Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00258
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: April 15, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00258
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text



Rm Ntw New k4 eC"4y D


Comp Plan


F Then


Franklin


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA, FL
32320
PERMIT #8


50O


Chronicle


Volume 14, Number 8 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER April 15 28, 200W


Kolbe.Boyd Bipartisan

Retirement Security Act

Individualization-Not Privatization
By Richard E. Noble
"If any of us had our wishes," Congressman Boyd began. "We wouldn't
be here talking about changing the Social Security System. Social
Security has been an incredibly important and successful program
for this nation in so many ways. In 1964, fifty-eight percent of those
people who were retiring, were below poverty. Today, just forty years
later, that percentage is less than ten percent. "
The Congressman then explained the importance of the Social Secu-
rity Program and the problem of its long term insolvency. "You can-
not deny the -fact that the Social Security Program has a long term
insolvency problem. We all know'that-it is not a big surprise.
"Franklin D. Roosevelt created Social Security in 1935-everyone con-
tributes, and everyone receives benefits. In its history, Social Secu-
rity has paid over 4.7 trillion dollars in benefit payments to retirees,
disabled workers and survivors. Currently, Social Security protects
154 million workers and their families. Why is the Program on a path
to insolvency?"
Rep. Boyd pointed out that due to the nearing retirement of the
baby-boomer generation and the blessings of a longer healthier life
that is in store for all of us as we mature more people are living
longer than ever before in history and therefore the insolvency is
inevitable.
In 1945 there were 42 contributors to the program for every one re-
cipient: in 1950 that number had shrunk to 17; by the year 2005
there will be only 3 contributors for each recipient and by 2040, the
number will be down to 2. Estimates predict that by the year 2020, or
there about, payouts will, for the first time in history, exceed contri-
butions. At that point the reserve that has been built up in the Social
Security Trust Fund, after all of these years, will have to be used to
supplement the program.
The surplus that has been built up over the years in the Social Secu-
rity Trust Fund will be gone in the year 2041, it has been predicted.
The program will then be forced to rely on its incoming contributions
only all the money collected from all of the programs past contribu-
tors will have been paid out.
"If we were to try and solve the problem right now by either cutting
benefits or raising taxes today in 2005 we would either have to cut
benefits by thirteen percent or raise payroll taxes by fifteen percent.
If we wait until the year 2042 we will either have to cut benefits by
thirty-one percent or raise payroll taxes by forty-six percent." Rep.
Boyd explained, in order to point out the urgency of doing something
now as opposed to waiting until the crisis has peeked.
The Congressman then elaborated on the Kolbe-Boyd proposal which
has been in existeje e since the year 1996. Tlis legislation is designed
to restore solvency to the Social Security program while maintaining
a strong, defined Social Security benefit.
His first concern was to point out that his proposal would not affect
anyone 55 years or older for those who are 55 or older the old rules
will apply and nothing will change for them.
The bad news is that the payroll tax cap will have to be extended from
$89,900-to $142,500; there will be a slight cut in'the cost of living
adjustment (COLA); benefits will be progressively reduced for work-
ers under 55, and there will be larger reductions for higher income
workers.
On the positive side there will be a system or opportunity of private,
personal investment accounts to compensate for the reductions in
overall benefits; there will also be an expanded savings opportunity
which will provide a savings subsidy or "match" for low-income work-
ers who make voluntary contributions to their personal accounts;
and these personal accounts will be yours and can be passed on to
your descendants or heirs.
These personal accounts will be publicly-administered by the Indi-
vidual Security Fund Board (ISFB) and will be based on the Thrift
Savings Plan (TSP). The TSP program has been a success. There are
currently 3.4 million participants in TSP with over $152 billion in
assets. All workers will still receive a defined benefit from Social Se-
curity. In other words, the savings accrued in the personal account
are in addition to the Social Security benefits which flow from the
current program.
Younger workers will be able to direct 3 percent of the first $ 10,000 of
earnings and 2 percent of the remainder up to the taxable maximum.
Workers can make additional voluntary contributions of up to $5,000
a year to their personal accounts, and these voluntary contributions
would be after-tax.
For the low-income workers who choose to make voluntary contribu-
tions to their personal accounts, the government will match 50 per-
cent for each additional dollar up to $600 annually.
Today in America, unfortunately there are still 8 million seniors who
live below the poverty level. Congressman Boyd hopes that this bill
will be a step in the direction of alleviating this problem along with
making the Social Security program once again solvent.
Rep. Boyd pointed out that this Kolbe-Boyd Plan is the least expen-
sive plan yet suggested; it requires the least amount of borrowing of
all the bills that have been introduced.
The Congressional Budget Office scored the plan as being solvent
over the next 100 years and the Social Security Administration scored
the Kolbe-Boyd bill as restoring the solvency of the trust fund for 75
years and beyond.
Congressman Boyd's bill is consistent with the original mandate of
the program-that it be Federally managed, it revenues invested in.
Federal securities, and that it be mandatory.
In 1935 it was agreed that it would and must be mandatory-no one
in 1935 would have ever suggested that funds from Social Security
be put into the Stock Market. It was partially the collapse of the Stock
Market in 1929 that precipitated the need for the Social Security Sys-
tem in the first place. If the program were not mandatory certainly
the poor would have been the first to opt out. They needed every
penny that they had to buy bread. Providing options to pull out of the
program will undoubtedly be the end to the program as it presently
stands and has existed for all these years.
Congressman's Boyd's bill-Kolbe/Boyd-doesn't involve unwarranted
risks and seems sound economically. It has several interesting op-
tions for the wealthy and the not so wealthy. If you like this bill, the
Congressman recommends that you contact your Senator or Con-
gressman and voice your approval.


New Manager
At St. George
Plantation

Rita Culbertson, President of the
St. George Plantation Property
Owners' Association has. an-
nounced that Bernadette
Halloran has been hired as Gen-
eral Manager effective immedi-
ately. She replaces Paul Bosarge.


The
Frauu~ ~n~k'lu i~un
Choncl


St. George

Island

Christian

Retreat

Dedication

After eighteen months of con
struction, the First Baptis
Church of St George Island, ha,
completed the retreat facility. The
center is comprised of an assem
bly area, support buildings, anc
,eight sleeping cabins.
The church will celebrate an(
dedicate this facility on Saturda
April 16, 2005 at 12:00 noon. Al
churches and individuals are in
vited to attend and tour the
grounds for future use.
Registrations are being taken fo
Christian groups to utilize. Ar
rangements can be made by call
ing 927-3818 or on line a
www.sgichristianretreat.org


Apalachicola Tour Of

Historic Homes


Tribute to Harriet Kennedy
By Ruth Young
Trinity Episcopal Church an-
nounces the annual Apalachicola
Tour of Historic Homes on May 7,
2005 from 1:00 to 5:00 in the af-
ternoon eastern time. There will
be more than a dozen homes on
exhibit this year ranging from the
architect-restored Dosik cottage
to the splendid Willis Hodges
house majestically ensconced be-
hind its white picket fence on Bay
Avenue across from the water.
Tickets are $12 if ordered in ad-!
vance or .$15 if purchased on the
day of the tour. Advance tickets
are available from Trinity Church:
850-653-9550; email
trinitychurch@mchsi.com. web
site-mytrinitychurch.org. A
shrimp salad luncheon will be
served at Trinity Church before
the tour. It is $9.
This annual tour of homes pro-
vides a wonderful opportunity to
spend the weekend in one of the
most beautiful and historic spots
in Florida's Panhandle on the ex-
quisite Forgotten Coast. There is
something here for everyone: the
historic home tour and shopping
in the picturesque downtown:
fishing on the Apalachicola River
and Bay or in the Gulf of Mexico;
camping in the State Park on the
eastern end of St. George Island;
bicycle riding on the Island; golf,
swimming; fine dining in our
many gourmet restaurants serv-
ing local seafood and special
Gulf-coast cuisine.
Let your imagination create a
fun-filled and educational week-
end trip. Even dogs are welcome
on our beaches provided they are
on a leash or under voice control.
They too love the opportunity to
romp and swim or play endless
games of tug-of-way and fetch. So


come for the tour, but stay for the
weekend.
Call the Apalachicola Chamber o
Commerce for information abou
places to stay, where to eat, ant
other recreational and cultural
activities in Franklin County
Their number is 850/653-1291
Tickets for the tour will go on sale
at 11:00 am Saturday morning
May 7, at Trinity Church, corner
of Highway 98 and Sixth Street
A brochure about the homes and
a map of the tour will be avail
able at that time, The luncheon
is 11:30 to 1:00 at Trinity Parish
S.all.
The 13th Annual Apalachicola
Historic Home Tour will be dedi
cated to Harriet Kennedy, the
founder of the tour in 1992.
Laura Moody has written a trib-
ute to Harriet that will be featured
in the 2005 home tour brochure
Being keenly aware of the great
importance of maintaining Trin-
ity Church, as well as the oner-
ous cost of maintenance, Harriet
founded the Tour, designating all
the proceeds to go to the Trinity
Restoration and Preservation
Fund. Through the years, her goal
has been beyond expectation.
Husband Willis has been her right
hand man at every step of the
way. Although a steel magnolia,
she brings elegance and grace to
all she undertakes. She retired
from chairing the tour in 1997.
In addition to Trinity, other
churches will also be open for tour
on May 7, including First Baptist
Church, 46 Ninth St.; First United
Methodist Church, 75 Fifth St.;
and St Patrick Catholic Church,
27 Sixth St. Also, there will be a
very beautiful photo exhibit at St.
Patrick's Parish Hall of Cistercian
Trappist monasteries throughout
the United States.


Historic Trinity Episcopal Church, Apalachicola


The Ormond House, Apalachicola


I


Inside This Issue
12 Pages

Comp Plan.. 1, 8, 9, 10
Kolbe-Boyd ......... 1
Tour of Homes ......... 1
Retreat .................. 1
Franklin Briefs ........ 2
Editorial & Commentary
........................... 3,4
Second Circuit Court.
........................... 5, 7
Bird Day .................. 6
Real Estate News ..... 6
Flea Market ........... 6
FCAN ....................... 8
Business Card Directory
O*......... .................. 9
Bookshop ......... 11, 12


County had been doing thus far on these issues. He spoke to the
affordable housing problem and to the secondary housing explosion.
For every full-time residence, there are three part-time and vacation
homes being built in Franklin County and throughout the Panhandle.
This is a vital industry, Mr. Pierce explained. He explained that the
suggested land use changes were necessary to address these second
home market considerations over the next fifteen years.
"But Alan, why do we need to approve this fifteen or twenty year land
use change now, when we can send in changes every year?" asked
Commissioner Putnal.
"We need three limes as many houses for the secondary market as we
do for the permanent market. This market can not be satisfied with
the residential land that is now available. We need to address this ...
by looking at additional land uses. We have a need, and we are trying
to address that need. There are still additional processes that a de-
veloper or developers have to go through. This is just the first step ...
all of this takes time ... it takes years sometimes to get these things
going. The consideration of those four land use changes is just the
beginning of that process. Summer Camp has been on line for over a

