Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00243
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: September 3, 2004
Copyright Date: 2004
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00243
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Making Our Own News

Eastpoint Theatre Incorporated

Andy Dyal Appointed Director of Operations
Tom Hoffer, publisher of the Franklin Chronicle, announced last week
that formal registration papers for the incorporation of the Eastpoint
Theatre, Inc. have been filed with the Florida Secretary of State, for-
mally establishing the theatre as a "for-profit" commercial enterprise.
The pending sale of his property on St. George Island now makes
possible the planning and construction of a 50 by 100 foot, 300 seat
auditorium at 33 Begonia Street in Eastpoint, he said.
Two smaller auditoriums or activity rooms, measuring 15 feet by 60
feet are also planned, to accommodate films, video, small group meet-
ings and other activities. The main auditorium will feature stadium
seating, generous sightlines for wheelchair viewers, love seats and
capabilities for live performances.
The theatre is the third phase of a 3-point plan that began in the fall
of 2002 with the physical move of the Franklin Chronicle to Eastpoint.
This was followed by the construction of the first duplex, one of three
being planned. The steel frame structures have been the subject of
several hype stories intended to promote a new type of steel fabrica-
tion for hurricane-prone environments. The second duplex will start
this fall, and the main theatre building will begin construction late
2005. "The price of steel fabricated product has been wildly fluctuat-
ing and this may be a factor in our timetable." Hoffer added that
there are numerous elements involved in the entire process including
a sustained effort in exploiting solar energy, given the high costs of
operating the facility. 'The results of our initial research into solar
applications have been extremely disappointing, given our nation's
reliance on fossil fuels. Research and development outside of the space
program has been pitifully scant, even among the monopoly power
companies." Hoffer added, "The need for more solar applications is
extremely great yet the number of entrepreneurs working in this field
is embarrassingly limited, especially in sun-drenched panhandle of
Florida. Perhaps fulfilling this need would bring in a new industry
that could potentially flourish throughout this area."


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Reahing New R"44,E ,r DAy

BULK RATE
SU.S. POSTAGE PAID
SAPALACHICOLA, FL
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Chronicle


Volume 13, Number 18 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


N


September 3 16, 2004


Primary Campaigns Wrap Up Cose Res

Franklin County Sheriffs Race With 6 Candidates In Franklin


- w


(From left) Bruce Barnes, John Crum, Mike Mock, Joel Norred, Skip Shiver and Wayne
Williams at the last Political Education Forum, Saturday, August 28, 2004, staged at the
Apalachicola High School Auditorium.

District 1 Candidates For Franklin County Commission
Eastpoint Fire Station Political Education Forum, Tuesday, August 17, 2004


Andrew Dyal
The theatre and newspaper will be under the control of a living trust
with three directors setting overall policy and managing the principal
hires such as theatre manager or publisher. Those principals will be
announced at a later date. A director of operations has been appointed
currently. He is Andy Dyal, former Circulation Manager of the Franklin
Chronicle. Mr. Dyal's responsibilities will include all operations at both
the newspaper and the theatre activities.
The heart of the theatre operation will be an extensive concession
area, comprised of the usual amenities found in most theatres supple-
mented with a bookstore and related businesses. There is some in-
terest in founding a restaurant adjacent to the theatre catering to the
general public and specialized groups.


(From left) David Ard, Russelt*Crofton, Joyce Estes, Buddy Shiver,
Willard Vinson.


Clerk of Court
There will be an automatic recount in
the Franklin County Clerk of Circuit
Court race between Marcia Johnson
and Renee Griffin. Johnson received
2,467 votes and Griffin received
2,461-a difference of only six votes
in an incredibly close race.
Sheriff
For Sheriff of Franklin County, Demo-
crat Mike Mock will face Republican
Robert Barnes in. November. Mock
defeated five other candidates in the
Democratic Primary with about 48%
of the vote. Skip Shiver was second
with about 36% of the vote, accord-
ing to unofficial results verbally an-
nounced Tuesday night.
County Commissioners
Clarence Williams, incumbent, lost his
District 3 seat to Noah Lockley, Jr.
who won with about 56% of the vote.
Lockley now faces Michael Moron and
Cora L. Russ, non-party affiliations,
in November. In District 5, incumbent
Bevin Putnal defeated Thomas Lee
Brannan with about 67% of the vote.
In District 1, St. George Island resi-
dent Russell Crofton edged out
Eastpoint's David Ray Ard, but
Crofton will face Republican Joyce
Estes in the November election.
Superintendent of Schools
In another narrow race, incumbent
JoAnn Gander defeated Frank
Stephens. Gander garnered about
46% of the vote, Stephens 45%. Jeff
Weiner came in a distant third or
about 9% of the vote.
School Board


Denise Butler won the race in District
S. 1, defeating C. Rex Pennycuff. Teresa
Howard and C. J. Ogles. The incum-
bent for District 3, Teresa Martin, won
- her seat with about 51% of the vote,
defeating Fonda Davis and Richard
.. "Bell. In another surprise upset, in-
S- cumbent Katie McKnight lost her seat
Kenneth Shiver and in District 5 to newcomer John
Richards.


Halibut Fishing at Anchor Point, Alaska, on June 28, 2004.
Alan Pierce is fourth from the left, next to the "Good Time
Charters" logo. These fish weighed between 40 and 100
lbs.

Summer Vacations 2004

Summer Escape To Alaska

As Told By Alan Pierce To Tom W. Hoffer
2004 may be a milestone year in many ways for Alan Pierce, former
Franklin County planner and Director of Administrative Services. His
decisions brought an end to his employment as Franklin County Plan-
ner but also ushered him into a travel binge across the United States
to Alaska, along a 13,000 mile "trail" of asphalt and concrete in 65
days. He toured the central and northern areas of the United States
just before entering Canada, joining other family members on their
way in a trip of a lifetime, to Alaska. His Honda SUV wore the mileage
well as he started his trek from Apalachicola on May 21, 2004 and
returning on July 25, 2004 from the western United States.
His entry into Canada came through Tennessee to St. Louis via the
interstate, then up to Iowa and across to the west through South
Dakota, spending some time in the Black Hills. A rough thunder-
storm in the Dakotas encouraged him to take a slight detour into
Thermopolis, Wyoming, and eventually to Devil's Tower, a sacred In-
dian totem. "It was just as depicted in the sci-fi film, "Close Encoun-
ters of the Third Kind," but I did not climb the 850 feet to the top..."
Just prior to his entry into the Dakotas, Alan stopped to try his luck
on a casino barge parked in the Missouri River, typical of many river
promotions featuring gambling casinos. "Unfortunately, my luck at
the casino was very limited and I could not muster any winnings to
pay for the trip..."
He met his sister and brother-in-law in Montana, and they toured
Glacier National Park but they could not camp at Glacier "...because
the snow was so thick ... so we drove on to Calgary, Canada into the
Canadian Rockies where they spent about a week. Calgary is the
Capitol of Alberta Province with nearly 1-million in population. The
city grew after 1883 with a great influx of homesteaders who arrived
with the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway. This city is con-
sidered the gateway to the Canadian Rockies. Alan opined, "...The
roads were in good shape but gas was expensive. There are huge
caravans of RVs (recreational vehicles) that travel across Canada,
some the sizes of Greyhound busses..." At this point in their travel,
the group began using the MILEPOST guide, advertised as "the bible
of North Country travel." in its 56th edition in 2004. The MILEPOST
provides mile-by-mile descriptions of all major highways and roads
in Canada and Alaska, detailed information on all destinations and
-"how-to-help" for various modes of transportation. The logs are very
detailed, and used by virtually all travelers driving into Canada. Call
toll free 1-800-726-4707 or www.themilepost.com.
The Pierce group left Calgary and headed for Dawson Creek, the be-
ginning of the world-famous ALCAN highway. 'The ALCAN highway
itself is 1400 miles long, a paved, two-lane road. This is the only
paved road you can drive on to Alaska." He expected see long lines of
trucks, but there were none. Continued on Page 5
Continued on Page 5


Franklin County

Primary Election Results

August 31, 2004

Primary Election 8/31/04
United States Senator (Dem)
Precinct Number 1 2 3 .4 5 6 7 8 ABS Total
Castor, Betty 429 30 339 99 310 68 151 226 944 2596
Deutsch, Peter 103 5 84 24 78 19 34 81 207 635
Klein, Bernard E. 29 8 21 9 29 3 16 21 69 205
Penelas, Alex 66 7 51 23 59 29 21 47 147 450
United States Senator (Rep)
Precinct Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ABS Total
Byrd, Johnnie 6 4 1 1 4 4 2 4 13 39
Gallagher, Doug 9 4 6 6 11 7 12 11 29 95
Klayman,Larry 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 4 8
Kogut, William Billy 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
March, Sonya 3 0 1 0 3 0 3 1 10 21
Martinez, Mel 24 9 1 14 18 15 11 6 47 145
McCollum, Bill- 13 11 7 6 14,. 13 17 0 55 136
Saull, Karen 1 1 3 3 2 2 0 0 8 20
Clerk of the Circuit Court (Dem)


Precinct Number 1 2 3 4 5 6' 7 8 ABS Total
Griffin, Renee'Shiver 515 67 162 54 377 112 127 135 912 2461
(Dem)
Johnson, MarciaM. 267 16 418 150 210 62 174 333 837 2467
(Dem)
Sheriff (Dem)
Precinct Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ABS Total
Crum, John (Dem) 11 1 3 0 2 0 0 3 11 31
Mock, Mike (Dem) 305 21 221 24 384 84 30 161 846 2076


Norred, Joel (Dem) 49 6 101 70 29 5 25 98 217 600
Shiver, Skip (Dem) 311 23 196 69 88 37 193 174 448 1539
|Williams, Wayne (Dem) 125 110 1119 I0o 118 Ill Il 111 22 1177


._ -_ .t--__
.~- U -:


S.. s 2

(From left) Candidates for Clerk of Court Marcia Johnson
and Renee Griffin chat with moderator Richard Harper at
the close of the Political Forum on Tuesday, August 17,
2004.


Superintendent of Schools (Dem)
Precinct Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ABS Total
Gander, JoAnn (Dem) 356 46 211 60 392 97 97 165 844 2268
Incumbent
Stephens. Frank(Dem) 368 35 275 108 175 61 157 256 763 2198


Weiner, Jeff (Dem) 53 3 87 30 33 16 45 43 137 447
County Commissioner Dist 1 (Dem)
Precinct Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ABS Total
Ard, David Ray (Dem) 165 0 0 0 0 30 0 85' 85 365
Boatwright, Larry (Dem) 168 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 98 280
Crofton, G. Russell (Dem) 63 0 0 0 0 0 193 0 120 376
Shiver, Kenneth (Dem) 40 0 0. 0 0 0 11 0 41 92
County Commissioner Dist 3 (Dem)
Precinct Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ABS Total
Frye, Jack E. (Dem) 0 0 132 0 0 0 0 0 86 218
Hand, Bryant (Dem) 0 0 42 0 0 0 0 0 14 56
Lockley, Noah Jr. (Dem)) 0 0 242 0 0 0 0 0 130 372
Williams, Clarence (Dem) 0 0 119 0 0 0 0 0 91 210
Incument


County Commissioner Dist 5 (Dem)
Precinct Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ABS Total
Brannan, Thomas Lee 78 0 0 0 137 0 0 0 132 347
(Dem)
Putnal, Bevin (Dem) 207 0 0 0 206 0 0 0 276 689
Incumbent
School Board Member Dist 1 (NP)
Precinct Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ABS Total
Butler, Denise D. (NP) 107 0 0 0 0 0 198 0 189 494
Howard, Teresa 95 0 0 0 0 0 21 0 73 189
Ogles, CJ 21 0 0 0 0 0 51 0 20 92
Pennycuff, C. Rex 269 0 0 0 0 0 28 0 134 431
School Board Member Dist 3 (NP)
Precinct Number 1 2 3 4 15 116 117 118 |ABSIlTotal
Bell, Richard C. 0 0 73 0 10 110 10 110 125 1198
Davis Sr., Fonda D. 0 0 221 0 10 I0 110 1I0 1127 11348
Martin, Teresa Ann 0 0 279 0 0 0 0 0 191 1470
Incumbent II II I I
School Board Member Dist 5 (NP)
Precinct Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ABS Total
McKnight, Katie 82 0 0 0 186 0 0 0 213 481
Incumbent
Richards, John 206 0 0 0 156 0 0 0 194 556

Political Forums And Dialogue Mark

2004 Primary Campaign

August 31st 2004 marks the close of the first portion of the local
2004 political campaigns in Franklin County with two innovations
put into practice. The first political forum of the season began with
the Political Education Committee of the St. George Island Civic Club
on July 26th. The second forum of the campaign season was spon-
sored in Apalachicola by the Hillside Coalition of Laborers for
Apalachicola (HCOLA) on July 30th. The HCOLA sponsored forums
were more concentrated with the greater number of candidates for
various county offices placed into two meetings of about three hours
each. The Political Education Committee forums were spread out over
seven meetings, ending with a discussion among the six candidates
for Sheriff at the Apalachicola High School on August 28th. Almost
all of the candidates for various county offices participated in the
forums.


cz-Ew


'; -








Pa e 2 3 SeDtember 2004


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


'Ihe F~'ranklin Chronicle


Franklin County Unemployment Rate = 2%

Florida Continues To Lead The

Nation In Employment Growth

Unemployment Rate is 4.4% (Seasonally Adjusted)

Florida continued to lead the national job market in employment
growth while the rate of unemployment remained below the national
average.
In Franklin, the labor force was estimated to be 6,028 with 5,906
employed, or an unemployment rate of 2.0 %. In nearby Liberty
County, the unemployment rate is 2.5%; 3.7% in Bay County, 4.4%
in Calhoun County, and 2.7% in Wakulla County. Unemployment is
estimated for Leon County to be 2.9 % for July 2004.
The statewide Florida Unemployment rate is 4.6% not seasonally ad-
justed. The Seasonally adjusted Florida Unemployment rate is 4.4%.
The seasonally adjusted rate for the country (entire U. S.) is 5.5%.
This represents a slight improvement over one year ago when the
seasonally adjusted rate was 6.2% (July 2003).

