but the approaches have not.

9. Seek funds to purchase and maintain automated emergency telephone warning
system to rapidly notify and evacuate County. .
The Franklin County Sheriffs Office has a "reverse 911" system that allows them
to send a message to telephone prefixes in the county.

10. Collect topographic and elevation data using airborne light detection and
ranging technology (LIDAR) in cooperation with the Water Management District.

The Northwest Florida Water Management District is applying to the Federal
Emergency Management Agency for funding.


11. Institute notification process for hazardous cargo on the Intercoastal Waterway.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the agency responsible for the Intercoastal
Waterway, will not notify the County of traffic on the waterway. Monitoring of radios
may be the only way to know what is traveling on the waterway.
12. Routinely notify hospitals, schools, and prisons within the hazardous material
vulnerability zones of potential risks and standard precautions.
No action has been taken on this project.
13. Routinely notify owners of forested lands with fire safety issues of the risks they
face.
No action has been taken on this project by Franklin County.

14. Better water system pumps in selected locations of Eastpoint
No action has been taken on this project
The Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is currently planning major
improvements for their water system, which will include a new well and a new storage
tank. These proposed improvements should accomplish this objective.

15. Relocate Apalachicola fire station from flood hazard area.
No action has been taken on this project.

16. Relieve localized flooding from stormwater in the areas of24t and 25" Avenues
and 8" through 10" Streets between Avenues J and G.

Stormwater improvements have been made between 8' and 10 Streets between
Avenues J and G in the City of Apalachicola. .

17. Buy out repetitively damaged structures on Alligator Point.
The County received a Flood Mitigation Assistance Grant to purchase a repetitive
loss property on Alligator Point (RL#0074248), but the property owner turned down the
County's offer to purchase the property. This property was destroyed by the storm surge
during Hurricane Dennis on July 10, 2005. Six other repetitive loss properties at
Alligator Point were also destroyed during the same storm. These were RL#0129256,
RL# 0005957, RL#0094446, RL#0055288, RL#0010080, and RL#0072756.
The County is working with the owner of one repetitive loss property
(RL#0137362) to apply for a Hazard Mitigation Grant to buy the property.

18. Extend water and sewer lines along River Road to provide fire hydrants and
protection.
Water lines have been extended along River Road in Carrabelle. Sewer lines are
planned but not yet constructed.

19. Draft a site alteration ordinance designed to minimize stormwater flooding of
off-site properties.

No action has been taken on this project.
20. Hazard awareness, resources, and evacuation information packet mailed to new
residents.

No action has been taken on this project

21. Place shutters on the Raney House.

The County has allocated its Hurricane Ivan rditigation funds to be used for this
project. Bob Cambric, as a consultant for the Apalachee Regional Planning Council,
submitted the application.
22. Provide hazard mitigation workshops to local builders with FLASH, Inc.

A workshop offered in April 2004 with FLASH, Inc. (Florida Alliance for Safe
Homes) was cancelled due to lack of interest. Franklin County will continue to work
with FLASH, Inc. to coordinate future workshops.

23. Identify limited fire service areas.

No action has been taken on this project.

24. Back-up power generators for sewer station lift pumps in Eastpoint

Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is currently researching equipment to
purchase and funding sources.

Continued on Page 9


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Page 6 16 SeDtember 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


How You Can Help Katrina

Victims

First Call For Assistance: The FEMA
Teleregistration Line
Hurricane Katrina victims in Alabama's three declared counties as
well as evacuees from other hard-hit Gulf Coast states are reminded
that the only way to register for federal and state disaster assistance
is by calling the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's)
toll-free teleregistration line.
All disaster victims throughout the area are urged to call FEMA's toll-
free application number 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) or for the speech-
or hearing-impaired 1-800-462-7585 (TTY). The toll-free telephone
numbers are available 24-hours a day, seven days a week until fur-
ther notice. Multilingual operators are available at these numbers to
assist disaster victims. Registration can also be completed online at
http://www.fema.gov.
The three Alabama counties eligible for FEMA individual assistance
programs are Baldwin. Mobile and Washington. "The aid can include
funding for temporary disaster housing assistance, U. S. Small Busi-
ness Administration low-interest loans for individuals and business
owners to repair or replace real or personal property' and housing
repair; grants to help meet serious disaster-related needs and ex-
penses not covered by insurance or other assistance programs; and
disaster unemployment assistance.
Due to the extraordinary scale of devastation, applicants are encour-
aged to call late in the evening or very early in the morning, or on
weekends. The best time to call is after 12 midnight when call volume
is at its lowest.
Officials continue to urge Mississippi Gulf Coast evacuees not to at-
tempt to return home. Evacuees or residents attempting to get to the
Gulf Coast could be impeding rescue missions, which are still ongo-
ing. Search and rescue teams, other support services and commodi-
ties from other states have joined in the effort to assist federal, state
and local authorities.
Interstate 1-55 is open, and generally, highways north of and includ-
ing Interstate 20 are open. Interstate I-10 is closed to the public for
the foreseeable future. Highway information is updated regularly by
calling 601-359-7017.

Restoration of Cellular Services
Cellular South is working to restore cell service to Hancock County by
placing a temporary tower in the Wal-Mart parking lot at Bay St. Louis.
Other cell companies are working to provide "cellular on wheels"
(COWs) to the affected area.

Shelters
Currently, there are 99 American Red Cross shelters open. The cur-
rent total population registered population is 12,958, with the total
capacity of opened shelters at 32,696. The need to open additional
shelters is anticipated. Local governments and other community or-
ganizations are asked to consider opening shelters, and local busi-
nesses are urged to donate supplies to support those additional shel-
ters in their communities.

Search and Rescue
Currently a total of 22 teams are engaged in search and rescue opera-
tions. U.S. Coast Guard and local rescue teams have rescued thou-
sahds of individuals.

