Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00196
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: October 4, 2002
Copyright Date: 2002
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00196
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text





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BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
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PERMIT #8



Franklinil






Chronicle


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Volume 11, Number 20 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER October 4 17, 2002



Isidore Leaves Minor Damage In Franklin-A Weary Eye Is Cast To Lili


Emergency Management Direc-
tor "Tim" Turner said the re-
cent tropical storm Isidore left
only minor damage in Franklin
County by the time it had made
landfall further west. "Mill Road
was flooded and Alligator Point
Road, County 370, had minor
damage but not enough to close
them.". The road to St. George
Island was also not closed de-
spite rumors to the contrary.
The Emergency Operations
Center at the Apalachicola Air-
port was activated at 7 a.m. on
September 25th but the center
"stood down" by 6 p.m. that
night and returned to normal
operations when the immediate
threat appeared to be over.
Turner explained that the worst
problems were the threats of
tornado strikes and high gusts
around the rain squalls. Lorr-
aine Brown, Wyona Barber, Don
Banta, Sam Ball, Melanie Hut-
chins and Amy Ham were
among those manning the cen-
ter. There was some beach ero-
sion across the county.,includ-
ing areas between Eastpoint
and Carrabelle that were re-
paired with additional fill dirt



Saunders "Trial"



By Rene Topping
At last Terry Saunders was able
to speak out in public on the alle-
gations that led to the Carrabelle
City Commissioner's terminating
him from his job as a City Police-
man. He spoke as the last.witness
at the "trial" held at the Franklin
County Senior Center on Septem-
ber 16th.
City Attorney Douglas Gaidry
spoke first saying, "Mr. Klein has
asked me to go ahead and present
our case first. This is really the.
appeal that is called for. It gives
an opportunity to present wit-
nesses and to go over the evi-
dence. There will be opening
statements and then I will put on
our case and enquire of some of
the witnesses. There will be cross-
examination by Mr. Klein and
then we have closing statements."
Between the two attorneys,
Gaidry and Tom Klein, there was
an agreement that they would
both write their closing argu-
ments and they would be deliv-
ered at another meeting in the
future. It was approved by the
commissioners.
Gaidry then said in his opening
statement, We met the last time
based on the documents that you
had before you then, are the same
documents before you again to-
* night with one additional one from
Deputy Marich. Toni, we are go-
ing to show through the testify-
S ing of the witnesses and an affi-
davit that Officer Saunders has
not been truthful about a letter
he wrote. We will try to straighten
the record out with the people
who can do that, and I think it
will show the commission was
justified in the termination.
Tom Klein said in his opening
statement, "What we would like
to do tonight, quite frankly, we
would like to rely on the docu-
ments we have already presented
to you, and would add some docu-
ments we did not have at the time
and I have provided a copy of
those documents to Mr. Gaidry.
Also I would like to put on some
testimony from Mr. Saunders.
And I will anticipate on being able
to question some individuals in
cross-examination that will im-
pact some of the allegations
you have made against Officer
Saunders. It is our position that
we believe the dismissal was too
harsh." (The documents they were
talking about is a list of allega-
tions and was printed out com-


.... 7




(Top photo) Beach erosion Carrabelle and Eastpoint.
was severe in several spots (Below) The wind throws wa-
on US Highway 98, between ter into different locations


between Eastpoint and
Carrabelle.


on Thursday. The maximum danger from the tropical storm. on the beach being assisted by
sustained winds experienced in One search and rescue case in- local citizens. In another, un-
the storm were 35 mph. volving a 64-year-old man on a related incident, the Coast
26-foot sailboat near Pensacola, Guard evacuated an injured
TheUU, S. Coast Guard units re- --; ForiiaaitbgaWednfes-~da yfeven- I crcvman off thie tanker Key-
sponded to several calls in the in and ended successfully the i stone Texas in 29 mph winds
Gulf of Mexico beginning on nelt morning. John Kimbro, and 15-foot seas 280 miles
Wednesday, involving boaters i from Milton, FL was found safe south of New Orleans Thursday
morning.


-Appeal Unfolds

pletely in the Chronicle Issue Sep-
tember 19.)
The first witness was Donnie
Fitzgerald, a mechanic who had
bought the abandoned squad car
for $200. Gaidry asked him if he
had been able to examine a car
that was up for sale. Gaidry asked
Shim about the transmission. "Did
you ever tell Saunders that there
was nothing wrong with the trans-
mission?", Fitzgerald said, "No, I
never did. I am not a transmis-
sion man. He said he checked the
oil and he had to put in transmis-
sion oil. He said that he thought
he would keep it for the engine."
Tom Klein asked Fitzgerald "I
wondered If you had talked to him
about the transmission. How did
you find out that the car was for
sale?" Fitzgerald said that he had
talked with the mayor. It was re-
vealed that the car was advertised
in the Carrabelle paper.
Carl Renfroe was the next wit-
ness. He is employed as a lieu-
tenant and he said that he was
Saunders' supervisor. Gaidry
asked Renfroe if he had a chance
to read the allegations made
against Saunders and he said he
had read them. Gaidry said, "in
respect to the first allegation on
the accident on May 19. Did you
work that accident and how did
it come about ?" The answer was
"No." He (Saunders) said they had
a suspect at the mall." Gaidry:
"Was he using proper procedure
at that point Renfroe answered
"No." Gaidry: "Did you work the
accident in April?" Renfroe said
"No." Gaidry: "Are you aware of a
reprimand put in Saunders' file?"
He said, "Yes." Gaidry: "Yes, I
knew of it. Gaidry: "Did you know
that if he had no other accidents
in the year it would be taken out."
Gaidry said, "Tell me about the
April accident. Did you ever talk
to the FHP officer who worked the
Accidentt" Renfroe said "No."
Gaidry: "Did you ever talk about
it to Saunders?" Renfroe: "No, sir."
"With respect on the Michael
Champion accident either on the
14th or 16th of December, can
you recall which it was ?" Renfroe
said "I believe it was the 13th."
Gaidry showed him an exhibit of
copies of the tickets that were is-
sued. Renfroe said that he had
written them for DUI, reckless
driving and no insurance." Gaidry
asked, Should a police officer let
him get in the car and drive? Did
you know where he had gotten in
the car to drive?" Renfroe re-

Continued on Page 8


Opening Of

Kid's Cafes In
Franklin

County
America's Second Harvest of the
Big Bend in conjunction with
Trinity Episcopal Church and
First Baptist Church of Eastpoint
is opening two new Kids Cafes in
Franklin County. The Kids Cafes
will be housed in Chapman El-
ementary School and Brown El-
ementary School.
As a community we have a spe-
cial responsibility to children in
need of proper nutrition. The pri-
mary goal of the Kids Cafes is to
provide hot meals and snacks,
along with nutrition education to
hungry children. Kids Cafes
across the country achieve this
goal by utilizing existing commu-
nity resources, such as public
schools. In addition to providing
hot meals to hungry kids, Kids
Cafe programs also offer a safe
place, where under the supervi-
sion of a trustworthy staff, a child
can get involved in educational,
recreational and social activities.
"Franklin County is currently ex-
periencing a high percentage rate
of unemployment," said Richard
Key, Principal of Chapman El-
ementary School. "Two nursing
homes have closed, an area pa-
per mill has closed down perma-
nently and the seafood industry
has been in a deep recession. The
local economy is basically surviv-
ing on the tourism industry and
a local state prison work camp...
"The Kids Cafes will bring much
needed assistance to the children
in our schools, we are particularly
grateful to our local churches and
the efforts of America's Second
Harvest of the Big Bend, on be-
half of our students," states Mr.
Key.
Cindy L. Wagner, Executive Direc-
tor of America's Second Harvest
of the Big Bend and President of
the Florida Association of Food
Banks states, "We are so pleased
to reach the children of Franklin
County through our Kids Cafe
partnerships with Trinity Episco-
pal Church and First Baptist
Church."
To obtain additional information
on how to help with the hunger-
relief efforts of America's Second
Harvest of the Big Bend, visit
www.fightinghunger.org.
The mission of America's Second
Harvest of the Big Bend is to col-
lect and distribute food to 501(3)
nonprofit organizations in the Big
Bend area that provide food to


people in need and to educate and
inform the public about the prob-
lem of, as well as the solutions to,
hunger.



EPW Committee

Passes Graham Bill

To Deauthorize

Dredging Of The

Apalachicola River
On September 26th, the Senate
Environment and Public Works
Committee passed by a voice vote
a bill sponsored by Senator Bob
Graham, D-Florida, that would
deauthorize the dredging of the
SApalachicola River and authorize
a study of ecosystem restoration.
"Two administrations have found
this project to be economically
and environmentally indefen-
.sible," said Graham during the
Committee markup. "Deauthor-
izing outdated projects will help
modernize the catalog of projects
done by the Army Corps of Engi-
neers and ensure that federal dol-
lars are available for other appro-
priate activities."
S.2730, the Restore the Apalach-
icola River Ecosystem (RARE) Act,
ends the federal authorization of
navigational dredging on the
Florida section of the Apalachicola
River and directs the Army Corps
of Engineers to complete a plan
for the restoration of the river's
ecosystem.
The Corps is authorized to main-
tain a 9 ft. deep channel for
year-round navigational use of the
Apalachicola River, part of the
Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint
River System. In an attempt to
achieve this, the Corps dredges
the river and uses water releases
to provide navigation windows for
barge traffic. Despite this attempt,
the Corps is not able to maintain
a 9 ft. channel, creating unreli-
able navigation windows for
non-existent industry. This dredg-
ing, along with'water releases,
have scarred the Apalachicola
watershed, threatening the eco-
nomic and ecological well-being of
the area.
The combination of dredging and
low commercial barge traffic make
the Apalachicola River the most
expensive Corps river project in
the south. The Congressional
Budget estimates that the aver-
age cost per ton-mile from 1995-
98 at 14.1 cents, almost 24 times
more than the cost of the Upper
Mississippi River (.597 cents).


Franklin County Enterprise Zone Workshop

County Businessmen Briefed On

Florida Enterprise Zone Program

The incentives can amount to substantial credits
and refunds with proper planning.
Burt Von Hoff,.of the Office of Tourism, Trade and Economic Devel-
opment, and the Executive Office of the Governor, briefed about 20
Apalachicola area businessmen on the Florida Enterprise Zone Pro-
gram on Tuesday, September 24th. The program was established by
the Legislature in 1981, and under current plans, it is scheduled to
be repealed at the end of 2005. Since then, 47 Enterprise Zones have
been designated in Florida, fostering the creation of 2,781 new busi-
nesses, nearly 25,000 new jobs, and awarding over $24 million in
State Tax incentives to encourage new business.
In Franklin County, there are nearly 20 square miles of Enterprise
Zones, essentially including most of the communities of Apalachicola.
Eastpoint and Carrabelle. The program consists of a series of credits
and tax refunds designed to encourage development of new busi-
nesses in areas targeted for economic revitalization. Financial incen-
tives are offered to businesses and property owners to encourage pri-
vate investment and the creation of jobs for the residents of the zone.

State Incentives

ing:
S1. Tax Credit against corporate income tax or sales and use tax.
2. Property Tax Credits.
3. Sales tax refunds for building materials used in rehabilitation of
real property.
4. Sales tax refunds for business equipment purchased for use in an
Enterprise Zone.
5. Sales tax exemption for electrical energy; and
6. Community Contribution Tax Credit.
Between October 2000 and September 30, 2001, nearly $5 million of
state tax incentives were approved, creating 654 new businesses and
6,394 new jobs.

Economic Development Changes
Since July 1, 2001, certain changes were made to the enterprise zone
and other economic development programs. These are the highlights:

SALES TAX
Effective July 1, 2001, the refund of sales taxes paid on building
materials used in the rehabilitation of real property located in an
enterprise zone is available to nonprofit community-based organiza-
tions, as well as to city, county or other governmental agencies if the
materials were paid for from funds of a community development block
grant, State Housing Initiatives Partnership Program, or similar grant
or loan program. Additionally, applications will be required to be sub-
mitted within six months after rehabilitation of the property is deemed
to be substantially completed, or within 90 days after the rehabili-
tated property is first subject to assessment. (Section 212.08(5)(g),
Florida Statutes).