Florida's Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)
Florida's July 2004 unemployment rate was 4.4 percent, down from
the revised rate of 4.8 percent in June and down 0.8 percent point
from 5.2 percent a year ago.
Out of a civilian labor force of 8,376,000, there were 367,000 unem-
ployed and 8,009,000 employed Floridians. This was the first time
that total employment (seasonally adjusted) in Florida surpassed 8
million.
Florida's July 2004 rate was 1.1 percentage point lower than the na-
tional rate of 5.5 percent Florida's unemployment rate has been at or
below the U.S. rate since February 2002. Both the nation's and the
state's unemployment rates have trended downward since July 2003.
Based on June 2004 data (the most recent comparable month avail-
able), Florida's preliminary unemployment rate of 4.7 percent was
the second lowest among the nation's ten most populous states (tied
with New Jersey), behind only Georgia at 4.0 percent.
Florida's Nonagricultural Employment By Industry
(Seasonally Adjusted)
In July 2004, Florida's nonagricultural employment expanded by 2.2
percent, a gain of 163,200 jobs from the same month a year ago. In
comparison, nonagricultural employment grew nationally at a rate of
1.1 percent. Florida has recorded positive over-the-year job growth
for two years.
In June 2004 (the most recent comparable data available), Florida
had the fastest rate of annual job growth among the ten most popu-
lous states, and gained more jobs than any other state in the nation.
Florida's Nonagricultural Employment By Industry (Not
Seasonally Adjusted)
Florida's total nonagricultural employment continued its positive
over-the-year growth. In July 2004, there were 7,330,400 jobs, an
increase of 2.3 percent (+162,800 jobs) since July 2003.
Professional and business services continued to lead the super sec-
tors in employment growth over the year, adding 53,300 jobs (+4.2
percent). Leisure and hospitality (+24,100 jobs, +3.0 percent) and
construction (+23,700 jobs, +5.3 percent) were next in job gains. Edu-
cation and health services (+21,200 jobs, +2.4 percent); total govern-
ment (+14,200 jobs, +1.4 percent); trade, transportation, and utili-
ties (+10,800jobs, +03 percent); financial activities (+10,000jobs, +2.1
percent); and other services (+8,200 jobs, 42.6 percent) also gained
employment. Manufacturing employment continued to decline, los-
ing 1,400 jobs (-0.4 percent). Information also lost 1,500 jobs (-0.9
percent).
Within construction, most of the job growth was in specialty trade
contractors, which gained 15,900 jobs (+5.5 percent). Growth in the
construction industry peaked in September 2000 at 7.6 percent be-
fore slowing to below 1.0 percent in mid-2002. This industry has
continued to gain jobs due to, low interest rates and Florida's popula-
tion growth.
Gains in the government sector were entirely in local government
(+16,400 jobs, +2.5 percent). Both federal and state government lost
jobs over the year, down 1,500 and 700 jobs, respectively.
The job growth in financial activities was mainly due to increases in
real estate and credit intermediation and related activities (+4,800
jobs and +3,000 jobs, respectively). Insurance carriers lost 500 jobs
while Insurance agencies gained 800 jobs over the year.
Employment in the information industry lost 1,500 (0.9 percent) jobs
over the year. Much of the weakness was in telecommunications and
Internet service providers, down 700 and 500 jobs over the year, re-
spectively.
Florida was still experiencing weakness in some sectors of the manu-
facturing industry particularly in nondurable goods. While total manu-
facturing exhibited a small job loss of 1,400 jobs (-0.4 percent), the
durable goods sector has shown positive over-the-year job gams for
four consecutive months. Much of the improvement in durable goods
was in communications equipment manufacturing (+800 jobs, +6.8
percent) and aerospace products and parts manufacturing (+400 jobs,
+2.2 percent).

Local Area Unemployment Statistics (Not Seasonally
Adjusted)
In July 2004, Lafayette County .continued to post the state's lowest
unemployment rate (1.4 percent). The majority of the counties in
Florida (61 of 67) experienced decreases in their unemployment rates
over the year. The counties having the largest over-the-year declines
in unemployment were Taylor (-2.4 percent); Indian River and Jefferson
(-1.7 percent); and Hardee (-1.6 percent).
Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) Nonagricultural
Employment By Industry (Not Seasonally Adjusted)
The Orlando and Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater MSAs led the state
in over-the-year job growth (+18,900 jobs and +15,900 jobs, respec-
tively). The Orlando area's job gains were largely in leisure and hospi-
tality and construction, together producing 12,800 new jobs. Job gains
in the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater MSA were mainly in profes-
sional and business services and education and health services, to-
gether adding 13,700 new jobs.


Puilhandle Players Hold Auditions


The Panhandle Players will hold
auditions Tuesday, September 7
for their next performance-'The
Unexpected Guest" by Agatha
Christie. The play is a murder
mystery which involves parts for
7 men and 3 women, but can be
flexible in gender to involve parts
for 5 men and 5 women. The char-
acters range in age from a man
or female in their late teens to
slightly older than middle age
male or female roles.
Auditions will be held at the Dixie
Theatre beginning at 7 p.m. Tues-
day. Those persons wishing to
audition will be scheduled for a
five minute period. In that time
individuals may perform a 1
minute monologue; or read from
a play, speech, poem or newspa-


per article; present past theatre
experience and other information
about themselves helpful in de-
termining character performance.
Wednesday, September 8 and
Thursday, September 9 the call
back nights, will involve persons
reading together from the play in
order to cast the roles. In order to
set up an audition time please call
Barbara Siprel at 653-9641.
'The Unexpected Guest" will be
performed November 12 & 13.
Rehearsals will be evenings in
September and October.
If you would like to help behind
the scenes or have any questions
regarding the play please call Liz
Sisung at 670-8261.


Frankin Chonicl


N[ow distrI,~~ ibuedinS 4 Franklb 'Sin,4
6 0laadGufCunis


The August 9, 2004 Court Report will appear
on Page 7 of this issue.


Second Circuit

Court Report

The Honorable Judge Janet E. Ferris
Prosecuting Attorney Michael Schneider
By Carol Noble
July 12, 2004
(Continued from the issue of August 20, 2004.)
All persons identified below are innocent unless proven
otherwise in a court of law.


Mau, Corey K: Charged with abuse of elderly person on January 23, 2004.
Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for Septem-
ber 13, 2004.
Register, Brandon Schai: Charged with throwing deadly missile, aggravated
assault with deadly weapon on November 2, 2003 and burglary of conveyance
(person assaulted) and driving while license suspended or revoked on Decem-
ber 19, 2003. Bond was $5,500.00. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was entered on the Docket Sounding
for September 13, 2004 and jury trial on September 15, 2004.
Rell, Thomas Daniel: Charged with driving while license suspended (felony)
on February 11, 2004. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Plea
Docket for August 9, 2004.
Schoelles, Kevin Morris: Charged with burglary of conveyance, grand theft,
possession of controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver and. resisting
officer without violence on March 26, 2004. Bond was $17,500.0,0. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea
of no contest and was adjudicated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to 36
month probation on counts 1, 2, 3. Defendant was sentenced to 90 days in jail
with credit for time served on count 4. He must report to jail by July 30, 2004,
5pm. The defendant to pay $598.54 restitution and $275.00 court costs; no
alcohol or drugs and must submit to random tests, evaluation and treatment
for substance abuse as recommended. Cost of supervision waived.
Sellers, Lisa Marie: Charged with 2 counts of grand theft from retail mer-
chant on January 4, 2004. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was present
in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the
Plea Docket for August 9, 2004.
Trujillo, Armando I: Charged with criminal mischief (3rd degree felony), felony
fleeing or attempt to elude and attached tag not assigned on June 17, 2003.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was passed to Wednesday July 14, 2004.
Wicks, Larry B: Charged with burglary of a dwelling on March 3, 2004. De-
fendant was incarcerated. All charges were dropped on July 9, 2004.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION PLEA DOCKET
Ard, Carl Wayne: Charged with DUI manslaughter on February 13, 2003.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented by Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Violation of Probation
Plea Docket for August 9, 2004.
Branch, Wesley W: Charged with grand theft of motor vehicle on April 18,
2002. Defendant was released on his own recognizance. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued
on the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for October 11, 2004.
Brown, Bobby F: Charged with fleeing attempting to elude police officer, pos-
session of a controlled substance and driving while license suspended (felony)
on April 30, 1999. Defendant released on his own recognizance. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The court dis-
missed Violation of Probation warrant. Probation was continued.
Cogburn, Joey C: Charged with forgery on August 9, 2002; forgery and 2
counts of uttering (passing worthless document) on October 8, 2002.,'harged
with burglary of a dwelling and 2 counts of dealing in stolen property on June
28, 2003. Charged with burglary of a dwelling and 2 counts ofg dealing in
-stolen property on August 6, 2003; -Ddfendant was represented by-Attorney
John Leace. The case was continued on the Violation of Probation Plea Docket
for August 9, 2004.
Colon, Edward Anthony: Charged with uttering a forged instrument and pos-
session of a controlled substance on July 18, 2002. Defendant was incarcer-
ated. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Charles E. Hobbs II,
admitted to being in violation and was adjudicated guilty. Probation was re-
voked, sentenced to 60 days in jail with 60 days credit for time served and a
new two year community control. All conditions reimposed plus restitution.
All other outstanding costs, reduced to a judgement.
Croom, Valerie D: Charged with uttering (passing worthless document) on
August 29, 2002. Defendant was released on own recognizance. Defendant
was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The court dismissed
violation of probation warrant and probation was continued.
Dixon, Wade Odell: Charged with felony battery on September 22, 1999. De-
fendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Violation of Probation
Plea Docket for August 9, 2004.






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Dykes, Clifford M. Jr: Charged with possession of cannabis more than 20
grams on June 8, 2001. Charged with cultivation of cannabis and possession
of more than 20 grams cannabis on September 16, 2001. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. Defendant admitted to
being in violation of probation and was found in violation. Probation was rein-
stated and modified to complete in-patient treatment at Phoenix House and
aftercare. Cost of supervision was waived.
Fichera, Tilden Lee: Charged with possession drug paraphernalia on Febru-
ary 19, 2003. Cash bond was $254.00. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Violation
of Probation Plea Docket for August 9,2004.
Goggins, William B: Charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon
on August 27, 2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The case was re-set on the
Violation of Probation Plea Docket for August 9, 2004.
Laye, Katherine: Charged with dealing in stolen property on February 26,
2000. Defendant was released on own recognizance. The defendant was present
in court. The case was continued on the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for
September 13, 2004.
Prince, Edward: Charged with grand theft on July 25, 2001. The defendant
was present in court with Attorney Charles E. Hobbs II. The defendant admit-
ted to being in violation of probation and was found in violation. New 2 year
probation with all conditions re-imposed. Probation may terminate upon pay-
ment of restitution to victim. All outstanding costs were' reduced tojudgement
except restitution.
Russell, Charles Forrest: Charged with uttering a forged instrument on Sep-
tember 4, 1991. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The defendant admitted to being in
violation of probation and was found in violation. Probation was revoked. New
1 year probation imposed. Upon payment of restitution and fine, probation
may terminate.
Stevens, Larry T: Charged with aggravated battery with firearm on April 8,
1998. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court but,
attorney was not. The case was continued on the Violation of Probation Plea
Docket for August 9, 2004.