Damage Assessments
RESIDENTIAL HOMES
Destroyed 176
Major Damage 2,871
Minimal Damage 8, 038


BUSINESS AND AGRICULTURE
Destroye0,28
Major Damage 61
Minimal Damage 249


V(


Coroner confirmed deaths 161
MS Secretary of State, Eric Clark reminds people to be cautious about
giving to charitable organizations that are unfamiliar. If you are not
sure if a company is legitimate, please call 601-359-6367.
APPLYING FOR ASSISTANCE WHILE AWAY FROM HOME
Even if you fled ahead of Hurricane Katrina to another state, help is
still as close as your telephone or online computer.
If you evacuated from one of the Gulf Coast states, and are still away
from a home or business you believe sustained uninsured losses from
Hurricane Katrina, you can speed the assistance process if you apply
right where you are before returning home, Department of Homeland
Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) officials
said today.
The President has declared areas of Alabama, Louisiana and Missis-
sippi as major disaster areas.
FEMA has created two ways to apply. You can call FEMA's toll-free
number 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) or 1-800-462-7585 for those with
speech or hearing impediments. FEMA specialists will be working
around the clock seven days a week taking application information
until further notice.
For those with access to a computer with Internet connections, appli-
cations can be filed at FEMA's Website, www.fema.gov where home
page instructions at the "Online Individual Assistance Center" will
lead applicants to the right place.


A HAIR T

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BODY WRAPS
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If you do not have a computer with you, they are generally available at
public libraries. Many commercial office suppliers and motels also
have computer facilities.
If you have the information below ready, it will speed the telephone
process. But heavy telephone traffic caused by the large number of
applications may cause delays. To avoid such delays, place your calls
well before dawn or after sunset. Be ready to provide such informa-
tion as:
Your mailing address.
A telephone number where you can be reached.
* Your social security number.
* An indication of your income.
* Any insurance information,
HOUSING
The Red Cross is issuing hotel/motel vouchers good for 14 days. Go
to its Family Service Center, 243 Office Plaza Drive, Tallahassee. Open
9 am. to 5p.m. seven days a week. Special phone numbers will be
available soon or those who cannot make the trip. The Red Cross
does not reimburse for hotel bills already paid, but the Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency might. FEMA forms can be completed at
the Family Service Center.
CHILD CARE
Child Care Resource and Referral can help parents find child care.
In Leon county, call 414-6085, ext. 204. In Wakulla County, 926-
0980, ext. 210.
JOBS
The Agency for Workforce Innovation can help displaced workers ap-
ply for assistance and look for temporary work in Florida. Call (866)
352-2345 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Also, for
unemployment compensation services: Alabama hurricane victims,
call (866) 234-5382; Mississippi and Louisiana hurricane victims, call
921-7400.
CASH GRANTS
Go to the Family Service Center, 243 Office Plaza Drive, Tallahassee
to apply for one of the Red Cross cash grants of $700 to $1,800,
depending on family size.
ONLINE RESOURCES
Find information at www.myflorida.com on a wide variety of services
for evacuees in Florida, ranging from finding temporary housing and
employment assistance to enrolling displaced students in schools or
replacing a driver's license. It also provides access to information on
health and human services, including crisis counseling, food stamps,
medical assistance and residential placements for people with dis-
abilities.
Tallahassee Community College is offering free Internet access to
evacuees at its on-campus computer labs. The Center for Economic
and Workforce Development at TCC is open from 8 am, to 5p.m. week-
days. The TCC library is open 7:30 am, to 9 p.m. Monday through
Thursday, 7:30. am, to 5 p.m. Friday and 10 am, to 2 p.m. Saturday.
It's closed Sunday. Call 201-8760 for more information.
HEALTH
United Healthcare has established a 24-hour, toll-free hot line for
anyone affected by Katrina, regardless of their health-care provider,
to help them cope with health, emotional, financial and legal con-
cerns. Call (866) 615-8700.
DONATIONS
The Federal Emergency Management Agency recommends a number.
of reputable charities that accept money. For a complete list, go online
to www.fema.gov. Also, go to www.volunteerflorida.org for a list of
charities helping hurricane victims in the Gulf states. Here is a par-
tial list:
* American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund, (800) 435-7669 or
www.redcross.org. Major credit cards accepted. Also, shoppers at
Publix Super Markets may donate money when checking out.
* America's Second Harvest, (800) 344-8070.
* Or America's Second Harvest of the.Big Bend 562-3d33. Donations.-
can also' be made online at www.fightinghunger.org. Second Harvest'
also needs volunteers to sort disaster-felief food. Call 562-3033.



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* Florida Hurricane Relief Fund, (800) 825-3786 or
www.flahurricanefund.org. Write checks to Volunteer Florida Foun-
dation, 401 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32301.
* The Green Cross, 656-7158 or www.GreenCross.org. Send checks
to the Green Cross Foundation, 1564 Keily Run, Tallahassee, FL 32301.
* Salvation Army, (800) 725-2769 or www.1800salarmy.org.
VOLUNTEERS
Call these organizations to volunteer locally or in the hurricane zone.
* American Red Cross: Call 878-6080,
register online at www.tallytown.com/redcross or go to the Capital
Area Chapter office at 187 Office Plaza Drive in Tallahassee. The chap-
ter has received many calls from residents wanting to volunteer and
asks for patience as they reply.
* The Green Cross: Visit the Web site joingreencross. mollyguard.com
or call 656-7158.
* Leon County Volunteer Center: Call 921-3015 or visit the Web site
www.VolunteerLeon.org VolunteerConnection or send an e-mail to
volunteerleon@leoncounty.fl.gov.
* Salvation Army: Call (800) SAL-ARMY (725-2769).
POETRY.COM TO HELP VICTIMS OF HURRICANE KATRINA
Poetry.com and The International Library of Poetry announced that
they will donate one dollar ($1.00) to the American Red Cross for
every poem they receive during the month of September. Company
spokesperson, Eric Mueck said, "Our Board of Directors has decided
to focus all of our charitable efforts on helping the people affected by
Hurricane Katrina. The American Red Cross is our nation's premier
emergency response organization, and we are confident that they will
put our money to good use.
All poetry received will be entered into the International Open Ama-
teur Poetry Contest, where over $1,000,000.00 has been awarded to
amateur poets.
"We welcome all types of poetry," stated Howard Ely, Managing Editor
for poetry.com "When people learn about our donation, they will sud-
denly realize that their own poetic works can make a difference, as
well as gain national recognition.. In fact, we are already receiving
thousands of poems expressing personal feelings about this tragic
disaster"
To enter, send ONE original poem, any subject and any style to: The
International Library of poetry, Suite 19923, 1 Poetry Plaza, Owings
Mills, MD 21117. The poem must be 24 lines or less, and the poet's
name and address should appear on the top of the page. Entries must
be postmarked or sent via the Internet by September 30, 2005. You
may also enter online at www.poetry.com
The International Library of Poetry, founded in 1986, is the largest
amateur poetry publisher and membership organization in the world.
VETERANS
The South Central Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care Network has es-
tablished a toll free number for Veterans wvho receive care at the VA
Gulf Coast Health Care System in Biloxi and Gulfport and the New
Orleans VA Medical Center. The majority of veterans in the Florida
panhandle receive medical treatment from the VA facilities in Biloxi
and Gulfport as these can be more convenient than the VA center in
Lake City. Florida.*
The toll-free number is 1-800-507-4571, which will be open 24 hours
a day, seven days a week. Veterans are encouraged to call with ques-
tions, such as where to access health care, how to receive prescrip-
tion drugs, or any other concerns they may have about their care. The
phone number may also be used by families and friends seeking in-
formation about patients from those VA facilities affected by Hurri-
cane Katrina.