BUSINESS PROPERTY USED
IN AN ENTERPRISE ZONE
Applications for refunds of sales tax on business property purchased
prior to July 1, 2001, must be filed within six months after the busi-
ness property is purchased. The $5,000 per unit limitation does not
apply to business property purchased prior to July 1, 2001.
Applications for refunds of sales tax on business property purchased
on or after July 1, 2001, for use in an enterprise zone must be filed
within six months of when sales tax is due on eligible purchases.
- Items eligible for the refund must have a sales price of at least $5.000
per unit and must meet the other criteria under the "business prop-
erty" definition, The term "unit" refers to a single item of tangible
personal property...If two or more items are sold to the same pur-
chaser at the same time and each of the items is Interconnected and
necessary to make the others) functional and integrated, such items
are a single unit for purposes of the $5,000 limitation when sup-
ported by charge tickets, sales slips, invoices, or other tangible evi-
dence of a single sale. (Section 212.08(5)(h), F.S.) The following are
examples of how two or more items sold to a purchaser at the same
time are treated for the $5,000 per unit limitation:
1. A computer, monitor, keyboard, speakers, printer, and mouse sold
to a customer at the same time on one invoice comprise a unit for
purposes of the $5,000 limitation. The "unit," the computer, is a
single item comprised of different parts sold to the customer at the
same time on one invoice.
2. Furniture sold in furniture suites or sets to a customer, where the
furniture suites or sets are identified on one invoice, is a unit for
purposes of the $5,000 limitation. When furniture is sold by the
piece, each piece is a unit for purposes of the $5,000 limitation.

COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION TAX CREDIT
Effective July 1, 2001, the community contribution tax credit may be
claimed by persons registered with the Department under Section
212.18, F.S., to collect or remit sales or use-tax. The credit shall be
computed on 50 percent of the person's approved annual community
contribution. The credit is limited to a maximum of $200,000 per
donor per year and is to be claimed as a refund against sales tax
remitted in the 12 months prior to the refund application date. If the
credit amount exceeds the sales tax remitted in the previous 12
months, the balance may be claimed as a refund against sales tax
remitted in each of the three years subsequent to the refund applica-
tion date.
Any person seeking to participate in this program must submit an
"application for tax credit to the Office of Tourism, Trade, and Eco-
nomic Development (OTrED) which sets forth the name of the spon-
sor, a description of the project, and the type, value, and purpose of
the contribution. Any person who has received notification from
OTTED that a tax credit has been approved must apply to the De-
partment of Revenue to receive the refund. A person may submit only
one application for refund to the Department within any 12-month
period. A person who is eligible to receive the credit as a refund against
sales and use tax must claim future credits against that tax for the
duration of the program. (Section 212.08(5)(q), F.S.)

ENTERPRISE ZONE JOBS CREDIT
Effective January 1, 2002, the enterprise zone jobs credit against
sales tax no longer applies to part-time jobs. Effective on that date.
the enterprise zone jobs credit against sales tax is available to busi-
nesses which have increased the number of full-time jobs from the
average of the previous 12 months, or added at least five new full-time
jobs between July 1, 2000, and December 31, 2001. The credit is also
available for jobs filled by leased employees who meet specific crite-
ria. The credit is computed as 20 percent of the actual monthly wages
paid for each new job created, or 30 percent of the monthly wages
paid if the business is located in a rural enterprise zone. If at least 20
percent of the full-time permanent employees of the business are
residents of an enterprise zone, the credit is 30 percent of the actual
monthly wages paid, or 45 percent of the actual monthly wages paid
if the business is located in a rural enterprise zone. (Section 212.096.
F.S.)


If the new employee is a Welfare Transition Program participant. the
credit is 40 percent of the monthly wages paid if the hourly rate is $4
above the hourly federal minimum wage rate; 41 percent if the hourly
rate is $5 above the hourly federal minimum wage rate; 42 percent if
the hourly rate is $6 above the hourly federal minimum wage rate; 43
percent if the hourly rate is $7 above the hourly federal minimum
wage rate; and 44 percent if the hourly rate is $8 above the hourly
federal minimum wage rate.
The phrase "new job has been created" means that the total number
of full-time jobs has increased in an enterprise zone from the average
of the previous 12 months, as demonstrated to the Department by a
business located in the enterprise zone. (Section 212.096(1)(e). F.S.)
For purposes of the enterprise zone jobs credit against sales tax, the
credit shall be allowed for up to 24 consecutive months, beginning
with the first tax return due after approval by the Department.
The Enterprise Zone Jobs Credit against sales tax may be claimed by
businesses in rural enterprise zones that hire employees who live
Continued on Page 10


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A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs

October 1, 2002
Present: Chairperson Eddie
Creamer; Commissioner
Clarence Williams;
Commissioner Jimmy
Mosconis; Commissioner
Cheryl Saunders and
Commissioner Bevin Putnal

Clerk of Court
Before the report of department heads.
Kendall Wade announced, in the fu-
ture, that all departments must en-
sure that their budgets and grants are
closely monitored because "...we are
going to approve year-end payment of
bills on the second meeting at the end
of September of each year. instead of
waiting for the last day." He said he
would send out a memo to.all dept.
heads informing them of this change.
in the future.

Superintendent of Public
Works
Herbert Chipman said "We've got a lot
of roads in bad shape." He pointed out
that the roads on St. George Island
are in bad repair. He was going to
await passage of the next storm be-
fore making repairs. Cheryl Saunders
made a motion to have the superin-
tendent of public works remove the
dock in front of the KOA. and the
Board approved.

Solid Waste Director
Van Johnson reported on two new
hires in his department.

Judge Russell, County
Judge
Judge Russell appeared before the
commissioners to request:pffice and
courtroom space in the new annex.
The new circuit judge expects to uti-
lize the large courtroom (in the court-
house) for her work. Judge Russell
plans to utilize the smaller hearing
room in the new annex but as the dis-
cussion unfolded, the'comnmissioners
and others realized that he would also
need office space adjacent to that
hearing room, as well as'the larger
courtroom currently utilized as a
meeting room for the Frariklin County
commission. Kendall Wadejteminded
the commissioners :hat n an v circuit
court, the chief judge is inpcharge of
all of your courthouses. Thip discus-
sion extended to available space for
others including Bill Mahai, who is
likely to return to the coiu thouse for
his office. Jimmy Mosconis sYdted that
there was never any discussion that
the judge's office would be in the new


annex. Bevin Putnal reminded others
that "...We wouldn't even have this
building if the judges had not provided
the money for this facility..." Some
comments were raised about security
matters but Judge Russell indicated
that as county judge. this was not a
matter of concern to him. Most
breaches of security statewide have
involved family disputes when parties
might have threatened violence dur-
ing hearings. "...We don't have the risk
that the circuit judge has with domes-
tic cases...." Judge Russell concluded.
The Board approved the motion for
Judge Russell to move his offices into
the Court Annex. and to use the hear-
ing room for his jurisdiction.
Director of Administrative
Services
Mr. Pierce suggested that the Board
investigate whether the county has
ever granted the City of Carrabelle a
sewer franchise along the two-river
road. "River Road is county property
and the county has extended a fran-
chise on the east end. Lake Morality
Road. but I don't know if that has been
done on the west side." Mr. Pierce said.
He concluded that somebody needs to
approach the county about a fran-
chise before the county approves the
running of sewer lines on River Road.
A resident of River Road. Mr. T Baker.
raised the question about procedure.
"...Will we, the citizens of River Road,
be involved, informed, questioned....
what is the legal procedure?" Mr.
Pierce said there would be a public
hearing on whether to adopt the fran-
chise.
Mr. Pierce recommended that the
Board approve a resolution to the
Franklin County Legislative Delega-
tion requesting funding for the con-
struction of the Carrabelle prison this
upcoming legislative session. The
Board approved the resolution.
Frank Venable requested the Board to
direct County Attorney Al Shuler to
advise Mr. Bob Allen that his tenant
has erected posts too close to Ven-
able's property line. The tenant was,
denied a variance to erect a pole barn/
shrimp peddler shed near the corner
of U. S. 98 and South Bayshore Drive
in Eastpoint. The county had issued
a stop-work order earlier. Jimmy
Mosconis moved to have a letter writ-
ten to Mr. Bob Allen instructing'him
to move the posts and building within
30 days, or the county would take
appropriate action.

Porter Street Canal
Mr. Nick Yonclas addressed the Board
with additional information about his
client's use of the Porter .Street Ca-
nal. The client is Ron Bloodworth.
Recent history of this issue involved
the closing of the canal for boat-ramp
usage. His appearance now was to
present the new information, and to
request reopening of the boat ramp.
"...Basically, the Porter Street and the
canal involved the old boat ramp, that
you closed, is part of a platted
sub-division in Unit 5 over on St.
George Island. The original plat was
filed in 1960 by the then developers
and owners of St. George Island. They
dedicated the street and the canal. for


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public use. That adds two significant
results. One is, insofar as the resi-
dents in there are concerned, when
they bought pursuant to a recorded
plat, they got certain rights to use the
streets and canals designated there.
If this plat has been approved... then
it has become subject to the para-
mount right of the county to reason-
ably regulate those streets and that
canal...."
Yonclas further advised that. "If the
county has abandoned the street, by
their actions (by putting up a barrier).
and if so, the plat has reverter lan-
guage sending the canal ... back to
the original developer. The original
developer's rights have been suc-
ceeded to by an entity owned and con-
trolled by Gene Brown. Gene Brown
has entered into a lease with Ron
Bloodworth, allowing him to use the
canal and a small strip of land be-
tween the street and the canal. ... The
central issue is what is the intent...
...and the proof of the pudding is in
the eating, the proof is that the canal
has been used by the public as a boat
ramp for some 30 years..." Mr.'Yonclas
read a letter from William Dodd, ad-
vocating that the Porter Street Public
Water Access be reopened.
Bevin Putnal made a motion asking
that the County Planner. Mr. Alan
Pierce, the County Attorney Al Shuler
and Mr. Yonclas meet outside of the-
commission meeting and "work out a
solution" to this problem. Cheryl
Saunders pointed out that the com-
mission closed the canal on the rec-
ommendation of Mr. Shuler. Mr.
Shuler remarked that the Board acted
properly in this matter, citing earlier
complaints concerning safety. Shuler
reminded the commission that an
abandonment would require a public
hearing. The Board eventually ap-
proved Mr. Putnal's motion.
The Board approved an amendment
to purchase 88 acres in the Carrabelle
area in a letter to DEP/FRDAP.
The Board accepted the annual SHIP
Report authored by Michael Moran.
In nine projects, $101,168 was ex-
pended during the period 2001-2002
leaving $222,232 unencumbered.
Most of the money comes from the
state's annual distribution and $8,400
from program income. The annual rev-
enue deposited into' the Local Afford-
able Housing Trust Fund is $358,400.
Moran told the commissioners that
there appeared to be more confidence
in the program now. Mr. Pierce noted
that contractors were paid more fre-
quently, and projects moved more
expeditiously through the process.
Mr. Pierce raised a question about
keeping the airport building open,
given some problems with sewage and
other needed repairs and continuing
electric bills. Discussion followed on
the status of emergency management
equipment storage and Bill Mahan's
office. Cheryl Saunders commented
that the Extension Director's pro-
grams have expanded in recent
months, and there remains a need for
more storage space. A Red Cross rep-
resentative reaffirmed the need for
additional space for their supplies.
Kendall Wade suggested that the bot-
tom floor of the old jail be renovated


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for additional office space. He sug-
gested that the Board look into that
possibility.
Jimmy Mosconis moved the Board to
write the St. Joe Companyannd Peter
Rummel in particular asking them to
develop a model plan for low-cost
housing. The Board approved the
motion. This need was identified in the
Apalachee Regional Planning guide
earlier this summer as a continuing
problem in most of the Apalachee
counties. The Chronicle published the
plan in two parts during September.

County Clerk
Mr. Wade reminded the commission-
ers about a $3000 payment to Emer-
gystat each month, to be added to the
current $7500 monthly payment. The
Board approved. The clerk also sought
and received two resolutions to accept
unanticipated revenues into the Gen-
eral Fund, amounting to about
$53,500.

County Attorney
Mr. Shuler told the Board of a judicial
decision affecting Washington County
that dissolved a decision requiring
single-member districts, and allowing
the county to run candidates at large.
This report brought forward some dis-
cussion on the Franklin County's plan
to redistrict in the next calendar year
but the configuration of single-
member districts would have to re-
main.
During Mr. Shuler's report, Represen-
tative Will Kendrick introduced Mr.
Alan Bense, representative for a por-
tion of Franklin County to the state
legislature. Bense represents the
western portion of Franklin from the
Gulf County line through the city of
Apalachicola, as recently redrawn by
the legislature.
In response to a question from com-
mission Cheryl Saunders, Mr. Shuler
said he had not found any evidence
that the Sumatra Cemetery had been
conveyed to Franklin County or other
entity. He concluded that no such con-
veyance exists. However, the Liberty
County Clerk would have a report on
Sthe matter at the next meeting.


Carrabelle City

Commission

Meets
By Rene Topping
The Carrabelle City Commission met
on September 28 instead of their regu-
lar October 3 meeting.
Under the commissioner's reports
Raymond Williams reported that the
ARPC approved a grant for land ac-
quisition of 54 acres for a sports and
recreational area and sent it onto
DCA.
The commission sat as a Board of
Adjustment and approved a request
from Marian and June Fadden to con-
-struct an 8 x 16 feet porch with a 4 x
8 feet ramp. They needed the variance,
of 8 feet within in the 25-foot front
setback. Motion was made by Com-
. missioner Phillip Rankin seconded by
Raymond Williams.