DOCKET SOUNDING
Burns, Linda D: Charged with aggravated assault with firearm on November
10, 2003. Bond was 815,000.00. The defendant was present in court with
Attorney Charles E. Hobbs II, waived right to jury trial and requested a non-
jury trial July 14, 2004.
Holliday, Sam: Charged with grand.theft (third degree) on December 30, 2003.
Bond was $1,000.00. Non-jury trial scheduled on July 14, 2004.
DISPOSITION
Bass, Christopher Shondell: Charged with felony fleeing or attempting to
,elude on January 10, 2000. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was
present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The defendant was sen-
. tenced to 16 months in the Department of Correction with 258 days credit for
time served and is to run concurrent with any sentence being served. Any
outstanding costs were reduced to a judgement.

HEARINGS
Brackin, James M: Petition for early termination of probation. The defendant
was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler. Petition for early termi-
nation was granted.


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The Franklin Chronice


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


3 September 2004 Page 3


EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY


Two-Thirds Of Fish From Florida

Lakes Test Positive For Mercury

Contamination

Progress Energy Complex At Crystal River Is
Biggest Polluter
In recent U.S. EPA tests of fish caught in Florida lakes, every fish
sample tested was contaminated with mercury, and sixty-three per-
cent contained mercury levels that exceed EPA's "safe" limit for women
of childbearing age. The findings are from "Reel Danger: Power Plant
Mercury Emissions and the Fish We Eat", a new analysis of EPA data
by Florida PIRG and Clear the Air.
"Because of mercury pollution, I worry whether the fish I catch are
safe to feed to my wife, my two daughters and my grandkids. That's
just not right," said John Chason of Pensacola, who serves as the
mercury/water pollution coordinator and committee chairman for the
Florida Bream Fisherman Association.
Nationally, 55 percent of the fish samples exceeded EPA's safe mer-
cury limit for women and 76 percent exceeded the safe limit for chil-
dren under age three. The safe limits are based on women and chil-
dren eating two meals of fish per week.
"Mercury pollution is making the fish in Florida's lakes unsafe to
eat," stated Holly Binns, Clean Air & Energy Advocate with Florida
PIRG. "The Clean Air Act calls for the maximum achievable reduc-
tions of power plant mercury emissions by 2008. Unfortunately, the
George Bush Administration is finalizing a proposal that would delay
meaningful reductions in mercury emissions from power plants until
at least 2018. Eating fresh seafood is a cherished part of the Florida
lifestyle; the EPA's proposal is just too little, too late for Floridians."
"Reel Danger" is based on the first available data from EPA's ongoing
National Study of Chemical Residues in Lake Fish Tissue. From
1999-2001, EPA collected approximately two composite samples of
one predator fish species and one bottom-dwelling fish species at 260
lakes, for a total of 520 composite samples, or 2,547 fish.
Key findings include the following:
All of the fish samples EPA tested in Florida, and nationwide, were
contaminated with mercury.
In Florida, 63% of the fish samples contained mercury levels that
exceed EPA's "safe" limit for women of average weight who eat fish
twice per week.
The average mercury concentration of the composite samples from
Florida lakes was 0.26 ppm, or twice the level that EPA considers
safe (The EPA "safe" limit for women of average weight who eat fish
twice per week is 0.13 ppm).
-" 92% of largemouth bass tested in Florida had mercury levels that
exceed that EPA's "safe" limit.
Nationwide, 55% of the fish samples exceeded the safe mercury
limit for women and 76% exceeded the safe limit for children of aver-
age weight under age three who eat fish twice a week.
"The Reel Danger" report clearly shows why, according to a recent
poll of Florida anglers, 85 percent support implementing the stron-
gest possible controls for mercury from smokestacks. The Bush
administration's weak mercury rule would sentence another genera-
tion of Florida anglers to fishing under the cloud of mercury con-
sumption advisories," said Jerry Karnas, Florida organizer with Na-
- tional Wildlife Action.
- Mercury is toxic to the developing brain, and exposure in the womb
can cause learning disabilities, developmental delays, and other seri-
ous health problems in children. EPA estimates that one in six women
of childbearing age has enough mercury in her blood to put her child
at risk. Eating contaminated fish is the primary way people are ex-
Sposed to mercury.
Power plants are the single largest.source of mercury emissions. Other
industrial sources have reduced their emissions of mercury by more
than 90 percent within a few short years, but power plants continue
to emit unlimited amounts of mercury into the air. The technology is
available to reduce power plant mercury emissions by at least 90
percent.
Florida ranks 14th nationwide for the most mercury emissions from
power plants, releasing 2,410.92 pounds of mercury into the air in


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2002, according to tne most recent ht-A sata. mne Crystal River En-
ergy Complex alone emitted 491 pounds of mercury into the air in
2002.
Another View From Southeastern Fisheries Association
PIRG used the EPA mercury tolerance level instead of the FDA mer-
cury tolerance level and there is a big difference between the two.
EPA seems to relish setting the mercury tolerance at the lowest pos-
sible level while at the same time seems to ignore pollution in many
different forms in our nation. There are very few fish, probably on the
planet, that are free from mercury because mercury has been in the
environment for hundreds, if not thousands of years and maybe it is
not all due to power plants.
Our organization has stood with PIRG on many occasions in pushing
for reduction of mercury from power plants and for reducing all forms
of pollution in our oceans including ocean outfalls that permeate the
Southeast coast of Florida.
I would think that in the spirit of telling the whole truth, PIRG should
calculate the amount of mercury it found in the lakes of Florida and
compare it with the allowable limit as established by the FDA. Such
an honest and open comparison of the FDA level would separate PIRG
from the radicals who are trying to stop all fishing and consumption
of any kind of animal protein.
Bob Jones, Executive Director
Southeastern Fisheries Assn.
1118-B Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
850-224-0612
www.southeasternfish.org
Florida PIRG is a statewide, non-profit, non-partisan public interest
advocacy organization. Download the full report from our website at
www.floridapirg.org.


Angry Citizen Expresses Views On

The Eve Of The Primary

Publisher's Note: The following letter from Eastpoint resident
Frank Venable has been edited. The original document was nearly
twice as long as that which appears here. I think the shorter
version preserves his points more effectively.
Just paying reasonable attention to decisions being made by the
Franklin County Commission that will have a permanent effect on
Franklin County begins to show a planned effort agenda if you will of
opening the gates to for developers by either "ignoring" our compre-
hensive plan provisions, or "interpreting" them in such a way or grant-
ing "a special exemption that it gives clear sailing to the wishes of
developers, with little to no concern as to the combined effect on our
quality of life in Franklin County.
These developers are 90% non-residents of Franklin County. They
have not paid taxes here over the years and been a contributing part
of our community. They are newcomers in large part with their out of
state big $ who are generously "permitted" to drive "over the speed
limit" in our county with their plans, which always in some fashion
called for exceptions to our comp plan.
THE TAX PICTURE ... A year ago, our property values rose by a phe-
nomenal 38% in one year. It was clear the NEW TAX REVENUE to the
county would amount to $2 3 4 million ... new money, a windfall in
attending a budget meeting in fall of 2003, 1 asked:
1) How much actual new revenue would there be?
2) Would they please reduce the millage rate in order to return a mill
or part of the windfall revenue.... To the taxpayers...
I suggested they fund these increased costs with an IMPACT FEE on
each new housing commercial unit (the same as most all other growth
counties in Florida do).... place the funding on those who were creat-
ing these cost increases ... the developers..... and not put the burden
on the existing resident-homeowners who otherwise are subsidizing
the developers...
Their arrogance reached its limit when a very conscientious citizen
appeared before the commission with a $40,000 grant to find a com-
munity study plan of the Eastpoint Waterfront ... best use for future
balance one commissioner loudly refused it saying "I don't like any
citizens initiative."
THE VISIONING PLAN ... over the past 1 2 years was wonderfully
conceived, funded by various parties (St. Joe, the largest) and imple-
mented by hiring FSU professionals as the hands on facilitators to
keep it flowing. The County Commissioners gave it lip service of con-
sent....
Meetings were announced and held in various places, typically with
50-70 attending. Sub-groups were identified by topics of need, with
separate detail information-ideas organized or a consolidated pre-
sentation toward a new and much improved Comp. Plan. There could
easily have been 2,000 man hours invested by this motivated and
concerned group. But guess what? It didn't amount to a hill of beans
because what was presented to the Commission ... DID NOT INCLUDE
new provisions from the collective efforts of these multiple visioning
meetings over 12 15 months.


,,V W4, POST OFFICE BOX 590
C-or-^ % EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
W 1, 850-670-1687 (OFFICE)
o" VFacsimile 850-670-1685
0 e-mail: hoffer531 @gtcom.net
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 13, No. 18


September 3, 2004


Publisher Tom W. Hoffer
Director of Operations Andy Dyal
Contributors Harriett Beach
............ Dawn Radford
............. Carol Noble
............ Richard Noble
............ Skip Frink
Advertising Design
and Production Artist Diane Beauvais Dyal
Circulation Associate Jerry Weber

Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis Apalachicola
Skip Frink Carrabelle
David Butler Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins................ Eastpoint
Barbara Revell Lanark Village
Richard Harper St. George Island
Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue would
cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the Chronicle
for price quotes if you seek several different or similar
issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2004
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


Bayside Residential, Waterfront &
A ReaIt yrDog Island Properties
ReInc.
850-697-5470
HOMES
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bedrooms with master baths + a loft upstairs could be used for fourth
room. Florida Room overlooks the river from the 2nd floor, screened-
in porch overlooking the river from the first floor. Home has 1080
sq. ft. carport under the house with two storage rooms, 10' ceilings,
elevator, dock with boat lift, central sound system, and an irrigation
system with well. $925,000.00.
* Bayou Harbor-One acre overlooking Dog Island and St. George
Island. Direct Bay access. $700,000.00.
* One Bay Front Lot-49 x 138 lot on the Bay, located in St. James.
Spectacular view. $495,000.00.
* New Home-Still under construction. 2088 sq. ft. home overlook-
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countertops, hardwood floors, Andersen windows and much more.
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Freda White-Owner/Broker
Raymond Williams-Broker/Sales Beth Barber-Realtor


Everytime a commissioner says their decisions are based on CREAT-
ING NEW JOBS, they are again off base. Franklin County has the
lowest unemployment ratio in Florida. Anyone who wants a job, can
get a job. Otherwise, why are there hundreds of out of county- out of
state workers coming in here every week to work? Very few new jobs
created will be much above minimum wage, and few will pay as well
as oystering. What this entire picture translates into is a continuous
squeeze of "higher costs of living" for the true working families who
have and do make up the backbone of Franklin County, resulting in
an increasing stream of them, their adult children and grandchildren
(new family formation) having to move out of Franklin County to be
able to afford to live.
This is the result of uncontrolled growth. Growth is managing us,
instead of our leaders being willing to manage it.
WHO IS RESPONSIBLE? Initially it is our elected officials. But today
it is the public who is not willing to take a stand. Now is the time
we have the opportunity...
THIS LETTER IS NOT AGAINST GROWTH ... It is however, against
uncontrolled and unplanned growth, and the negative result that will
have to be endured by all Forever.
Continuing on this same path, we will certainly lose our magnificent
God given natural Beauty and become as all the other waterfront
communities, just one more expanse of concrete asphalt, and plastic
signs an endless man-made belt along the entire sea Coast and its
estuaries. We will only have pictures to show how it should be.
This letter is for moderate growth, that is not rushed, but well-planned,
with a major concern for our long term infrastructure, preserving our
water quality, and overall our Wonderful quality of life
Please join me now ... at the polls ... and make a difference by voting
out of office ALL Existing county commissioners as soon as we can
(with the exception of Bevin Putnal, who hopefully will have more
qualified competition next time).
We need and must have accountable system honest people who will
represent who they say they will ... not outside special interests.
A very sincere THANK YOU for joining me August 31st and November
2nd.
Frank A Venable
WAKE UP FRANKLIN COUNTY WAKE UP


Red Cross Trucks Add New Delivery

Routes To Provide Recovery

Supplies To Hurricane Victims

The American Red Cross will continue mobile distribution of clean-up
and comfort items to victims of Hurricane Charley. Twenty-four foot
box trucks and vans with Red Cross logos on the sides have been
canvassing numerous routes over the past week 'in Charlotte, DeSoto,
Hardee, Lee and Polk Counties and will continue providing much
needed supplies directly to residents in storm-damaged communities
this weekend.
Items being distributed in the hurricane-affected area include shov-
els, rakes, tarps, trash bags, bleach and other cleaning supplies as
well as other essential needs like water, baby food and diapers. As is
the case with all American Red Cross assistance, the recovery sup-
plies are free of charge, made possible through the generosity of the
American public.
Red Cross family assistance specialists, nurses and crisis counselors
continue to provide free 'individualized aid to storm victims at nine
Red Cross service centers across the state.
Individuals, who-because of age, physical difficulty, or similar rea-
sons-cannot come to a Red Cross Service Center, may also use the
Red Cross Helpline to request assistance. To obtain information about
Red Cross assistance for disaster victims, call the Helpline at
1-866-GET-INFO, TDD 1-800-526-1417 for hearing impaired callers.
All American Red Cross disaster assistance is free, made pos-
sible by voluntary donations of time and money from the
American people. You can help the victims of Tropical Storm
Bonnie and Hurricane Charlie and thousands of other disas-
ters across the country each year by making a financial gift
to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund, which en-
ables the Red Cross to provide shelter, food, counseling and
other assistance to those in need. Call 1-800-HELP NOW or
1-800-257-7575 (Spanish). Contributions to the Disaster Re-
lief fund may be sent to your local American Red Cross chap-
ter or to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washing-
ton, DC 20013. Internet users can make a secure online con-
tribution by visiting www. redcross.org.