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 September.2005 Page 7.


Briefs from Page 2

gry about their situation. We are
looking at ten years that we
haven't had a road out there. A
man stood up at the meeting Sat-
urday; he said that he paid $2,000
in taxes five years ago; he paid
$5,000 last year, and he paid
$10,000 in the one he just got this
year." Mr. Osborne explained that
recent tax increases to the area
have amounted to 93% last year
and 53% this year. "We have some
very angry people out there, If a
house out there catches on fire
today the fire chief has written the
residents that he can not fight the
fire. We don't have a water line big
enough to run one hydrant out on
Alligator point. And we don't see
anything coming to take care of a
public safety issue (an escape
route right-of-way)."
Ms. Saunders told Mr. Osborne,
apologetically, that the Board is
still waiting on the DEP to have a
meeting with them.to. tell them
what they intend to do about the
situation out there.
"Are they going to do anything out
there? You got a man here today
who says that he is going to spend
50 million dollars on highway 98.
Now I realize that the Highway is
more important than us but, nev-
ertheless, we have six hundred
people out there."
"You've brought up a good point,"
said Mr. Mosconis, "I think that
we ought to have another budget
workshop." Mr. Mosconis then
explained that the tax base in this
county is now over three billion
dollars. "Don't look at me, he
said, "You all know where I stand
on the money being wasted in this
County. This is not the year to be
giving five thousand dollar raises
to people. And I'll tell you who's


paying for all of this, like Mr.
Osborne says, that one man with
the two thousand, five thousand,
and then ten thousand. I know
where the money is coming from."
"Now we have never fussed about
our taxes here," said Mr. Osborne.
"We didn't complain when you
built a seventy million dollar
bridge out to Mr. Crofton's Island.
We came here and asked that you
double our premium to the fire
department. We buy the equip-
ment for our fire department. Fif-
teen percent of the taxes that I pay
goes to the fire department. We're
not saying to pull back the money
that we pay to the school board
even though there is what, three
or four children from all of Alliga-
tor Point going to the schools. But
we have got to have something
done and we don't need to spend
another ten years on dirt roads
getting in and out. And we don't
need to have people trapped in-
side Alligator Point that have no
way out."
"Well, should we have another
budget workshop," suggested Mr.
Crofton. A motion was then made
by Mr. Mosconis to conduct an-
other public budget workshop. It
was seconded by Mr. Crofton.
Commissioners Saunders and
Putnal voted nay. Mr. Lockley was
tot present; therefore the motion
was denied.

Brief briefs
The ambulance service is being
put out for bids. They have two
different companies who have
submitted bids at the moment,
The Eastpoint channel will not be
dredged. Approval has not yet
been gained from the Florida De-
partment of Environmental Pro-
tection and the' money that had


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already been allocated to the
project has been spent elsewhere.
Planning and Zoning is still con-
sidering Hotel/Condo rules and
regulations.
DaaSee (Weems Hospital) is in
default. Mike Shuler, the county
attorney, informed the board that
he had a verbal commitment from
the DaaSee organization but ...
"we will ha'e to wait and see."
The Thom Lewis case is in Limbo.
Mr. Lewis has decided to see how
the culvert that was installed to
solve his flooding problem works
out but he has five years in
which to file a challenge if he finds
it to be unsatisfactory.
Alan Pierce informed Mr. Putrial
that there is no industry left in
America to go into our industrial
park. "Most of our American in-
dustries have gone offshore," said
Mr. Pierce.
"Don't you see that everything in
the department stores is made in
China," offered Mr. Mosconis.
Interesting to note- Retired Sena-
tor Hollingsworth, in a recent ar-
ticle for Prospects magazine, said;
"If we decide to have a trade war
with China we would have to can.-
cel Christmas." Toys-R-Us and
other large toy manufacturers
have all moved their operations to
China. It seems that China is the
place to go. They are even manu-
facturing many of our weapons
systems. Mr. Hollingsworth also
pointed out that if we decide to go
to war with China, we had better
stockpile a good supply of the
weapons that they produce for us,
otherwise we won't be able to sus-
tain the war. I personally wouldn't
worry about that scenario, from'
my considerable reading on the
subject, weapons manufacturers
have traditionally been more than
willing to sell to both sides in any
worthwhile conflict,
At one point in our history manu-
facturing represented 80% of our
home industry today it repre-
sents 20% and a good many of
them are packing their bags. Cor-
porate taxes at one time repre-
sented 40% of our nation's tax rev-
enue; it is now between ten and
fourteen percent.
China, they say, is the world's new
frontier. Manufactures from com-
panies around the world say that
they cannot afford not to go there.