The commissioners also approved a
private dock 6 feet x 70 feet to be built
on Lot 2 Riverside Heights for Jessie
and Mayme Millender.
The first item on the agenda was dis-
cussion and possible action to hire a
new employee for Roads and Parks.
The commissioners decided that the
person they needed should be a me-
chanic who could maintain the city
vehicles. Advertisement will go into a
newspaper with a hourly rate of $11
as pay.
Item 2. Jim Lycett reported elsewhere
in this issue.
Item 3. Dan Keck of Baskerville and
Donovan Inc (BDI) who spoke on rais-
ing the tap fees and water rates. Keck
suggested that the city raise the tap
fees on the sewer from $750 to $4.000
immediately. Keck said with the short-
fall in the budget and the fact that the
city will have to spend $85,000 to re-
pair the water system. The water tank
alone is going to cost $35,000. The
city will need further maintenance on
both water and sewer. Keck said that
a raise in the rates on water and sewer
will be used for maintenance and capi-
tal outlay.
The commissioners felt that was too
much of a hike in the fees and three
of the Commissioners Frank Mathes,
Williams and Mayor Curly Messer
voted for $2,500. The tap fee proposal
was voted down by Commissioner
Phillip Rankin and Commissioner Ed-
ward (Ed) Saunders. Rankin said it
would not affect the people now-but
their children and grandchildren will
be paying for it down the road.
There will be an amnesty period for
those people who are ready to buy
their taps. The amnesty period will
start on October 1st and will end on
February 28 in 2003 for both east of
the river and west of the river. The
amnesty is only for those who can
connect to a present sewer line.
The commissioners voted the same 2
- 4 on a 10 percent raise in the water
rates soon. This will be accompanied
by 10 percent of the sewer usage. The
raise was called for by Commissioner
Williams who said "At the final bud-
get I had to balance the budget by
using potential tap fees." He admit-
ted it was improper but he said he
believes that would easily raise suffi-
cient funds to balance the budget.
Keck said it will raise the average
customer's bill by $2.21 on the water
and $ 1.86 for sewer.
Item 4. Discussion and action con-
cerning the consolidation with Lanark
Village Sewer and Water District.
There Was a draft of a resolution but
there was no one there from the
Lanark Village Board.
Item 5. The commissioners approved
a request to look into the claim that
is Gulf Road, Spain and Casey Drives
are private roads. The city had
planned to have sewer lines at the Old
Carrabelle Beach and they need to
know what they should do.
Under New Business
Item 1. The commissioners approved
donating $100 to the Timber Island
Yacht Club for their 10th Annual
Christmas Parade of Boats.
Item 2. City Clerk asked $30.12 for,
- money to buy Christmas decoratipp, s.


Nineteenth

Annual Fall

Open House

Tours

St. Vincent National Wildlife Ref-
uge will conduct the nineteenth
Annual Fall Open House Tours
during the third week of October.
Participants will have the oppor-
tunity to become better ac-
quainted with their refuge and its
varied wildlife and wildlife habi-
tats. The Open House is part of
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
"National Wildlife Refuge Week",
October 13-19, 2002.
One tour will be conducted daily
October 14,15, and 16 (Monday
through Wednesday). The tours
are scheduled to leave the
Refuge's Indian Pass boat dock at
8:00 a.m. E.D.S.T. and will return
at approximately 1:00 p.m. E.D.S.T.
Transportation across Indian
Pass will be provided for partici-
pants of the Open House Tours.
Those wishing to participate must
make reservations by phone at
850/653/8808 beginning on Sep-
tember 30. Reservations will be
limited to four individuals per
group.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
former Director Mollie Beattie said
the third week in October will be
observed annually as NATIONAL
WILDLIFE REFUGE WEEK, lead-
ing up to the 100th anniversary
in 2003. "By that time," Beattie
said, "We hope to make all Ameri-
cans aware of the National Wild-
life Refuge System as places to
enjoy wildlife, to hunt, to fish, to
watch, and to learn about our
natural heritage."
In addition to the Open House
Tours, the Refuge will be conduct-,
ing a birding tour, October 10-11,
2002, as part of the Florida Pan-
handle Birding and Wildflower
Festival. For more information
on the festival you can visit
www.birdfestival.org or e-mail
info@birdfestival.org,
As a reminder, the Refuge is open
to the public year-round during
daylight hours except during hunt
periods arid prescribed burns
and/or wildfires. Special permits
or prior notice are riot required to
Visit. Transportation to the Ref-
uge is, the responsibility of the
visitor when not in conjunction
with a.especific refuge activity.
"Our rhission is working with oth-
ers to conserve, protect, and en-
hance fish, wildlife, and plants
and their habitats for the continu-
ing benefit of the American
,peqple.'-, ..
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' The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


4 October 2002 Page 3


EDITORIAL AND COMMENTARY


Fire Fighters Say-It's Up To

The Residents Now

By Rene Topping
Franklin County Fire Fighters are asking you to listen to a reason-
able plea. It comes from some very common sense, responsible men
and women who-fill out the ranks of our first line of defense when it
comes to fires and all other emergencies.
They would ask you to call the commissioner in your district and tell
him or her that you will get behind the fire fighters and tell them that
you will proudly add to the $42.00 you will pay for your fire tax an-
other $28.
They also know because they too, pay fire insurance on their con-
tinuing service will take a slice off the top of whatever insurance you
pay on your home. For most of us it will be more than the $70 we
paid. Where in any other way can you spend your money and get
.such a bargain.
Here are some things the fire chiefs of our fire departments are
saying:
1. The commissioners are ultimately in charge of the county building
and development.
2. Franklin County has allowed the buildings to be built higher and
higher outreaching the capabilities of the fire departments.
3. These commissioners have been advised by their fire departments
that fire suppression and rescue and at this point rescue could be
impossible with their equipment.
4. Earlier this year the fire departments proposed a fee of $70 with
which the departments could purchase the needed equipment to pre-
vent needless death in our county.
5. The Franklin County Commission adopted a yearly fee of $42 per
person and that does not enable the fire department to buy the needed
equipment.
6. The Franklin County Commissiori'has jeopardized every Franklin
County citizen's lives under the guise that the MSBU tee of $70 is too
much, Is it too much when in fact each household's $70 will be re-
turned in the $300 saved on their home insurance?
7. The Franklin County Commission says that we have too many
poor people who cannot pay the fee of $70 but there are ways that the
$70 can be paid by placing a lien on the house. No widow lady, no
single mother with children or anybody will be turned out or lose his
or her homes as these liens are collected, only when the house is
sold.
8. The'decision is up to the people. The tragedy is that people may die
and homes could be destroyed.
The fire fighters are asking all residents to call their district commis-
sioner and ask them to get a little common sense into decisions that
affect so many people and let the fire fighters go back to what is their
passion, fighting fires and saving lives.

The John Gorrie Story

'The Iceman" Premieres On The

Dixie Stage October 25 And 26

First Performance of Locally Authored Play About
Apalachicola's "Favorite Son"
As the 200th Anniversary of the arrival of John Gorrie'to the United
States approaches, a play-based on his:life has been' completely 'and
.cast for production at the Dixie Theatre for Friday and Saturday,-1 '
October 25 and 26, 2002, Apalachicola. The production is written
and directed by Thomas Campbell with the Panhandle Players.
John Gorrie is the inventor of a refrigeration unit that made ice and
his patented prototype, circa 1851, became the forerunner of air con-
ditioning in the modern era, incorporating theoretical constructs that
led to the development ofair conditioning. The play is based in part
on historical fact insofar as these can be determined, based on the
writings of the patent itself, and many observers and authors who
have researched the story, including the writings of Dr. Gorrie him-
self.
Playing the lead character, Dr. Gorrie, is Barrie Watson. Ed Tiley re-
turns to the stage in this production as Thomas Orman. Loismay
Provenzano plays Sarah Gorrie, and Thomas Provenzano plays John
Myrick Gorrie.
The cast also includes the following:

"THE ICE MAN"
Characters in order of appearance:
Miss Winifred Kimball .................................. Delores Roux
Dr. John Gorrie .................. ............... Barrie Watson
William, A Young Sailor ................................ Royce Rolstad, III
Thomas Orman, a northern-banker................................. Ed Tiley
Dr. Alvan Wentworth Chapman .......................... Wesley Chesnut
Mrs. Caroline Myrick Gorrie ........................................ Gina Vicari
Monsieur Rousard, French Counsel.............................. Hans Barg
Savannah Hancock....................................... Carolyn McCullaugh
N than ...................... ......................... ...................... A lan Pierce
Sarah Gorrie ................................ ............ Loismay Provenzano
John Myrick Gorrie ....................................... Thomas Provenzano
Technical Crew:
Director and Script......................................... Tom-Campbell
Assistant Director........... Janet Christensen and Judith Henderson
Stage M anager................................ ...................... Blake Sasnett
Assistant Stage Manager ......................................... Laura Moody
Costumes ............................Judith Henderson and Barbara Siprell
Set Decor and Props......................... Janet' Christensen
Technical Director ...................... .................... Randy Thompson
M usic .......................................................... ............ Tom Adam s
Fog, Brass Bell, and other technical effects.................. Hardy Bush
Sound .................................. Janet Christensen and Hardy Bush


WAKULLA PORTABLE BUILDINGS
3771 Crawfordville Highway, 2 Miles South of Traffic Light, Crawfordville, FL
(850) .926-8215 or (850) 926-2664


Dr. John Gorrie

Publisher's Note: Winifred Kimball lived in Apalachicola for most
of her life. She was a free-lance writer and never married. Her
home, and that of her parents, was a three-story edifice where
Lanier's Pharmacy now stands. In the early 1920s, she wrote a
screenplay later produced as a silent motion picture entitled "Bro-
ken Chain," which had a gala premiere in Apalachicola. Earlier.
Miss Kimball also wrote an often cited, but rarely seen manu-
script about John Gorrie. The Chronicle unearthed her work in
the State Historical Archives in Tallahassee and it has become
the basis for her narrator character in the Tom Campbell play
"The Iceman" scheduled for the Dixie Theater at the end of Octo-
ber. The internal evidence in her manuscript suggests she wrote
the long piece sometime after 1911 but most likely before her
movie script. Deloros Roux, who as a child, performed errands
for Miss Kimball, plays Miss Kimball inthe Dixie-Panhandle Play-
ers production. The timing of the theatrical production is an op-
portune time to publish the Kimball manuscript locally for the
first time, although some historical pieces about John Gorrie con-
tain references to her work, especially the materials put into the
Congressional Record in 1933 by Senator and Congressman
Claude Pepper. Miss Kimball died in the 1950s.


The Iceman-..


By Miss Winifred Kimball
No matter what others may think, I am of the steadfast belief that the
world does not know enough about John Gorrie. For if the truth were
known the manufacture of ice and the introduction of artificial refrig-
eration would be recognized as the most vital service offered by sci-
ence to modern civilization. We of the South could easier get along
without gas 'or electricity than without them; and John Gorrie is the
inventor of the first machine that manufactured ice.
The world and science accept this fact and Dr. Gorrie's statue stands
in the Florida sector of the Hall of Fame at Washington; but even this
statue is impersonal and it is most easy to forget names. There must
be some touch of personality, some hint of living man about his name
before the users of ice will really care what American Inventor threw
ice on the southern market in the good old summertime.
It is not strange that such a benefactor could be forgotten. A century
and a quarter have passed since the birth of John Gorrie and the first
ice was manufactured fifty years before the production of the article
became a general and commercial success. Men forget a lot in five
decades. A world devastating war'surged over the United States for
four years. Dr. Gorrie was dead, his son killed in the Civil War, and of
his fellow citizens many friends were dead and those who remained
were swamped in the tidal wave of trouble that surged over their
state in the wake of Appottomatox.