FSU Professor Finds Gulf

Recreational Fishermen Catch 64%

Of Overfished Species

In a truncated and fragmentary report published in the August 27,
2004 issue of the Tallahassee Democrat, reporter Bruce Richie de-
scribed a research report by Florida State Professor Felicia Coleman
that indicates recreational fishermen may be overfishing some spe-
cies in the Gulf of Mexico including gag grouper and red snapper.
For years, commercial fishermen have complained that they were
unjustifiably blamed for overfishing some species. Indeed, the argu-
ment extends back to the high propaganda days when advocates for
the "net ban" proposed a complete ban on commercial fishing of some
species. Court decisions later revised the Constitutional Amendment
limiting commercial fishing as a "net limitation", not a complete "ban".
Since the early 1990s, when the "ban" was put into place through a
Constitutional Amendment to the Florida Constitution, and chang-
ing state regulatory agencies, the commercial fishing community has
tried to find a net that would enable them to survive commercially,
despite the state's systematic efforts to put them out of business. In
Wakulla County, through their fishermen's association and the ef-
forts of Ron Crum, the commercial fishing community has met the
state agencies in court on more than one occasion. Unfortunately,
most of those legal cases have been lost.
If the Coleman study applies to recreational fishermen without quali-
fications, this may be the first solid evidence that challenges the flawed
assumptions concerning overfishing and the net limitation regula-
tions. A copy of the study to be published in SCIENCE magazine has
been requested for further study.





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Page 4 3 September 2004


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Shrimp Business Options

http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/mediacenter/fishflles/
HShrimpBusinessOptions.pdf
Greetings:
If you go to the above site you can read the proposed options for the
Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic shrimp fisheries.
The National Marine Fisheries Service has developed a business plan
they believe would help the domestic shrimp industry. This plan is
very controversial and has already been heavily criticized by the South-
ern Shrimp Alliance as basing too much of the report on old data.
-Another controversial aspect is many people believe NMFS is com-
mitted to reducing the number of all commercial fishing vessels fish-
ing in federal waters. This is not something new as numerous regula-
tions have been put into effect making it harder to make a profit in
"the industry. Limited entry is where NMFS is headed as far as cap-
ping commercial effort. On the other hand, NMFS proposes nothing
to cap or even slow down the plethora of new recreational boats that
*enter the fishery every day of the year. There are nearly 1,000,000
.recreational fishing boats registered in Florida alone and that num-
Sber will double in our lifetime if something isn't done to slow it down.
* Everyone who is even remotely involved in the shrimping issues knows
the deluge of imported shrimp is the reason the price for domestic
shrimp is extremely low. Everyone who is even remotely involved in
the shrimping industry should realize imports will never be stopped
from entering the United States. There will more than likely be some
tariffs initiated and there should be some Byrd money distributed to
the shrimpers, but even that will not stop the imports.
Read the options paper and look at the options proposed by NMFS.
Maybe none of them will work but something must be done within
the industry if it is to survive for the long haul. Changes will occur
and hopefully the shrimping industry itself can guide how these
changes will happen but we can never go back to the way it was
before the Magnuson Act was passed in 1976. 1 said the act was the
worst thing that could happen to the distant water fleet when it was
being considered. It's still the worst thing that was ever done to the
distant water fleet and it is turning into an anti-commercial fishing
law except for Alaska.
I would like to get some feedback from every member of SFA who is in
the shrimp business.
Thank you,
Bob Jones, Executive Director
Southeastern Fisheries Assn.
1118-B Thomasville Road

The Boyd Report

Higher Education: Hitting

The Books, Not The Bank

By Congressman Allen Boyd
As the school bell rings signaling the start of another academic year,
parents and children have been vigorously preparing for the "back to
school" season. The courses have been chosen and the school sup-
plies purchased, but for many recent high school graduates, their
education has abruptly come to a halt due to a nationwide economic
slump and rising tuition costs of Florida's community colleges and
universities, The U.S. economy increasingly demands a college de-
gree to achieve financial success, yet many low-income and minority
families and an increasing amount of middle-income households ate
unable to afford the rising costs of getting that education.
At a time when a college education is so important, why is it so finan-
.cially out-of-reach for so many?
"As the Representative for Florida's 2 d Congressional District, my
classroom has been in the homes and businesses of my constituents
who look to me for help, assistance and guidance. Traveling across
North Florida and talking with my constituents, I have learned that
many parents' concerns regarding their children's education do not
end once they turn 18. With approximately 80 percent of new jobs
requiring education beyond high school, it is imperative that our chil-
dren have the opportunity to receive the training they need for the
careers they wish to pursue. As a member of Congress, I play a cru-
cial role in ensuring that higher education is affordable for everyone,
and as, a father of a college student myself, my desire to make higher
education more affordable hits even closer to home.
Numerous federal and state programs ate in place to assist families
with higher education costs. The Higher Education Act (HEA), en-
acted by Congress in 1965, is one example of the way the federal
government is sustaining the concept of the American D. learn and
investing in Americans who believe this aspiration must not remain
elusive. This legislation was created to guarantee that no academi-
cally qualified American was barred from college solely for financial
reasons.
One of the most beneficial elements of the HEA is the Pell Grant pro-
gram, the single largest source of federal grant aid for low-income
students seeking higher education. Approximately 4.4 million un-
dergraduates received $11.2 billion in need-based Pell grants during
2002. However, a closet look reveals that the Pell grant is not as ad-
vantageous as it once was. Twenty-five years ago, the average Pell
grant coveted 84 percent of the cost of a four-year, public college
education, but this percentage slipped to 39 percent by 1999, as in-
flation has outpaced the typical giant amount.
Currently, the maximum Pell grant is funded at $4,050, and the Ad-
ministration wishes to freeze this amount as a part of their education
budget proposal. The Administration's plan to cut this and other sig-
nificant programs by slashing the Department of Education's budget
falls very short of its promise to leave no child behind. There is poten-
tial for the Pell Grant program to remain beneficial if the maximum
amount is raised to coincide with rising tuition costs. In this way, the
Pell Grant program will continue to benefit low-income students who
rely on this funding, not.as a mere supplement, but as the primary
source of their college funds. When Congress considers the Pell Grant
program during the reauthorization of the HEA, I will work to ensure
that the maximum Pell giant is appropriately increased, and higher
education programs are adequately funded and proficiently adminis-
tered.
On a state and local level, I support Florida Prepaid and Florida Bright
Futures Scholarship and companies, such as Sallie Mae, that pro-
vide valuable seminars, information sessions, and support programs
for families who ate planning their children's education. Children from
low-income families should not be forced to check their "learninghat"
at the door once they teach the designated age of 18. Although these
young men and women are technically adults, they are America's
children and deserve equal educational opportunities. Our country
will not revert back to the time when the poor were locked out of
higher education and college was hardly a given for middle-class fami-
lies. As students file back into the classroom, Congress will also re-
convene this fall and face many budgetary issues dealing with fund-
ing for education. I look forward to working for students seeking a
college diploma by ensuring that federal grants and loans are avail-
able for all tho' e who need it.


Franklin County Public Librai

Happenings

By Judi Rundel

Library Programs
The Franklin County Public Library's new after school p
WITH-ITI, kicked off the season with its first theater perform
the Carrabelle branch on Thursday night, August 5h, to rave
Parents and students are excited about the theatre project'
underway at all three program sites. The Apalachicola site (l
the New Life Center on 8th Street), is holding their evening b
Monday nights and the Eastpoint branch is holding evening 1
Friday nights. WITH-IT! is a program for students between th
10 and 17. After school program hours on Wednesday, Tl
and Friday include time for homework, computer skills, tuto
skills, and career development. The first creative project, the
dramatic arts, adds a cultural dimension to the program.
As part of the project students went to the Monticello Opera I
see a live production of Romeo and Juliet. The next creative
block is Sports and includes a field trip to Tallahassee to see
Olympic gymnastic team perform. This will be the team's firs
a nation-wide tour after the Summer Games which were helh
ens, Greece. Call 670-5250, 697-9216, or 653-2784 to regis
child. WITH-ITI is made possible by a Department of Juvenile
Title II grant with support from the J. Ben Watkins Founda
the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library which als
as fiscal agent of the program.
The Library's FROG Family Learning Program held Family Fu
in August at all three program sites. Families made school
and homework reminder calendars, received homework a
management tips for juggling all those family activities thr
the busy school year, and enjoyed a light snack. Call Ma
Michelle at 697-2091 or 670-4423 to find out about upcomir
fan nights. The FROG Family Learning Program also offers onc
or small group computer classes as well as individualized tut
students. As with most other programs, these services areI
at all three of the Library's program sites.
Story Time with Michelle (for kids in Kindergarten, first, secc
third grades) is up and running again. Bring your little or
Eastpoint branch each Monday at 4:00 p.m., the Apalachit
gram site every Tuesday at 4:00 p.m., and the Carrabelle br
ery Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. It's a fact that reading to child
ages makes them better readers.
TIGERS (Teens In Gear Enjoy Realize Succeed) is the Franklii
Public Library's after school program for young adults who e
18 years old. This program is geared toward career develop
includes special projects, field trips, and a new community.
incentive plan., Registration for new students is on-going at
of the Library's program sites. Call 670-5250, 653-2784, or 6
for information on how your teen can participate in this
award-winning program which is funded through a contract
Gulf Coast Workforce Board.

The Book Club
The Book Club which meets at the Eastpoint branch of the
will hold its monthly meeting on Tuesday, September 7th b
at 7:00 p.m. This month's book, Mary Called Magdalene by I
George will be discussed. All people who love to read and sh
thoughts on selected readings are welcome. Call Judi Rt
670-4423 for more information.
Music Magic at the Library, a special mini grant run in con
with the Summer Reading Program, will hold a final perform
third graders and their families on Saturday, September 1
11:00 a.m. 12 noon. Yazid, an African drummer from Tall
along with other drummers who perform with him, will give
ing performance at the Eastpoint Firehouse. Yazid and his



Between Two

Rivers

A new literary movement kicks off
in north Florida and southwest
Georgia September 11th with the
release party for Between Two Riv-'
ers, an anthology featuring 29
writers telling stories about the
extraordinary landscapes of the
Red Hills and northern Gulf coast.
The book is the product of the new
Red Hills Writers Project, a group
of writers and editors who believe
in the power of nature-based lit-
erature to move and inspire
people, and deepen their under-.
Sstanding of and attachment to
place. The two rivers referenced
in the title are the Aucilla to the
east and the Apalachicola to the
west, which define the Red Hills
and Gulf coast regions. A series
of diverse and remarkable essays'
cover the rich cultural and envi-
ronmental landscape between
these two waterways.
Editors include Susan Cerulean,
a biologist, writer and activist
well-known Southern author
Janisse Ray and Tallahassee poet 1
Laura Newton, editor of the ,
Apalachee Review.
The writers are: Doug Alderson, 4
Susan Anderson, Wendell Derry, ".
Susan Ceralean, Jim Cox, Donna
Decker, Faith Eldse, Gail '
Fishman, John Hall, Julie *
Hauserman, Claudia Hunter
Johnson, Saundra Gerrell Kelley, /
Kathleen Laufenberg, Monifa A. 1 NI
Love, D. Bruce Means, 0. Victor
Miller, Ann J. Morrow, Hope
Nelson, Laura Newton, Janisse
Ray, Mane K. Roberts, Ann
Rudloe, Jack Rudloe, Mary lane
Ryals, Michael Trammel, Crystal API is A.
Wakoa, S. David Webb, June and are su
Bailey White, and June Wiaz.
The Red Hills Writers Project is an
initiative of the nonprofit group,
Heart of the Earth. Both groups
are deeply concerned that un-
planned growth and sprawl are
placing the region's communities
at risk. The Red Hills Writers
Project hopes to spark important
conversations from Thomasville to
Panacea, from Apalachicola to -


dren gave a workshop in African drumming during the summer to
over 30 people who were encouraged to touch and play the drums for
themselves. Call Judi at 670-4423 to reserve a seat for this special
event. Admission is free.
The Franklin County Public Library's programs-FROG, WITH-IT!,
and TIGERS-are offered at no cost to participants. Registration how-
ever is required. For information about upcoming events, becoming a
volunteer tutor, or becoming a library volunteer, please call 670-8151,
6972366, or 697-2091, or view the Library's website located at
www.fcpl.lib.fl.us.
Library Opens Doors To Democracy On
September 11, 2004
On Saturday, September 11, people across the nation will gather in
public spaces in nearly every state to exchange ideas about issues
that matter. The Franklin County Public Library will be one of over
300 sites that will present creative ways to reflect upon democracy,
citizenship, and Patriotism at its Carrabelle branch beginning at 11:00
a.m. Activities are being organized and include readings by local au-
thors, voter registration information from the County's Supervisor of
Elections, and a performance encore by the Carrabelle branch's
WITH-ITI students. All events will be part of The September Project, a
local, national, and global effort to create a day of engagement, con-
versation, and democracy. To learn more.call 670-8151 and visit
www.theseptemberproject.org.