Director of Administrative
Services
Mr. Alan Pierce-reported that
FEMA has submitted a new Flood
Damage Prevention Ordinance for
the county to consider. "At some
point in the future the county will
probably have to adopt the ordi-
nance. It will replace the county's
current FloqdQ ordinance. The sig-
nificait dil-ere,'' r is that the new


ordinance requires the county al-
low houses to be built one foot
above the base flood require-
ments, and I believe gives the
county additional points on the
CRS program if we allow houses
to be two feet above the base flood
requirements. These new require-
ments could potentially mean the
county will be moving its maxi-
mum allowable height for houses
up two feet. Mark and I will evalu-
ate the ordinance and come back
to the Board with a recommenda-
tion."
Mark Curenton also recommends
the following action to the CDBG
grant that is funding the Lanark
Village drainage project: Board
action to approve a submission of
a request for DCA to amend the
CDBG budget to align actual
spending where possible, and to
decrease the property acquisition
activity to 5,500 square feet. The
budget will be altered to transfer
unused funds remaining in the
sewer rehab, property acquisition
and water hookups into water
lines and drainage. The new prop-
erty acquisition square footage is
the actual amount of Lanark Vil-
lage drainage easement required
and obtained through the grant.
There is no change in the total
funding amount. The Board ap-
proved the recommendation.
Clarification on direction the
Board provided at the last Board
budget workshop regarding the
position of airport grant manager/
airport manager, and the funding
for the position. It is unclear
whether the Board funded a posi-
tion of some title in the amount of
$12,000, or whether the Board
deferred the discussion to Ms.
Williams and expects her to make
a decision without the issue re-
turning to the Board. The Board
decided not to fund the position
but be taken from grant money.
Debris removal by Crowder/Gulf
started September 5, 2005.
We have applied for a waiver from
FEMA for the local match require-
ments. The current match re-
quirement is 12.5%, It is unknown
whether we will get the waiver.

Mobile Home Park
Discussion on the concept
brought forth by Mr. Gary Shiver
regarding the county developing
a mobile home park for county
residents. The Planning Dept.
called Wakulla, Calhoun, Gulf,
Bay, and Alachua counties. None
operate mobile home parks. None
were discussing a moratorium or
a prohibition on the sale of mo-
bile home parks. There is some
sort of a mobile home trust fund
operated by the state of Florida
that is there to help individuals
relocate from a mobile home
park."
"As far as I can tell, and I only did
a brief investigation, the individual


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being displaced applies t0-the
fund. There are cities that do mod-
erate municipal mobile home
parks. I spoke to the manager for
the City of Ocala. He new that the
City of Winter Park also had a
municipal park, and he said there
were other ones as well. In our
discussion, he said Ocala got into
the park business about sixty
years ago as a way of encourag-
ing some tourism. The park was
intended for RVs and short stays
but there are permanent residents
living there in mobile homes that
are unable to move. He said the
City park is a constant problem
and the City has considered clos-
ing the park down but the resi-
dents of the Park can not afford
to move into a privately operated
park."
"Further, it is unclear to me
whether the state would actually
support or encourage Franklin
County in getting into the mobile
home park business considering
our vulnerability to hurricanes.
Further, the Board needs to re-
member that the county requires
any new mobile homes brought
into the county to meet Zone 3
requirements, which are very
stringent, and expensive. Mobile
homes built before 1994 do not
meet those requirements. The
county is taking a large liability if
it opened a park and allowed older
substandard mobile homes to be
placed there. The Board did not
act on this matter.

Ambulance Service
The Health Council believes that
the best option for the county is
to let prospective bidders of am-
bulance service develop the level
of staffing each recommends,
rather than the county stipulat-
ing. Some Council members be-
lieve we should have 2 Advanced
Life Support (ALS) and 1 Basic Life
Support (BLS), while others
thought we should have 3 ALS.

Riverkeeper Proposal
The Apalachicola Riverkeeper Or-
ganization submitted a proposal
to the County, in support of the
seafood industry. Please accept
the following as a proposal to ap-
ply for Federal Hazard Mitigation
Grant funding to support a sus-
tainable Commercial Seafood In-
dustry in Franklin County.
The Need: Commercial Seafood
needs a place to launch from and
recover harvested product at a
reasonable, working distance from
the product harvesting areas. Sea-
sonal tropical storms have peri-
odically wreaked havoc on struc-
tures sited in the Coastal High
Hazard Area (CHHA) of Franklin
County as designated in the
Franklin County Comprehensive
Plan, more particularly in the
coastal lands south of US High-
way 98 in the Eastpoint and 2-
mile areas of the County. With-
out pro-positive action by the
County Commission and the
State, needed coastal properties
will be re-zoned and sold for non
commercial seafood related uses,
effectively precluding commercial
seafood harvesters and proces-
sors from critical water access.
Options: Under the Federally
funded Hazard Mitigation Grant
Program (HMGP) lands that are
predictably in harms way from
such as the storm surge of the
most recent' hurricane, Dennis,
can be procured at a fair market
price with Federal money and set
aside for common, public use, for
such as the launch and recovery
of oyster harvesting boats as has
been done traditionally from these
areas. A feasibility study looking
at the overall situation for the
sustainment of a viable commer-
cial seafood industry in Franklin
County will be supportive of this
HMGP request.
Recommendations: It is recom-
mended that the Board of County
Commissioners approve and for-
ward'to the State (DCA/Emer-
gency Management) this request
or necessary Federal HMGP fund-
ing to support a viable and sus-
tainable commercial seafood in-
dustry in Franklin County. The
actual siting of the proposed work-
ing waterfront lands in Eastpoint
and 2-Mile to be determined by
the pending feasibility study.


St. George Island Realty
235 E. Gulf Beach Dr.
St. George Island, FL 32328

LAND FOR SALE:
Lovely Bay & Marsh Views! Over
State land. Very private, with lush
vegetation including mature palm
trees, pines & oaks. Easy beach
access. MLS#105282. $437,000.
Gulf & Bay Views! Wonderful
sandy path to beach. Full acre
Plantation Lot with beautiful vegeta-
tion. Quiet location. SEE this one!
MLS#106390. $565,000.
First Tier One Acre/Plantation! At
end of cul-de-sac. High lot next to
beach boardwalk. Great Gulf views
& open green space views East &
North. MLS#107424. $1,097,000.