Continued on Page 8


Public Hearing-Vote for Submittal and Adoption
By Richard E. Noble
It was standing room only at the Court House Annex in Apalachicola
this April 5th for the possible vote and submittal of the final draft of
the Comprehensive Plan.
Alan Pierce began the meeting with a review, once again, of all of the
previous Comp Plan submittals and reports.
In April of 2004 a proposed Comp Plan was submitted to the DCA.
(Alan Pierce thumped this dictionary sized report down onto the Com-
mission table.) This was reviewed by the DCA who then returned, to
the County, an ORC report with 47 criticisms. (A slightly thinner
volume was then added to the table.) The county then wrote a Draft
Response to the DCA's ORC Report.(Another volume was added to
the pile.) This Draft Response was then criticized publicly by the Citi-
zens Advisory Group and The River Keepers. (A fourth volume was
tossed onto the pile of mounting literature.) Alan Pierce then wrote,
S at the direction of the County Commission, a 17 page pamphlet high-
lighting the public input which he entitled 8 Key Issues (This seven-
teen page appendix was then added to the stack). This was then fol-
lowed by a new Draft Comp Plan which included red-ink criticisms
from the Citizen's Advisory Committee (The sixth, and largest vol-
ume, was then stacked onto the mountain of proposals and reports.)
Then, finally a revised ORC response was the final addition to the
pile.
Alan Pierce then explained the most recent updates, additions and
deletions from the proposal about to be submitted.
There were four land use changes or considerations dealing with the
St. Joe Company-Carrabelle East, Maclntire, Conservation Residen-
tial, and Marina Village. (These have all been outlined in previous
editions of the Franklin Chronicle.) Several thousand acres had been
returned from proposed development to agricultural from the devel-
opment called Conservation Residential.
t
s In addition to these St. Joe projects there was a 45 acre track in
e Eastpoint submitted that was being purchased by the Eastpoint Sewer
-and Water district for additional drain field and 15,000 acres of pre-
d vious privately owned land which had been zoned Rural Residential
that was being returned to Agricultural as a part of the Tate's Hell
Swamp reservation. The land had been purchased by the State of
d Florida.
Y
.1 There were four other land use changes that were submitted previ-
-ously for adoption but due to criticisms were being dropped from the
e proposal. They could not be resolved in a timely fashion.
Changes in policy were made in response to DCA suggestions, State
r of Florida recommendations due to statute changes, citizen driven
criticisms and public input.
t The discussion was then turned over to the public.
Charles Lewis-Citizen Advisory Consensus
"I'm Charles Lewis and I am providing the consensus from the Citi-
zens Advisory Committee. At the last meeting we made suggestions.
We were trying to be inclusive (of everyone's point of view). That prob-
ably wasn't the best strategy. So we went back to work and tried to
put together something that was a consensus. Something that we all
felt strongly about and the issues that could best be dealt with in the
e Comprehensive Plan. Our first concern was with land use amend-
ments. We feel that any land use amendment is important enough to
be looked at and dealt with,by itself. We are concerned that by mak-
)f ing these land use amendments, something may be done that can
t not be reverted. Once these land use decisions are made, the County
d loses a lot of control with regards to what happens in the future. This
1 land is owned by a large corporation, corporations get sold and change
.hands-you don't know what the corporation will do in the future.
e 'The other thing is that when the Commission approved Summer
SCamp, the Commission wisely made a promise to both the St. Joe
r Paper Company and to the public. That promise was, that you would
. watch and see how things went through with that development. If
d things went well, there would be ample opportunity to make changes
Sin the future. Well, Summer Camp hasn't been done yet. We don't
Know how ... it is going to develop. I think that it is best that we wait.
SThis is supposed to be a fifty to a hundred year use plan why do we
have to make these land use changes today? The Committee strongly
recommends that these land use charges be stricken from the plan.
a You can make amendments every six months."
e 'Mr. Charles Lewis provided a document with the Citizens Advisory
issues and policies listed:
Issue 1: Approval for large scale developments should be preceded by
a comprehensive assessment of the suitability of the land for devel-
opment along with community benefits and impacts. The Citizens
S Advisory Committee proposes that language similar to that contained
in the Land Use Policies 11.12 and 11.13 remain in the comprehen-
sive plan. Example language is submitted.
Issue 2: The Committee recommends that the Franklin County Com-
mission maintain oversight and control over future large scale devel-
opments and that citizen input be a part of the approval process, and
thus we urge that no Future Land Use Amendments (FLUMs) be in-
cluded in this Comprehensive Plan. The Committee feels that it is
premature to submit the proposed amendments, and that no harm
will result from waiting.
The Citizens Advisory Committee also recommended that the St. James
over-lay be reconsidered-Alan Pierce announced that it would not
be included as a part of the present plan due to the citizens concerns
and that it would be included only as an appendix. They suggested
that language should be added that would delineate that the St. James
over-lay was onlyan appendix and that it would not be binding on
the county.
The CAC was also concerned with the St. Joe development that was
nearest to the city of Carrabelle. They felt that Carrabelle should be
considered and that public input from Carrabelle should be sought.
The CAC then enumerated their Policy recommendations: public ac-
cess to water; a limited property tax exemption for homes to have
interaction; adoption of an ordinance to control obtrusive signage
such as billboards; adoption of ordinance to prevent obtrusive night
time illumination; affordable housing be made available; and policies
for economic development.
The Committee recommended that the County host 9 public meeting
on each topic where these proposals may be presented and discussed
prior to submitting them to the Commission for consideration. They
also recommended that a policy be included to identify and enact
means to reduce property owners' insurance premiums under the
National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).
Mr. Lewis, in closing, reiterated his concern over the vital nature of
water access to the public.
SCommissioner Putnal complimented the Committee on being more
reasonable and specific with this new group of recommendations.
Mr. Putnal suggested that public hearings be held sometime before
September with regards to giving serious consideration to the
Committee's requests, but expressed the Commissions need to sub-
mit a Comprehensive Plan now.
Mr. Lewis agreed but then made a final request that the proposed
land'use amendments be dropped from the Comp Plan at this time-
thus leaving the County in control.
Alan Pierce then discussed all of the issues that Mr. Lewis had pre-
sented and informed the audience along with Mr. Lewis of what the








Page 2 15 Aoril 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs

April 5, 2005
By Richard E. Noble

Bobby Pickles
Bobby Pickles, representative of
Allen Boyd, was first to come be-
fore the Commission. He was here
on Congressman Boyd's behalf to
assist in the development of a re-
gional health care council here in
Franklin County. The council will
be comprised of one member from
each of the counties that the Con-
gressman represents. 'The pur-
pose of the council will be two-
fold," explained Mr. Pickles. "One
will be to arrange for the regional
planning of health care related
issues in north Florida. And also
to help direct funding opportunity
through the Congressman's office
to the issues that will be identi-
fied and prioritized through that
committee. It is important that
Franklin County be a part of that
committee.
"The second issue is the develop-
ment of a health care council. I
have attended one of the health
care meetings here in Franklin
County. You are all ahead of the
ball or the game on that issue.
We would like to get an appointee
to our regional council-that
could be a County Commissioner
or a designate of the County Com-
mission."
A motion was approved to have
somebody appointed at a future
date.
Commissioner Sanders then
asked for an update on the dredg-
ing of the Eastpoint Channel.
S"This project has needed to be
done for a number of years. The
Congressman's office has been
successful in obtaining Federal
funding for the project about two
years ago. That money has yet to
be spent, due to slow permitting.
Part of the problem is getting the
Corps properly motivated. We
have certainly got the Corps at-
tention." Mr. Pickles explained
that he had made progress and
that the project should be on line
soon. He asked that the Commis-
sion keep in touch with him on
this issue.
The conversation then turned to
the possibility of a beach
re-nourishment project over at
Alligator Point.
Mr. Pickles said that he would
certainly bring this problem to the
Congressman's attention and
meet with Alan Pierce to get more
information on the issue and in
the future to work with the
County on that issue.
The dredging of the two mile chan-
nel was also discussed.
Hubert Chipman-Public
Works
A flooding problem over on River
Road was discussed. A new cul-


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU










+rintp


850-653.9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


vert was suggested. Mr. Chipman
was aware of the problem and
suggested some alternate meth-
ods to alleviate the problem.
Van Johnson-Solid Waste
Director
David Fonda spoke on behalf of
Mr. Johnson. Action was re-
quested on a motion to authorize
the transfer of $22,150.00 from
the Recycling Fund to the Solid
Waste Budget. And an additional
motion to authorize the transfer
of $14,850.00 from the Landfill
Tipping Fee Account to pay
Preble-Rish, Inc., for engineering
work to expand the Class III dis-
posal area at the Landfill and to
renew the permit. Both motions
were approved.
Bill Mahan IFAS Extension
Director
Mr. Mahan informed the Board on
the latest happenings in the
Aquaculture industry and about
the Spring Thing-Garden Expo
on Saturday, April 16, 2005. It will
be from 8:00am 3pm at the Bay
.County Fairgrounds, 2230 E.
15th Street, Panama City FL.
Mr. Mahan suggested that the
Spring Thing was great fun for
gardeners and a good place to
pick up some inexpensive plants
and supplies. For more informa-
tion call 1-850-784-6105 or visit
http://bay.ifas.ufl.edu/Spring
Thing/ index.htm.

Doris Gibbs-Supervisor of
Elections
The supervisor had two issues-
Help America Vote Act-On this
issue she was concerned about
the purchase of necessary equip-
ment to assist the handicapped
in voting. She had received ap-
proximately $37,000 in grant
money but over $77,000 would be
necessary. The purchase of this
equipment was not an option-it

was the law.
Her request to begin negotiations
for the purchase of the necessary
equipment was approved by the
Board.
Her next issue was concerned
with space for her office. The
Commission' appointed Alan
Pierce to look into it.

Public Hearings-Rezoning
Requests
Parcel 1-lot 7 & 8 Blk. 4, unit I
east SGI to go from C-2 Com-
mercial Business to C-4 Mixed
Use Residential Approved.
Parcel 2-lots 26 & 27, Blk. 1,
unit I East, SGI to go from C-2
Commercial Business to C-4
Mixed use Residential. Approved.
Parcel 3-Lots I & 2 Blk. 2, Unit I
West, SGI to go from C-2 Com-
mercial Business to C-4 Mixed
use Residential. Approved.
Parcel 4-Lots 20 & 21, Blk. 3,
Unit I West, SGI-to go from C-2
Commercial Business to C-4
Mixed Use Residential. Approved.
Public Hearings-Land Use and
Rezoning Requests


jfir t Saptist |)urch
St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!

Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 7:00 p.m.
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


St. George Island
United Methodist Church


You ARE INVITED To

SUNDAY WORSHIP 9:30A.M.


201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org Pastor: Bill Rhoads





New Life Worship Center
Pastor: Floyd Jones
Sunday Morning: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening: 6:00 p.m.
Everyone Welcome! Come as you are...Come grow with us!
We will be under construction in April. The church will have a fresh appearance.
Come be a part of us.
Beside Papa's Pizza on Highway 98.
For Information call 1-706-244-1662.


The following were all
approved:
Tract 1-Land use Change A.46
acre parcel
Washington St.-Eastpoint-
Residential to Commercial. Zon-
ing change R-4 single Family
Home Industry to C-4 Mixed Use
Residential. A question of proper
public notice was brought up with
regards to this issue and was ex-
plained and resolved to everyone's
satisfaction. A discussion followed
as to how these notifications
might be handled in the future-
a large sign at the site was sug-
gested as one alternative. No so-
lution was agreed upon. This
property belongs to Maxie Carroll.
A neighbor had questions with
regards to the fire lane and the
possible re-zoning of her own
property.
Tract 2-Land use-Change-
A.79-acre parcel 23 and 27 Wash-
ington Street-Eastpoint-Resi-
dential to Commercial.
Zoning Change-R-4 Single Fam-
ily Home Industry to C-4 Mixed
Use Residential.
Request to adopt an ordinance -
18.08-Acres on the Apalachicola
River from C-3 to 'Tucker's Land-
ing Pud". This is the old
Breakaway Lodge property. It will
remain mixed use but new stan-
dards will have to be met with re-
gards to sewer and septic sys-'
tems, sub-standard housing and
other up-grading requirements.
Land use Change A 5.04 acre
parcel-section 13-T7S-R5W-West
of Carrabelle from Agricultural to
residential. Coastline Properties,
owner.
Zoning Change A-2 Forestry Ag-
ricultural to R-1 Single Family
Residential.
Request approval of final Plat
"River Crest" A 14 lot Subdivi-
sion on Bay City Road North, of
Apalachicola. The necessity for a
sixty foot right-of-way was in
question. Mr. Shuler asked that
the Plat be approved contingent
on the solving of the right-of-way
problem. Pat Floyd spoke on be-
half of "River Crest".

Condo-Tel's
Freda Moore was back before the
Board with regards to the
Condo-Tel project that she is con-
cerned-about. The problem is that
the County has no definition for
this new building concept. Mr.
Shuler assured Ms. Moore that
the definition would be to her sat-
isfaction, primarily, because he
intended to use her lawyer's
guideline as a "map" for his new
definition. A definition was given
to the Board to review and a pub-
lic hearing for adoption was set,
for the 19th of April which will be
held in the evening. One issue to
be discussed at that meeting will
be the number of parking spaces
required per room or unit at the
new development.


Tom Lewis
The low water crossing promised
to Mr. Lewis has not yet been con-
structed. The problem deals with
drawings submitted by Mr. Lewis
which were inconsistent with the
County's policies. Amended draw-
ings have been sent out to the
involved parties and when word
of approval or acceptance is re-
turned, the project can be put on
schedule.

Eastpoint Channel
There was a discussion as to what
was to be done with the fill or spoil
dredged from the Channel. Noth-
ing was decided or solved.

Alan Pierce Report
Alan Pierce reported the following:
1. Provide Board with copy of
. Analysis of Revenue Options for
Franklin County that has been
done by Small County Technical
Assistance Services Program. Re-
port was submitted by Mr. Jim
Parrish, executive director.
2. Alan informed the Board that
it appears that VMS will take care
of the paving needs on Bay St. in
Eastpoint. It appears that the part
of the street that needs paving is
within the U.S. 98 right-of-way.
3. Alan thanked Van Johnson,
Recreation Director, for his assis-
tance in providing space for the
.county extension service in the
Armory.
4. Alan informed the Board that
Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Rickards
called about continuing issues at
Donnie Wilson Park. The Rickards
are the closest neighbor to the
Park and have been constantly
unhappy about how the Park has
devalued their property. They are
considering selling, and he told
them that the Board might be in-
terested in buying them out. They
are paying for an appraisal. He
told them to provide the Board
with a copy when it is done.
,5. Alan informed the Board that
Mr. Larry Parsons, USACOE, has
scheduled a pre-application meet-
ing with DEP for dredging of the
Eastpoint channel on April 20,
2005. He plans to attend. This is
the first step forward in two years.
6. POT has informed Rich Reeves,
county grant writer, the City of
Parker is not going to use its
$150,000 DOT landscaping grant.
DOT wants to know if the Board
would like to receive the funds to
continue landscaping on St.
George Island. Board action to
accept funds. Approved finished
project.
7. Board action to pursue FCT
applications to buy water access
points along US 98 specifically to
provide access points for mullet
li-hling. Approved motiorfto pur-
sue.
8. Board action to direct
Preble-Rish Engineers to prepare
and advertise for Request for Pro-
posal to build boat ramp and
parking area at the new Bluff
Road Boat Ramp. Approved.