The picture of this great American today rests upon a daguarreo-type
or two, and the personal recollection of his distinguished contempo-
raries. All of his associates are long dead, but there are half a score
living who have heard the children ofGorrie's day speak of their father's
friends. I am one of these. I listened to the romance of his life story. I
heard it from the lips of Dr. Chapman, who as a botanist had an
international renown. He was John Gorrie's best friend. Then from
Judge George Raney's graphic recollections of their family physician.
my store of knowledge has been enhanced and through the data the
Hon. George Whiteside collected when the monument to this Ameri-
can was built, my facts have been corroborated.
But the introduction of artificial ice, that is the human story about it.
came straight from Dr. Chapman's lips; and I am going to
tell it first. For after all is said, John Gorrie's life is epitomized in his
invention even as the Declaration of Independence contains the body
and soul of Alexander Hamilton.
"John Gorrie came to me one day in the last of June 1850, and he
seemed unduly excited. I was in my drug store, and he beckoned me
behind the prescription counter." Here Dr. Chapman would use to sip
the mint julep my mother had mixed for him, and he would glance
out over our flower garden, which now filled the city square, where
once the antebellum hostelry, the "Mansion House" had stood.
"Our offices were on either side of this square," he would go on.
"Gorie's home and laboratories on the uptown side, my store down-
town. Naturally, I had stopped in often and talked with my friend
about his inventions. Now, as I followed him behind the counter. I
asked, "Well, have you found a way to freeze all your patients?" "Not
exactly," he answered with a glimmering of that infrequent smile.
while he paused. "I have made ice." This he said quietly.
"The hell you have!" I exclaimed.
"No," he replied. "This has nothing to do with Hell. On the contrary, if ,
I succeed I'll lower the temperature of even that torrid climate."
"May I see your machine?" Dr. Chapman asked. He ignored Gorrie's
pleasantry.
"Of course you may!" The other answered. "But I think we had best
keep this matter between ourselves, until I can see how my engine
works."
"Naturally, I agreed. And so it came about that I was the only man in
Apalachicola who knew what Gorrie had accomplished until the night
of Consul Rousard's Bastille dinner."
I must interrupt Dr. Chapman's story here to state that Monsieur
Rousard was the French Consul for the Port of Apalachicola. He was
also a cotton broker and a popular social leader. He was a close friend
of Dr. Gorrie, and when he was lamenting the fact that there would
be no ice for his patriotic dinner, Chapman' suggested that Dr. Gorrie
should make ice for that occasion.
The Frenchman jumped at Dr. Chapman's suggestion. "Certainment!"
he ejaculated; then with sparkling eye. "Let me introduce the inven-
tor at my Bastille dinner?" Glancing from one physician to the other,
"if you gentlemen will so honor my country and me, I will make it an
occasion?"
And Gorrie happy in his achievement accepted Rousard's suggestion.
Together with Rousard and Chapman he repaired to his laboratories,
where in the presence of these two friends, Gorrie froze ice. The ma-
chine worked. A cube of ice about ten inches long and eight inches
high was produced. No others in the city knew of the inventor's suc-
cess. With all the dramatic flare of the French, Monsieur Rousard
threw himself into the preparation for that dinner. He worked upon
the fact that the arrival of the iceboat from Portland was long over
due, and that if the vessel did not arrive, the local icehouses would
soon be empty. He bet a dollar that there would be no ice in town by
Bastille Day. This started the drama. There was a sporting chance
that the boat, long over due, might any hour be sighted; and this
uncertainty was enough for the heterogeneous population of this small
city. With odds about two to one the betting was lively and soon most
of Rousard's invited guests were holding wagers for or against their
host's ability td srve ice.
That was the start of the most phenomenal betting that the city had
everseen. The interest auginbnted, the betting increased and the odds
were against Rousard; for the ice ship failed to arrive and the mer-
chants were refused ice at the icehouses. The French Consul made a
lot of talk, but he covered all bets and he insisted that he would serve
iced wines at his dinner on July 14th, so the excitement grew, the
odds were increased and the first week of July lapsed.
Meantime, Gorrie and Chapman were keeping that queer little ice
machine busy. The original model of this machine is in the Southern
Institute and the records of the patent are on file in the United States
Patent Office under serial number 8080.
History has catalogued and numbered the invention; but the picture
of those men all crowded in the confines of Gorrie's primitive labora-
tory and all intent upon the joke that they meant to put over cannot
be numbered. It can only be pictured and memory must be the artist.
Thus started the interest in that historical Bastille Day dinner. Be-
fore the guests arrived the fact had already been whispered about
that no ice was procurable. Those who had backed their host made
haste to cover their wagers. There was a great deal of badinage before
the guests proceeded to the dining room.
The Mansion House was the second largest hotel in Florida. So the
furnishings of that dining room were fashionable, and the hall itself
was spacious. It glittered with lighted tapers and many prism chan-


YV 'POST OFFICE BOX 590
rc o EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
Phone: 850-927-2186
S850-385-4003 (TALLAHASSEE)
SiO- Facsimile 850-385-0830
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 11, No. 20


October 4, 2002


Publisher .............. Tom W. Hoffer
Contributors Tom Campbell
............ Sue Cronkite
............ Barbara lRevell
............ Rene Topping
............ Jimmy Elliott

Sales ................. ....................... Diane Beauvais Dyal
........ Tom W. Hoffer

Advertising Design
and Production Artist............................... Diane Beauvais Dyal
Production Associates Andy Dyal
........ Michael Fallon
Director of Circulation Andy Dyal
Proofreader. Michael Fallon
Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein............. Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis ................................... Apalachicola
Rene Topping ......... Carrabelle
David Butler ........................... .......... Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung .................... Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins................. Eastpoint
George Thompson .................................. Eastpoint
Pat Morrison ........... St. George Island
Dominic and Vilma Baragona ................St. George Island

Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue would
cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the Chronicle
for price quotes if you seek several different or similar
issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2002
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


-I









Page 4 4 October 2002


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chraniri.


- -------.. '..'Rsk~J1II~..j~


The Iceman from Page 3

deliers. Doctor Gorrie was seated at his host's right hand and Dr.
Chapman on the other side. As honored guest. Dr. Gorrie rose to
answer the first toast.
What did the Iceman look like? He was of medium height, slender.
with dark complexion, and deep brown eyes. His natural expression
was serious; but when aroused all the fiery pride of his Spanish an-
cestors blazed in his eyes. He ever irked opposition.
On the July evening he was happy. This was the greatest moment of
his life. His eyes sparkled, and his lips curved as he gave the toast:


\-m mI "\ . '- 4 :* **
The Gorrie ice-making apparatus housed in The Gorrie -
Museum, Apalachicola.

"To our Sister Republic! My friends we drink to France in warm red
wines!" And so they drank to France. Then Dr. Chapman arose. He
said, "My friends we will, now toast our own country, and an Ameri-
can has produced the ice which will cool the champagne."
There was a pause. Nobody saw any ice, and so everyone looked at
his neighbor. Then one Yankee cotton broker cried; "You lose Rousard!"
Monsieur Rousard sprang to his feet. 'This is the day when France
began giving her people what they want," he cried. "So if my guests
want ice, they must have it even if to feed them we work a miracle."
Here he paused with Frenchman's appreciation of a dramatic mo-
ment. "Only", and he laid his hand lightly on John Gorrie's shoulder.
"Only", he repeated, "this time it is an American who has worked our
miracle." And these words brought the climax; forjust here four wait-
ers entered, each carrying a silver salver and upon each salver there
rested a cube of ice.
"I shall never forget how my friends looked upon this occasion," said
Dr. Chapman. "Gorrie never so.triumphantly handsome again. He
was always something of a dandy and he had dressed for this ap-
pearance.,,
"What did he wear?" I asked.
"Oh, you women", chuckled my, old friend, as he drew gently on his
briarwood pipe. Then he added, "Gorrie wore velvet trousers, and an
embroidered waistcoat, buckled shoes and lace-cuffs. His coat came
from Paris, and fitted him like a glove."'
"Men dressed in those days," I observed.,
"Yes, we did," asserted the great botanist; who if stories are true was
something of a dandy himself. "But Gorrie was every inch a man, and


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on that evening he outshone all of us, even our French host. Most
graciously he received our congratulations. He was true to his heri-
tage. He was a king among men, as ha had every right to be.
But his kingly heritage is another story, and I must finish with the
account of Gorrie's great day, when the inventor first offered manu-
factured ice to the public.
It was indeed a triumphant occasion. Gorrie's manufactured ice tinkled
in glasses brimming with sparkling champagne. Everyone drank again
to the French Republic, and then once again to the health of John
Gorrie, Inventor.
Afterwards, Dr. Chapman continued his story. "We all went over to
Gorrie's shop, where Rousard helped Gorrie explain the intricacies of
the machine. At the hotel a lot of money changed hands. We were all
quite sure that a new industry had started.
"That was forty-five years ago. The old scientist shook his head. "Gorrie
has been dead a long time, and behold the industry is just on its
feet."
It is appropriate here to note that.the Frenchman Rousard returned
to France inside the next two years. There he associated himself with
a scientist named Garre, who brought forward an ice machine of his
own. Whether this French scientist profited by his talks with the erst-
while Consul Rousard no one can say. But, fortunately for America.
Dr. Gorrie took out his letters patent on May 6th, 1851, which gives
his invention the priority. In'other words, Gorrie manufactured ice
ten years before Monsieur Garre of France.
With ice manufactured, a successful process, it worked out where by
his stifling hospital wards could be cooled. It would seem as is pros-
perity and renown were at hand; but instead, sorrow, humiliation
and bitter disaster filled Gorrie's cup during the next three years. He
raised all the money that he could, pledging every piece of property
that he possessed. Then carrying this collateral, he went to New Or-
leans to secure the rest of the capital- for building a large ice ma-
chine. He sold a half interest in his project to a Massachusetts finan-
cier, whereby all the money that he required was pledged. He wrote
home that he was very happy and then the Boston partner died. This
death brought about the collapse of Gorrie's whole fortune. He re-
turned to Apalachicola a broken man; so fighting with all his subcon-
scious soul against spiritual defeat, his physical collapse came upon
him.
He brooded most over the attitude of the Northern newspapers. The
ridicule in some of them cut him to the quick; for these jibes were
often most stinging. One New York daily carried an editorial which
commenced; "There is a crank called Dr. John Gorrie down in
Apalachicola, Florida who claims that he can make ice as good as
-God Almighty."
With the public ridiculing him, and debts accruing everywhere, he
felt that even his own neighbors were beginning to look at him as a
crazy crank. He died.
Men of his heritage either conquer or die. There is no middle course
for the Sons of the Mighty and that brings me to the story of the
romance and mystery of Gorrie's parentage. These facts and this story
were given me by my mother, who had them from Dr. Chapman's
lips.
Both men were physicians in Apalachicola, long before the Internecine
War was more than a liability. Both were scientists of note. Dr.
Chapman was in 1890 the greatest botanist in the South, ranking
with Dr. Asa Grey, and his textbooks were authority on the Southern
flora. Successful as he was, he never forgot. Now Gorrie died six years
before the guns were fired at Charleston. All the world forgot but
Chapman lived on and remembered.
Age made him more fond, so this is the story that Gorrie told Chapman
and which after forty years was revealed. Sometime in October of the
year 1803 there landed in the seaport of Charleston a small party of
visitors. The part came from the island of St. Nevis, and consisted of
a Scottish officer, who was called Captain Gorrie, a very beautiful
Spanish lady, and her one-year-old son.
Of course, there was a nurse in attendance. The officer settled the
party in the best hotel, deposited money with .the banks for the use
of the Spanish Senora, and returned to St. Nevis. Our Iceman came
from the West Indies, from St. Nevis; from whehce half a century
before' a greater American had come. As in the case of Alexander
Hamilton, secrecy and peril surrounded the childhood of this second
Spanish-American.
The Scottish soldier in the Spanish uniform never returned to America.
But his charges were sumptuously provided for and lived with all the
,surroundings of people of quality.


Gorrie was not proud of the mystery surrounding his birth. In fact,
he always stated that he was from Charleston. Said Dr. Chapman,
"but he once told me his mother's story, or what he knew of it. He
thought, and I agreed with him, that a great love and royal father
were his sires."
Anyway, according to his story Madame with a duenna, fled from
Spain under care of this Captain Gorrie who was a middle aged of-
ficer in the Spanish army. They arrived on the island of St. Nevis, and
there her child was born. There she remained until some changes in
the government of the Island sent them scurrying to the United States.
On the day of their arrival, John Gorrie was one year old, and that
was his birthday, at least he claimed it as such.
For a number of years, mother and son lived quietly in Charleston.
Each month remittance arrived and their household lacked nothing.
Gorrie was educated in the best private schools of South Carolina.
The Scotch-Spanish Captain Gorrie never returned; but Madame
adopted the Gorrie name and gave it to her son. Who his father really
was, Dr. Gorrie never knew, but he believed that a great nay even
Royal love, had consecrated his birth; and he so honored his lady
mother that he never sought a confidence which she hesitated to
give.
School days, college, youth in this social southern city filled his days.
He had no time to question life; Then, one day the remittance stopped
coming. There had been an upheaval in the government in Spain.
There never was any further news. Madame Gorrie was crushed by
misfortune; but John Gorrie was an American out and out. He set
about supporting his mother.
It was not such an arduous task, thanks to his friends. He took good
care ofher while she lived and after her death woi-ked his way through
the old New York School of Surgeons, where he added to his income
by writing "poney" for the upper classmen. The Botanist, Dr. Asa Grey
and John Gorrie were graduated in the same class at this college of
Surgeons; and Dr. Grey used to say "young Gorrie was the cleverest
man in our class."
After his mother's death, and with his degree gained, Dr. Gorrie left
Charleston, and moved to Abbeville, South Carolina. Here he was an


The Gorrie Statue in the U.S. Capital Rotunda.

Continued on Page 5


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The Franklin Chronicle


A A O N W P ER th- .Rt*uI.MU.-4.'", ,g.J e .