Carrabelle City Council
Meeting September 1,
2005

Birthday Boy

Bombarded

Short-timer mayor has no
easy last meeting
Mayor Jim Brown presided over
his last meeting, since elections.
were scheduled for the following.
week, and celebrated his 82nd-
birthday. Some birthday.
Although not as strident or repeti-.
tive on most issues as was seen
at the August meeting, the dis-'
senting group was heard in force-
as always. First, though, all heard.
from the mayor.
After outlining Carrabelle's plan to
send $10,000 worth of aid to a to-
be-selected "sister city" in the.
Hurricane Katrina disaster area,
and accepting additional funds
from the Chamber of Commerce,:
Knut Rittweger and generators
from city surplus, Mr. Brown chal-;
lenged the room.
"I didn't have anything to do with
bringing it here" (the prison), "but.
I feel like I had an awful lot to do
with getting it open". Sewer and
water infrastructure, easements
under roads and haggling with
property owners, the St. James
Bay line legal battle with Lanark
village, and other challenges took
up all the city's, and particularly'
the mayor's attention.
"The reason I'm going into these-
things ... I've heard so much this"
last 2 or 3 weeks about what hap-
pened ... there's never been any
planning in the city of Carrabelle.,.,
nobody plans anything" ....when-
I get through with this list, I want"
to ask you: If we had had plan-
ning, just how much we could
have accomplished...? We could
have planned "the whole state".'
Next he outlined the water line to
the prison, up Highway 67, and'
the sewer. "The Waste Wate'r
Treatment Plant, which ran right
at $11 million", will be open for-
service "Tuesday of next week.
"We got a half-million dollar fire'
truck at no cost whatsoever to the
city," through Senator Al Lawson's
help. "In the mean time we started
off with a $19 million sewer con-
struction plan with a price,
escalation... that ran to $29 mif--
lion. Well, trying to find the $10-_
million...wasn't the easiest thing"
to do... "There's been a lot of talk-
about running sewer outside the.
city without getting people in the
city ... the only foot of sewer that
the city has run outside the city,;
with my knowledge (and I think
everybody else's knowledge) is the'
sewer going to St. James Bay-,'
which is carried there in order to
give us a spray field.
'There's been some remarks made
about some commissioners being
on the take. I asked for some
names and numbers... 'Well, so--,
and-so told me that he heard it...'
Now, every member of this com-
mission.., their integrity is impecr
cable, as far as I am concerned..,,
thank you" (much applause).
Commissioner Williams intro-
duced the representative of the,
firm who is putting together
Carrabelle's new revised Comp
Plan, which is woefully outdated.
Scheduled for the 15th of Septem-
ber, 7 p.m. at the Senior Center is
a public workshop to review the
draft copy of the new plan.
Dan Cox, former city attorney,
outlined progress in the Sub-,
merged Lands Lease (the city's'
property around the river pavil-.
ion). Commission voted to enter
financial contract negotiations
with a potential representative for'
Carrabelle in the matter.
City Administrator Mclnnis en-
tered a lengthy account of police
activity over the past month. Most
arrests seemed to involve alcohol,
or drugs. He summed up with the:
comment that Carrabelle "is be-.
coming an unfriendly place" for
the drug trade. Also, he explained
the details of the new "Special
Master" ordinance which gives
judicial power to one person ap:-
pointed by the city to charge vio-'
lators of laws pertaining to keep-
ing property reasonably neat. He.
emphasized that cooperation is
the byword for anyone who has
any hardship in complying with
the cleanup, that the city would
help in any way possible.
Thirteen separate readings of or-
dinances and the resultant dis-
cussions took most of the balance
of the meeting. Long Pointe, the
long-reviewed project on the filled
land west of the bridge, took most
of the time and featured 7 speak"
ers in opposition. The goal of


changing the zoning from Agricul:
tural to Residential was finally
approved by the council 3-1, with
Philip Rankin the lone dissenter:
River Road and Mill Road bore the
Sbrunt of most of the other reviews;
with most applications for annex-
ation being approved.

Adjournment
10:15 p.m.






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Enjoy More

of Your Life

with

Chiropractic Care!


JL ,-A -----


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rage o Zi --to !oLepte LuuJ


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


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Announcements

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Financial

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Health

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Home For Sale

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HUNT ELK, Red Stag, Whitetail, Buffalo season opens
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Dennis Help

Available

Chris Floyd, Emergency Sernices
Dffector, Capital A.gg Chaapter.
American Red Cross says help is
still available for victims of Hurri-
cane Dennis. For additional infor-
mation please download, print
and distribute the flyer found at
the following web site:

http: //www.tallytown.com/
redcross/situation/dennis-
flyer.pdf

Learn how to prepare yourself,
your family, your workplace and
your neighborhood for the next
hurricane by visiting the Hurri-
cane Survival Guide for the Capi-
tal Area found at the following web
site:

http://www.tallytown.com/
redcross/hsg.html

Bookmark us at: http://www.
tallytown.com/redcross/ds


CAH wm As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on TV.

ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS


(800) 79447310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW

for Structured Settlements!






i> Primary Residence > No Income Verification
;> Second Homes > No Asset Verification
Investment Property > First & Second Mortgages

S First Choice
SIFF SWIF limt*clllmli`B Sll23
SAMERICA'S DISCOULlT LENDERS
NORTHCAROPLINA.FLORIDALICENSED MORTGAGELENDERJl
e aYA&AY ('A ( I




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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


16 September 2005 PaoP


Pay The County Bills

$871,714.07 was dispensed by the Franklin County Commission at
the September 6, 2005 meeting. Here is the list of bills supplied by
the Finance Office.


ACS GOV'T FINANCIAL SYSTEM
09/02/2005 13:


Check Register


BANK VENDOR
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
001711 A I ROOT
002395 AT &T
002366 ALLEGRA PRINT & IMAGING
000214 AMERIGAS
002172 APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE
001634 AQUACULTURE MAGAZINE
002281 ARAMARK
002400 BCC TOURIST DEVELOPMENT
, 000194 BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD 0
000547 C.W. ROBERTS CONTRACTING
000192 CITY OF APALACHICOLA
000869 CITY OF CARRABELLE
002401 COLUMBUS TROPHY AND
001699 CONSUMER REPORTS
000202 EASTPOINT WATER & SEWER
002402 EDUCATION WEEK
002005 EMERGYSTAT INC
001259 FLEET SUPPLY
002399 FLINT EQUIPMENT COMPANY
001921 FLORIDA COMBINED LIFE IN
002092 FLORIDA LIGHTING SPECIAL
000226 FLORIDA MEDICAID-COUNTY
001488 FLORIDA 4-H FOUNDATION
002112 FREIGHTLINER OF TAMPA LL
001830 GANDER AUTO PARTS
000136 GANDER'S GULF SUPPLY HAR
000184 GIBBS/DORIS S.
001900 GT COMMUNICATIONS
000635 HARRIS,JR./JAMES A.
000273 HUNT INSURANCE GROUP
000143 JACKSON AUTO PARTS & ACE
002329 JOHNSON/MARCIA M.
002271 JUDITH RUNDEL
001838 KONE INC.
002392 LANARK VILLAGE WATER &
000429 LEITZ & REED OFFICE PROD
001503 LIBERTY COMMUNICATIONS
000777 MAHAN JR./WILLIAM T.
002063 MEDIACOM
.03802 MIKE MOCK
002330 MOCK/MIKE
002354 NASHTECH INC
002343 NEXTEI, PARTNERS INC
000286 OFFICE OF THE STATE ATTO
001278 PARKER SERVICES, INC.
002194 PROGRESS ENERGY FLORIDA,
000932 PRUETT'S AC, REFR, HEAT
001972 QUALITY WATER SUPPLY
001175 SCIENCE NEWS
000217 SCOTT/WILLIAM E.
000729 SHULER/THOMAS M.
001642 ST.JOE RENT-ALL, INC.
001929 STANDARD INSURANCE COMPA
001995 TAX COLLECTOR, FRANKLIN
000175 TAYLOR'S BUILDING SUPPLY
000205 THE APALACHICOLA TIMES
002264 TRIPLE B SPORTS SUPPLY
002278 URS CORPORATION
002377 WARD/LAURA
001725 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF PC
001993 WATER MANAGEMENT SERVICE
GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
FUND RECAP:
FUND DESCRIPTION
001 GENERAL FUND
120 FINE AND FORFEITURE
S137 FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC LIBRARY
140 ROAD AND BRIDGE
141 LOGT ROAD PAVING
170 AIRPORT FUND
201 GEORGE E WEEMS HOSPITAL FUND
TOTAL ALL FUNDS


BANK RECAP:
BANK NAME
---- --------------.-.-----------
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
TOTAL ALL BANKS


FRANKLIN COUNTY
GL540R-V06.60 PAGE 1


CHECKS DATE

33218 09/06/05
33219 09/06/05
33220 09/06/05
33221 09/06/05
33222 09/06/05
33223 09/06/05
33224 09/06/05
33225 09/06/05
33226 09/06/05
33227 09/0/05
33228 09/06/05
33229 09/06/05
33230 09/06/05
33231 09/06/05
33232 09/06/05
33233 09/06/05
33234 09/06/05
33235 09/06/05
33236 09/06/05
33237 09/06/05
33238 09/06/05
33239 09/06/05
33240 09/06/05
33241 09/06/05
33242 09/06/05
33243 09/06/05
33244 09/06/05
33245 09/06/05
33246 09/06/05
33247 09/06/05
33248 09/06/05
33249 09/06/05
33250 09/06/05
33251 09/06/05
33252 09/06/05
33253 09/06/05
33254 09/06/05
33255 09/06/05
33256 09/06/05
33257 09/06/05
33258 09/06/05
33259 09/06/05
33260 09/06/05
33261 09/06/05
33262 09/06/05
33263 09/06/05
33264 09/06/05
33265 09/06/05
33266 09/06/05
33267 09/06/05
33268 09/06/05
33269 09/06/05
33270 09/06/05
33271 09/06/05
33272 09/06/05
33273 09/06/05
33274 09/06/05
33275 09/06/05
33276 09/06/05
33277 09/06/05
33278 09/06/05


AMOUNT

41.00
154.45
116.72
421.48
153.59
S44.00
56.16
40.00
68,300.40
250,873.17
1,412.24
168.40
100.00
44.00
1,282.45
39.00
15,500.00
270.98
23,000.00
6,638.39
633.24
10,784.87
790.14
24.00
1,737.89
209.45
16,882.00
90.90
35,252.00
1,406.16
111.11
23,583.00
169.68
4,705.00
54.00
568.35
185.50
445.58
25.70
29,494.29
350,898.00
95.45
152.41
92.98
2,583.65
7,162.27
528.50
62.25
98.00
182.13
3,917.60
728.69
546.00
43 .20
635.15
20.00
504.00
6,375.80
300.00"
830.31
148.39
871,714.07


DISBURSEMENTS
173,866.22
414,389.47
1,574.88
8,965.39
250,873.17
6,544.94
15,500.00
871,714.07



DISBURSEMENTS
871,714.07
871,714.07


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 08/26/05 Invoice No. 11131
Description of Vehicle: Make Kia Model 4-Door Color Silver
TagNo. 0336HD Year 2004 State FL VinNo. WNADC1Z5846347518

ToOwner: Casey Wakenda Hood To Lien Holder: Eurita S. Wheelus
578 Alligator Drive P.O. Box 22
Alligator Point, FL 32346 Cottondale, FL 32431


You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
08/22/05 at the request of FHP that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 458.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien
of the lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT'
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 09/29/05 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of
the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay
the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219





Bayside Realty Inc.
877-577-7177 Toll Free
850-697-3919 Phone
850-697-9607 Fax

SResidential & Waterfront Properties.
ST.JAM E J Serving you in Wakulla and Franklin County.
BAY














Waterfront 3BW/2-A home, with a long pier to dock. This beauty offers
a 2.7 31 screen porch downstairs with a 31 Y 11 screen porch upstairs
offering wonderful Gulf views. There is a great room large enough to
use for. formal and informal dining, as well as a full living room.
Mother-in-law suite downstairs and a 3-car garage. Don't let this catch
of the day get away. Call to see today. MLS#lOS64. $I,2.75,ooo.oo.

Freda White--Licensed Real Estate Broker
Beth Barber--realtor
Petra MyricK- realtor
160 Laughing Gull Lane Carrabelle, FL 32322


Progress Report from Page 5


r - m amm- --- m i


, UPHOLSTERY UNLIMITED
I

S Furniture Repair & Upholstery

25% OFF

I with this coupon only


I 850-926-2746







FOR SALE

Florida Seafood Festival Framed Posters
1987 2004: $2,000 for the set.

Roll Top Desk circa 1900
in good condition: $1,500.


Phone Eastpoint: 850-447-1404.