9. Board action to approve the
Local Mitigation Strategy, a docu-
ment created by the ARPC for the
county. Butch Baker, EM Direc-
tor, and he has worked on the
document and we recommend the
Board adopt it. It has been ap-
proved by the state, and now the
Board needs to adopt the LMS.
Approved.
10. Alan informed the Board that
Commissioner Lockley and he
met with Mr. Hampton May last
week regarding the Senior Citizen
Center and the development of a
broader county affordable hous-
ing program. Mr. May was going
to discuss the issue with his
board and get back with the
county. Mr. May would also like
the Board to know that his Board
is seeking new Senior Citizen
Board members and encourages
interested citizens to contact the
Board for more information.
11. Mr. Michael Moron, SHIP Ad-
ministrator, would like to some
direction from the Board on a
SHIP issue. Approved.
12. Mr. Ryan Dwyer would like to
construct sidewalks along both
sides of Pine St. in Eastpoint. Pine
St. is the entrance to his spbdivi-
sion Lakes on the Bluff and leads
down to the water. He would con-
struct the sidewalks for public use
at his expense. Board action was
to defer for public hearing.
13. Alan informed the Board that
Preble-Rish Engineers are still
evaluating the canopy idea be-
tween the courthouse and the
annex. Since the canopy would be
crossing a parking area some con-
sideration has to be given to the
parking configuration. Also the
annex front door and the court-
house side door do not directly
line up, but it is being looked at.
14. Board action to allow Mr.
Chad Gunter to erect a rock re-
vetment about 20 feet into Wing
St. on the bay side of St. George
Island. The purpose of the en-
croachment is to protect the west-
ern boundary of Mr. Gunter's
property from erosion. Board ac-
tion was approved pre-agreement
with Mr. Gunter.
15. Give Board another recorded
drainage easement for the Lanark
Village Drainage Project. The
easement was granted by two par-
ties: the Teasley's and the Miley's.
16. An organization known as the
Two Mile Property Association has
submitted a petition to lower the
speed limit in the Two Mile area.
It is currently posted at 55 mph
and they would like the speed
limit to go back to 45 mph. Board
action to submit the petition to
DOT for consideration. Approved.
17. Pickles, informed the Board
that Officer Ryan, U.S., Co,ast'
Guard, was in town last week to
provide maintenariice,,n, tble
buoys. in the Two Mile Channel.
The Coast Guard was unable to
get its vessel into the Channel
because of shoaling that evidently
occurred because of one of the
hurricanes this summer. The
Coast Guard has a responsibility


to maintain aids to navigation in
Corps of Engineers dredged chan-
nels. If they can not maintain the
aids, they must report to the
Corps that the Channel is not
navigable by Coast Guard stan-
dards. Upon hearing of the Coast
Guard's failure to enter the chan-
nel, I contacted Officer Ryan when
he was in town. He recommended
that the county contact its federal
legislators to see what funds
might be available to re-dredge
the channel. He has contacted Mr.
Bobby Pickles, Congressman
Boyd's aide, and is investigating
the situation.
18. Alan informed the Board that
I have contacted Ms. Marcia Har-
ris, aide to Senator Nelson, for
help in getting FEMA to approve
the county's Hazard Mitigation
Funds for Alligator Point. Until the
FEMA signs off on the rock revet-
ment extension the project is not
eligible for FEMA funds. He hopes
to ear very soon.
19. Board authorization for Ms.
Paula Luberto to place limerock
base and put down an asphalt
surface on Kentucky St. in Lanark
Village at her own expense. The
improvements would meet county
standards but she will bid out the
job herself, if she does it at all.
She is evaluating costs at this
time. Does the Board want to al-
low her to improve Kentucky St.?
Approved.
20. Alan informed the Board that
Ms. Janet Llewellyn, DEP Deputy
Director, has written a letter to the
Board informing the Board that
DEP is releasing additional funds
to initiate a geotechnical investi-
gation of an alternative source of
sand for the Alligator Point beach
renourishment project. He has
asked Mr. Mike Dombrowski,
county beach consultant, to de-
velop a scope of work. Essentially
the work will to evaluate the qual-
ity and quantity of the sand di-
rectly off the Point. Board action
to submit a scope of work to DEP
for funding. This was approved.
Ms. Llewellyn also said in her let-
ter that Franklin County will be
eligible to receive funds for the
actual beach restoration if there
are funds leftover from other
projects previously funded.
21. Provide Board with copies'of
VMS contract renewal for the end
of the calendar year which pays
the county for mowing down in
Lanark Village and Eastpoint.
Done.
22. Board action to approve rec-
ommendation of the Construction
SIndustry Licensing Board moving
Franklin King and Jimmy Thomp-
son to full members and appoint
Bruce Sansom and Dick Fisher as
alternate members. Approved.
23 Alan Infoirmed the Board and
Country Ai.tt:irn'ci with copy letter
;.from Carlisle SynTec Incorporated
regarding the meeting the County
Attorney and I had with Mr. Ken
Cearns, Carlisle, and Mr. Eddie
Carroll,' Peach State Roofing. The
letter essentially points out other

Continued on Page 5


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A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


15 April 2005 Page 3


EDITOR & COMMENTARY


National Child Abuse

Prevention Month

Child Abuse Prevention Month has been observed each April since its
first presidential proclamation in 1983. For the over two decades,
advocates have worked to educate the public about what constitutes
child abuse and neglect, how prevalent it is in our communities, how
to recognize signs of abuse and neglect, and how to report suspected
abusers. The public now believes that abuse is common and has last-
ing effects, but they are not looking at their own behavior as a key to
preventing abuse in their own families and communities.
Preventing abuse will require the active concern of educational, medi-
cal, mental health, law enforcement and social service professionals,
and the efforts of volunteers and private citizens to help families over-
come daily challenges that place them at risk for abuse and neglect.
Currently, the public views child abuse and neglect as criminal atroci-
ties by bad parents, sexual predators, and failed government. Citi-
zens and policy makers sometimes have the mistaken beliefs that:
Abusive families are poor, uneducated, minority fami-
lies.
Bad parents and bad people abuse children; my friend,
my neighbor and I are not bad people, so we are not po-
tential abusers.
Parenting is a private matter.
Parenting is instinctive and asking for help is a sign of
weakness or deficiency.
Abuse is hard to prevent.
Reporting abuse is prevention.
Extensive research conducted by FrameWorks Institute for Prevent
Child Abuse America has caused us to re-evaluate our message and
the tools we use to present our message to the public. As the focus of
our message shifts from the problem of abuse to the solution of effec-
tive prevention, Prevent Child Abuse Florida adopted Winds of Change
as the statewide campaign theme. Winds of Change highlights how
parenting has changed over the years as a result of changes in social,
cultural and demographic trends in families. It also encourages us to
change the way we communicate our prevention message.
As part of the Winds of Change campaign, pinwheels are being dis-
played in neighborhoods throughout the state, each one representing
a child in the community who suffered from abuse or neglect last
year. These displays are meant to inspire community involvement in
efforts to help strengthen families and prevent abuse and neglect
before it ever starts.
For more information on the Winds of Change campaign to prevent
child abuse and neglect, visit www.ounce.org.


Gill Nets Referendum Hurts

Poor People

By Dave Grix
With the "Ban the Nets" referendum now having gained enough sup-
port to be placed on November's ballot, it is time to take a closer look
at who it will affect and the straightforward facts behind the referen-
dum.
First of all, it should be said that 75 percent of all fin-fish caught in
Florida's inland water by gill nets are consumed by minorities, and
73 percent that is purchased with food stamps.
Despite representation to the contrary, this referendum is least likely
to affect the average sports-fisherman, who are mostly white males,
78 percent of whom earn over $25,000 per year.
Our vote to strike down this cleverly-disguised referendum is indis-
pensable, if we are to preserve our right to equal access to Florida's
fin-fish.
As a small commercial fisherman, I have never seen a dead sea turtle
(or a dolphin) in a net or any of the other heinous acts blanketly
attributed to the net fishing industry in Florida by the movement to
ban gill nets. In all fairness to myself and other local fisherman who
earn our living from Florida waterways, the videos and pictures of
tuna fisherman killing dolphin taken in the Pacific Ocean is pure
deception and in no way reflects how I and other Florida fishermen
fish!



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THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.
Vol. 14, No. 8 April 15, 2005
Publisher .................................................. Tom W Hoffer
Director of Operations ..................:.......... Andy Dyal
Contributors ............................................. D awn Radford
............ Carol Noble
............ Richard Noble
.............. Skip Frink
Advertising Design
and Production Artist............................... Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate .............................. Jerry W eber

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein ........................................ Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis ................................... Apalachicola
Skip Frink ............................................... Carrabelle
David Butler ........................................ Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung .................. Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins ................. Eastpoint
Barbara Revell ......................................... Lanark Village
Richard Harper ........................................ St. George Island
Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue would
cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the Chronicle
for price quotes if you seek several different or similar
issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.
Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2005
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


I wish to present the facts which prove that the "Ban the Nets-Save
Our Sealife" movement is nothing more than the sports-fishing
movement's attempt to control all of the fish for themselves.
There are 5,000 commercial fishermen in Florida. These fishermen
supply a potential 10,000,000 consumers with fresh, native (to Florida
waters) finfish. The argument that netters are wiping out all of the
fish is simply not true. The fact is, 70.46 percent of all fish are caught
by sports-fishermen, which means that only 29.54 percent of all fish
are available to the hardworking people who love fish-or need to
satisfy a dietary requirement-but don't own a boat.
The accusation that netters are the primary destroyers of dolphins
can be discounted by a study conducted by the Department of Natu-
ral Resources and the Department of Agriculture which gathered sta,
tistics on fatalities of our sea creatures. For example, from 1974 to
1991, net fishermen accounted for the deaths of only seven mana-
tees, while sports-fisherman killed a staggering 514.
Earlier this year, the "Ban the Nets-Save Our Sealife" folk attempted
to have net fishing banned from Jupiter Inlet to Cape Canaveral, claim-
ing that sea turtles were being killed by nets. Fortunately, instead of
taking their word for it, Governor Chiles ordered that all net boats be
registered to have observers placed aboard vessels to separate the
facts from the hysteria.
According to observer reports from February 4 to April 12, 1994,"No
dolphin, sea turtles or other sea creatures were caught in the 42 nets
observed by federal authorities." More than 43 nets were specifically
observed for accidental sea-turtle netting and the result was no turtles.
The honest facts would point to a ban on sports fishing, not net fish-
ing. A prospect we in the commercial fishing industry would not sup-
port because we're hardworking people who understand extremely
well the words "equal access."
We, the net fishermen of Florida, have a tremendous fight on our
hands, and your vote will not only save my livelihood and your equal
access to fish, but will demonstrate that you refuse to side with a
greedy special interest that disregards the minority consumer. In the
Holy Bible there is a passage to heed: 'The words of wise men are
heard in quiet more than the cry of him that ruleth among fools."


Alert!

There will be a viewing of fish "lying in state" held from 8 a.m. until
5 p.m. on the Capitol grounds. A memorial service will be held from
12 -1 p.m. starting off with
THE HONORABLE SENATOR AL LAWSON
In addition to other guest speakers, we invite the public to speak
out and voice their concerns for the environment.
Let your voice be heard at the capitol!
As of July 1, 2005
The unnecessary killing and waste of Florida's Marine Resource will
increase 10-20 fold due to political rules of the Florida Fish &
Wildlife Conservation Commission.
A tribute to the BILLIONS of unnecessarily killed and wasted
juvenile fish will be memorialized by a few thousand "lying in state"
on Wednesday, April 13, 2005, at Florida's Capitol.
Please come and join us to stop the political genocide of our marine
environment!
It's time to protect Florida's Environment, Economy & People!
STOP THE KILLING!


Coastal Conservation
Association (CCA) Petitions
Secretary Of Commerce
The CCA filed a Petition on March 29, 2005, asking the US Secretary
of Commerce to enact emergency rules shutting down the Gulf of
Mexico shrimping industry from Cape San Bias west to the Texas/
Mexican border. The Petition indicates the shrimp fishery should be
closed until a plan is approved that reduces the bycatch from 60% to
80% as part of the recovery of the overfished red snapper fishery.
Their petition says that Amendment 9 of the Gulf of Mexico Shrimp
Management Plan called for at least a 44% reduction in the bycatch,
of juvenile red snapper, which are caught mostly west of the Missis-
sippi River. Most of Florida's shrimping area was not included in the
Petition because the bycatch of red snapper on Florida's shrimping
grounds is nil.
The Petition fails to mention the monumental discard rate of under-
sized red snapper in the Texas charterboat fishery. The Petition fails
to mention the fact NMFS scientists called for a 6 million-pound total
allowable catch, but the directed red snapper industry prevailed with
a 9.1 million-pound total allowable catch. The Petition states the di-
rected red snapper fishery has done its share by having quotas, sea-
sons and bag limits but the shrimp industry has done very little to,
reduce its bycatch.
No mention was made of the years of work on developing by-catch
reduction devices by the industry, resulting in tremendous savings of
juvenile fish. Hundreds of millions of dollars, devastated local com-
munities and thousands of shrimp related jobs are at stake under
CCA's attack.
From: Southeastern Fisheries Association


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Save Florida Shrimping

For more than a century, the shrimping industry has been a part of
Florida's legacy. Today, the industry employs approximately 4.400
Floridians and contributes a value of $225.9 million to the state's
economy. It has afforded fishing families with a treasured way of life
for generations, and has provided economic stability for many of the
state's coastal communities and related industries. However, the sur-
vival of Florida's once-prosperous industry is threatened by the on-
slaught of imported shrimp that has overwhelmed America's market-
place in recent years.
From 2000 to 2002, the price of shrimp in Florida to the fishermen
dropped 38 percent. Today, domestic shrimp represents 12 percent
of the U.S. market, while the other 88 percent is represented by for-
eign imports, according to the National Marine Fisheries Service.
Concerned about this alarming trend and its severe economic impli-
cations, the United States Congress approved fishery
disaster-assistance funding in 2003, with nearly $7 million desig-
nated for Florida's shrimping industry.
For the industry to recover and sustain itself, consumers need to
purchase premium-quality, ocean-caught Florida shrimp. By asking
for ocean-caught shrimp from Florida, consumers will be guaranteed
a product of superior quality and taste. Florida shrimp is fresh, clean,
free from antibiotics and natural.
The goal is to increase awareness and encourage consumers to choose
Florida ocean-caught shrimp by conveying the difference between
imported farm-raised and domestic ocean-caught shrimp.
This is the only strategy that will ensure that the Florida shrimp in-
dustry, culture and heritage survive in today's marketplace.
Bob Jones, Executive Director
Southeastern Fisheries Association


FWC Offering Grants For

Boating Projects


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission is gearing
up to dole out $2 million under
the Florida Boating Improvement
Program (FBIP). The FBIP pro-
vides funding through competitive
grants to support recreational
boating and boating-related ac-
tivities on Florida's coastal and/
or inland waters.
Eligible program participants in-
clude Florida's municipal and


county governments. The dead-
line for submitting grant applica-
tions is June 10.
In 2004, the FBIP awarded over
$1.9 million in grants for 19
projects statewide.
Visit 'MyFWC.com/boating/
grants to read the complete pro-
gram policies and guidelines and
to download a copy of the appli-
cation.