The Iceman from Page 4
inmate of the family of the great Calhoun, and a close friend of his
son. Here he drank in those principals of Democracy that the elder
Calhoun transmitted to his brilliant son. Here in this congenial at-
mosphere, the young man worked for several years. Then with an
established reputation as a scientist and a record that gave authority
to his medical opinions, at the age of thirty-one, Dr. Gorrie arrived in
Apalachicola.
Apalachicola at that time was the third cotton market on the Gulf
Coast. Sixty thousand bales of cotton were shipped through this port
in the spring of 1836. It was a frontier town, where there was no
established influence of family. A man stood for what he was, or could
give. Cold sagacity sharpened by suspicion and hardened by indi-
vidual greed sat in judgment seat. It met and weighed each new comer.
In this graduate school for men, John Gorrie took his third degree.
He made friends. He was so absorbed in his profession that its neces-
sity of improving the saratory condition of the locality in itself threw
the student into politics. Many of the articles, which he wrote upon
sanitation are extant. He was made resident physician of both the
city and U.S. Marine Hospitals. It was then that he began his studies
in refrigeration. He worked with the purpose of cooling southern sick
rooms and hospital wards.
During this period, when he was the most prominent man in the
state, John Gorrie married. His wife was not his equal socially. al-
though she was a most beautiful woman, also a popular and very
attractive widow. She was a pleasant companion for prosperity's high
tide, but when the ebb tide of adversity and failure came, she could
not bring him the help he so bitterly needed. It was not in her.
However, John Gorrie's married life was so outside the scope of his
national fame, that the fact that he married the handsome widow
Caroline Bierman is forgotten. Of this union, there were two children.
A son, an officer in the Confederacy who died of wounds and a daughter
who married an officer who was killed in the Virginia Campaign of
1862. The daughter had one child, All these are gone.
So it would seem as.if John Gorrie's invention was.to be the only
thing that has lived after him. But in those June days in 1855. it
seemed to the sick man that the only thing that was deader than his
sick body was his invention. Convinced of this, his hope and pride
languished, his dejection grew; and he welcomed the thought of death.
This was natural; for service was the key note of Gorrie's life purpose.
If he could not serve 'humanity, he could not live. How, humanity
laughed at the scientific knowledge, and that world rejected his in-
vention. Lacking their confidence, how could he heal the maimed?
What was left? Personal service. Why, he did not have the strength to
make one round of neighborhood calls. His days as a practitioner
were over. He was a sick man, both physically and spiritually ill.
There has been more intellectual stimulus in his domestic life. he
might have rallied his forces; but his wife had success; she had no


patience with failure. The children were more of a burden, than an
incentive. He was tired. A lassitude as purposeless as the Florida
June air overpowered him. He was very, very tired.
This collapse was natural. Genius cannot brook defeat. It strives to
overcome all obstacles, but if it cannot, then by the cumulative force
of these very obstacles, it is itself overcome. There was no light on
Gorrie's horizon. He thought of himself as a failure. At the age of fifty
he saw himself skulking in his home ridiculed and abandoned by the
world he had proudly meant to serve. It was too much. He welcomed
the end. In fact, he died without one glimmering idea of the fame that
was to come to him. Thus his body grew sick unto death. Hope and
pride languished and the light went out.
It is written that in the long hours of his last illness, he refused to see
anyone. He would die alone served only by the woman who married
his success.
This did not deter the people of the community from constantly call-
ing at his house, and asking for him. Though he persisted in his
denial, their loving persistence so impressed him, that he told his
wife that when he was dead she was to let them all come in and gaze
upon his body. Perhaps he thought that this was the last tribute he
could pay to the community which was trying to tell him that he had
their love. It was a kingly thing to do.
So all his neighbors came to honor him. All day they passed through
the empty room where the bier rested. In that procession were moth-
ers with little children whom he had served, then there were sailors
and soldiers whom his skill had snatched from death, and the offi-
cials of the town together with many friends. They all came.
His funeral was said to be the largest ever seen in Apalachicola; and
it must have had about its pageantry, much of the grandeur of Medi-
eval Spain. For the coffin was carried to its resting place by the lead-
ing young men of the city. Shoulder high they carried his bier, and
there followed the procession of his friends. His son walked bare-
headed next to the coffin. After him followed the long column of his
honorary pallbearers, then the woman bearing flowers. Everyone came.
It was a mighty tribute to the man himself. Nobody even thought
about his invention.
Thus in a royal way he was buried a simple, modest, but truly great
man. Born under the influence of Spanish grandeur, he chose to live
under America's southern skies; and there he sleeps beneath that
"low green tent whose curtain never outward swings."
His acquaintances never forgot him. This is true both of his profes-
sional and non-professional associates. After Dr. Gorrie had been dead
twenty-five years, Dr. Chapman and Prof. Asa Grey of Harvard were
walking in the outskirts of the city. They passed the grave of John
Gorrie, and Dr. Chapman stopped. He pointed to the stone saying,
"Grey, there is the grave of the man whom we recognize as the supe-
rior of us all."
Dr. Grey read aloud: "Here lies John Gorrie" and he added, "I knew
him well. I was ,at college with him and his standing there sustained
what his career here has established."


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Time passed, the old graveyard on the beach was abandoned, and
the city council had Gorrie's body moved to the center of the new
cemetery. By this time manufactured ice was becoming a general
commodity in the South the Southern Ice Exchange urged on the
George Whiteside, who owned the first ice plant in Apalachicola, and
voted to erect a monument to the inventor of the ice machine.
This monument was dedicated April 30th, 1900. It stands in one of
Apalachicola's city squares. The world began its tardy appreciation of
her first Iceman. Then ten years after this, the State of Florida chose
Dr. Gorrie's statue to occupy one of her two niches in the historical
Hall of Fame at Washington.
Thus, through a period of sixty years the world came gradually to
appreciate one of her benefactors. And such of us as have actually
known friends of John Gorrie feel as if the public might like to recall
the inventor along with his invention. For as already stated, the mak-
ing of artificial ice and refrigeration has proved to be the most vital of
all services offered mankind.
It has taken sixty years for mankind to give her first Iceman any
appreciation, and even now, we do not honor him enough. For if a
truth, the South can never cease to be grateful to her compatriot.
John Gorrie, the Inventor, the first maker of artificial ice.
Note: There is one point in the working ofGorrie's ma-
chine as the direction for its use was carefully outlined
by him in 1850, which is intriguing to the imagination.
As it shows how the intellect plunging into creation of
something marvelous, will be halted be a difficulty, which
is in itself nothing. .
Thus, Gorrie gives specific directions for greasing of the
interior of the containers before the water is put into them,
in order to facilitate the removal of the ice. The fact that
plunging the blocks, case and all into a bath of warm
water melted the ice out, seems never to have entered
his earlier calculations. He would have seemed to have
centered his mind upon freezing water until the useful-
ness of the melting side of its escaped him.

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T- J l -1 1 .


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TO ST GEORGE
ISLAND |
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236 Hwy. 98 at Island Dr.
Eastpoint, FL 32328
850-670-.1211
Mon.-Thurs. 11-7
Fri.-Sat. 10-10; Sun. noon-7


HELP WANTED
Salesperson for the Franklin Chronicle and Eastpoint
Theatre. We are looking for someone who has the
capacity to grow with our organization, beginning in
sales. Must have owni transportation, telephone, and
willingness to learn sales techniques and procedures.
This opportunity is likely to lead into other diversified
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and organization needs. Salary supplement available
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The Franklin Chronicle


2002-03 Newell Concert Lineup

Announced

The Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts Con-
cert committee has announced the lineup of mu-
sical offerings for the new season. As their memo
from the Executive Committee indicated, 'The Con-
cert Committee tries to present one or two "new
and different concerts each season in addition to
our Old Faithful 'tried and true.' Last year we fea-
tured the Capital Chordsmen, Tallahassee's Bar- ':
bershop Chorus, and the Irish Step Dancers and
Barley Thar Band. This year, you'll be the first to
know that we have booked a professional cham-
ber orchestra for our opening concert as well as a _
bagpipe band and Highland dancers for our Con- ----
cert in the Park."

Here are the season's offerings.
November 24-The Philharmonic Strings, under the direction of
Maestro Dr. David Ott, will present the Ilse Newell Fund's first or-
chestral program.
December 8-The annual Christmas Concert will return Merel
Young to the podium to conduct.the Bay Area Choral Society in
John Rutter's Mdgnificat and other seasonal choral works.
January 19--Our resident artists, the Trio Internazionale, com-
posed of Martha & Luciano Gherardi and Bedford Watkins. will
present another crowd-pleasing concert featuring a variety of musi-
cal styles. If you have favorite selections from previous concerts.
Mattha invites you to let her know!
February 9-The Tallahassee Vocal Duo, Belinda Dudley and
Sharon Tacot, have had impressive experience as soloists with opera
companies, civic chorale groups and symphony orchestras. They will
be accompanied by Pianist Susan Conrad in a program of opera.
spirituals, and Broadway show tunes.
March 9-Duo Pianists, Bedford Watkins and Karl Lester, who
have appeared on several Ilse Newell concerts, will present a program
of piano and organ solos and piano duets.
March 23-TheBay Area Choral Society will present their spring
concert at the Dixie Theater. Dr. Tom Adams will conduct the group
in another of his very entertaining concerts of music from Broadway.
April 6-The "A Family Affair" Concert, postponed from last spring,
will present approximately 20 musicians and thespians, ages 7 to 81.
from a local family group in a program of vocal, choral, and instru-
mental music, and drama.
April 27-The Concert in the Park will present the Panama City
Pipes and Drums and the Flynn Highlanders in a program of Scot-
tish music and dance.


I would like to make a contribution as follows:


$1000+ Benefactor
- $200 Sponsor..... .
$100 $199 Patron'


NAME
ADDRESS


CITY


STATE ZIP


PHONE NUMBER


NAME(S) TO APPEAR ON THE-PROGRAM
Check should be made payable to: Apalachicola Area Historical Soci-
ety with Ilse Newell Fund noted on the check. Mail to: Ise Newell
Concert Series; Apalachicola Historical Society; c/o Mr. William
Greer: P.O. Box 342; Eastpoint, FL 32328


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'CO 850-670-1141
Eastpoint


A 6A THERING PLACE
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Residential Commercial Property Management Vacation Rentals


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ILY


Huge Yard Sale At SGI Methodist

Church On October 19


Gather up your shopping bags,
it's that time of year again! Bar-
gains galore For the past four-
teen years the United Methodist
Church on St. George Island bas
held a gigantic indoor/outdoor
yard sale as an annual fundraiser
to support its building fund. This
year's event will be held on Sat-
urday, October 19, from 8:00 a.m.
until 3:00 p.m. at the Church
which is located at 201 E. Gulf
Beach Drive, just two blocks east
of St. George Island's "town cen-
ter."
Featured during the day will be
the silent auction of a 14' Holder
by Hoby centerboard sloop with
main and jib rigging and complete
with trailer, bids will begin at
$500 and silent auctioning will
close at 2:00 p.m.
Bargain-wise shoppers know to be
in line when the doors open at


8:00 am. to get first choice of the
many interesting household
items, furniture, computer equip-
ment, clothing etc. donated by
church' members and island visi-
tors over the summer. The com-
munity traditionally supports this
annual event with great enthusi-
asm and latecomers won't find
much left Spend the day on beau-
tiful St. George Island and enjoy
a fun-filled shopping excursion at
the same time!
Donations may be brought to the
Church or arrangements for
pick-up can be made by calling
Shirley Hartley at (850) 927-3154
or Carlton Ethridge at
S850-927-2010. Volunteers would
be very welcome and event
co-chairs Peggy Moore (9Z7-4039)
or Shirley Hartley would love to
hear from youl


Annual Meeting For Franklin

County Humane Society

Thursday, November 7, 2002 at 7:00 p.m. at
Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department


The Franklin County Humane
Society will hold its annual meet-
ing on Thursday, November 7hat
7:00 PM at the Eastpoint Volun-
teer Fire Department. The Board
of Directors will provide an over-
view of thepastyear's activities.


WHERE DID YOUi
ON EY Y O0 If you are retired
MONEY GO? narretirement
lostyour hard earned savings due to stock bikers investing
tech stocks and other risky investments, there is good news


P Food An*

Nutrition

So Healthyl
and By Sheey A
ig in By Shelley AlMen


Franklin County
Agent; Family N
Program; Expan
and Nutrition Ed
Program
Myths And Tn
Food And Fitnf
In today's society
stantly bombarded
ferent opinions ab
wellness. and weij
." eeryth ng from [a
h reolminates- entire' I,
.,:.,miracle pills that I
you sleep. Who kno
lieve about nutrition
-health? Most of th
available today is
and active people
fused about thei
needs. For exam
wonder if you should
ments, or if it's oka
exercising.


A healthful eating
people provides er
fat, carbohydrate v
erals, and water to
to work at its optim
all use the Food C
as a guide to eating
ness and health
needs are basically
those who exercise
health, for athletes,
active. The main di
amount of calories
person needs for
amount of food we
depending on our
activity level.
There are lots of m
diets you should try
should eat or drink
body in tiptop phys
In this article I wan
4 different myths a
fitness.