Prime Grove & Development Acreage

Excellent Income and Development Potential
Located in Highlands County, in the heart of
Central Florida, this property boasts over
three miles of frontage on SR-70.
Parcels range from 30 to 160 acres.
Buy one parcel or buy the entire tract.
Features 5000' Airstrip and access to
over 18 miles of navigable waterways.
Take advantage of the tax incentives and
benefits grove ownership offers.
Broker participation and 1031 exchanges welcome.



Auction Site: American Legion Placid Post 25
1490 US-27 North Lake Placid, FL.
Broker Participation Welcome.
S ECall for information & due diligence packet
8l0UCONEERS 800 -257-4161
Alr-tne.T.,end ReelU 800 0
M.E. Higgenbotham, CAI, FL Lie #AU305/AB158 www.hlggenbotham.com







RbnKIIP POWER

No Fuel No Noise Safe Indoors

Under $500

s 678-494-2035

O www.powerpal.us




Marshall Marine

Fiberglass & Transport

FULL SERVICE BOAT YARD:
OVER THE ROAD BOAT TRANSPORT BOTTOM JOBS
FIBERGLASS & MARINE SUPPLIES
FIBERGLASS REPAIRS & PAINTING

7205 S.E. Ave. B Highway 98 Carrabelle

850-697-3428 www.boalhansport.net



QUALITY DOCKS & BOAT LIFTS
Marine Construction Specialist Since 1967
--r.. .-'_ Environmental PermittinaServie.as,,


I ~~22RuYorAtesaewde:


2x2 Rates .
Statewide $1200
Regional or National
Placement also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


2x4 Rates
Statewide $2400
Regional Placement
also available
Regions: North, South, Central
Total Circulation: 2.2 Million


Affordable Health & Life Insurance


* Freedom of Doctors, Hospitals

* Cannot be singled out for rate

increases or cancellation

Call Licensed Agent:
JESSIE HILL, JR.
850-926-6575 or 866-343-6575

Visit approved website: www.jessiehillhr.mw-ins.com
Mid-West National Life Insurance of Tennessee;
Home Office: Oklahoma City, OK
Association membership is required. MW/000023 Exp. 06/06


25. Seek funds to purchase mobile fire proofing system (truck with fireproof foam
application system). -

Fires trucks in the Alligator Point, St. George Island, Carrabelle, and
Apalachicola departments have been outfitted for foam. Funding sources for systems for
Dog Island, Lanark Village, and Eastpoint are being researched.

26. Relieve occasional flooding from stormwater backing up at culvert under
Highway 98 at 12tk Street

No action has been taken on this project.

27. Apply for FCT funds to acquire sensitive land and shoreline along the St.
Vincent Sound and Eight Mile Point area.

Franklin County applied for funding from the Florida Communities Trust to
acquire property at Eight Mile, but the project was not funded.
St. Joe Lana has stated they plan to donate a two-acre site at Eight Mile. The
County is working with St. Joe to identify the site.

28. Provide additional disaster planning workshops.

The Emergency Management Office has offered to provide disaster planning
workshops for local businesses. Several businesses expressed interest in the workshops.
The workshops are to be coordinated through the Chamber of Commerce. The
Emergency Management Office is waiting to hear from the Chamber of Commerce.

29. Consider elevating homes,in flood prone area(7h Street area floodplain).

No action has been taken on this project.




CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE


Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b)


File No.


Date of this Notice 09/08/05 Invoice No. 12162
Description of Vehicle: Make Kawasaki Model 4-Wheeler Color Blue
TagNo. Year 2003 State VinNo. JKAEF8BI53B510212

To Owner Daniel Walker To Lien Holder:
P.O. Box 139
Eastpoint, FL 32328


You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
09/03/05 at the request of FCSO that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 230.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien
of the lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 10/06/05 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of
the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP'(title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay
the charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


'OHN'S Licensed & Insured
aJOH RG0050763
CONSTRUCTION Ro0051706

Quality Craftsmanship For Over 40 Years
SERVING FRANKLIN COUNTY SINCE 1982
Specializing in Custom Homes-Remodeling
Additions-Repairs-Vinyl Siding


850-697-2376
Fax: 697-4680


P.O. Drawer JJ Carrabelle, FL 32322


SMexican Restaurant
H iiBBB< iE 105 Highway 98

MEXICAN FOOD Eastpoint, FL 32328
Phone: 850-670-5900
Open 24 Hourk Friday and Saturday Pho 0-
Breakfast: 5 a.m. -11 a.m.
Lunch: 11 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Dinner: 3 p.m. 11 p.m.

Authentic Flavor of Old Mexico




MARINE SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES TRAINED MECHANICS

YAMAHA' o111


MIKE'S MARINE SUPPLY
P.O. BOX 429 HWY. 98 PANACEA, FL 32346
PHONE: (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693 FAX: (850) 984-5698
www.mikesmarine-panacea.com
HOURS: MON., TUES., THURS., FRI: 8:00 6:00
WED.: 8:00 -1:00 SAT.: 8:00 5:00
PRO-LINE GHEENOE BOSTON WHALER
PONTOON BOATS SEA PRO G-3



"Quality Service You Can Depend On"


JIMMY'S ALTERNATOR & STARTER

AUTO & TRUCK REPAIR

9 N. Franklin Street Eastpoint, FL


(8501670-8005

AUTO & HEAVY DUTY TRUCK REPAIR


X 4arU -7


T A61 %I








Page 10 16 September 2005


SA LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


the Chronicle Bookshop


Mail Order Service *

P.O. Box 590
Eastpoint, FL 32328


..- .' ":









) '

EDITED'B
S ShanhonTushinghan
Jane Hill, ar
Charles H. MiNu


(314) Histories of Southeastern Archeology. Edit
Shannon Tashing-ham, Jane Hill and Charles A. Mc
University of Alabama Press, 2002, 384 pp, Softc
Bookshop price = $23.00.