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Aucilla, about how we might col- S U '
lectively guide our rapidly grow-
ing region into a more sustainable BI
future.
The release will happen at a read-
ing, music and nature festival at
Tall Timbers Research Station,
north of Tallahassee. The festival T. JO
will kick off a series of public
events, readings, and nature
tours which will stimulate discus-
sion about the Red Hills and Gulf
coastal regions, For more infor-
mation about Between Two Riv-
ers, and to purchase the book, go
to www.redbillswritcrsproject.org, l *l i* FT


EDIrORAL & COMMENTARY







The Franklin Chronicle


Escape to Alaska from Page 1


Alan Pierce standing above a glacier on the Kenai Penin-
sula, June 28, 2004.
The Alaskan-Canadian (ALCAN) highway began construction in March
1942 and was concluded about eight months later, in late October
1942. The Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor and America's entry
into the Second World War conditiohed the decision to make the new
highway a military necessity. Alaska was considered vulnerable to a
Japanese invasion. The Canadian government secured rights-of-way
and the Americans agreed to pay for the road, turning over the Cana-
dian Dortion to Canada at the end of World War II. The two largest
construction camps were located at Whitehorse and Fort St. John.
The Pierce entourage traveled through Whitehorse enroute to
Fairbanks. Alan recalled, "...This was a nice road, very long. For travel
expenses, most of the time we used credit cards. We did not have any
breakdowns along the way..." There were gasoline stations, called
roadhouses all identified in MILEPOSTS, the bible of north country
travel.


Preparing for the "Midnight Sun 10K Race" in Fairbanks,
*Alaska, were this foursome consisting of (from left) Sandy
and Wes Whitley, Alan Pierce and Helen Whitley. This pic-
- ture was taken at 9 p.m. on June 20, 2004, before any sign
- of dusk.


Alan observed much wildlife along the ALCAN route; moose, elk, deer.
"We started on the ALCAN about 8 in the morning in Dawson Creek.
As we entered the Yukon, the daylight was noticeably longer, the sky
was sorta flattening out about 1000 miles north of Dawson Creek.
Here, you get away from the influence of American culture, Eskimo
and native Canadian culture kicked in. Basically, English was still
spoken but with different accents."
Alan described the nightlife along the highway. "...We ran into lots of
RV tours, mostly Germans. At night, we might sit around the camp-
fire... We did not have to worry about lights because the sun was still
shining, even until Midnight. We never went to movies and did not
watch TV. Radio reception was poor, but interestingly in the camp-
grounds, there were internet connections available, a steady waiting
line to the ports with their laptops..." He quipped, "We used to line up
for hot showers, now we lined up for the high speed internet..."
His group arrived in Fairbanks on June 21st. This turned out to be
the longest day of the year, "...the sun was up 23 hours and 12 min-
utes..." he said. "In Fairbanks, I was wearing shorts and a T-shirt,
200 miles south of the Arctic Circle for a week. Now, mind you, it
could snow at any moment." The winter season runs from September
15th to May 15th. MILEPOSTS reported that the temperatures dip to
minus 80 below zero and often there is up to 23 hours of darkness
during the winter months. "...They say that driving is better in the
winter because the ice freezes and covers all the pot holes..." Alan
said.
Alan and his family group then drove to Homer for a weekend. This is
a small town of about 3000 persons. "It is somewhat similar to
Apalachicola. Their economy has been fishing. They are suffering an
economic onslaught from imported salmon. Their bumper stickers
say, 'Friends don't let friends eat farm-raised salmon'. And, the
economy of Homer is shifting like ours, to tourism and construction.
Homer, Alaska has become a get-away for executives out of Seattle.
They all fly their Lear jets up from Seattle."
Alan's brother-in-law brought anuAltralight airplane with him. "We
flew over the water; I didn't like that. Powered by a lawnmower en-
gine, practically..." Question: Isn't that a little scary? Alan replied,
"The airplane had a parachute... You have to be very careful In an
ultralight; it doesn't take winds very well ... Trying to land was a
problem because of the updrafts around the mountains..." Airplanes
are everywhere. In the wintertime, they are equipped with skis.
The group also went fishing following the tourist route of renting a
boat and,guide. 'There was a limit of only two halibut per person.
But, like Alaska itself, everything is big." Alan caught two Halibut,
one 55 and other 65 lbs. Alaskan fishing boats do not have to have
ice chests.
On his return trip, Alan decided to ferry down to Seattle instead of
driving the long ALCAN highway route. The group observed the 4th of
July in Seward, and then parted. Alan got on a ferry taking the inland
waters to Juneau and then a change overnight to Seattle. The ferry
trip took a total of about eight days with an extra day in Juneau. He
rented a cabin enroute to Bellingham, Washington: Then, he decided
to drive to northern California, and turn east toward the Midwest.
Alan's final observations on his 13,000-mile trek included: the real
estate boom we have here is going on all across the United States.
There's nothing to do in this country except sell T-shirts and get into
the tourist business. We have lost our industrial base; manufactur-
ing has gone overseas. I saw a lot of small towns; there everybody is
trying to figure out how to create well paying jobs...


Alan Pierce during a brief hike on the Kenai Peninsula,
July 1, 2004, during his 13-week trip to Alaska.


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SBRUCE


FOR







Responsibility, Accountability, Accessibility

CONGRATULATIONS
to all of the winning candidates in last Tuesday's Primary Election!

I want to personally thank the folks at Hillside Coalition of
Laborers for Apalachicola (H'COLA) and the St. George Island
Political Action Committee for sponsoring the Political Forums.
.These forums provided myself and the other candidates the
opportunity to speak directly to citizens of Franklin County and to
hear the citizens questions and concerns as they relate to the
Franklin County Sheriff s Office.

THANK YOU!
Bruce Barnes

PLEASE CONSIDER MY QUALIFICATIONS, AND VOTE FOR
ME, IN THE GENERAL ELECTION, NOVEMBER 2,2004. >

'30 Years of Professional Law Enforcement

Fort Lauderdale Police Department
(Police Officer 1973 1976)
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms
(Special Agent 1976 1981)
Drug Enforcement Administration
(Special Agent 1981 2003)
Vietnam Veteran
(U.S. Army 1/1966 12/1967)
Florida State University
(BS Criminology 1973)
Florida Law Enforcement Certification
(1973 Present)
Tallahassee Police Department Reserve Officer
"' a *:m a (7/2004 Present)'
'Franklin County Property Owner
(1991 Present)





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iiwz Ju I allmlill -Axx


A LOCALLY.OWNED NEWSPAPER


3 September 2004 Page 5






Pane 6 3 Seatember 2004


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chroniclp


High Adventure In The Great Smokey Mountains Range:
A Scouting Venture


* i :--. -


(Back row, left to right) Larry Hale, Timothy Wallace, Daren Hoffman, J.R. Serato, Carl
Ard, Jr.; (3rd row) Chris Baines, John Spear, Valentina Lopez, Ben Law; (2nd row) Shelby
Lipscomb, Kenny Parker, Kellie Estes, Kevin Williams; (1st row) Jack Loveless, Patricia
Hale, Brook Pittman.


The Boy Scouts and Venture
Scouts are established worldwide.
Venture Scouts being a branch of
the Boy Scouts open to males and
females ages 14-20. When most
people think of Troop 22 of ST.
George Island they think of Larry
Hale and the annual youth sail-
ing regatta but little do they know
that sailing is only a small por-
tion of what we do. Scout Mas-
ters Larry and Patricia Hale also
teach their troop on subjects such
as land and water navigation, first
aid/CPR, ecology, economics,
communications, and so on. Larry
also takes his troop on many fun
and exciting trips; most recent of
which being to the Great Smokey
Mountain Range.
On July 24th at 7 a.m., the troop
assembled at Ard's Fina Station
in Eastpoint. After packing our
gear into a U-Haul, we were off.
That afternoon arriving at a small
cabin just south of the North
Carolina/Georgia line was a re-
lief from many hours of driving.
Sunday, July 25th the gang
geared up and hiked twelve miles
to the top of Big Scaly (a large
mountain in Georgia) and five
miles back down the following
morning. When our exhilarating
walk was through we relaxed to
I-Robot 1i a cinema outside of
Ashford and dinner at a Pizza Hut.
Although tired, our spirits were
still high.
Tuesday morning meant rising
only to attempt dropping our fear
of heights at a high ropes course
in Sky Valley, North Carolina;
which basically means an ob-
stacle course set up thirty feet in
the air. The course consists of four
different obstacles that you must'
conquer before being belayed
(lowered) to safety on the ground.
The course was designed to boost
self-esteem. There, you are made
safe by a. carabineer and harness
system. There is still the issue of
conquering your own fears.
Wednesday was our rock climb-
ing and rappelling course in High-
lands, N.C. This began with a
thirty-foot rappel and graduated
to a seventy-five foot rappel. Rock
climbing was made optional by a
footpath of the rappel site. Al-
though nervous, even Mrs.
Patricia couldn't miss out on that
exhilarating feeling of free fall.
Thursday was more of a relaxed
day. It began with some much
needed laundry cleaning and a
swim at a natural rockslide ap-
propriately named "Bust Your
Butt Falls." Larry also took us to
visit a wildlife museum, which
educated us on the native species
of the region, the local rock for-
mations, and the native Indians
that once inhabited that region.
Friday was my personal favorite,
white water rafting. The journey
began at the Nantahala Outd6ors
Center where the troop was given
life vests, paddles, and watched
a video teaching the proper ways
to raft and a few safety tips. After
being placed on a bus and es-
corted eight miles up stream the
troop was assigned rafts and let
loose on the Nantahala River (with
our leader Patricia, of course).
With rapids as high as class three
this was more than just a bumpy
ride but it sure was a lot of fun.
Saturday was our saddest day,
cleaning and saying farewell to
our beautiful mountain cabin that
had sheltered us for our week long
stay. It was tight quarters, be-
cause of lack of fair enough
weather to camp, but it was our
home if not for only a short while.
Once again with a loaded U-Haul
returning home around 6 p.m. a
little bruised, but certainly, with
no complaints.
Troop 22 wishes to give special
thanks to a wonderfulindividual,
the late Charles Wharton. Char-
ley was a life long ecologist and


White Water Rafting practice in rescue.


renowned conservationist. It was
his 140-acre home, Beech Creek
Tract, that accommodated our
stay. He has left his land to the
Georgia Wildlife Federation to be-
come a wilderness preserve. It
was his dream to teach people
about their environment as he
clearly expressed, "It is important
for us as teachers, to let people,
both young and old, to have a di-
rect experience with nature in
natural environments, the forest,
prairies, rivers and their flood-
plains, swamplands and sea
shores."


In the experience we have just had
here in the Blue Ridge I hope that
we have shared some under-
standing of the oneness of all
things "how things tie together."
It is clearly seen among the troop
that our experience has helped to
do this (if you don't believe me
simply throw a piece of trash on
the ground and let the troop see
it being done). The troop also
wishes to thank Carol Miley for
seeing that Charley's last wishes
were seen through.