1. Myth: Athletes
tive people need
of protein or ami
You don't need pr
acid supplements,
be dangerous!
Athletes do need
than non-athletes.
ily can get protein
food they eat for th
need. Not only is
protein not needed


Other business will include accep-
tance of nominations and voting
f9r new board members, as well
as approval of the annual budget.
For information please call Soci-
ety president Raymond Finn at
697-8577.


tra work for the body to process.
SProtein or amino acid supple-
ments may be harmful if taken in
F oG-r excess.:
SFor2. Myth: Physically active

need vitamin supplements.
Vitamins are nutrients that we
S, need in our diets in very small
amounts. They regulate chemical
V Extension reactions in our bodies. Vitamins
nutrition are not a direct source of energy.
ded Food Vitamins are widely distributed in
education foods, but no one food contains
all the vitamins we need. This is
why the Food Guide Pyramid rec-
iths About ommends that we eat a variety of
ess foods from all five food groups.
People who severely limit their
Swe are con- food intake or omit foods from one
with many dif- or more food group may not get
)out nutrition, enough vitamins and/or miner-
ght loss. With als. Theymay need.a.multivita-
a.d d iets,. t mlin/rmineral supplement to make
oorn groups whil up for inadequate intake-,of these
ws what t h be nutriets from foods. Taking large
in, fitness, and amounts Megaa doses) of vitamins
, itness, and can cause adverse health effects.
inconsistent, Mega doses may cause irregular
inconsistent, heartbeat, nerve degeneration,
may be con- diarrhea, gastrointestinal upset,
r nutritional and kidney stones. The body can
ple, you may also store some types of vitamins,
Id take supple- which can lead to toxic levels. This
y to eat before can cause illness and sometimes,
even death.
plan for active 3.'Myth: Chromium Picolinate
aough protein, is a safesupplement that boosts
vitamins,mi- performance.
allow the body perfo
al level. We can Reports in the media about chro-
iuide Pyramid mium often overstate its benefits
g well for fit- for performance and weight loss.
. Nutritional The truth is that research results
y the same for are conflicting. Before you take
,e for fun and any supplement, there should be
and those less clear scientific evidence that it is
difference is the effective and safe. Right now it is
and water the unclear if chromium supplements
Energy. The improve performance. There is
e eat will vary some concern that chromium can
age, size, and cause increased levels of free radi-
cals within.the body's cells. Free
radicals can cause damage to
yths out about DNA and may increase risk of
y and what you cancer.
k to keep your
sical condition. 4. Myth: Drinking water or
nted to discuss other fluids during exercise
about food and impairs performance.
Drinking water before, during,
and after exercise is essential to
and other ac- prevent dehydration! Dehydration
supplements decreases performance and can
no acids, cause serious harm to the body.
A 3% water loss can cause im-
otein or amino paired performance, 5% water
and they can loss can cause chills, nausea, and
a rapid pulse rate. Additionally, a
10% water loss can cause heat
more protein stroke and hallucinations.
But they eas-
from the extra Eating right is as simple as fol-
e calories they lowing the Food Guide Pyramid.
excess dietary It's important to remember to eat
it requires ex- a variety of foods from each food
group because no one food con-
tains all of the nutrients that your
ISTA body needs. Remember, active
people do not require special foods
or diet supplements, but they do
need more water and calories
than inactive people. Drink lots
of water every day. The hotter the
weather and the more active you
are the more water you need.
Source: Food and Fitness: Myths and
Truths by Linda B. Bobroff. Ph.D., RD,
LD/N associate professor, Department
of Family Youth and Community Sci-
ences, Florida Cooperative Extension
T Service. Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences. University of Florida.
RICES!! For further information and rec-
ommendations contact the Uni-
95 versity of Florida/Wakulla County
4.95 Cooperative Extension Service at
926-3931 or visit us at 84 Cedar
95 Avenue in Crawfordville.
'. daily The Florida Cooperative Exten-
sion Service offers educational
Ia programs and activities to all per-
sons without regard to race, color,
nner sex, age, handicap or national
origin and is an equal opportu-
nity employer.


4


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SEAFOOb STEAK PA







.LJUj

A FAMILY RESTAURANT'
FOR THE PEOPLE AT PEOPLE P

Salad Bar-All You Can Eat $5.
Daily Lunch Specials-Start at $
Dinner Entrees-Start at $10.9

Waterfront Dining Open 11:00 a.n
West Highway 98 Apalachico
Lunch 653-9410 bi
CLOSED MONDAYS


_





I-Ilior


I


L





TO
TO


REMIND YOUR COMMISSIONER'S THAT THEY ALLOWED COUNTY GROWTH AND IT'S NOW THEIR RESPONSIBILITY
FUND THE FIRE DEPARTMENTS TO MEET THIS GROWTH.


* REMIND THEM THEY ARE ELECTED OFFICIALS SWORN TO SERVE AND PROTECT THEIR CITIZENS.

* REMIND THEM THEY REPRESENT THE MAJORITY AND NOT A FEW SPECIAL INTERESTS.

* REMIND THEM THAT M.S.B.U. RATES CAN BE INCREASED AT ANY REGULAR COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING AND
NO ADVERTISEMENT OR PUBLIC HEARING IS REQUIRED.


COMMISSIONER CHERYL SANDERS
4901 JEFF SANDERS RD.
CARRABELLE, FL 32322
(850) 697-2534
697-3283
i
COMMISSIONER JIMMY MOSCONIS
243 BAY CITY RD.
APALACHICOLA, FL 32320
(850) 653-9294
653-3942


COMMISSIONER
208 11TH ST.
APALACHICOLA,
(850) 653-8202.


CLARENCE WILLIAMS

FL 32329


COMMISSIONEREDDIE CREAMER
206 OLD FERRY DOCK RD.
EASTPOINT, FL 32328
(850) 670-8132


COMMISSIONER BEVIN PUTNAL
809 W 1ST ST.
CARRABELLE, FL 32322
(850) 697-3719


FRANKLIN COUNTY UNI TED FIRE FIGHTERS ASSOCIATION


4 Octo ber 2002 Page


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Frarnklin Chronicle


FRANKLIN COUNTY GROWTH INCREASES RISK OF TRAGEDY, DESTRUCTION,
INJURY AND DEATH.
COMMISSION IGNORES FIRE DEPARTMENT WARNINGS, REFUSES FUNDING
NECESSARY TO PREVENT FRANKLIN COUNTY CITIZENS FROM NEEDLESSLY
DYING.

IN 1988, THE MUNICIPAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT WHICH FUNDS YOUR VOLUNTEER FIRE
DEPARTMENTS WAS ADOPTED. AT THAT TIME, FRANKLIN COUNTY STRUCTURES WERE LIMITED TO
APPROXIMATELY 40 FEET ABOVE GROUND. THESE STRUCTURES WERE ACCESSIBLE IN AN
EMERGENCY FOR RESCUE AND FIRE SUPPRESSION USING THE 40 FOOT LADDERS CARRIED BY THE
FIRE DEPARTMENTS.
AFTER 1988, FRANKLIN COUNTY ALLOWED NEW CONSTRUCTION TO INCREASE IN HEIGHT
EXCEEDING 40 FEET. THE FRANKLIN COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENTS 40 FOOT LADDERS NO LONGER
ALLOWED ACCESS TO THE UPPER PORTION OF THESE NEW STRUCTURES. THE M.S.B.U. FUNDING
ADOPTED IN 1988 WAS NOT SUFFICIENT TO ENABLE THE FRANKLIN COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENTS TO
KEEP UP WITH THE RATE AND TYPE OF GROWTH IN THE COUNTY.
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY UNITED FIRE FIGHTERS FORMED A COMMITTEE TO STUDY THE
CURRENT M.S.B.U. RATES AND TO MAKE INCREASE RECOMMENDATIONS TO ENABLE THE SEVEN
FRANKLIN COUNTY VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENTS TO MEET CURRENT NEEDS.
THE MOST CRITICAL LIFE OR DEATH ASPECT OF THIS STUDY REVEALED THAT YOUR FIRE
DEPARTMENTS CANNOT REACH A STRUCTURE ABOVE 40 FEET TO SAVE A LIFE OR EXTINGUISH A
FIRE.
THIS STUDY CULMINATED WITH A PUBLIC HEARING FEBRUARY,19, 2002. A MINIMUM M.S.B.U.
RATE INCREASE FROM $28.00 PER HOUSEHOLD PER YEAR TO $70.00 PER HOUSEHOLD PER YEAR,
WAS PROPOSED TO FUND THE EQUIPMENT NEEDED TO PREVENT CITIZENS FROM NEEDLESSLY
DYING. THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COMMISSION ADOPTED THEIR OWN INCREASE OF $42.00 PER
HOUSEHOLD PER YEAR, WHICH WILL NOT ALLOW YOUR FIRE DEPARTMENTS TO PURCHASE THE
NEEDED EQUIPMENT TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.

TIE R GED Y OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COMMISSIONERS DecisionM!'!!!!
CALL OR WRITE YOUR COMMISSIONERS

S ER ARN N PRESIDENT WHO HOAHOME OWNER'SINSURANCE
RECEIVES ONAVERAGE $300.00 YEARLY IN INSURANCE SAVINGS (DOCUMENT ED
AT THE PUBLIC HEARING) BECAUSE OF HME VOL UN I Wt FIRE DEPARTMENT'S
SERVICES. ASK YOUR COMMISSIONERS HOW CAN IHEY WITHHOLD THE FUNDING
THAT WOULD SAVE LIVES AND PROPERTY UNDER THE RUSE THAT $70.00 PER
YEAR IS TO MUCH MONEE
DO THE ADDITION AND ELL YOUR COMMISSIONERS. $70.00 PER YEAR
EQUALS LIVES AND PROPERTYSAVED AND PUTS $300.00 BACKING THE POCKET OF
EACH FRANKLIN COUNTYHOM~EO WNEIL
ASK YOUR COMMISSIONER HOW IHEY CAN SAY THAT $70.00 A YEAR IS TO0
MUCH MONEYFOR THIS LIFE SAVING SERVICE WEN INAACTA ALITY THE COSTS
FREE.
* TELL THEM YOU SUPPORT YOUR FIRE DEPARTMENT AND YOUR FAMILIES LIFE IS WORTH $70.00 A YEAR

* TELL THEM $70.00 A YEAR IS CHEAP INSURANCE THAT WHEN YOUR NEIGHBORS HOUSE IS ON FIRE IT WILL NOT
SPREAD TO YOUR HOME.










Pane 8 4 October 2002


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Florida Classified


Advertising Network


Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience

of 1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!


The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper

with the FLORIDA REACH at 850-385-4003, fax: 850-385-0830.


Announcements


AS SEEN ON TV: HELP FOR Seniors/loved ones during
any emergency! FREE Information. Call LIFE ALERT
Today! (800)503-4060ext. 1710.

WPB "Piccadilly" Antique & Collectibles Show South
Florida Fairgrounds. October 4-6. Hundreds of Antiques &
Collectible Dealers.Info 561-640-3433 Fri 12-5pm.Sat9am-
5pm. Sun 10am-430pm.

Auctions

ABSOLUTE AUCTION: Naples Bath & Tennis Club,
Naples. FL. October 22nd. Tennis/Health Club.conference/
restaurant facilities. J.P. King Auction Co..Inc. (800)558-
5464. Fl. Bro. & Auctioneer James Scott King #AU358.

ABSOLUTE LAND AUCTION:Oct. 12th (no reserve).
1.250 acres, prime hunting land in South Alabama in tracts.
Call for brochure (205)425-5454. Target Auction Co., J.
Hughes.AL936.

Business Opportunities

ALLCASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you earn800 in aday?
Your own local candy route. 30 Machines and Candy. All for
S9.995. Call (800)998-VEND. AIN#BO2000033

ATM ROUTE LOCATED in major fast food restaurants.
Minimum investment 57495.00. Call toll free: (888)337-
6411 REG#2001-010.

DYNAMIC BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY. Good Income.
Hot market. No door-to-door sales.Free No Obligation
information, www.bkemarketing.comorcall(888)222-1689.

LEARN @ HOME TO WORK FROM YOUR COM-
PUTER! Good pay. lotsofopportunities! Become a medical/
legal transcriptionist. para-legal, coder or biller! Visit
www.medltecorcall toll free!(877)335-4072 code#1.

INVESTMENT ONLY: NOT A JOB. A COMPLETE
TURN-KEY Vend Route, 10 Machines $3495. AAA Est
Coke Pepsi/PolandSpringFrito-LayRouteS9995 (888)922-
2822.AIN#02-004
MOST IMPORTANT DIST. EVER OFFERED IN
FLORIDA. $20K Investment returns 100K. Read meters.
Make money. Huge market cash business. No competition.
Part/Full time. (800)213-2166 AIN 2000-24.