Now is the time to
subscribe to the

FRANKLIN

CHRONICLE
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The Franklin Chronicle


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


Operation No More Back

Door Targets Illegal Fish

Sales

By Scott Fusaro, Key West Citizen
State officials are cracking down on illegal fish sales in a multi-pronged
effort aimed at protecting markets for commercial fishermen and safe-
guarding consumers from fraudulent fish dinners.
Operation No More Back Door, which began in February, is focusing
on recreational anglers who sell their catches to fish houses or res-
taurants, the establishments that make the illegal purchases, pur-
veyors who mislabel seafood products to charge more for inferior items
and those selling substandard products, according to state officials.
The breadth of the problems, statewide or in the Keys, is unknown,
but a state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officer said
the results from the crackdown will help expose the extent of the
problem.
"Frankly, it will give us an idea of what is out there," said FWCC
Major Gary Strickland, who coordinates the agency's statewide in-
vestigations.
"We're looking after the commercial fishermen, trying to' keep his fair
market price and make sure the consumer gets what he's paying for,"
Strickland added.
Tony larocci, a Marathon commercial lobsterman and member of the
South Atlantic Fishery Management Council which oversees federal
waters up to 200 miles off the shores from Key West to North Caro-
lina, said he hopes the effort will have a minimal impact in the Keys
because that will mean the illegal instances are rare in the island
chain.
'That kind of stuff drives our markets down," Iarocci said of activities
authorities are targeting.
In addition to recreational fishermen competing with commercial fish-
ermen, if retail outlets can pass off inferior fish species to unsuspect-
ing consumers as premium products such as grouper, it drives down
the demand for the desired catch from which commercial fishermen
earn their livelihoods.
In addition to the FWCC, the state departments of Agriculture and
Consumer Services and of Business and Professional Regulation are
participating in the operation.
As part of the probe, investigators may pose as'recreational fisher-
men attempting to make backdoor sales or purchases, perform DNA
tests to determine the species of fishery products suspected of being
mislabeled and visit supermarkets, fish stores and other retail estab-
lishments to check delivery boxes for accurate labeling of fish spe-
cies, according to authorities.
The Agriculture Department's law enforcement branch has also gath-
ered information from more than 500 shipments of seafood products
shipped through the agency's inspection stations on Florida
interstates.


Ben And Daylight Saving Time

Benjamin Franklin was a founding father who always seemed to be at
the right place at the right "time." While in Paris negotiating with the
French government to become an ally, he attended a demonstration
of a new oil lamp, an experience that caused his inquiring 78-year old
mind to become focused on the subject of natural light vs. artificial
light. However, while in Paris Franklin seemed to have forgotten his
famous "Early to bed, early to rise... "maxim. Instead, he did as many
Parisians, he often stayed up late playing chess with his French con-
tacts until the wee hours of the morning. Then slept late, not getting
up until 9 a.m.
Through his letter to the editor of the Journal de Paris, a leading
newspaper of that era, we learn that Franklin was unexpectedly awak-
ened at 6 o'clock to find his bedroom ablaze with natural light. Still
intrigued by the oil lamp demonstration, he consulted a French al-
manac, and learned that it substantiated his finding-that the sun
did rise at 6 a.m. on that particular day.
Franklin, noted for his frugality, then went about writing a lively
thought-provoking essay, An Economic Project, on the saving of time
and expense of natural light vs. artificial light. In his April 26, 1784
parody, which appeared in the same Journal de Paris, he calculated
the cost of candies in a natural light vs. artificial light comparison,
advising Parisians how much money they could save in candle costs
if they adjusted their sleeping habits. (it is speculated that the candle
industry was not overjoyed with Franklin's candle cost economics.)
Franklin, in his entertaining way, proposed four whimsical regula-
tions to ensure Parisians abided by free natural light. Two of his
light-hearted rules included: 1.) "A tax be laid on windows built with
shutters to keep out the light of the sun," and 2.) "Guards be posted
to stop the passages of all coaches having lights upon the streets
after sunset except those of physicians, surgeons and midwives."
However, Franklin's daylight saving time idea, conceived in humor
and reported with the same wit and levity found in his Poor Richard's
Almanack, was for the most part forgotten. It was not until 148 years
later that the U.S. Congress took Franklin's concept seriously. The
1973 oil embargo prompted Congress to declare the use of Daylight
Saving Time (now an official designation). Just as Franklin had cal-
culated candle cost economics associated with natural light vs. artifi-
cial light, government experts did the same calculation involving oil.
It was correctly projected that by adding an extra hour of daylight to
the day, an hour's worth of energy could be saved at the end of the
day. (According to a study conducted by the Dept. of Transportation,
Daylight Saving Time saved the equivalent in energy of 10,000 bar-
rels of oil per day during the embargo period.)
Today, as fossil fuels diminish and cost per barrel steadily increases,
we owe thanks to Benjamin for his 220-year old idea, allowing us to
save on energy. And too, we owe thanks to Messrs. Quinquet and
Lange for their oil lamp demonstration that prompted Franklin to be
at the right place at the right "time."
John Walburn
Ottawa (Franklin County) Kansas
Benjamin Franklin's Integrity Project
www.bfip.org-bfip@bfip.org
1-785-749-6526


Severe Weather Terms

What They Mean
By Chris Floyd
Emergency Services Director
Capital Area Chapter
American Red Cross
Advisory-A message released by the hurricane center, usually at
six hour intervals, updating information on a tropical depression,
tropical storm or hurricane, including watches and warnings when-
ever they are in effect. A special advisory is given any time there is a
significant change in weather conditions or a change in warnings
previously released. An intermediate advisory updates information
in advisories at two to three hour intervals, whenever a watch or
warning is in effect.
Gale Warning-Storm with non-cyclonic winds of 30 to 54 mph ex-
pected.
Hurricane-A tropical storm with winds of 74 mph or more.
Hurricane Season-June I through November 30 is officially desig-
nated as Hurricane Season.
Hurricane Warning-A hurricane is expected to strike your area within
24 hours with sustained winds of 74 mph or more accompanied by
heavy rain and high waves.
Hurricane Watch-The alert given when a hurricane poses a threat
to a certain coastal area within 36 hours.
Small Craft Warning-When a tropical storm or hurricane threatens
a coastal area, small craft are advised to remain in port and not to
venture into the open sea.
Storm Surge-A rise in tides caused by a tropical storm or hurricane
as it moves over or near the coastline. It can be much higher than the
normal tidal rise, with breaking waves on top.
Storm Warning-Storm with non-cyclonic winds of 55 to 73 mph
expected.
Tornado Watch-Tornadoes and severe thunderstorms are possible
in your area.
Tornado Warning-Tornado detected in your area 'TAKE SHELTER".
Tropical Depression-An area of low pressure, rotary circulation of
clouds and winds of 38 mph.
Tropical Disturbance-A moving area of thunderstorms in the trop-
ics.
Tropical Storm-Counterclockwise circulation of clouds and winds,
39 to 73 mph. The storm is assigned a name.
For additional information on preparing for a tornado of to become a
Disaster Resistant Neighborhood please call the Capital Area Chap-
ter of the American Red Cross in Tallahassee at 878-6080, in
Apalachicola at 653-4220, in Monticello at 342-0211, in Bristol at
643-2339 or in Perry at 584-6663 or visit our web site at:
www.tallytovwn.com/redcross/ds.


Natural wonders aren't formed overnight.


It takes time to turn promise into greatness. It also takes commitment, passion, and respect. At St. Joe, we employ all of these to bring value
to the land we develop and the places we create. We applaud those who do the same'for their neighbors. Together, for more than 75 years,
we have invested in today to create a better tomorrow. Not only for ourselves, but for our shared future. This is our home. Let's make sure
that the best is yet to come.




f f STJOE


2005 The St. Joe Company. "JOE," "St. Joe," and the "Taking Flight" design are service marks of The St. Joe Company. For more information, please visit www.joe.com.


I









The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


15 April 2005 Page 5.


Second Circuit

Court Report

The Honorable Judge Janet E. Ferris
Prosecuting Attorney Michael Schneider
March 14, 2005
By Carol Noble

All persons identified below are innocent unless proven
otherwise in a court of law.

ARRAIGNMENT
Akers, James D: Charged with felony DUI on February 11, 2005. Bond was
$7.500.00. The defendant was present in court and a public defender was
appointed. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Anderson, Brenda D: Charged with burglary of a dwelling and grand theft on
February 21, 2005. Bond was $6,000.00. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of not guilty. The case
was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Baker, Jason P: Charged with driving while license suspended (felony), DUI,
and giving false name or identification to officer on February 7, 2005. Defen-
dant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court but Attorney Clifford
Davis was not. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Bohling, Amanda N: Charged with fraudulent use of credit card on February
16. 2005. Bond was $500.00. The defendant did not show up for court. A
capias (warrant for arrest) was issued. Bond was forfeited.
Bowers, Walter F: Charged with sale/possession of controlled substance with
intent to sell within 1.000 feet of store on January 23, 2005. Bond was
$25,000.00. The defendant was present in court and a public defender was
appointed. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Carroll, John Orbin: Charged with cultivation of cannabis, possession of can-
nabis (more than 20 grams), possession drug paraphernalia on February 18,
2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not guilty. The case
was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Clark, Donald K: Charged with armed robbery with deadly weapon on Janu-
ary 22, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in
court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way who entered a plea of not guilty. The
case was entered on the Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Coker, Jeffrey: Charged with felony DUI, driving while license suspended
(felony), and refusal to submit to balance test on February 6, 2005. Bond was
$20,000.00. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney Rachel
Chesnut who entered a written plea of not guilty dated February 15, 2005.
The case was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Dalton, Toby L: Charged with litter law Florida on January 25, 2005. Bond
was $500.00. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger. Defendant found not indigent by Judge. The case was entered on the
Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Daniels, James Ivan Jr.: Charged with flagrant violation of net law on Febru-
ary 3, 2005. Defendant released on own recognizance. The defendant did not
show up for court, but was recalled on March 15, 2005. A plea of not guilty
was entered by the Court. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9,
2005.
Emswiler, George I: Charged two times with worthless check over 150 dollars
on February 3, 2005. Total bond was $5,659.17. The defendant was present
in court and entered a plea of not guilty. The case.was entered on the Plea
Docket for April 11,2005.
Fichera, Tilden Lee: Charged with aggravated assault with firearm on Janu-
ary 9, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not guilty. The
case was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Geter, David L: Charged with burglary of a dwelling on January 7, 2005.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Pub-
lic Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not guilty. The case was
entered on the Plea Docket for April 11, 2005,
Gordie, Curtis: Charged with possession of prescription drugs with intent to
sell or deliver on February 14, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea
of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 30
months drug offender probation; 6 months inpatient treatment with 6 months
aftercare; 7pm to 7am curfew; $535.00 court costs and fees. Cost of supervi-
sion waived.....


Gorski, Thomas A: Charged with sale of controlled substance on February
16, 2005; charged with possession of controlled substance with intent to sell
or deliver on February 16, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was present in coprt and entered a plea of not guilty. A public Defender was
appointed. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Harris, Omarsharek A: Charged with driving while license suspended (felony)
on January 14, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was repre-
sented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way who entered a plea of not
guilty. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Jenks, Joseph A: Charged with grand theft from retail merchant on January
15, 2005. Bond was $1,500.00. The defendant was present in court and en-
tered a plea of not guilty. A public defender was appointed. The case was
entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Johns, Royce Lee III: Charged with 3 counts of aggravated battery with deadly
weapon on February 8, 2005. Bond was $21,500.00. The defendant was present
in court and entered a plea of not guilty. A public defender was appointed. The
case was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Kilgore, John H: Charged with flagrant violation of net law; possession of net
of 500 square feet: possession of net larger than 2 inch stretch; two nets tied
together connected on November 22, 2004. Bond was $1,000.00. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a
plea of not guilty. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Lanza, Gerson R: Charged with possession of controlled substance and driv-
ing while license suspended or revoked on February 5, 2005. Bond was
$1,000.00. The defendant did not show up for court and a capias (warrant for
arrest) was issued. The bond was forfeited.
Lowery, Chiquita L: Charged with grand theft from retail merchant on Janu-
ary 21, 2005. Bond was $1,000.00. The defendant was present in court and
entered a plea of not guilty. A public defender was appointed. The case was
entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
McClure, Gary Todd: Charged with driving while license suspended (felony)
on January 17. 2005. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was present in
court and entered a written plea of not guilty. Attorney Clifford Davis was not
present. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Morris, Carlos Artiz: Charged with sale/possession of controlled substance
with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a church (two counts); possession of
controlled substance; possession of cannabis, on February 12, 2005. Defen-
dant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not guilty. The case was entered
on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Nichols, Donnie Gordon: Charged with flagrant violation of net law; posses-
sion of net of 500 square feet; possession of net larger than 2 inch stretch; two
nets tied together connected; on November 22, 2004. Bond was $1,000.00.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and
entered a plea of not guilty. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for May
9, 2005.
Prince, Edward J: Charged with possession of contraband at county deten-
tion facility on January 7, 2005. Bond was $1,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of not
guilty. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Randolph, Manuel Jr.: Charged with grand theft from retail merchant on
January 13, 2005. Bond was $7,125.00. The defendant was present in court.
The case was continued on the Arraignment Docket for April 11, 2005.
Ratledge, Robert P: Charged with grand theft of motor vehicle and burglary
of a conveyance on December 7, 2004. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant
was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea
of not guilty. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Ray, Alan Blake: Charged with robbery (second degree) no weapon on Febru-
ary 17, 2005. Bond was $1,000.00. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of not guilty. The case was
entered on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Ray, Keith: Charged with sale of controlled substance on January 26, 2005.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Attor-
ney Ethan Andrew Way and entered a plea of no contest. Adjudication was
withheld. The defendant was sentenced to 47 days in jail with 47 days credit
for time served; 2 years probation; $535.00 court costs and fees. Cost of su-
pervision waived.
Rhodes, Tobias J: Charged with aggravated battery with deadly weapon on
January 13, 2005. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant did not show up in
court and a capias (warrant for arrest) was issued. Bond was forfeited.
Richards, Joseph D: Charged with grand theft from retail merchant. Bond
was $5,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger and entered a plea of not guilty. The case was entered on the Plea
Docket for June 17, 2005.
Sanders, Anthonyi Charged with delivery of controlled substance (3 counts);
false report to law enforcement officer (3 counts) on August 10, 2004. Defen-
dant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public