S 7, 7

; '- . . , :


.--. ------ ; i






(310) Spring Creek Chronicles, II by Leo Lovel, Illus-
trated by Clay Lovel and edited by Ben Lovel. Here is the
second volume written by a northern Floridian in a col-
lection of observations, opinions, true-life experiences and
:. related tales gathered from living and working on the
.-" '"- Gulf Coast. Many take place in or near the community of
Y .' Spring Creek, a small fishing village located at the end of
county road 365. Commercial fishing, crabbing and oys-
S tering have been the backbone of this economy. Author
Lovel tells these stories with a glimpse back to what it
t was like to live and work around the woods and waters
of the Old South, a time and place he reminds the reader
S that is quickly being erased into history. Paperback, sold
across the Panhandle for about $14.95, the Chronicle
bookshop price. Leo Lovel owns and operates the Spring
Creek Restaurant at 33 Ben Willis Road, Crawfordville,
ed by. Florida 32327, phone: 850-926-3751.
Nutt.
over.


S,".
1" 4 .:., _.. I- -
. ..I..


(313) The Northwest Florida Expeditions of Clarence
Bloomfield Moore. The classic studies of Archeologist
Clarence Bloomfield Moore have been republished and
available from the Chronicle Book-shop in very limited
copies. When Clarence Bloomfield Moore cruised the riv-
ers of Florida in search of prehistoric artifacts a century
ago, he laid the groundwork for archaeological investiga-
tions to follow. This volume reflects Moore's fieldwork
along the northwest Florida coast, the most
archaeologically rich area of the state, as well as up the
Apalachicola River to the Chattahoochee and Flint Riv-
ers in Alabama and Georgia. Here readers will share
Moore's first look at the northwest Florida area in 1901 -
1903 and additional observations made in 1918 during
what was to be his last field season. Moore's works re-
veal ceramics, tools, skeletal remains, and exotic arti-
facts excavated fromthe earthen mounds and shell
middens built by native peoples over the last two millen-
nia. In the introduction to this edition, David S. Brose
and Nancy Marie White place Moore's investigations
within the context of science, natural history, and anti-
.quarianism of his day. They document what happened
to the sites he explored, tell how his findings fit into the
body of his research, and explain how those findings
should be interpreted in the context of southeastern cul-
ture history and modern archaeological theory. Univer-
sity of Alabama Press, 1999, 525 pp. This is an oversized
book measuring 10" x 14" requiring postage and han-
dling charges of.$8.50. Bookshop price for the volume is
$60.00. Softcover.


Eeyam era rartri tot



Frnki Crnil


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Saint George slhnd & Apalachicola
: romnEarlv Exploration
.. ...' to \'rld W ar II



i ". i ^ -. .^-. - - -


(21) Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers. Uni-
versity of Florida Press, Hardcover, 297 pp. In this book,
Rogers traces and documents the economic, social and
political emergence of the Gulf coast port of Apalachicola
and the pristine barrier island, Saint George. From the
earliest times, both the island and Apalachicola have be-
come intertwined. The account of the machinations of con-
troversial developer William Lee Popham is the first phase
of area development, later leading to the controversial
struggles of the 1970s when environmentalists and sea-
food industries fought to determine the ecological and eco-
nomic fate of the Bay area. The Chronicle has obtained
a fresh supply of newly reprinted volumes at an at-
tractive price. Available elsewhere for $35.95 plus ship-
ping and handling. The Chronicle Bookshop price is much
cheaper at $25.00 per volume.


Dubious Benefit from Page 1


~~~*1


Please Note
Books from'the mall service of the Chronicle Book Shop are new and
used, and are so-designated in each item description. Some titles
may be temporarily out of stock, in which case a second shipment
wil be made, normally in 14 days. Books are shipped in 48 hours,
normally. Some of our books are publishers' closeouts, overstocks,
remainders or current titles at special prices. Most are in limited supply
and at these prices may sell out fast. If any book is sold out your
money will be refunded by bank check. To offer the lowest possible
prices all orders must be prepaid. We do no billing and do not accept
credit cards.



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I


Anyway it's looked at, Red Tide is
a natural disaster. Though re-
searchers don't have all the an-
swers, they do have educated
opinions, said Heil. "Here's how
the infestation happened. Karenia
brevis, the scientific name for the
Red Tide organism, is a single-
celled toxin-producing plant that
can swim. It takes roughly an
hour to propel itself through a foot
of water.
'The organism does not like to
swim through dramatic changes
in temperature," said Heil. "This
year the layer of water in the gulf
that divides warm waters near the
surface from the cooler waters
below is particularly well-defined.
"The trapped bloom probably
killed coral and sponge on the
bottom," she added. "As they de-
cayed, oxygen was leeched from
the water, creating a dead zone by
early August," affecting fish and
other sea creatures.
"It has taken another natural
force, Hurricane Katrina, to bring
some relief," said Heil. "As the
storm moved toward the Louisi-
ana, Mississippi, Alabama coasts,
it whipped up the Gulf enough to
return some oxygen to the starved
waters.
"Though it didn't do much to the
Red Tide bloom itself," said Heil.
"It's a start, Getting the oxygen
back is the first step. We are very
pleased to see that."
It's the hidden costs that hurt
coastal towns trying to keep the
beach clean for use by locals and
tourists. The cost of dealing with
storms and hurricanes can be
daunting. Cleaning up dead fish
is an extra problem.


(311) Hollywood Cartoons: American Animation in its
Golden Age by Michael Barrier. Oxford University Press,
1999; paperback, 648 pp. Here is a guided tour of Ameri-
can animation in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, to meet
the legendary artists and entrepreneurs who created Bugs
Bunny, Betty Boop, Mickey Mouse, Wile E. Coyote, Donald
Duck, Tom and Jerry and many other cartoon favorites.
This is a meticulously researched yet enchanting history
of animation in the American studio system. For many
years, Mr. Barrier was the publisher and editor of
FUNNYWORLD, a magazine devoted to the animated film
in America. This is the definitive history. Given the over-
size of this work (648pp), the postage required for ship-
ment is $4.00 for the volume. Bookshop price = $20.00.


(312) On The Air: The Encyclopedia of Old Time Ra-
dio by John Dunning. Here are some 1,500 old time ra-
dio shows presented in alphabetical order, each with a
complete broadcast history, listing major cast members,
network, time period, sponsors, producers, actors and
theme song. This is the definitive encyclopedia of Ameri-
can radio from its beginnings in the 1920s until the early
1960s. Once you pickup this tome, you will not be able
to put it down. Hardcover, 822 pp, Oxford University
Press, 1998. Sold nationally for $60.00 Bookshop price
= $45.00. This is an oversize book with considerable
weight so the postage for shipping is $6.00.


(-'.5




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