Financial

TOO MANY BILLS? Fed up? Want to start up a business
or buy yourown home? Call (866)859-8414.

SSCASHSS Immediate Cash for structured settlements,
annuities, real estate, notes, private mortgagenotes, accident
cases, and insurance payouts.(800)794-7310.


:ForSale. ,


GOVERNMENT SURPLUS on the internet: cars, trucks.
buses, trailers, confiscated items, computers, tractors, con-
struction equipment, ever changing inventory, bid from a
computer: at www.govdeals.com (800)613-0156.
Saunders "Trial"
from Page 1
sponded that he had been called
by Saunders to an accident-at the
flagpole at the Veterans Park.
Gaidry then changed the subject
saying, "With respect on the Nola
Tolbert affair on allegation num-
ber three, have you any informa-
tion bearing on that? Renfroe said
"No."
Gaidry: "Do you know whether the
Sheriff of Franklin County has the
authority to tell a Carrabelle po-
liceman what to do." Renfroe re-
plied "No, he doesn't. It is a dif-
ferent organization." Gaidry: "If
you had someone in control and
the Sheriff said not do it would
you just not do it? Renfroe: "No,
sir I would have her take a
breathalyzer test." Gaidry: "You
would have taken her in to blow?"
Renfroe: "Yes."
Gaidry handed Renfroe some pa-
pers that he had marked. Then
he asked, "Did you have occasion
to read a letter that Terry Saund-


ForSale

FINAL DAYS: Jacobson's Store Fixture Liquidation! 100's
ofiems: Garmentracks, artwork,showcases, unique decor,
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www.fixture-liquidators.com (888)818-4836 *Jacksonville:
9911 Old Baymeadows Rd.. www.nrel.com 10% Buyers
Premium.

Help Wanted

WOR K FROM ANY LOCATION stuffing envelopes.$4000
o PIT. Rcceie $S4.0 0 orevery envelope processed with
oursales material. Call 24 hrs. Recorded message (858)492-
8624.
LEARN @ HOME TO WORK FROM YOUR COM-
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legal transcriptionist, para-legal, coder or biller! Visit
www.medltecorCall toll free! (877)335-4072 code#1.

$SSSWEEKLY! Processing HUD/FHA mortgage refunds.
No experience required. Call project refund (800)449-4625
ext. 2252 For more information.

FEMALE MODELS WANTED forTV print, promotional
& music videos. M ust be 18 or older and can travel. (410)658-
3636or(6101656-3098orapplyonlineatwww.gls-services.com

EASY WORK! Great Pay! Earn extra income processing
mail. Free Supplies. No exp. necessary. Call our live
operators now. (800)267-3944 Ext 104 www.easywork-
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Drivers: North American Van Lines has openings in Logis-
tics, Specialized Truckload and Household Good Fleets.
Minimum of 6 months to I year o/t/r experience required.
Tractorlease/purchase available. (800)348-2147,Dept.FLS.

COMPUTER. INTERNET person-part time. $75-$150/
hour.(800)211-0070 or www.profitpc.net
****ANNOUNCEMENT**** Now hiring for2002/2003.
Postal Jobs $13.21-$28.16/hr. Full benefits/Pd. Training/
SNoExpNec.Acceptingcalls7days(888)359-3590ext. 101.

DRIVERS-OWNEROPERATORS-8 Immediately!Reefers-
wehavefreight! 23 yrs.ofage,CDL W/Hazmat, clean record,
I YR/OTR. (407)331-3833 or(800)715-9556 M-F, 10am-
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SALES-Sales Managers-One of the highest paid jobs in
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I!E L'-'LIFT F.iel, ., .t':i-'. '. .:.,'piai, pl j1 ,:.,
Call aboutourfantastic new managerprogram. Decorgifts,
toys, Christmas. Cash Trips. Recognition. (800)488-4875.
www.friendlyhome.com

ers wrote about you?" Renfroe:
"Yes, sir it was on the city com-
puter." Gaidry: "How did you hap-
pen to find it?" Renfroe: "It was
,on Key Log." Gaidry: "What is Key
Log?" Renfroe answered, "Key Log
is a program that can read any-
thing that has been done on the
computer."
Gaidry: "Why did you put Key Log
on the computer?" Renfroe: "I
called up FDLE to ask them what
I should do if someone was going
places and doing things he
shouldn't. He advised me it was a
good idea." Gaidry: "Aie you su-
pervisor of that computer?"
Renfroe: "Yes, Sir."
Gaidry: "Is there an expectancy of
privacy when somebody writes
letters on the computer?" Renfroe:
"No, sir" Gaidry: "Do others have
access to it?" Renfroe: "Yes." If
someone were to get into your
E-Mail do you have expectancy of
privacy?" Renfroe "Yes." Gaidry:'
"Have you authorized anyone like
Terry Saunders or anyone in this
town to get into your E-Mails?"
-Answer: "No." Gaidry: "When you


"Antiques and old toys cheerfully
bought and sold."


See 32 e52iwf L pree
DISTINCTIVE ANTIQUES
& ACCESSORIES
79 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320

WESLEY & ANN CHESNUT STORE (850) 653-2084
HOME (850) 653-8564



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Crawfordville, FL 32327 ,
(850) 926-6181 REC ECK



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SATELLITE TECHNICIANS: Experienced Hughes
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DRIVERS. WILL-TRANS NEEDS student drivers NOW!
CDL training available, with our partner training program
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I'NEED HELP! $500-$4500/mo. PT/FT. Call (888)563-
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Legal Services


DIET DRUG.USERS, FREE Echocardiogram. Fen-Phen,
Redux, Pondimin. find out if you are injured and have money
coming.CallKatzman,Wasserman, and Bennardini,(800)-
3-LAWYER.

SERIOUSLY INJURED? Need.a Lawyer? All accident and
negligence claims. Auto, Med., Malpractice, Wrongful
Death, etc. A-A-A Attorney Referral Service. (800)733-
LEGAL,(5342) 24 hrs. statewide.

DIVORCES 175.00" COVERS children, property division,
name change, military, missing spouse, etc. Only one
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Paperwork done for you (800)462-2000 ext. 401. B.
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read that letter was it insubordi-
nate?" Renfroe: "Yes" Gaidry: "Was
there foul language in it? Renfroe:
"Yes."

Gaidry: "Is there any doubt in
your mind that he wanted you to
see it?" Renfroe: "No, Sir." Gaidry:
"How did you know that?" An-
swer: "He wrote my name in it and
in the letter itself it stated 'I know
you are reading this."'
Gaidry again gave Renfroe a
package of 119 papers and asked
Renfroe if he had printed them out
from Key Log. Renfroe agreed that
he had printed them out. Gaidry
said "In that package there is
evidence that Terry Saunders has
been conversing with others in a
chat room and what is the name
of the chat room is." Renfroe said


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GOLF FRONT BARGAIN $49,900. Asheville NC area.
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"LAY THEM LOW." Gaidry asked
if there was expectancy of privacy
in a chat room and Renfroe
responded, "No. The chat room is
public."
Gaidry asked, "Did he ever iden-
tify himself as a police officer?"
Answer "Yes." "Does he say rude
things about the mayor and his
superior officers?" Answer again
is "Yes." Gaidry now read out
numbers of about 10 pages and
asked Renfroe to say if he had
printed these off. Again "Yes."
Gaidry asked, "was there vulgar
language in there? Language that
would be unbecoming a police of-
ficer?"

Continued on
Page 10


firot 3aptiot Cburdi
St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor

Join-us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!

Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 7:00 p.m.
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


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Beach!
Sun.-Thurs.
1$59 + Tax
Per Night
Fri.-Sat.
$69 + Tax
Per Night


The Franklin Chronicle
-------------- ---



BEACH RESORT

A Stress-Free Getaway I
Ask for the "Beach Treat" Rate.

1-800-826-9724


www.bilmarbeachresort.com I
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Immediate opening for Executive Housekeeper for a vacation rental
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Please send or deliver your resume to:

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Prudential Resort Realty
123 Gulf Beach Drive West
St. George Island, FL 32328

dprickett@stgeorgeisland.com FAX:850-927-3770
,..........


St. George Island Beachview: "Great Escape, Gulf Beaches,"
600 W. Pine Avenue, Gulf Beaches. Affordable 3BR/2BA, 1356+/- sq.
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SPrudential Toll-Free: 800-974-2666
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123 Gulf Beach Drive West e-mail: info@stgeorgeisland.com
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An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.


3026eCoa stalHighway Crale Florida 32327
1 ( 5 0 9 2 3 1 4 ( 0 0 7 6- 3 0 4 a x ( 5 0u 9 6 1 7


-~b- ~ ----- I


aI


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The Franklin Chronicle



Tiffn Funiture &
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Drexel, Broyhill, Lexington
Carpet, Tile, & Window Treatments
Painting by Nationally Known Tiffin Family
Huge Selection of Gifts & Accessories
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Fresh Produce Groceries noon 6:30 p.m.
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St. George Island, Florida 850-927-2808



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Realtyc.

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HOMES
2BR/1BA-Apartment in Lanark Village. Located in quiet neighborhood
on backside of Lanark. This unit looks out over an open field. Screened in
porch on front, a utility shed in back and a large attic. $48,000.00.
2BR/2BA-Gulf front home. White sand beach with beautiful views out
Over St. George Sound. Carpet in both bedrooms, vinyl in both baths, and
wood floors in the rest of the house. $299,000.00.
LOTS
New River Run-1-acre lots located in a nice "homes only" subdivision.
Close to the river, some lots have views! Starting at $29,900.00 and up!.
Gulf Front-Two 1-acre lots on Hwy 98. Located on the North side of
98 with property on the Gulf. Panoramic Views! $175,000.00 each.
Riverfront-Beautiful 1-acre lot located on New River. Located across
the river is Tate's Hell State Forest. This property has deep water access to
the Gulf, nice growth, and plenty of room for a dock! Included in this
price is a dock permit. $225,000.00.
Gulf Front-This is one of the best gulf front lots left in this area!
Beautiful white sand beach with a state easement to the left.
$350,000.00.
SBayside Realty, Inc.
305 Avenue B South Carrabelle, FL 32322
697-5470* 697-3919 877-577-7177 Fax: 697-5471
Freda White-Owner/Broker
Raymond Williams-Broker/Sales Courtney Millender-Realtor
Beth Barber-Realtor Mike Riley-Broker/Sales David Ard-Realtor
Jenny Weaver-Realtor Lee Schaffer-Realtor

CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Dale of this Notice 09/16/02 Invoice No. 8207
Description of Vehicle: Make Oldsmobile Model 98 Color Brown
Tag No Year 1989 state Vin No, IG3CW54COK1339013
To Owner: Leikeisha Louise Lemon To Lien Holder:
500 SW 33rd Avenue
Ocala, FL 34474


You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
09/09/02 at the request of APD that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 230.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of
the lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 10/24/02 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 447 HWY 98 EASTPOINT, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of the
vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and PROOF
OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay the
charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


Saint George Island & Apalachicola
from Early Exploration
to World War II


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(21) Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers. Uni-
versity of Florida Press, Hardcover, 297 pp. In this book,
Rogers traces and documents the economic, social and
political emergence of the Gulf coast port of Apalachicola
and the pristine barrier island, Saint George. From the
earliest times, both the island and Apalachicola have be-
come intertwined. The account of the machinations of con-
troversial developer William Lee Popham is the first phase
of area development, later leading to the controversial
struggles of the 1970s when environmentalists and sea-
food industries fought to determine the ecological and eco-
nomic fate of the Bay area. The Chronicle has obtained
a fresh supply of newly reprinted volumes at an at-
tractive price. Available elsewhere for $35.95 plus ship-
ping and handling. The Chronicle Bookshop price is much
cheaper at $25.00 per volume.. ,.... ..
AD 1&


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Lookjbr t e big ti shed on
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170 Water Street
P.O. Box 9
Apalackicola, FL 32329
(850) 653-3635
Li da, & H arry A rold, Own ers


(22) University Of Alabama
Press. Fair To Middlin':The
Antebellium Cotton Trade
Of The Apalachicola-
Chattahooche River Val-
ley. Sold nationally at
$26.95. Available through
the Chronicle Bookshop at
$21.00. Hardcover.


(126) Shipwreck and Adventures of Monsieur Pierre
Viaud From 1768, the sensational story of a shipwreck
near Dog Island, and the adventures of Pierre Viaud and
his search for survival. Published by the University of
Florida Press, 139 pp. Hardcover. Sold nationally for
$24.95. Bookshop price = $20.95.