mmuEiuAiK


TESUR CHEKIN


3g.00 A


Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of not guilty. The case was entered
on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Smith, Jesse G. Jr.: Charged with possession of controlled substance with
intent to sell or deliver on February 16, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and
entered a plea of not guilty. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for May
9, 2005.
Taglaris, Anthony: Charged with uttering (passing worthless document) 3
counts on January 25, 2005; Charged with uttering (passing worthless docu-
ment) I count on January 24, 2005. Total bond was $20,000.00. The defen-
dant was present in court. The case was continued on the Arraignment Docket
for April 11, 2005.
Vitale, Louis: Charged with uttering (passing worthless document) 8 counts
on February 4, 2005. Bond was $8,000.00. The defendant was represented in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a written plea of not guilty.
The case was entered on the Plea Docket for June 17. 2005.
White, Nathaniel: Charged with grand theft on January 21, 2005. Defendant
was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court and entered a plea of
not guilty. A public defender was appointed. The case was entered on the Plea
Docket for May 9, 2005.
Williams, Joshua C: Charged with possession of controlled substance and
possession of cannabis on February 15, 2005. Bond was $5.500.00. The de-
fendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered -
a plea of not guilty. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for June 17,
2005.
Yarrell, Ricco: Charged with sale of crack cocaine on January 18, 2005. De-
fendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Attorney
Ethan Andrew Way and entered a plea of not guilty. The case was entered on.
the Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION ARRAIGNMENT
Cargill, William: Charged with sale of controlled substance within 1,000 of a'-
church on October 9, 2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was ,
present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way and entered a plea of de-
nial. The case was entered on the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for April
11,2005.
Dykes, Clifford M. Jr.: Charged with possession of cannabis (more than 20
grams) on June 8, 2001; charged with cultivation of cannabis and possession
of cannabis (more than 20 grams) on September 16, 2001. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin
Steiger who entered a plea of denial. The case was entered on the Violation of
Probation Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Gorski, Thomas A: Charged with driving while license suspended (felony) on
June 15, 2002; charged with possession of controlled substance on July 22,
2003; charged with fighting or baiting animals. Defendant was incarcerated.
The defendant was present in court, a public defender was appointed. The
case was entered on the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for May 9. 2005.
Jackson, Del Romel: Charged with driving while license suspended (felony)
on September 12, 2001. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant did not show up
in court and a capias (warrant for arrest) was issued. The capias was recalled
on March 15, 2005 and a plea of denial was entered. The case was entered on
the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for April 11. 2005.
Morris, Carlos Artiz: Charged with lewd or lascivious conduct on July 27,
2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial. The case was
entered on the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Newberry, Charles D: Charged with burglary of occupied dwelling on August
14, 1996. Bond was $505.00. The defendant was present in court. Bond was
estreated to Dept. of Corrections for costs. Probation terminated.
Page, Mayson Randall: Charged with culpable negligence on April 9. 2002.
Defendant was released on own recognizance. The defendant was present in
court, costs were paid. Probation terminated.
Roberts, Olenza D: Charged with possession of cocaine with intent to sell
and fleeing or attempting to elude police officer on August 11, 2002. Defen- .
dant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial. The case was entered on
the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Rowland, Robert Lewis: Charged with burglary of a dwelling on August 30,,
2001. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Attorney Gregory Cummings, admitted being in violation of probation and
was found in violation. The defendant was sentenced to 84 months in prison
(concurrent with other cases) with credit for time already served. Probation
was revoked. Financial amounts reduced to, civil judgement.
Scofield, Stephanie L: Charged with fail to comply with sex offender stat-
utes. The defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger
and an agreement between parties was decided. Probation terminated.
Continued on Page 7


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Briefs from Page 2

non-warrantee work as a poten-
tial source of the roof'leaks. Mr.
Shuler and I are going to seek an
independent opinion before we
recommend to the Board any par-
ticular course of action.
24. Mr. Bobby Siprell has re-
quested that the extension of
Squire Road in Southland Subdi-
vision be opened. Mr. Siprell be-
lieves this section of road was
dedicated to the county, but in a
brief look in the records Mark
Curenton could not find any evi-
dence that it had. Mr. Siprell will
not be disappointed if the county
does not own the road, because
then he will build his own drive-
way, but he was lead to believe
the county does own a 66 foot
right-of-way. This was owned by
Shuler and is to be given to the
county. Board direction.
25. Airport issues: A) New date
from DOT for re-inspecting airport
for license renewal is May 3 1. B)
Board action on signing Resolu-
tions and contracts for three
projects-fence & gate, fence, and
brush cutter, and action to Bid
fuel farm. Approved.
26. Also approved, Lanark drain-
age project to accept bids.




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Paee 6 15 April 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Migratory

Bird Day

Open House
Tours

St. Vincent National Wildlife Ref-
uge will conduct staff-guided ref-
uge tours May 11, 12, and 13 to
celebrate Migratory Bird Day.
Many neotropical migratory birds
are declining due to fragmenta-
tion of breeding habitat in North
America and loss of winter habi-
tat in the Caribbean, Central
America, and South America. Par-
ticipants will have the opportunity
to become better acquainted with
their refuge and its varied wild-
life and wildlife habitats.
One tour will be conducted daily
May 11, 12, and 13 (Wednesday
through Friday). The tours are
scheduled to leave the Refuge's
Indian Pass boat dock at 8:00
a.m., E.D.T. and will return at
approximately 1:00 p.m., E.D.T.
Transportation across Indian
Pass will be provided for partici-
pants of the staff-guided tours.
Those wishing to participate must
make reservations by phone at
850/653-8808 beginning on April
25. Reservations will be limited to
four individuals per group.
As a reminder, the Refuge is open
to the public year-round during
daylight hours except during hunt
periods and prescribed burns
and/or wildfires. Special permits
or prior notice are not required to
visit. Transportation to the Ref-
uge is the responsibility of the
visitor when not in conjunction
with a specific refuge activity.


Prudential Resort Realty
Wins Top Honors

Real Estate

News

Galloway #1 in North
America and Thompson #8
in North America
Jeff Galloway was honored as the
.#1 Real Estate Sales Agent in the
entire Prudential network at the
recent National Convention in Las
Vegas, held annually by Pruden-
tial Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.
(PREA). Jerry Thompson was hon-
ored as the #8 Real Estate Agent.
Rose Drye, President of Pruden-
tial Resort Realty (PRR), received
the Gibraltar Circle Award, rec-
ognizing the company as one of
the most' productive .in' the, Pru-
dential network, ranking 48 of the
top 50, of 1800 companies in
North America.
"We put St. George Island on the
map this year," said company
owner Helen Spohrer. "I am really
proud of everyone's accomplish-
ments."
Galloway and Thompson were
honored at a special awards cer-
emony at the Mandalay Bay Ho-
tel featuring comedian Jerry
Seinfeld.
Other local Prudential agents
honored for their achievements
were: PREA 100-Libia Taylor/Eli
Duarte; Chairman Circle Dia-
mond-Pandora Schlitt; Chair-
man Circle Platinum-Helen
Spohrer/Patty Durham; Presi-
dent's Circle-Kara Landiss,
Stuart White, Michael Howze and
Leading Edge Society-Al
Mirabella, Ruth Schoelles.


Florida
Developmental
Disabilities
Council
Launches
"Inclusion
Works!"

Campaign
The Florida Developmental Dis-
abilities Council (FDDC) today
launched a public awareness
campaign stressing the impor-
tance of including individuals
with disabilities in Florida's edu-
cation system, business environ-
ment and local communities.
While hosting "Developmental
Disabilities Awareness Day" at the
Capitol, the council and its civic
partners debuted an educational
video and introduced the Florida
Inclusion Alliance, comprised of
42 businesses and organizations
from around the state, all of whom


have banded together to educate
the public about inclusion as part
of the campaign entitled "Inclu-
sion Works!"
A speakers' bureau with more
than 50 self-advocates, family
members and professionals dedi-
cated to the inclusion movement
will give presentations to civic and
professional organizations around
the state in the months ahead.
They plan to illustrate their point
with the educational video that
premiered today at the Capitol,
showcasing five individuals,
schools and businesses success-.
fully practicing inclusion in
Florida, as well as other support
materials.
The FDDC notes that, in terms of
providing inclusive settings,
Florida has some growing to do.


It acknowledges a strong start,
however, with the formation of the
Inclusion Alliance and the enthu-
siasm of the speakers' bureau,
which is in the process of sched-
uling speaking engagements with
interested businesses and orga-
nizations.
For more information on the in-
clusion movement, or to sched-
ule a Florida Inclusion Alliance or
speakers' bureau presentation,
visit www.fddc.org or call
1-800-580-7801.


Flea Market

Special

The Franklin/Gulf County Retired
Educators Association (F/GREA)
will be holding a flea market on
Saturday, April 16, from 9:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m. at the Eastpoint
Firehouse to raise money for the
F/GREA Scholarship fund.
Money raised from this event will
be used to fund scholarships for
high school seniors.
This event will be an opportunity
for residents of Gulf and Franklin
counties to buy useful, many
one-of-a-kind items at VERY REA-
SONABLE PRICES and have their
money contribute to furthering
the education of high school se-
niors. Raffle tickets for a $250
prize are also available for this
worthwhile cause. The raffle
drawing will take place at the
firehouse on April 16. A craft and
baked goods sale is also planned
for this event. For information call
Arlene at 697-9790 or Marty at
927-2243.

Five-Year

Fishing
License Bags

Goodies For

Anglers

Now's a good time for Florida resi-
dents to buy a five-year freshwa-
ter fishing license. The first 3,000
anglers to buy the $61.50 license
will save up to $20 in fees over
the five years, and will automati-
cally get $80 worth of free hooks,
lures, fishing line, magazines and
other goodies like t-shirts and
fishing towels via mail within a
few weeks.
If you plan on buying a boat and
pick the right make, you can save
250 on gear to outfit the vessel
using one of the included cou-
pons.
Licenses are available at county
tax collectors' offices, license
agents, onlinie at 1ivF; 'WC.cofi n or
over the phone at 1-888-FISH
FLORIDA. License sellers collect
fees of $2 $4.83 in addition to
the cost of the license.
Florida is the premier fishing des-
tination hosting over 3 million
resident and 1 million nonresi-
dent anglers each year qualifying.
it as the Fishing Capital of the
World. For more information, visit
MyFWC.com.


Boyd

Receives

"Spirit Of

Enterprise"

Award

U.S. Chamber Honors
Congressman Boyd For
Backing Business
Congressman Allen Boyd
(D-North Florida) received the
"Spirit of Enterprise" award from
the United States Chamber of
Commerce for his strong support
for a pro-economic growth legis-
lative agenda in the second ses-
sion of the 108th Congress.
"It is such an honor to receive this
award from the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce." said Congressman
Boyd. "The federal government
can play a meaningful role in pro-
viding economic opportunity for
our businesses, and I am proud
to work with the Chamber of Com-
merce to promote more economic
growth. Our communities are
stronger because of the work and
dedication of tile local chambers
and their membership, and I will
continue to support our chambers
and the issues that are important
for the economic development of
North Florida."
The Chamber awards the "Spirit
of Enterprise" based on rankings
it gives members of Congress for
key business votes. Among the


key votes counted by the Cham-
ber in 2004 were votes on medi-
cal liability reform, the tJ.S.-Aus-
tralia free trade agreement, pen-
sion reform and tax-relief.


FWC Releases
2004 Boating
Statistics
Florida's 2004 boating statistics
are out, and again they are so-
Sbering.
The number of registered boats in
Florida soared to 982,907 in
2004, compared to 978,225 in
2003. Boating fatalities jumped to
68 in 2004 from 64 in 2003. In
fact, fatality numbers have in-
creased slowly since 2000 when
Florida had its lowest number of
boating fatalities in many years.
Monroe County reported the high-
est number of accidents and in-
juries, 98 and 57 respectively.
Pinellas County reported the
highest number of fatalities with
seven. Palm Beach County re-
ported the highest property dam-
age figures at $8.69 million, in-
cluding one incident that ac-
counted for $8 million of that to-
tal. The second-highest property
damage occurred in Miami-Dade
County with $1.2 million.
Even the good news wasn't really
good. The statistic that recre-
ational boating accidents dipped
to 743 from 1,005 in 2003 reflects
a change in the amount of dam-
age an accident has to involve
before it counts. In 2003, an ac-
cident had to involve $500 dam-
age to be included in the statis-
tics. They had to involve $2,000
in damage to make the cut in
2004 due to a change in the law.
Statistics indicate experienced
boaters may fall prey to a false
sense of security. In fact, more-
than half the boat operators in-
volved in fatal boating accidents
last year had more than 100
hours of boat operation experi-
ence.
The typical boating accident vic-
tim is not a child or adolescent.
He's a 22- to 50-year-old male
with many hours of experience in
operating a vessel. In most cases,
if he sustained an injury, it was
not life-threatening. If he did not
survive the accident, most likely
he drowned, because he thought
it uncomfortable, unbecoming or
unnecessary to wear a life
jacket-even if he couldn't swim.
Drowning continued to be the
leading cause of death in Florida's
boating accidents (65 percent).
FWC boating safety officials and
officers encourage boaters to con-
sider life jackets to be similar to
seatbelts when it comes to their
life-saving potential. New types of
inflatable life-jackets-especially
the waist-pack variety-are light-
weight and hardly noticeable
when worn.
"It simply makes sense to wear
one when you're on the water,"
said FWC Capt. Richard Moore.
"It's like the seatbelt in your car.
If you aren't wearing it when you
find yourself a few seconds from
a collision, you may have waited
too late."
Also,, excessive alcohol use con-
tinued to be the leading cause of
boating fatalities in 2004. The ef-
fects of alcohol may be even
greater on boat operators than
vehicle operators because the
combination of wave action, hot
sun and physical exertion from
being on the water compounds
the influence alcohol consump-
tion can have on people.
"As with cars on land, it's always
best for boats to be operated by
someone who hasn't been con-
suming alcoholic beverages,"
Moore said.'"Designated drivers
can save lives on boats, just like
they do on highways."
Moore said other suggestions for
having safe experiences on
Florida's waters include taking a
boating safety course, filing a float
plan with a friend or relative each
time you take to the water and
making sure you have the proper
safety equipment in working or-
der. For boat operators age 21 or
younger, the boater safety course
is a requirement-not merely a
suggestion-for legally operating
a vessel with 10 or more horse-
power in Florida.
More information about boating
accidents and boating safety is
available online at MyFWC.com.
Click on "Boating."
To report resource or boating-
under-the-influence law viola-
tions, the FWC's Wildlife Alert
hotline number 1-888-404-3922
or #FWC (*FWC in some areas) by
cellular phone.