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Franklin County Clam Aquaculture
Workshop: A New Fishing Industry
Leslie Sturmer of the University of Florida Extension, Cedar
Key Field Lab and Mark Berrigan of the Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Affairs held a clam workshop at
the Florida State University Marine Laboratory on
Thursday, August 19, 2004. Berrigan reviewed lease
requirements for the 43 lease holders; Sturmer provided a
detailed overview of clam aquaculture in Florida with an
emphasis on activities at Alligator Harbor. There were 140
fewer operations in 2003 compared to 2001 statewide. Most
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1993 with the number of growers increasing to 170. But,
many growers did not sell clams last year, less than half
reported sales. The demand for luxury seafood, such as
clams, has been negatively affected by the nation's
economic recession. Ms. Sturmer also discussed examples
of local promotional efforts in introducing new methods
of marketing clams to local restaurants and other retailers.
Bill Mahan, extension, also assisted in the presentations.


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2,







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


3 September 2004 Page 7


Second Circuit

iCourt Report

a The Honorable Judge Janet E. Ferris
: Prosecuting Attorney Michael Schneider
By Carol Noble
August 9, 2004
All persons identified below are innocent unless proven
otherwise in a court of law.

ARRAIGNMENTS


n


Steiger and entered a plea of denial. The case was entered on the Violation of
Probation Plea Docket for November 8, 2004.
Schoelles, Roland Morris: Charged with DUI with serious injuries and prop-
erty damage on September 7, 2002. Defendant was incarcerated. The defen-
dant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger who entered a
motion for pretrial release or reasonable bail. Motion was denied. Defendant
entered a plea of denial to violation of probation. The case was entered on the
Violation of Probation Plea Docket for September 13, 2004.
Vasquez, Gwendolyn C: Charged with grand theft of motor vehicle on March
3, 2004. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger and admitted to being in violation of probation. The
defendant was found in violation and sentenced to 23 days in jail with 23 days
credit for time served. Probation was modified with cost of supervision waived,
financial costs reduced to judgement.
Whiddon, Paul J: Charged with fraudulent driver license on March 15, 2000.
Defendant was released on own recognizance. The defendant was present in
court and case was entered on the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for No-
vember 8, 2004. He is to complete an anger management program then pro-
bation will terminate.
Sherlock, Stan: Charged with passing worthless bank check and grand theft.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger and admitted to being in violation. Defendant was
found in violation of probation and sentenced to 60 days in jail. Probation will
terminate after jail.
PLEA DOCKET
Ard, Carl Wayne: Charged with felony DUI and driving while license sus-
pended or revoked on January 18, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The
case was continued on the Plea Docket for September 13, 2004.
Blackburn, Thomas M: Charged with sale/possession of controlled substance
with intent to sell within 1000 feet of store on August 28, 2003. Defendant
was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Charles
E. Hobbs II. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for September 13,
2004.
Campbell, Marvin: Charged with grand theft of motor vehicle on May 5, 2004.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Attor-
ney Alexander Dombrowsky who entered a motion for bond reduction. Motion
was denied. The case was entered on the Docket Sounding for September 13,
2004 and trial for September 15, 2004.
Coulter, James Earl: Charged with attempted burglary of dwelling on April
28, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, entered a plea of no contest, was adjudi-
cated guilty. The defendant was sentenced to two years probation; inpatient
treatment and aftercare; $370.00 court costs; and must submit to random
testing for no alcohol or drugs. Cost of supervision was waived.
Creamer, Mark Devin: Charged with sale of controlled substance on June
23, 2004. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was present in court, entered a
written plea of not guilty dated August 4, 2004. Attorney Alex Dombrowsky
was appointed. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for October 11,
2004.
Dixon, Wade Odell: Charged with sexual battery upon a child under 12 on
January 18, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The defendant entered a plea of no
contest to the lesser charge of lewd or lascivious act on minor. He was adjudi-
cated guilty and sentenced to 20 years in prison with 204 days credit for time
served; 10 years sex offender probation to follow prison; $370 court costs; no
contact with victim or her family.
Etheridge, Christopher V: Charged with burglary of a dwelling and grand
theft (third degree) on June 3, 2004. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was
present in court with Attorney Alex Dombrowsky. The case was entered on
the Docket Sounding for October 11, 2004 and trial October 13, 2004.
Fichera, Tilden Lee: Charged with possession of more than twenty grams
cannabis on March 4, 2004. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was present
in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the
Plea Docket for September 13, 2004.
Geter, David L: Charged with possession of contraband at county detention
facility on February 18, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant
was present in court with Attorney James C. Banks. The case was continued
on the Plea Docket for September 13, 2004.
Harris, Samuel Smith: Charged with lewd or lascivious battery on April 10,
2004. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. The defendant entered a plea of no contest to a lesser
charge of battery upon a child. Adjudication was withheld. Defendant was
sentenced to 2 years probation; court costs and other costs of $823.00. The
defendant is to have no contact with victim and no unsupervised contact with
family members under 16. Cost of supervision was waived. Partial payment
plan.
Heath, Harvey D: Charged with aggravated assault on law enforcement of-
ficer, resisting officer with violence and battery on February 1, 2004. Bond


ou


I'd like to take this opportunity to say thank

you to all my family, friends, co-workers, and

supporters. I would not be the person I am

today without you. I conducted my political

campaign in an honest and forthright manner,

and I have been overwhelmed by the

generosity of the citizens of this county. I

received contributions, compliments, and

encouragement from so many people, and I


will forever be grateful.


"472/a2ux


Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Marcia Johnson, Democrat, for Clerk of Circuit Court


Allen, Leonard S: Charged with felony DUI, giving false name adversely af-
fecting another, driving while license suspended (felony), resisting officer with-
out violence, refusal to submit to balance test, and attaching tag not assigned
'on June 8, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
S- court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The defendant entered a plea of not
.-guilty and the case was entered on the Plea Docket for September 13, 2004.
- Corley, Karen: Charged with issuing worthless check on January 20, 2004;
grand theft (third degree) and issuing worthless check on July 6, 2004. Bond
was $1,063.83 and $2,440.56. The defendant was present in court and a
public defender was appointed. The defendant entered a plea of not guilty and
.-the case was entered on the Plea Docket for November 8, 2004.
"Johnson, Marvin Dwayne: Charged with driving while license permanently
evokedd and fleeing, attempting to elude police officer on May 14, 2004. Bond
-was $20,000.00. Attorney Don Pumphrey entered a plea of not guilty. The
case was entered on the Plea Docket for October 11, 2004.
Moore, Edley Ralph Jr: Charged with DUI (felony) with property damage on
May 31, 2004. Bond was $17,500.00. The defendant was present in court and
a public defender was appointed. The case was entered on the Plea Docket for
November 8, 2004.
Rivera, Ricardo J: Charged with possession of controlled substance with
intent to sell or deliver on June 15, 2004. Bond was $15,000.00. The defen-
dant was present in court and entered a plea of not guilty. The case was
entered on the Plea Docket for September 13, 2004.
Weeks, Charles Michael: Charged with felony DUI and driving while license
suspended (felony) with property damage on April 29, 2004. Bond was
$5,000.00. The defendant was present in court and entered a plea of not
guilty. A public defender was appointed. The case was entered on the Plea
Docket for November 8, 2004.
VIOLATION OF PROBATION ARRAIGNMENT
Buzbee, Christopher: Charged with burglary of a structure on September 6,
2001; 4 counts of uttering (passing worthless document) on May 6, 1999.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of denial. The case was entered on
the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for October 11, 2004.
Creamer, Bobby Gene: Charged with felony fleeing or attempt to elude, with
property damage on February 2, 2003. Defendant was released on own recog-
nizance. The defendant was present in court with Attorney Gordon Shuler
who entered a written plea of denial. The case was entered on the Violation of
Probation Plea Docket for October 11, 2004.
Creamer, James Daniel: Charged with grand theft on January 21, 2004.
.Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public
.Defender Kevin Steiger and admitted to being in violation. The defendant was
:-found in violation of probation and sentenced to 60 days in county jail begin-
~- ning August 9, 2004. Probation will terminate and outstanding costs reduced
,to judgement.
Johnson, Barney Wayne: Charged with grand theft on April 11, 2003. Defen-
:dant was released on own recognizance. The defendant did not show up in
"*.court and a capias (warrant for arrest) was issued.
7'Jones, William, III: Charged with battery by inmate on January 27, 1999.
7.Defendant was released on his own recognizance. The defendant was present
-in court and the violation of probation warrant was withdrawn.
Rivera, Ricardo J: Charged with resisting officer with violence on September
i5, 2002. Defendant was incarcerated. Defendant was present in court with
Attorney J. Gordon Shuler and entered a written plea of denial dated June 11,
.2004. The case was entered on the Violation of Probation Plea Docket for
,.'September 13, 2004.
..,Russell, Christopher Lee: Charged with trespass while armed on August 28,
.2002 and lewd or lascivious conduct on November 22, 2002. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
-UI. .


was $18,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Attorney J. Gordon
Shuler. The defendant entered a plea of no contest to count I and 2, stipulated
lesser; count 3 as charged. Adjudication was withheld. Defendant was sen-
tenced to 3 years probation count 1; 1 year probation on count 2 and 3; All to
run concurrent. Costs and court costs were $722.00 and to be paid on a
partial payment plan. Defendant must forfeit firearm, submit to random tests
for substance abuse, evaluation and treatment, batterers intervention pro-
gram and no drugs or alcohol use or possession.
Hutchins, Sheri M: Charged with two counts delivery of a controlled sub-
stance to minor, and 1 count of murder third degree on August 20, 2003. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney Rachel Chesnut. The case was
continued.on the Plea Docket for September 13, 2004.
Jones, Anthony Allen: Charged with sale of controlled substance on June
18, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
with Attorney Charles E. Hobbs II. The case was continued on the Plea Docket
for September 13, 2004.
Maine, Richard: Charged with possession with intent to sell cannabis on
March 24, 2004. Bond was $15,000.00. Attorney John Leace was present in
court. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for September 13, 2004.
Rell, Thomas Daniel: Charged with driving while license suspended (felony)
on February 11, 2004. Bond was $2,500.00. The defendant was present In
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger and entered a plea of no contest. The
defendant was adjudicated guilty and sentenced to 9 months in jail with 2
days credit for time served; $370 court costs. Defendant must report to jail
September 8, 2004 by 5 p.m. Partial payment plan, 90 days.
Sanders, Delmon: Charged with grand theft on March 20. 2004. Bond was
$2,500.00. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger. The case was entered on the Docket Sounding for October 11, 2004
and trial October 13, 2004.
Sellers, Lisa Marie: Charged with two counts grand theft from merchant on
January 4, 2004. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant did not show up in
court and a capias was issued (warrant for arrest) Bond was forfeited.
Suggs, Kristopher M: Charged with burglary of dwelling while armed and
grand theft of a firearm on June 15, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was present in court with Attorney John Leace and entered a writ-
ten plea of not guilty dated August 4, 2004. The case was continued on the
Plea Docket for September 13, 2004.
Ward, Timothy Shawn: Charged with throwing deadly missile on March 11,
2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for
September 13, 2004.
Yarrell, Ricco: Charged with sale of controlled substance on June 21, 2004;
felony fleeing or attempting to elude officer, resisting officer with violence and
possession of cannabis more than 20 grams on May 18, 2004. Bond was
25,000.00 and $20,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Attor-
ney Alexander Dombrowsky. The case was continued on the Plea Docket for
October 11, 2004.
Yerden, Phillip Lee: Charged with driving while license suspended (felony)
and property damage of $500.00 on February 13, 2004. The defendant did
not show up in court and a capias (warrant for arrest) was issued.
Zindler, Michael David: Charged with possession of controlled substance
and driving while license suspended or revoked on March 1, 2004. Bond was
$5,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger. The defendant entered a plea of no contest and adjudication was with-
held. He was sentenced to two years probation on count 1 one day in jail
with 1 day credit for time served on count 2. He must complete in-patient
treatment and aftercare; submit to random testing for no drugs or alcohol and
pay costs and court costs of $470.00. Cost of supervision waived. Partial pay-
ment plan, 90 days.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION PLEA DOCKET
Ard, Carl Wayne: Charged with DUI-manslaughter on February 13, 2003.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented by Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Violation of Probation
Plea Docket for September 13, 2004.
Bates, Rudolph: Charged with sale of controlled substance on February 2,
2002. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Attorney Don Pumphrey Jr., admitted to being in violation and was found in
violation of probation. Defendant was sentenced to 8 months in jail with 125
days credit for time served.
Cogburn, Joey C: Charged with forgery on August 9, 2002; forgery and 2
counts of uttering (passing worthless document) on October 8, 2002. Charged
with burglary of a dwelling and 2 counts of dealing in stolen property on June
28, 2003. Charged with burglary of a dwelling and 2 counts of dealing in
stolen property on August 6, 2003. Defendant was represented by Attorney
John Leace. The case was entered on the Violation of Probation Hearing Docket
for September 13, 2004.
Dixon, Wade Odell: Charged with felony battery on September 22, 1999. De-
fendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public
Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted to being in violation, and was found in viola-
tion of probation. Probation will terminate with any outstanding costs re-
duced to a judgement.
Fasbenner, Cindy D: Charged with sale of a controlled substance on May 12,
1999. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted to being in violation and was found in
violation of probation. Defendant was sentenced to' 11 months, .29 days in jail
with 266 days credit for time served. Probation revoked. Any outstanding costs
reduced to a judgement.
Fichera, Tilden Lee: Charged with possession of drug paraphernalia on Feb-
ruary 19, 2003. Bond was $254.00. The defendant was present in court with
Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Violation of
Probation Plea Docket for September 13,2004.
Gloner, Michael E: Charged with uttering (passing a worthless document) 2
counts on November 11, 2002; 19 counts on November 20, 2002; 4 counts on
December 31, 2002; 3 counts on January 7, 2003 17 counts on February 6,
2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court


Continued on Page 8


SER VICE TO INCLUDE:

STORAGE, BATTERY
CHARGING, PERIODIC
STARTING and OPTIONAL
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For more information


*-^
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LAND FOR SALE:
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OPENING IN
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Paie 8 3 Sentember 2004


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


SFlorida Classified


FCAN Advertising Network



:Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience


of 1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!