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


15 April 2005 Page 7"


Second Circuit Court from Page 5

Suggs, Kenneth E: Charged (times 3) with worthless check over 150 dollars
on September 10, 2003. Defendant was released on own recognizance. The
defendant was present in court and agreed to pay restitution. Violation dis-
missed.
Tipton, Miriam: Charged with sale of controlled substance, trafficking in con-
trolled substance, and sale of controlled substance on August 21, 2003. Total
bond was $3,000.00. The defendant was represented in court by Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial. The case was entered on the
Violation of Probation Plea Docket for April 11. 2005.
Vonier, Brook J: Charged with grand theft on June 1, 2002; charged with
aggravated battery with great bodily harm on March 19, 2003. Total bond was
$5,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler
and entered a written plea of denial dated March 8, 2005. The case was en-
tered on the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Weeks, Charles Michael: Charged with felony DUI (with property damage);
driving while license suspended (felony) with property damage on April 29,
2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial. The case was
entered on the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
West, Raymond D: Charged with sale of controlled substance on June 7,
2002. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a plea of denial. The case was
entered on the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.

PLEA DOCKET
Banks, James Gadsden: Charged with flagrant violation of net law and pos-
session of net larger than 2-inch stretch on November 12, 2004. Bond was
$5,000.00. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney Gregory
Cummings. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for June 17, 2005.
Banks, Ricky: Charged with flagrant violation of net law and possession of
net larger than 2-inch stretch on November 10, 2004. Bond was $5,000.00.
The defendant was present in court with Attorney Michael Rayne. The case
was continued on the Plea Docket for June 17, 2005.
Boone, Daniel Ray: Charged with flagrant violation of net law and possession
of net larger than 2-inch stretch on October 31, 2004. Bond was $5,000.00.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The
case was continued on the Plea Docket for June 17, 2005.
Burns, Calvin: Charged with sale of controlled substance on December 9,
2003 charged with aggravated assault on law enforcement officer and posses-
sion of controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver on December 9,
2003. Total bond was $50,000.00. The defendant was represented in court by
Attorney David W. Collins. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for
April 11. 2005.
Crauswell, Daryl Alvin: Charged with attempted sexual battery and false
imprisonment on August 19, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was
continued on the Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Creamer, Kerry S: Charged with trafficking in a controlled substance and
sale of a controlled substance on August 21, 2004. Bond was $25,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case
was continued on the Pea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Edwards, Ross Wayne: Charged with sale of controlled substance on Janu-
ary 15, 2004(charge #1); sale of controlled substance on January 15, 2004
(charge #2); possession of contraband at county detention facility (charge #3).
The defendant was present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, en-
tered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The State dropped charge
#1. The defendant was sentenced to 36 months in prison with 272 days credit
for time served (concurrent with other cases). Costs reduced to civil judge-
ment.
Facer, Craig A: Charged with corruption by threat against public servant,
battery, resisting office without violence on November 2, 2004. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan An-
drew Way. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Facer, Craig A: Charged with felony fleeing or attempting to elude offer, felony
DUI, Driving while license suspended (felony), resisting officer without vio-
lence, refusal to submit to balance test, property'damage on November 3,
2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. The case was continued on the Plea Docket
for April 11, 2005.
Gillespie, John F: Charged with possession of firearm by convicted felon,
possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of firearm in closed manage-
Smentarea facility on September 13. 2004. Bond was $2,000.00. The defen-
dant was present in court with Attorney Barbara Sanders. The case was con-
tinued on the Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Goodson, Noah: Charged with driving while license suspended (felony) on
.January 11, 2005. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and was
adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 62 days in jail with 62



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days credit for time served; 18 months probation; $435.00 court costs and
fees. Cost of supervision waived.
Green, Alicia D: Charged with giving false name adversely affecting another.
driving while license suspended or revoked, possession of cannabis on No-
vember 16. 2004. Bond was $1.500.00. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest and adjudica-
tion was withheld. The defendant was sentenced to 18 months probation (count
1); 6 months probation (count 2); 12 months probation (count 3); all to run
concurrent; $510.00 court costs and fees. Cost of supervision waived.
Harris, Lataska V: Charged with possession of controlled substance with in-
tent to sell or deliver on December 31; 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case
was continued on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Hatler, Derick M: Charged with burglary of a conveyance, criminal mischief,
petit theft on August 21, 2004. Bond was $8,500.00. The defendant was rep-
resented in court by Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. The case was continued on
the Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Johnson, Marvin Dwayne: Charged.with driving while license permanently
revoked and fleeing attempting to elude police officer on May 14. 2004. Bond
was $20,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender
Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Lake, Willie Carr: Charged with felony fleeing or attempting to elude, driving
while license suspended or revoked, property damage on January 11, 2005.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for April
11,2005.
Lohnes, Joe Eugene: Charged with uttering a forged instrument on October
13, 2004. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Pub-
lic Defender Kevin Steiger, entered awplea of no contest and was adjudicated
guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 30 months probation; $435.00 court
costs and fees.
Martin, Robert Steven: Charged with possession of controlled substance,
possession of cannabis (more than 20 grams), cultivation of cannabis, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia on October 1, 2004. Bond was $20,000.00. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. The case was
continued on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Ray, Lawrence William: Charged (two times) with sale of controlled sub-
stance on December 28, 2004. Total bond was $3,500.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way. The case was continued on
the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Reed, Mervin Eugene: Charged with sexual battery with deadly weapon on
July 21, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, entered a plea of no contest to the
lesser charge of felony battery (third degree) and was adjudicated guilty. The
defendant was sentenced to 236 days in jail with 236 days credit for time
served; 60 months administrative non-report probation; $787.00 court costs
and fees; no contact with victim. Cost of supervision waived.
Register, Robert J: Charged with possession with intent to sell cannabis,
possession of paraphernalia on September 8, 2004. Bond was $15,000.00.
The defendant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. The case
was continued on the Plea Docket for; April 11, 2005.
Rhodes, Wayne: Charged with driving under influence causing serious bodily
injury, driving while license suspended or revoked. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
The case was continued on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Richards, Christopher Ralph: Charged with felony fleeing.or attempt to elude,
resisting officer with violence, driving while license suspended or revoked on
April 9, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, entered a plea of no contest and was
adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 18 months in prison with
90 days credit for time served (count 1); 18 months in prison (count 2) con-
current; 60 days in jail with 60 days credit for time served (count 3). Costs
reduced to civil judgement.
Roberts, James Lee: Charged with flagrant violation of net law, possession of
net larger than 2 inch stretch on October 24, 2004. Defendant was released
on own recognizance. The defendant was present in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for May 9,
2005.
Salmon, James A: Charged with I count burglary of a dwelling on January 9.
2005; 4 counts burglary of a dwelling on December 30, 2004. Bond was
$15,250.00. The defendant was represented in court by Attorney Ethan An-
drew Way. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Sapp, Paul C: Charged with possession of more than 20 grams cannabis on
November 12, 2004. Bond was $1,500'00. The defendant was present in court
with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. The case was continued on the Plea Docket
for May 9, 2005.
Strops, Michael John: (Chjrgid n.-ih 1l.-,r' DUI, driving while license perma-
nently re.uk-cd (.on October 2 20,4. Bond was $1,500.00. The defendant was
present n court \wunh rPuiliL. Dcni-ider Kevin Steiger. The case was continued
on the'"Plt a D.:-: ke t f.:.r Ju re 17 .205'.
Thompson, Vernon: Charged with possession of controlled substance, pos-
session of cannabis (more than 20 grams), possession drug paraphernalia on
November 9, 2004. Bond was $10,000.00. The defendant was present in court
with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. The case was continued on the Plea Docket
for May 9, 2005.
Walker, Daniel William: Charged with flagrant violation of net law, posses-
sion of net larger than 2 inch stretch on October 24, 2004, Bond was $1,000.00.
The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The
case was continued on the Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION PLEA DOCKET
Ash, Craig: Charged with possession of controlled substance and fleeing or
attempting to elude police officer on May 13, 2004. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
admitted being in violation of probation and was found in violation. The de-
fendant was sentenced to I year and I day in prison (to run concurrent) with
222 days credit for time served. Probation revoked. Costs reduced to civil
judgement.
Bentley, Franklin J: Charged with burglary of a dwelling and grand theft of a
firearm on June 15, 2004. Defendant was released on own recognizance. The
defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted
being in violation of probation and was found in violation. Probation was rein-
stated.
Byrd, Billie Jo: Charged with purchase of controlled substance on December
20, 2002. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation of probation
and was found in violation. Probation was revoked. The defendant was sen-
tenced to 2 years drug offender probation with previous conditions reimposed.
6pm to 6am curfew. Cost of supervision waived.
Douds, Tammy: Charged with 4 counts uttering (passing worthless docu-
ment) on August 13, 2002. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender. Kevin Steiger, admitted being in viola-
tion of probation and was found in violation. Probation was revoked. The de-


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fendant was sentenced to 24 months in prison with 537 days (stipulated)
credit for time served. Financial amounts reduced to civil judgement.
Estes, Frederick Jr: Charged with grand theft on September 4, 2003. Defen-
dant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Attorney
Gregory Cummings, admitted being in violation of probation and was found in
violation. The defendant was sentenced to 60 days in jail with 49 days credit
for time served. Probation reinstated, modified. The defendant entered a plea
of no contest to charge possession of cannabis, was adjudicated guilty (stipu-
lated to probable cause), and sentenced to 49 days in jail with 49 days credit
for time served; $500.00 court costs.
Evans, Shirl Brannan: Charged with resisting offer with violence on June 19,
1999. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation of probation and .
was found in violation. Probation was terminated. The defendant entered a
plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty to charge of DUI, resisting of-.,
ficer without violence. The defendant was sentenced to 6 months license sus-
pension; 6 months probation (concurrent, count 1 & 2); 50 hours'community,
service; DUI school; vehicle impound.
Goodson, John: Charged with dealing stolen property on May 1. 2002. De-
fendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation of probation and was found
in violation. Probation revoked and sentenced to I year and 1 day in prison;
with 115 days credit for time served. Financial amounts to civil judgement.
Harris, Lataska V: Charged with sale of controlled substance on October 30.
2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Violation of
Probation Plea Docket for May 9, 2005.
Lake, Willie Carr: Charged with retaliate against a witness on July 18, 2003"
charged with possession of contraband at county detention facility on March
4, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Violation
of Probation Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Massey, Connie F: Charged with grand theft on November 9, 2002. Defen-
dant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Violation of Probation
Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Moran, Timothy R: Charged with dealing in stolen property on September
23, 2003. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger, admitted being in violation of probation and was found in violation.
Defendant to be evaluated and have treatment if needed. Probation reinstated,
modified..
White, Damien: Charged with sale of controlled substance on November 4,
2001. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted being in violation of probation and
was found in violation. Probation was terminated.

DOCKET SOUNDING
Corley, Karen: Charged with issuing worthless check on January 20, 2004;
charged with issuing worthless check and grand theft (third degree) on July 6,
2004. Total bond was $3,504.39. The defendant was represented in court by
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Docket Sound-
ing for April 11, 2005.
Edwards, Ross Wayne: Charged with aggravated battery with deadly weapon
and possession of firearm by convicted felon on January 15, 2004. Defendant
was released on own recognizance. The defendant was present in court with
Attorney Ethan Andrew Way, entered a plea of no contest to count 2 and was
adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 36 months in prison (con-
current with another case) with 272 days credit for time served. The State
dropped charges count 1. Costs reduced to judgement.
Etheridge, Christopher V: Charged with burglary of a dwelling and grand
theft (third degree) on June 3, 2004. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Gregory Cummings. The case was continued
on the Docket Sounding for July 11, 2005.
Moore, Edley Ralph Jr: Charged with felony DUI. Bond was $17,500.00. The
defendant was represented in court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The
case was entered on the Plea Docket for June 17, 2005.
Yarrell, Ricco: Charged with sale of controlled substance on June 21. 2004;
charged with felony fleeing or attempting to elude officer, resisting officer with
violence and possession of cannabis (more than 20 grams) on May 18, 2004.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by At-
torney Ethan Andrew Way. The case was continued on the Plea Docket'for
April 11, 2005.

HEARINGS
Alexander, Kenneth D: Competency hearing. The case was entered on the
Plea Docket for April 11, 2005.
Williams, Norman B. Jr: Defendant's motion forn statement, of particulars.
Motion granted,within ,30 days,.,.., .
Smith, Jesset Motion for pretriial release or reasboiable bail. Motiori granted.
Bond reduced to $5,000.00.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION HEARING
McAnally, Robert T: The defendant was present in court on March 15, 2005
with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler, admitted being in violation of probation and
was found in violation. Probation revoked. The defendant was sentenced to 2
years drug offender probation (running concurrent); 7pm to 7am curfew. The
defendant entered a plea of no contest and was adjudicated guilty to the charge
purchase of cannabis. The defendant was sentenced to 2 years drug offender
probation (running concurrent). Cost of supervision waived. Financial costs
reduced to civil judgement.,


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Pane 8 15 April 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


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Comp Plan from Page 1

year ana still, roads and houses are not being build yet. It takes a
lpng time to get this stuff through the system."
A debate then followed as to whether the process should be handled
in phases or as proposed. Putnal suggested phases, Mosconis sug-
gested that nothing was written in stone no matter what the commis-
sion decided; and Mr. Lewis simply suggested caution-things could
happen; companies could change hands etc.; better for the County to
move slowly than rush ahead and end up sorry in the future.

Don Ashley-St. James Resident
"We have not always been right, but we have certainly been sincere.
We (himself and his wife) are residents of St. James Island. I've owned
property in the county for almost twenty years. We have raised our
children .here;' we intend to raise our grandchildren' here. I think that
the pwpIe inp this community have very strong feelings about this
very unique part of Florida. We trust that this new Commission is
listening ... to the citizens' input and trying to find a common ground
for balanced growth and not explosive growth. I don't want to sound
like we are totally against all development. Frankly, I think that St.
Joe is the .best one to develop. They have the best resources; they
have the best people; they have the best capacity to do this correctly.
"Three thousand three hundred eighty-seven units in addition to four
hundred ninety-nine at SummerCamp-that's a lot of units. In
Carrabelle there are six hundred more units approved; four hundred
more for Timber Island; and for St. James Bay DRI with five hundred
and ninety-seven. There are 2000 of these secondary units already in
the pipe-line and now we are going to approve nearly four thousand
more. Remember the promise on Summer Camp." Mr. Ashley talked
about beach access, assessments that were promised and not yet
made, protection of wildlife species, gulf sturgeon etc., and suggested
that these things should all be a part of the development consider-
ations "... Why don't we go site specific, one at a time, and try to get
the best development that we can get with the least impact to the
natural resources and our cultural heritage and the greatest benefit
to the community. If this commission will help us to do that; I think
,this Community stands ready to work with them."

Tom Adams
"What you do if you approve those uses on that Future Land Use Map
(FLUM), you have granted vested rights. That means in perpetuity. I
think that Mr. Putnal is exactly right that you have eliminated any
,possibility in the future that the board would have with respect to
vested rights. I would not even include the St. James over-lay as an
attachment (appendix). Send that at some other time. I would not'
want to contaminate the process that you are in with something in
:the appendence that can be used for someone to interpret vested
,rights. That's the big danger.
"C-4 (another issue of concern to Mr. Adams calls for one unit per
acre.) I was one of those who asked for a moratorium on C-4 until it
has been sorted out. The problem is that you have no standards with
C-4 as you do with all of your other zoning ordinances. I hope that
you will give consideration to those areas. One would be the denial of
the land use changes, and the other would be re-consideration of C-4
as a problem yet unresolved."

David McLain-River Keeper
"I speak only on behalf of ABARK at this particular time. My hope
would be that we would continue the public participation (as recom-
mended by DCA). We had public workshops ... We tried to boil all of
these things down to Public Priority Concerns ... and make Goals,
Objectives, and Policies. We tried to keep within a time line. I remain,
right now, a little bit confused as to what it is the Commission is
going to ask to adopt. I don't know under which shell to look for the
pea. Is it the Plan in the red and black or is it some other document?"
Mr. McLain closed his statement by showing photographs of his grand-
parents and grandchild and offering the explanation that it was on
behalf of their memory and future that he based his commitment to
the preservation to the Apalachicola Bay and River.

Charles Pattison
Charles Pattison of 1000 Friends of Florida stepped forward to sup-
port-not including the land use amendments. He spoke in union
with the previous speakers with regards to that particular issue. He
closed by complimenting the St. Jbe Company on their past perfor-
mances, but recommended caution with regards to development on
St. James Island.

Ronnie Davis
Mr. Davis was concerned with the C-1 designation that required wa-
terfront property to remain seafood related. "Our land-if we don't
have the opportunity to do something with it'besides commercial fish-
ing or commercial related-we gonna die holding onto a piece of land
that we can't even sell ... From the Hut all the way out to Lombardi's
out there; from the Hut up to Harvey Allen's place, there is no com-
mercial activity going on at all except my place, and I'm out of it soon.
I spent forty years of my sweat and blood out there. I want to benefit
from that property in my lifetime. That (property) is my only chance
of retirement-selling that property for a decent price. All the prop-
erty owners out there that I've talked to-that's their attitude too. As
long as there's a bay and there's seafood workers, there will be sea-
food-but it don't have to be on my piece of property down there."


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The room went still with surprised attention during and after Mr.
Davis's speech. Many people were just not aware that so many of the
Seafood business owners were of Mr. Davis's opinion. Some seemed
surprised that any seafood dealer would be of such an opinion.
'This has been very illuminating to many of the listeners out there.
The Board of County Commissioners," Alan Pierce explained, "are
very much aware that you bought that piece of property as an invest-
ment. You didn't buy it as some sort of heritage based idea. You bought
that land with the idea to make money. You are a businessman and
you want to have the option to make a decision about what your land
is to be used for. You want to make a use out of it and make a return
on it. We recognize that some of these traditional uses do not have to
be on the water anymore. I appreciate you saying that right now."
"Well," said Mr. Davis. "(the seafood business), it is phasing out pn the
waterfront. It really does need to be looked into real seriuLis.hke."
'That's why we got to get this stack of papers o8tl th1s table sd'tait we
can start working on some of these problems like Mr. Davis has," said
Jimmy Mosconis.

Van Lewis-St. James IslandResident

Mr. Lewis spoke first to the issue of beach access. "I was recently on
Sanibel Island with my family attending a wedding. We asked the
people on the Island; 'What is your main problem as a result of Devel-
opment here." And they told us, without any hesitation-public ac-
cess to the beach and the water." Mr. Lewis explained that on Sanibel
Island there was no beach parking and no public beaches. It is a big
problem for tourist and residents.alike. He expressed the hope that
we here in Franklin County would learn from that poor example and
make provisions for the public and the residents for free access to the
water and beaches.
He was also concerned with traditional mullet fishing in the county.
He expressed his discontent with the Turkey Point land use change
that had been approved by the previous County Commission. "I hope
that you will not make the same mistake with these additional pro-
posals here. You need more public access. You need to take these
things one step at a time. If you grant all of that-you lose a lot of
your bargaining power with St. Joe Company.
His last request was for public access to the planning of the County,
the Board of Commissioners, and the local government in general.
Mr. Lewis'felt that he was not represented adequately and felt that in
addition to our present Board of County Commissioners two new, at
large, representatives should be added to the Commission thus pro-
viding even greater democratic representation. "We have had inad-
equate public access to planning our Comprehensive Plan. I hope
that this Commission will do a much better job than the previous
Commission in taking public input."
He closed his comments byaddressing Mr. Mosconis on a remark in
a past meeting that Mr. Lewis and others did not represent the pub-
lic. "You were right Mr. Mosconis, we do not represent the public-we
are the public."
"Would somebody please tell Mr. Lewis that we are talking about the
Comp Plan this afternoon," Mr. Mosconis requested of the Chairman.
Mr. Lewis then finished by restating his opinion that he and others
like him were the public and deserved to be considered. He asked the
Commission not to grant the land use changes to the St. Joe Com-
pany on the ground that the County would be giving up its power. He
expressed the notion that the Board should represent the people and
not just the St. Joe Company.
"Van," offered Commissioner Sanders. "When you have an at large
government, like Leon County has;,the statute requires that you must
have a population of at least 100,000. So, we're not there yet."
"Well then, you need to change the statute." advised Mr. Lewis.

John Hedrick-Sierra Club
Mr. Hedrick spoke in support of the Citizens Advisory Committee and
other public input groups and agencies. He basically supported ev-
erything that was previously outlined by Mr. Charles Lewis in his
statements. "We urge today that no Future Land Use Amendments or
FLUMs, as they are. called, be included in this Comprehensive Plan
or transmittal. No harm will result in waiting and we will get a better
product in the long term.
"Where do you live, Mr. Hedrick?" asked Jimmy Mosconis.
"Our organization is head-quartered in Tallahassee but our heart is
all over the Panhandle."
"But Mr. Mosconis asked you, where do you live at Mr. Hedrick?"
asked Ms. Sanders.
"I live up in Tallahassee."

Joyce Estes-Northwest Florida Water Management
District
"I was a part of the visioning process and I'm Chair of the NWFWMD.
I sit here and listen to all of this and there is one thing that disturbs
me-we're drilling test wells to see where good water is in this County.
We're having a lot of trouble trying to drill wells and supply the people
who need water with water. Just remember when you say that you
Continued on Page 9


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Comp Plan from Page 8
are g. g to give that land in planning (to St. Joe Development) that
is where water is not. (Where St. Joe is planning to develop) That area
is where we have the least amount of water. "
Bruce Sanson-President of Forgotten Coast Builder -
Association
"I'm here representing 180 members. Years ago, the economic hub of
this area was mostly cotton, timber, and seafood-now it is tourism
and building. Every house that is built employs over 100 individu-
als-all the way from the architect, down to the people who do the
cleaning. And if that house goes onto the rental market it employs
even more people after that." Mr. Sanson expressed praise for the
present County Commission and the rules and policies that are cur-
rently in place. He was not in favor of the suggested 150 ft. set. back.
He was informed that provision had been deleted from the present
proposal. 'The St. Joe Company is one of our members and we do
support what they have going on. I believe that they are one of the
better developers to do that project and we hope that you will give
them your support. "
Dennett Rainey-St. Teresa
"We (he and his wife) have been full-time residents of Franklin County
for the last five years. About two years ago when St. Joe decided to
develop St. James Island, I called St. Joe in Jacksonville and I said-
who do I talk to because what St. Joe does on St. James Island is
going to affect me and the people on St. Teresa Beach dramatically
for the rest of our lives. They gave rme Billy Buzzett's number. I told
Billy that I, along with a couple of others, was going to represent
some two hundred home owners on St. Teresa Beach. We had a quiet
place and we wanted to keep it that way. I said to Billy, we want to
take care of this (place). We do not want to lose it. We then invited all
of the property owners in St. Teresa Beach to meet in Tallahassee
and let Billy present to them their general ideas at that time. The
concerns basically were please don't mess up the things that we
have. We are the closest homes in this County to this development.
So whatever happens (there) makes or breaks us. To the best of my
knowledge He (Billy Buzzett) listened to us, and we are going to keep
what we have at St. Teresa Beach.
"I've come to trust Billy Buzzett; and I've come to trust the St. Joe
Company. I think that we have got the best development company in
the state of Florida here. If you look at any of their other develop-
ments, you will see quality and environmental concerns taken care
of. I have visited just about all of their developments and I haven't
seen one yet that I wouldn't be proud to live in. I encourage you to go
forward with them and pass this Comp Plan today. They're good
people."
Roger W. Bybee-Carrabelle-Retired Engineer
"In Carrabelle right now, the city has approved approximately 1100
homes that are going to be primarily second homes, along the water.
We only have 1900 homes there at present. St. Joe is still going to
own that property (east of Carrabelle) so there is not a time where
they are going to lose the property if you don't include it in the FLUM.


I would urge you to leave those properties out of the plan-include
them as a appendix or an item for consideration." He noted that in
the future the city of Carrabelle will have to be included in the dis-
cussion of these St. Joe future projects-it's the state law, he in-
formed the Commission. "For those things that can be added, they


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can be added later. The land is not going to go away and neither is the
interest in development-That's here. We have to learn to live with it,
and we will live with it. "
Curt Blair-Vice president of the Chamber of Commerce
Mr. Blair spoke to the Economic Development Plan that the Chamber
has been working on and to the health care issues that, he suggested,
go hand in hand with growth and development. He thanked the Board
or their cooperation and asked for consideration in the future for the
Chamber's suggestions.
Nick Yonclas-Retired Attorpey and Resident
"I decided to speak today when I read a full page ad in a local newspa-
per last week's edition of the Apalachicola Times where there is a
suggestion that if you adopt this plan, somehow the Bay was going to
be ruined. I think that is probably hyperbole. I think that the people
who are sitting in those chairs up there (Commissioners) and those
that are developing for St. Joe are as mindful of our Bay as any group
can be. I have been here representing many a developer and have had
my ears boxed in because of your concern for the Bay. I'm not a
supporter of St. Joe, nor am I against St. Joe. But I think that we are
probably lucky to have St. Joe. I've seen developers come in and pro-
pose ten story buildings. St. Joe is' not doing any of that. They are as
responsible a group as I suppose that you could find. They're here to
stay. They're here for a hundred years. They aren't down here to make
money and get out. They are here for the long play, and they don't
want it to be a part of their history that they somehow ruined the
Bay. I don't think that we ought to listen to those particular innuen-
does that are created by those ads.
"There is the suggestion that you are, in adopting this plan, somehow
giving away the farm. By changing land use, you aren't giving away
your zoning regulations; you're not giving away your set-backs, you're
not giving away your minimum lot sizes. You will have control over
this project. I don't care if you adopt those land use changes or not.
But even if you do, I think that you have plenty of rules and regula-
tions in your zoning ordinances which this County follows. I know
that they are followed, because they have been strictly enforced.
"The other thing is public access and I don't know how you solve this
problem. Everybody says that you gotta have public access and you
all are going to have to change the land use because you will take
away public access. Well it is all private property. Whatever it is zoned
... it's private property. Unless the county buys that property, I don't
know how you can insure public access or public use, simply through
a land use change.
"My last comment is to a remark that was made as to public access to
this Commission and this process-my Lord, this thing has been go-
ing on since 2002. 1 think that you have committee-ed this and heard
this to death. It is time to move on. Your staff is over worked (and
probably under-paid). I can tell you that they are genuine and that
they don't lay down and play dead. I'm supporting your staff today,
and I think that you ought to go ahead and get this process under
way."