The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper

with the FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-1687, fax: 850-670-1685.


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2004. Bond was $50,000.00. The defendant was present in court with Attor-
ney Alexander Dombrowsky. The case was continued on the Docket Sounding
for November 8, 2004 and trial on November 10, 2004.
Cummings, Larry: Charged with two counts of sale of controlled substance
on January 13, 2004. Bond was $50,000.00. The State dropped all charges
on August 6, 2004.
Dillon, Robert J: Charged with trafficking in a controlled substance on Janu-
ary 30, 2004. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in
court by Attorney Alexander Dombrowsky. The case was continued on the
Docket Sounding for September 13, 2004 and trial September 15, 2004.
Grey, Beauford: Charged with 2 counts aggravated assault with a deadly
weapon and I count of battery on June 14, 2003. Bond was $50,000.00. De-
fendant was represented in court by Attorney Charles E. Hobbs II. The case
was continued on the Docket Sounding for September 13, 2004.
Griggs, Quinnella: Charged with sale/possession of controlled substance with
intent to sell within 1,000 feet of store and sale of substance in lieu of cocaine
on August 21, 2003. Bond was $3,500.00. The defendant was represented in
court by Attorney Charles E. Hobbs II. The case was continued on the Docket
Sounding for October 11, 2004.
Morris, Carlos Artiz: Charged with lewd or lascivious molestation on July 27,
2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court
by Attorney Adam Ruiz. The case was continued on the Docket Sounding for
September 13, 2004.
Sanders, Mark Paul: Charged with felony fleeing or attempt to elude on De-
cember 11, 2003; introducing contraband into county detention facility, DUI,
driving while license suspended or revoked, fleeing or attempting to elude
police officer, refusal to submit to balance test, possession of cannabis, resist-
ing arrest without violence on September 20, 2003. Bond was $4,750.00. The
defendant did not show up in court and a capias was issued (warrant for
arrest). Bond was forfeited.
West, James E: Charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon on
October 2, 2003. Bond was $5,000.00. The defendant was represented in
court by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Docket
Sounding for October 11., 2004.

HEARINGS

Buzbee, Christopher: Charged with burglary of a structure on September 6,
2001; 4 counts of uttering (passing worthless document) on May 6, 1999;
Burglary of a structure, petit theft, criminal mischief on May 2, 2004. Defen-
dant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger who entered a motion for pretrial release or reasonable
ball. Motion was denied the case was entered on the Violation of Probation
Plea Docket for October 11, 2004.

Griggs, Demar L: Charged with sale of controlled substance on July 9, 2004.
The defendant was present in court with Attorney Robert Culpepper II who
entered a motion to reduce bond. Bond was reduced to $5,000.00 with 7 p.m.
to 7 a.m. curfew imposed.
Lashley, Betsie: Charged with possession of controlled substance with intent
to sell, and 2 counts sale of controlled substance. The defendant was present
in court with Attorney J. Gordon Shuler who entered a petition for early ter-
mination of probation. Petition was granted.
McKee, Christopher Michael: Charged with sexual act with child under 16
years of age. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger who entered a motion for termination of probation. Motion was granted.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION HEARING

Dillon, Robert J: charged with manslaughter by auto negligence, two counts
DUI with serious injuries on March 9, 1998. Defendant was incarcerated. The
defendant was represented in court by Attorney Alexander Dombrowsky. The
case was continued on the Violation of Probation Hearing Docket for Septem-
ber 13, 2004.
Morris, Carlos Artiz: Charged with burglary of a dwelling on June 8, 1999.
Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented in court by At-
torney Adam Ruiz. The case was reset for September 13, 2004.


Second Circuit Court Report from Page 7

by Public Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was continued on the Violation of
Probation Plea Docket for September 13, 2004.
Goggins, William B: Charged with aggravated battery with deadly weapon on
August 27, 2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in
court with Attorney Alex Dombrowsky, admitted to being in violation and was
found in violation of probation. He was sentenced to 60 days in jail with 60
days credit for time served. Probation was re-instated, modified. All condi-_
tions re-imposed along with substance abuse evaluation and treatment as
required. Defendant entered a plea of no contest to disorderly intoxication
and was adjudicated guilty. He was sentenced to 60 days in jail with 60 days
credit for time served and $190.00 court costs. Partial payment plan.
McIntyre, Freddie: Charged with aggravated battery with firearm and pos-
session of firearm by convicted felon on October 25, 1996. Defendant was
incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin
Steiger, admitted to being in violation and was found in violation of probation.
He was sentenced to 52 days in jail with 52 days credit for time served. Proba-
tion was reinstated, modified. Future cost of supervision waived. Current fi-
nancial costs reduced to a judgement, except any restitution.
Roberts, Dona Marge: Charged with possession with intent to sell cannabis
on March 20, 2002. Defendant was incarcerated. Defendant was present in
court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted to being in violation and
was found in violation of probation. Defendant was sentenced to 30 days in
jail. Probation to terminate and any outstanding financial costs reduced to a
judgement.
Scott, Jeffrey Blair: Charged with grand theft on January 24, 2004. Defen-
dant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger, admitted to being in violation. He was found in violation
of probation and was sentenced to 60 days in jail. Probation to terminate and
any outstanding financial costs reduced to a judgement.
Stepp, Daniel Alan: Charged with dealing in stolen property on December 13,
2003. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was represented by Public
Defender Kevin Steiger. The case was entered on the Violation of Probation
Hearing Docket for September 15, 2004.


Stevens, Larry T: Charged with aggravated battery with firearm on April 8,
1998. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court with
Attorney Don Pumphrey Jr. and admitted to being in violation. He was found
in violation of probation and sentenced to 24 months in prison with 265 days
credit for time served, to run concurrent. Any outstanding costs reduced to a
judgement. Probation revoked.
Taunton, Gary Dwayne: Charged with battery of law enforcement officer on
May 18, 2000 and grand theft on December 23, 2002. Defendant was incar-
cerated. The defendant was present in court with Public Defender Kevin Steiger,
admitted to being in violation and was found in violation of probation. Proba-
tion was revoked. He was sentenced to 18 months in prison with 416 days
credit for time served, to run concurrent. Any outstanding costs reduced to a
judgement.
Watson, James Raymond Jr: Charged with 2 counts burglary of a convey-
ance, 1 count burglary of a structure and 3 counts of grand theft on August
20, 2002. Defendant was incarcerated. The defendant was present in court
with Public Defender Kevin Steiger, admitted to being in violation and was
found in violation of probation. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail, probation
re-instated, modified.

DISPOSITION

Norwig, Scott Henry: Charged with dealing in stolen property. Defendant
was released on own recognizance. Deferred prosecutor agreement filed for 12
months.

DOCKET SOUNDING

Bunyon, Vedell M: Charged with sale of controlled substance within 1,000
feet of a church on October 9, 2003. Bond was $2,500.00. The State dropped
all charges on August 6, 2004.
Burns, Calvin: Charged with sale of controlled substance, aggravated assault
on law enforcement officer and possession of controlled substance with intent
to sell or deliver on December 9, 2003; possession of cannabis on January 6,


TheS -
Franklu Iin'ruL~I~

Chroicl


Allyn
Jasper,
Realtor



13


The Milepost-The periodical used in Alan Pierce's "Escape
to Alaska" as an indispensable guide to Canada's north-
west.


An attentive audience listens to the Political Forum at the
Dixie Theatre.


St James Island Gulf l
Front: Beautiful Gulf .
front lot with 3 bedroom/ "": ,'" S-
1 bath house. Home has
been freshly painted and has central air and heat. Remnants of
concrete dock approach exist and a concrete boat ramp. This prop-
erty is located less than a mile from the entrance to St. James Bay
Golf Course. Call for a viewing. MLS#100097.


Office: (850) 697-9000
Toll-Free: (800) 613-5962
Cell: (850) 899-0582


314 St. James Street
Carrabelle, FL 32322
Fax: (850) 697-4311


Email: allynj@florida-beach.com


BAR-B-Q
Hickory-smoked the old-fashioned
way with all the fixns prepared from
our own recipes.
NOW OPEN IN CARRABELLE
LUNCH BUFFET Sun.-Fri.
SUPPER BUFFET Mon.-Fri.
HOBO'S ICE CREAM
1593 West Highway 98-Carrabelle
697-2776
'Worth Driving 100 Miles For."
Open 6 days 11:00 a.m. 9:00 p.m.
Closed Tuesday
Thank you for letting us serve you!


4 4


BEAT HIGH GAS $


VISIT THE


Alternative Community Transportation

Smart Styling Reliable Performance


Lay-Away Now for Christmas!


AUTHORIZED DEALERS FOR


VERUCCI SCOOTERS AND CYCLES




653-3885


JL "F,%'--- ,


44 F


ar







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


3 September 2004 Page


UPHOLSTERY UNLIMITED

Marine Auto Furniture

850-926-2746
3215 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL
09-03/09-17





Nails
& more
P.O. Box 736 347 Highway 98 Eastpoint, Florida 32328
Phone: (850) 670-4000 0820/09-03


LAND CLEARING SITE WORK BASE & PAVING
FILL SAND TOP SOIL




LAND DEVELOPMENT, INC.
Phone: (850) 926-7876 Cell: 545-6906 Fax 926-1011
4851 Coastal Highway 98 Crawfordville, FL 32327
09-03/09-17


PENNy/S Shoes & ThiNqs

MEN'S, WOMEN'S, CHILDREN'S
ATHLETIC, DRESS, CASUAL
WORKBOOTS & MUCH, MUCH MORE!

312 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL (850) 670-8718
Mon. Fri. 10:00 6.00 Sat. 9:00 5:00 Sun. Closed
09-03/09-17




Jackson Auto Parts and Hardware
Check our inventory out, we have a full line of building
materials, hardware and auto parts.
Give us a call and let us serve your needs.
Highway 98 P.O. Drawer L
Carrabelle, FL 32322 Phone: (850) 697-3332 0820/0903














If addiction is killing a loved one, we have the answer. We deliver the most
effective drug and alcohol rehab program in the world, with a success rate
over 70%. It s a 3-6 month long-term residential program located on a private
lake in Battle Creek, MI. Sauna detox gets toxins and drug residues out of the
body eliminating physical cravings. Life skills training courses prepare our
students for long-term success in life. We have a large job-referral network
in place!
in place!