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George Mahr-Resident of St. George Island
"I second what Nick has just said. At the conclusion of this meeting,
let's just vote in, what we have and move on. Fifteen years in the
development business seems like a long time, but it is not. It takes
three and four years to get a major development even started. I have
been in the development business for many years that is not a long
horizon. There has been offered the complaint that maybe there is
too much development going on. A developer is not going to put all of
these things in (roads and infrastructure) if the demand is not there.
So let's let the developers be the guide on what they are going to do
because they are going to spend the money.
"Sewer and water-well those are things that in order to get your
development through, you have to have. St. Joe is not going to come
in here-nor will I as a developer-and put roads down and then
realize and say; 'Oh my goshl We don't have water; we don't have
sewer.' That is part of the planning process. That is why sometimes it
takes so many years. In conclusion, I hope that you will adopt the
plan as submitted by Alan as submitted by the County in the past-
I hope that you will adopt that today."
Debate On An Issue
Van Lewis responded to Mr. Yonklas's statement with regards to pub-
lic access by pointing out that the general public can and has super-
seded the individual's rights to private property. The public can de-
mand beach and bay access even through privately owned property -
if the public demand is there.
Charles Lewis then expressed the notion that by the County holding
back on the land use amendments, it could, in effect, garner more
leverage in future negotiations with the St. Joe Company.
Billy Buzzett-The St. Joe Company
"I been here before this Commission, week in and week out, for sev-
eral years now. When we talk about trust, it really comes down to
basic human nature. Over the last few years we have worked very
diligently ... to earn your trust. Summer Camp has been an interest-
ing ride for us. It is one that you all know is tied up in litigation. On
the 20th of January in 2002, you approved Summer Camp and here
we sit on April 5th of 2005 and we are no closer now than we were
then. On this Future Land Use Map-we are trying to be able to plan
into the future. We have created a vision-we have agreed with the
DCA and others that perhaps the best place for that vision to lie is in
the appendix to your Comp Plan-not in your Comp Plan-so that
there is not an expectation of entitlements. That yellow area up there
(map of County on wall) is the size of St. George Island. What we're
planning to do is to build a community out there of about five hun-
dred homes. A fraction of what you see on St. George Island. As to the
water-we're putting standards in there that are higher than Franklin
County-higher than the state of Florida. Every one of those land use
developments out there are going to have central sewer and water or
there is no go. It doesn't go anywhere. We have to plan. We are asking
you to work with us to make that plan. I don't think that we should
get penalized because we are the majority land owner. Our future lies
completely and totally with your future. You hold our future in your
hands. We are going to continue to work to earn your respect. I'd ask
that you transmit this plan to the Department of Community Affairs
for final adoption. "

Continued on Page 10


-VVU


L-l


d~'~;t







Page 10 15 Anril 2005


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Comp Plan from Page 9

Mr. Putnal wanted to know why everything had to be approved all at
once. Mr. Buzzett suggested that it wasn't all being approved at once-
that this was simply a guideline for the future to allow the St. Joe
Company to move forward and make plans-Nothing was being ap-
proved in advance; most everything would have to come back before
the Commission in the future for consideration.
'Throughout that whole visioning process," Mr. Buzzett explained.
"One of the things that the citizens asked us to do was protect that
Crooked River. You don't see it on there (the FLUM). You see that
13,506 acres that is now in state ownership because the people wanted
it. We're going to turn it green and add it to that 80 percent (state
owned land). At Bold Point, when the citizens toward Alligator Point
wanted to see the size of that park tripled-we agreed. We didn't wait
for the vision. We didn't wait to get any one of these changes. We're
going to continue every time to be good partners with you. We didn't
try to leverage that acquisition by the State-that preservation so
that we could get something else. If that was our idea, we would have
kept it apart. We would have waited until today and said, 'Hey, in
exchange for that, we will do this.' We didn't do that. I'm just asking
that we get the same reciprocal treatment. We are the largest land
owner; we will be here tomorrow, and we will be here many days from
tomorrow. I can't afford to mislead you or take advantage of you. I'm
just not going to do it. We really want to be a partner in Franklin
County. I just wish that you would give us the chance."
Gathana Parmenas-Citizen
Ms. Parmenas expressed the notion that the FLUM that was being
presented at this point was something new and that it should be
subject to discussion by the Community. She also suggested that
Carrabelle should be brought into the development and land use dis-
cussion, since much of these new developments would be over in
their direction. "I, like many of the people here, just ask that you go
slowly; that you look at this more carefully-it isn't necessary to trans-
mit those FUTMs with the Comp Plan today."
Conclusion
In response to Ms. Parmenas, Alan Pierce, said that-other than for
minor changes-that the FLUM being presented on this day was ba-
sically what had been presented previously over a year ago-'They
have changed slightly through the review process, but they were there
and presented to the public in April of 2004-they have changed
slightly in configuration, but they have been there."
He then explained that many of the concerns.- water and roads etc.-
were the problem of the developer. They will be responsible; they will
be paying the bill. "If they can't find water, guess what, there is a
requirement that they must provide public water or they can't do that
development."
"Alan, what do you recommend that we do?" asked Jimmy Mosconis.
"I recommend that you adopt this Comp Plan, as proposed, with those
six land use changes."'
"I want to say something else," Ms. Sanders interjected. "We five Com-
missioners, but I can only speak for myself-I am a sixth generation
Franklin County resident and I'm proud of it-very proud of it. We
helped to build this community-to mold this county to what it is.
Our families made this County what it is. We've given these people
who recently came into this County ... we given you the opportunity
to live in heaven. That's the way it is. We have made this county what
it is. And I don't appreciate people coming in here disrespecting this
Commission and these people who have lived here all of their life,
saying that we can't do nothing for ourselves. We must have done a
pretty good dog-gone job or you wouldn't all be here livin'! And that's
my statement." The crowd erupted into applause.
A motion was then made for adoption to transmit the Comp Plan
proposal as Alan Pierce and his staff had constructed and recom-
mended. Commissioner Crofton then interrupted the vote:
"If we transmit this now the adoption-I want a guarantee that we
will re-open; or not close it down completely. We will come back and
we will amend this later on."
"September," Ms. Sanders stated definitively;


'The last time that we shut down," Mr. Crofton continued. "We went
ten years without any amendment and I don't think that we ought to
do that at this time. I want a guarantee from the Board here that we
will amend this later on."
Commissioner Mosconis disagreed. It was then agreed that Mr.
Crofton's demand be added to the approval of the Comp Plan trans-
mittal.
A vote was taken. Commissioner Putnal was the only commissioner
who voted not to approve the Plan as drawn up and recommended by
Alan Pierce and staff. His objection was to the FLUMs. He felt that all
of the land uses did not have to be approved at this time and that
they could be handled at different intervals in phases.
Mr. McLain of the River Keepers then asked for a clarification. He was
not sure what was being approved.
"I'll put it point blank," said Alan Pierce, "that the adoption that I
understand that the Board has just made is the policy that I and the
staff have recommended and that has been reviewed by the DCA. It
does not include any of the red ink of the Citizen's initiative that was
proposed on March 15th. It does not include that red ink."
'The one with no public input?" someone in the audience asked.
'This report contains both," responded Mr. Pierce.
And the meeting was adjourned.




Apalachicola Area Historical Society
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(314) Histories of Southeastern Archeology. Edited by
Shannon Tashing-ham,'Jane Hill and Charles A. McNutt.
University of Alabama Press, 2002, 384 pp, Softcover.
Bookshop price = $23.00.


(313) The Northwest Florida Expeditions of Clarence,
Bloomfield Moore. The classic studies of Archeologist'
Clarence Bloomfield Moore have been republished and
available from the Chronicle Book-shop in very limited
copies. When Clarence Bloomfield Moore cruised the riv-
ers of Florida in search of prehistoric artifacts a century
ago, he laid the groundwork for archaeological investiga-
tions to follow. This volume reflects Moore's fieldwork
along the northwest Florida coast, the most
archaeologically rich area of the state, as well as up the
Apalachicola River to the Chattahoochee and Flint Riv-
ers in Alabama and Georgia. Here readers will share
Moore's first look at the northwest Florida area in 1901 -
1903 and additional observations made in 1918 during
what was to be his last field season. Moore's works re-
veal ceramics, tools, skeletal remains, and exotic arti-
facts excavated fromthe earthen mounds and shell
midderrs built by native peoples over the last two millen.-.
nia. In the introduction to this edition, David S. Brose
and Nancy Marie White place Moore's investigations
within the context of science, natural history, and anti-
quarianism of his day. They document what happened
to the sites he .explored, tell how his findings fit into the
body of his research, and explain how those findings
should be interpreted in the context of southeastern cul-
ture history and modern archaeological theory. Univer-
sity of Alabama Press, 1999, 525 pp. This is an oversized
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1995, 1,236 pages. Hardcover. This is an oversized book-
requiring postage and handling of $8.00. Bookshop price"
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A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


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(307) The Library of Congress Civil War Desk Refer-
ence. Simon and Schuster, 2002, 949 pp. This work is a
comprehensive yet accessible compendium organized into
chapters that address broad themes such as "Antebel-
lum America," "Wartime Politics", "Armies," etc. with each
chapter including more specific topics. There are timelines
that chronicle major events, brief profiles of significant
players in the war and extensive bibliography. The work
examines the lives of the common soldiers, the role of
women in the conflict, medical treatment, home front
events, maps, excerpts from journals and letters. Other
chapter titles include "Battles and the Battlefield", Weap-
onry", "War on the Water" "Prisons and Prisoners of War",
"Reconstruction and the Aftermath of the War" and "The
Civil War in Literature and the Arts". A final chapter dis-
cusses places for further research, archives, important
published sources and national historic sites. This is one
indispensable one-volume reference on the Civil War,
originally sold for $45.00. The 949 pp work is available
in limited copies from the Chronicle bookshop for $35.00
each.


" :. ,'l -'

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(310) Spring Creek Chronicles, II by Leo Lovel, Illus-
trated by Clay Lovel and edited by Ben Lovel. Here is the
second volume written by a northern Floridian in a col-
lection of observations, opinions, true-life experiences and
related tales gathered from living and working on the
Gulf Coast. Many take place in or near the community of
Spring Creek, a small fishing village located at the end of.
county road 365. Commercial fishing, crabbing and oys-
tering have been the backbone of this economy. Author
Lovel tells these stories with a glimpse back to what it
was like to live and work around the woods and waters
of the Old South, a time and place he reminds the reader
that is quickly being erased into history. Paperback, sold
across the Panhandle for about $14.95, the Chronicle
bookshop price. Leo Lovel owns and operates the Spring
Creek Restaurant at 33 Ben Willis Road, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327, phone: 850-926-3751.


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(21) Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers. Uni-,
versity of Florida Press, Hardcover, 297 pp. In this book,
Rogers traces and documents the economic, social and
political emergence of the Gulf coast port of Apalachicola
and the pristine barrier island, Saint George. From the
earliest times, both the island and Apalachicola have be-
come intertwined. The account of the machinations of con-
troversial developer William Lee Popham is the first phase
of area development, later leading to the controversial
struggles of the 1970s when environmentalists and sea-
food industries fought to determine the ecological and eco-
nomic fate of the Bay area. The Chronicle has obtained
a fresh supply of newly reprinted volumes at an at-
tractive price. Available elsewhere for $35.95 plus ship-
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THE FEVER MAN
A Biography of DC Joul Gorrie


ate ZIP


Cost


Total bookcost
Shipping & handling es t (6 in Fla.) +
I book....... S2.50
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(192) Vivian Sherlock's bi-
ography of John Gorrie,
The Fever Man, is available
once again after being
out-of-print for more than
a decade. This is the story
of John Gorrie, young phy-
sician who invented an "ice
machine" that many argue
was a forerunner to air con-
ditioning dozens of years
later. His cooling device was
developed to provide relief
to his suffering yellow fever
patients. A museum in
Apalachicola to this day
marks the work of John
Gorrie just across from his
last resting place in Gorrie
Square, down from Trinity
Church. This book tells
what is now known about
Dr. Gorrie, his work and his
ice machine. Paperback,
New, 151 pp. Bookshop
price = $10.00


(311) Hollywood Cartoons: American Animation in its
Golden Age by Michael Barrier. Oxford University Press,
1999; paperback, 648 pp. Here is a guided tour of Ameri-
can animation in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, to meet
the legendary artists and entrepreneurs who created Bugs
Bunny, Betty Boop, Mickey Mouse, Wile E. Coyote, Dofald
Duck, Tom and Jerry and many other cartoon favorites.
This is a meticulously researched yet enchanting history
of animation in the American studio system. For many
years, Mr. Barrier was the publisher and editor of
FUNNYWORLD, a magazine devoted to the animated film
in America. This is the definitive history. Given the over-
size of this work (648pp), the postage required for ship-
ment is $4.00 for the volume. Bookshop price = $20.00.


--- --^B^^^^^^^^^ I


(312) On The Air: The Encyclopedia of Old Time Ra-
dio by John Dunning. Here are some 1,500 old time ra-
dio shows presented in alphabetical order, each with a
complete broadcast history, listing major cast members,
network, time period, sponsors, producers, actors and
theme song. This is the definitive encyclopedia of Ameri-
can radio from its beginnings in the 1920s until the early
1960s. Once you pickup this tome, you will not be able
to put it down. Hardcover, 822 pp, Oxford University
Press, 1998. Sold nationally for $60.00 Bookshop price
= $45.00. This is an oversize book with considerable
weight so the postage for shipping is $6.00.


I -I _


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