NArIC2AYON


NARCONON"
STONE HAWK
1-800-420-3147


MESOTHELIOMA OR LUNG CANCER
*Did you know that being exposed to Asbestos dust can cause Lung
Cancer 20 to 30 years after exposure?
*If you or a family member has suffered or died from Lung Cancer or
Mesothelioma, you may be entitled to compensation.
CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION
Gary F. Easom
"Licensed in the States of Florida, Georgia, Pennsylvania and West Virginia"
Peirce, Raimond and Coulter, P.C.
Accepted Cases will be Referred to the Law Firm of Carey and Danis, LLC
8235 Forsyth Blvd., Suite 1100, St. Louis, MO 63105
Call toll free 1-800-721-2519
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be base solely on advertisements Before you
decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience "



BUILDING SYSTEMS.
EtMbIiaed 1979 *
STEEL BUILDINGS ON THE DOCK
READY FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT
25' x 30' x 12' .... $1,936.
10' x 120' x 8'-6" $4,467."
30' x 44' x 16' $7,357."
52' x 48' x 16' $15,889.-"
50' x 60' x 20' $17,833.-
60'-3" x 152'-5" x 16'Hs/13'-6"LS ........... $37,820."
FREIGHT & TAXES NOT INCLUDED
I-ws Pie i h eCut


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle pages is an
efficient way to promote your business to the public and save money
at the same time. These ads are strictly business cards magnified
to 2 columns by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two
insertions. Send your business card or copy to: Franklin Chronicle,
P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL 32328 or fax 850-670-1685. Your
check for $15.00 will guarantee position in the next issue.



Karen's Deli
Dine In and Take Out .

191 U.S. Highway 98 r '
Eastpoint, FL 32328 a- ."'I
Phone: 670-87170 ,'. ." .
Fax: 670-8716 \ "hO-0 ; L.
E-Mail: karensdeli@gtcom.net j .



Nero's Boat Yard
850-697-8177

CONCRETE RENTAL STORAGE
SE 10TH Street & US Highway 98
Carrabelle, Florida 32322
"Carrabelle's Most Complete Rental Store" 08-20/09-03


CARRABELLE
COASTAL
PROPERTIES, LL
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
850-697-5444
IS% wu.carrabellecoasial.com
Corner of 8th St. and Hwy. 98 201 W 8th Street
P.O. Box X Carrabelle, FL 32322 08-20/09-03


A Very Good Thing
Swedish Relaxation and Medical Massage
BODY WRAPS, TANNING, NAVEL PIERCING
Pamela Register, LMT
1-850-670-4411


29 Island Drive Unit 8 Eastpoint,
Lic.# MA-0029164


FL 32328
1 09-03/09-17


NEXTEL I i
AUTHORIZED SERVICE CENTER
Quality Plus
Communications, Inc.
Roger Pullium Direct Connect: 195*124*4190
143 W. Highway 98 Fax: 800-878-9725
Eastpoint, FL 32328 Mobile: 850-251-2332
roger@hwy98.com Office: 850-670-8688
DISCOUNTS TO GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES 08-20/09-03

FELONS: Get your Civil Rights Restored!
Many cases do not require a court appearance
Call for a FREE phone consultation
Confidentially Guaranteed!
The Civil Rights Restoration Firm
Call Toll Free: 1-866-446-9168
8:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. 7 days a week
www.restoremyrights.com


Foundation
Supplies
Backpacks To
Franklin County
Students
The J. Ben Watkins Foundation
has provided backpacks filled
with the appropriate grade level
supplies to 130 students through
the Franklin County Public
Library's WITH-ITI, TIGERS, and
FROG Family programs, Library
Director, Eileen Annie Ball, notes
that the Foundation, along with
Tom Geiger, Store Manager of Of-
fice Depot on Capital Circle NE in
Tallahassee, has again shown
their generosity to Franklin
County students in elementary,
middle, and high school. The
backpacks were loaded with sup-
plies ranging from pencils and
rulers to notebooks and calcula-
tors.
Students are writing thank you
notes and sending cards of appre-
ciation to Mr. Ben Watkins who
made this project possible, along
with J. Ben Watkins III, Steve
Watkins, and Tom Geiger, whose
Office Depot store donated 120 of
the backpacks and provided a dis-
count on all of the school supplies
purchased.


FranlinCbroic-

No distributed i


Richard Harper moderated'
the seven Political Forums
that began on July 26, 2004
at the Carrabelle Senior Citi-
zens Cepnter with the candi-
dates for District #5 for the
County Commission, and
District #5 candidates for
School Board.


Franklin

Gun & Pawn

Full line of Ammo, Tackle & Guns
Propane Exhange: $16.95 + tax

371 HIGHWAY 98 EASTPOINT, FL 32328
PHONE: (850) 670-8444 08-20/09-03/09-17


Rjaf Cofection JewerC &

Deborafs Closet Consignment
Sterling Silver & 14 Kt. Gold Jewelry
Clothing Gifts Tanning Products
Collectibles and Much More!
Hours: Monday Saturday 10 a.m. 5 p.m.
238 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL 850-670-5077
IN BETWEEN TWO GULLS & PUTTN FUSS 08-20/09-03


67~i ~Z)a~w


Stacy Williams, Stylist
TAKING CARE OF MEN AND WOMEN'S HAIR CARE.
ALSO DO MANICURES & PEDICURES.
P.O. Box 977 347 Highway 98 *-Eastpoint, FL 32328
Phone: (850) 670-1772
08-20/09-03


LARGEST EASTPOINT
SELECTION MUSIC
OF CD'S IN
FRANKLIN STORE GUITARS,
COUNTY 850-670-4531 AMPS, DRUMS
T^ We Don't Have It, We Can Get It!
191 Highway 98 Unit D Eastpoint, FL 32328
Store Hours: Mon. Fri. 10 to 6 Sat. 11 to 5 09-03/09-17


Ard's Service *
407 Highway 98
(850) 670-8463

New and Used Tires and Rims
Gasoline and Diesel
08-20/09-03


Tourist Tax Discussed at August 24th Forum::











Discussants Curt Blair (far right) and Pam Vest discussed:
the pros and cons of the proposed tourist tax and the uses =
and control of the revenue in the second half of the August-
24th Forum at the Dixie Theatre.


lx%., K 94A-...








F.ri m er20


L '-- P I I.'I.V.-U---W-Y----.--.-.----..--'---,--- -


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


P\ s .I
.A ,shal M.,ne ,r, h al
Highway 98 East* Carrabelle
0I" / ,/
FULL SERVICE BOAT YAR':/
BOAT REPAIRS BOAT,RENTALS SECURED BOAT STORAGE
QOVR THE ROAD BOAT TRANSPpRT FlIERGLASS SJ'PLIES'
BOTTOM PAINTS AND OTHER MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES
850-697 428 8 80- 89 S31
www.6boattranspoH.n-L


'C6'k trsU t hbt Agehcy, Inc.
ALTO + HOAI COMMERCIALL + LIFE
S11e'eiizih l i1i Co~stal Ptoperties
from Allig~aotr Poit to Mexico Beach

23 AVenue '0, Apalachicola, Fl 32329
850-653-9310 800-822-7530

Established1913 IA wL


Mexican Restaurant
WEI [ (1 IB IS 105 Highway 98
MEXICAN FOOD Eastpoint, FL 32328
& $ Phone: 850-670-5900
Open 24 Hours Friday and Saturday ne 850-670-59
Breakfast: 5 a.m. 11 a.m.
S Lunch: 11 a.m.-- 3 p.m.
Dinner: 3 p.m.- 11 p.m.
AuthenticFlavor of Old Mexico


tChronicle Bookshop

Mail Order Service *

P.O. Box 590
E.. -,int. FL 32328


J(305) Hobo-ing America by Richard Edward Noble, Pa-
Iperback. A humorous, light-hearted, workingman's, true
life, travel adventure story. Work your way around
America with Dick & Carol... feel the pain and the joy...
shake the calloused hands that make America what it is.
JBookshop'price = $14.00.


...no matter where you are-
ours is a service you can trust.

KELLEY FUNERAL HOME
KELLEY-RILEY FUNERAL HOME
serving all of Franklin County
653-2208 697-3366


THE FEVER MAN
A Biography of Dr. John Gorrie


(192) Vivian Sherlock's biography of John Gorrie, The
Fever Man, is available once again after being out-of-print
for more than a decade. This is the story of John Gorrie,
young physician who invented an "ice machine" that many
argue was a forerunner to air conditioning dozens of years
later. His cooling device was developed to provide relief
to his suffering yellow fever patients. A museum in
Apalachicola to this day marks the work of John Gorrie
just across from his last resting place in Gorrie Square,
down from Trinity Church. This book tells what is now
known about Dr. Gorrie, his work and his ice machine.
Paperback, New, 151 pp. Bookshop price = $10.00

(21) Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers. Uni-
versity of Florida Press, Hardcover, 297 pp. In this book,
Rogers traces and documents the economic, social and
political emergence of the Gulf coast port of Apalachicola
and the pristine barrier island, Saint George. From the
earliest times, both the island and Apalachicola have be-
codme intertwined. The account of the machinations of con-
troversial developer William Lee Popham is the first phase
of area development, later leading to the controversial
struggles of the 1970s when environmentalists and sea-
food industries fought to determine the ecological and eco-
nomic fate of the Bay area. The Chronicle has obtained
a fresh supply of newly reprinted volumes at an at-
tractive price. Available elsewhere for $35.95 plus ship-
ping and handling. The Chronicle Bookshop price is much
cheaper at $25.00 per volume.


St. George Island Business Opportunity: "Aunt Ebby's," 147
E. Gulf Beach Drive. Located in the heart of the Island commercial
district, this profitable ten year business includes ice cream/sand-
wiches upstairs and beach store downstairs. Offered as a package
including real estate and business. Excellent investment opportunity!
$900,000. MLS#100761.
Select Land Value
St. George Island Bayview-East End, Lot 13, Clipper Bay, 1.75 acres MOL.
Wonderful views of Apalachicola Bay, dedicated slip at community boat dock.
$550,000. MLS#101234.

(i.Y Prudential Toll-Free: 800-974-2666
Resort Realty Phone: 850-927-2666
123 Gulf Beach Drive West e-mail: info@stgeorgeisland.com
St. George Island, Florida 32328
www.forgottencoastrealtor.com
An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.


Now is the time to
subscribe to the

FRANKLIN

CHRONICLE
The Chronicle is published every other Friday.
Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County
are $16.96 including taxes for one year, or 26
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(307) The Library of Congress Civil War Desk Refer-
ence. Simon and Schuster, 2002, 949 pp. This work is a
comprehensive yet accessible compendium organized into
chapters that address broad themes such as "Antebel-
lum America," "Wartime Politics", "Armies," etc. with each
chapter including more specific topics. There are timelines
that chronicle major events, brief profiles of significant
players in the war and extensive bibliography. The work
examines the lives of the common soldiers, the role of
women in the conflict, medical treatment, home front
events, maps, excerpts from journals and letters. Other
chapter titles include "Battles and the Battlefield", Weap-
onry", "War on the Water" "Prisons and Prisoners of War",
"Reconstruction and the Aftermath of the War" and 'The
Civil War in Literature and the Arts". A final chapter dis-
cusses places for further research, archives, important
published sources and national historic sites. This is one
indispensable one-volume reference on the Civil War,
originally sold for $45.00. The 949 pp work is available
in limited copies from the Chronicle bookshop for $35.00
'each


IXIE
THEATRE
Apalachicola, Fla.
Presents the return of Movies!
For the 1st Time since 1967
I Robot
September
3,4,5 & 8
The Manchurian
Candidate
September
10, 11, 12 & 15
Friday & Saturday-8 p.m.
Sunday-3 p.m
Wednesday-8 p.m.
All Tickets $5.00

653-3891
www.dixietheatre.com


Franklin Chronicle
Post Office Box 590
Eastpoint, Florida 32328
850-670-1687 or 850-927-2186


Pw-I



* a~t )eorpe. Island &ip~ahco~
* .' I ~ fronirt ErlY xploratioi.'
to VbrdW, r T'.


r- ----- ------ --- ----- ---- -
Order Form
Mail Order Dept., Chronicle Bookshop
(Please Print)
Your Name
Address
Town State ZIP _
Telephone ( 1
Book
Number Brief Title Cost








Total book cost ____
Shipping & handling Ses tax (6% in Fla.) +
1 book ... $2.50
2-3 books .... $3.50
4-5 books.... $4.00 Shipping and
6-10 books... $5.00 handling +
Bookshop List of
3 September 2004 Total
Amount enclosed by check or money order $
Please do not send cash. Thanks.
All book orders must be ordered on this form. When
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L-----------------------


Please Note
Books from the mail service of the Chronicle Book Shop are new and
used, and are so-designated In each Item description. Some titles
may be temporarily out of stock, in which case a second shipment
wll be made, normally in 14 days. Books are shipped in 48 hours,
normally. Some of our books are publishers' closeouts, overstocks.
remainders or current titles at special prices. Most are In limited supply
and at these prices may sell out fast..If any book is sold out your
money will be refunded by bank check. To offer the lowest possible
prices all orders must be prepaid. We do no billing and do not accept
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