THE FEVER MAN
A Biography of DC John Gorrie


(192) Vivian Sherlock's biography of John Gorrie, The
Fever Man, is available once again after being out-of-print
for more than a decade. This is the story of John Gorrie,
young physician who invented an "ice machine" that many
argue was a forerunner to air conditioning dozens of years
later. His cooling device was developed to provide relief
to his suffering yellow fever patients. A museum in
Apalachicola to this day marks the work of John Gorrie
just across from his last resting place in Gorrie Square,
down from Trinity Church. This book tells what is now
known about Dr. Gorrie, his work and his ice machine.
Paperback, New, 151 pp. Bookshop price = $10.00


r ----------------------,
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L- ~O~Y~~~PI1~ZII~Pga-~"~a( CsryB~F~VL~M.mYW.~C'BP~BDBl(t~Htlldiie~i


'~",~f

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Paee 10 4 October 2002


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Th~ lranlrllui Clirnnuplp
UAAA~R11L ~...JLA A==~'~-'


Enterprise Zone from Page 1

outside the boundaries of the rural enterprise zone in which the busi-
ness is located, if the employees live within the jurisdiction of a rural
county.

CORPORATE INCOME TAX

Enterprise Zone Jobs Credit

Effective January 1. 2002, the Enterprise Zone Jobs Credit against
corporate income tax no longer applies to part-time jobs. Effective on
that date. the Enterprise Zone Jobs Credit against corporate income
tax is available to businesses which have increased the number of
full-time jobs from the average of the previous 12 months, or added
at least five new full-time jobs between July 1, 2000, and December
31, 2001. The credit is also available for jobs filled by leased employ-
ees who meet specific criteria. The credit is computed as 20 percent
of the actual monthly wages paid for each new Job created, or 30
percent of the monthly wages paid, if the business is located in a
rural enterprise zone. If at least 20 percent of the full-time perma-
nent employees of the business are residents of an enterprise zone.
the credit is 30 percent of the monthly wages paid, or 45 percent of
the monthly wages paid if the business is located in a rural enter-
prise zone. (Section 220.181, F.S.)
If the new employee is a Welfare Transition Program participant. the
credit is 40 percent of the monthly wages paid if the hourly rate is $4
above the hourly federal minimum wage rate; 41 percent if the hourly
rate is $5 above the hourly federal minimum wage rate; 42 percent if
the hourly rate is $6 above the hourly federal minimum wage rate: 43
percent if the hourly rate is $7 above the hourly federal minimum
wage rate; and 44 percent if the hourly rate is $8 above the hourly
federal minimum wage rate.
For purposes of the Enterprise Zone Jobs Credit against corporate
income tax, the credit shall be allowed for up to 24 consecutive months,
beginning with the first tax return due after approval by the Depart-
ment.
The Enterprise Zone Jobs Credit against corporate income tax may
be claimed by businesses in rural enterprise zones that hire employ-
ees who live outside the boundaries of the rural enterprise zone in
which the business is located, if the employees live within the juris-
diction of a rural county.

FLORIDA RURAL JOB TAX CREDIT PROGRAM

A second program, effective January 1, 2002, is the Florida Rural/
Job Tax Credit Program, also available to new businesses. A Rural
Job Tax Credit is an incentive for eligible businesses located within
one of the 37 Designated Qualified Rural Areas to create new jobs.
Franklin County is one such area. The credit ranges from $1,000 to
$1,500 per qualified employee and can be taken against either the
Florida Corporate Income Tax or the Florida Sales and Use Tax. The
credit can only be taken against one of these two taxes. Up to $5
million can be approved state-wide in any calendar year. Mr. Von Hoff
said that the maximum. dollars available had not been exceeded. A
qualified rural area canriot have a population of more than 75,000
persons. In this area, along with Franklin County, Calhoun, Gadsden.
Gulf, Holmes, Liberty and Wakulla Counties are among the 37 Desig-
nated Rural Areas. Businesses eligible to participate include those in
the qualified counties, and sole proprietorships partnerships or cor-
porations. However, to cqzclude their eligibility ,he businesses must'
be predominately engage in activities in AgriIulture, Manufactur-
ing, hotels, public wa fhsing and storage, motion picture produc-
tion and allied services; i search and development, public golf courses.
amusement parks, or ,cXstomer services centers. Employees eligible
for tax credits have tole%4ew who work in a regular, full-time posi-
tion.
Effective January 1, 2002, targeted industries eligible for the Quali-
fied Target Industry Business Tax refund under Section 288.106. F.S..
are also eligible for the credit available under the Rural Job Tax Credit
Program. The credit is also available for jobs filled by leased employ-
ees who meet specific criteria. The credit is $1,000 for each qualified
employee to new eligible businesses that have at least 10 qualified
employees. For existing eligible businesses with fewer than 50 em-
ployees, which have at least 20 percent more qualified employees
than one year prior to their application date, the credit is $1,000 for


Saunders "Trial"
from Page 8
Klein rose to cross-examine say-
ing that he would go backward
through the episodes. He said,
"Let's talk a little about Key Log.
You mentioned that you contacted
someone at FDLE. Did he ever
give you or have you ever gotten
information as to the legality of
conducting authorized or unau-
thorized electronic interceptions
of electronic messages?" Renfroe,
said, "FDLE stated that since it
was a city owned computer that
there is no expectancy of privacy-
on it and Key Log was fine."

Klein then asked Renfroe, "Does
an expectancy of privacy in your
opinion go to someone's personal
E-Mail account opposed to a city
E-Mail account? In other words if
you were to use Key Log for some
E-Mail messages on America On-
Line,.." Renfroe "if it was on the
City Computer there is no expec-
tation of privacy." Klein asked "Do
you have a legal opinion other
than a telephone conversation
with the Florida Department of
Law Enforcement saying that
your activity was legal." Renfroe
answered No. They said on city
equipment there was no expect-
ancy of privacy."
Klein said, "Has anyone ever ad-
vised you that violation of Chap-
ter 934, that's the eavesdropping
statue, is a felony." Renfroe, "It
has nothing to do With the expect-
ancy of privacy." Klein said, "That
is your interpretation?". Renfroe,
"There is no expectancy of privacy
inside a police car or on city
equipment. I did not go into his
house, I did not go into his home
computer. It was the office com-
puter I:had the Key Log on. It is
in the place everyone goes to in
the morning."
Klein: "Let's talkabout that letter
that you said was insubordinate?
Was that letter ever officially sent
.to you by Officer Saunders?"
Renfroe: "No, Sir." Klein: "In fact
it was deleted in the deleted file.
So there was no intent on his part
at least after deleting that file, of
sending it to you." Renfroe said,
"It doesn't matter. Number 1 he
wrote in the letter, Carl, I know
you are reading this, and num-
ber two he told the Chief that he


wanted me to read that letter."
Klein: "He never finalized it."
"If Officer Saunders would get up
here and say, I didn't know he was
drunk. You don't expect officers
of the Carrabelle Police Depart-
ment if they don't have any out-
ward manifestation of intoxication
to know that someone in the ve-
Shidie was drunk." Renfroe said
that when he got there he was
working a wreck.
: Klein: "With respect to Ms. Nola
'Tolbert the allegation having to do
with that, you basically don't have
any personal knowledge as to
-what transpired either with Ms.
STolbert at the scene or with Sheriff
Varnes at the Franklin County
Jail and you don't have any per-
sonal knowledge." Renfroe "No.
Sir"
Klein: "You first started talking
about the May 19 accident, which
resulted in a written reprimand
issued to Officer Saunders. He's
already been punished for that.
Yet we are bringing it up again as
one of the allegations, one of the
reasons why he is being dis-
missed. In other words you are
dinging him again for the same
allegation that he has already re-
ceived discipline for."
,Renfroe said "I imagine it is cor-
rect, in fact both of them are."
Klein: "Let's talk about the sec-
ond accident. Do you have any
personal knowledge as to how the
events transpired in the second
accident." Renfroe: "No, Sir."
Klein: "Did you have any contact
with the trooper who investigated
it?" Renfroe: "No, Sir."

"Klein: "OffTcer Saunders is not
disputing the fact that he-made
some derogatory comments about
you. Are you saying that he is the
only member of the Carrabelle
Police Department who has ever
made any derogatory comments
about superiors or public offi-
cials?"
Renfroe: "Not to my knowledge."
Klein "Prior to investigating Of-
ficer Saunders, prior to Putting
Key Log on the computers you
have any probable cause to think
that Officer Saunders was in-
volved in any criminal activities


each qualified employee. Existing businesses, in qualified areas, tnat
have 50 or more employees and have at least 10 more qualified em-
ployees than one year prior to their application date, may receive a
credit of $1,000 per additional employee. Businesses are limited to
$500,000 of tax credits for job creation per calendar year. (Sections
220.1895 and 212.098, F.S.)
There are other requirements for this program as well as the Florida
Enterprise Zone Program. The contact persons in Franklin County is
Ms. Anita Gregory, Chamber of Commerce, Apalachicola. For addi-
tional information, one may contact: Burt C. Von Hoff, Executive
Office of the Governor; The Capitol; Suite 2001; Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-0001; 850-487-2568; fax 850-487-3014;
burt.vonhoff@myflorida.com.


using the equipment of the
Carrabelle Police Department?"
Renfroe: "I was told that people
were on there doing things that
they shouldn't. I put that Key Log
on to watch every body in the de-
partment including myself." Klein:
"People like yourself and other
staff members that used the com-
puters officially including playing
the golf game and sending per-
sonal messages?" Renfroe: "Yes."
Gaidry called Chief Jetton. (Un-
fortunately some of Chief Jetton's
answers were inaudible as he
spoke in a low voice.), Gaidry
asked the chief, "Did you have a
chance to work either or both of
the accidents?" Jetton: "I worked
both of them." Gaidry: "Did you
overhear what the trooper was
saying about the accidents? Did
you have any input?" Jetton was
inaudible." Gaidry: "But you did
not find fault with the second?"
Gaidry: "With your experience, if
you have two cars and one is sta-
tionary and one is moving who is
to blame?" Jetton: "The car that
is moving." Gaidry said, "There
was some damage done."
Gaidry: "In respect to the Nola
Tolbert matter, did you know
Deputy Marich? He has had 20
years of experience. Would he be
qualified enough to administer the
road side tests? Would you trust
his decision whatever it was?"
Jetton: "Yes." Gaidry: "Would you
say that his judgment is better or
worse than Terry Saunders?"
Jetton, said "I would have to say
better than Terry Saunders."
Gaidry: Have you haEda chance
'to read the remarks that Terry
Saunders made in the chat room
regarding Carl Renfroe and the
Mayor?" Jetton: "I read some of
it." Gaidry: "Would you say that
was conduct unbecoming for a
police officer?" Jetton said, "Yes."
Klein now took over cross-exami-
nation. He asked Chief Jetton,
"Talking about the Nola Tolbert
and sheriff incident, Officer
Saunders did escort her to the.
Franklin County Jail after the
sobriety test was administered by
Deputy Marich. He did do that.
You were not present at the jail
during any kind of conversations
That the Sheriff would have had
with Officer Saunders?" Jetton:
"No."
Klein: "I'm looking back in time
for what we should have done but
'basically you have the highest law
enforcement officer of this county
talking to one of the lowest rank-
ing law officer in this county. Is
that fair to say? The Sheriff is an
elected official, he's not here to-
night to say what he said or didn't
say so other than what you have.
communicated to the commission
is_basically what he said. He's not-


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'I,49


here, is. that correct?" Jetton:
"Yes."
Klein: "Would it be unreasonable
for the lowest ranking police of-
ficer be a little bit intimidated by
the highest ranking officer when
it came to making a decision that
may affect the career of the
school, DUI and a teacher?"
Jetton: not audible except he said
that he was not sure she was.a
teacher. Klein: "Carrabelle is a
small town. Something like this
could be an embarrassment to the
Tolbert family. A DUI. As far as
you know there was no accident
that took place, no car accident,
involving Ms. Tolbert as a result
of driving under the influence on
that night she was taken to the
jail."
Klein: "An accident took place, but
it was a week later. Is Officer
Saunders responsible for the ac-
cident Ms. Tolbert had a week af-
ter the fact?" Jetton, inaudible.
Klein said, "Do you know what she
was arrested for?" Jetton "The
second time?" Klein "The first
time. Jetton" That time he called
me at 3 o'clock. He had said he
had arrested for DUI." Klein: "And
he also said he made that deci-
sion after his conversation with
the sheriff. "Jetton: "No." Klein
said, "He didn't say that?"
Klein: 'The night that you were on
duty and you saw Michael Cham-
pion. Officer Saunders was work-
ing an off-duty detail in front of
the IGA." Jetton: "Yes." Klein: "In
fact he was not on duty with the
Carrabelle Police Department.
How far away was Officer
Saundeis when you had your
conversation with Mr. Cham-
pion?" Jetton "He should have
heard the conversation." Klein
"Are you aware of any conversa-
tions Officer Saunders had with
Mr. Champion before or after you
had your conversation." Jetton:
"No."
Klein: "Two accidents, the first
accident May 19, 2001, Officer
Saunders had already received a
written reprimand for that one, is
that correct?" Jetton: "Yes." Klein:
'That wg .,the one involved in a
moving'~violation. He pulled the
car upon.the curb in order to pre-
vent hitting a car. Someone had
swerved in front of him. On the
second one other than what you
have testified to you don't have
any perspral knowledge as you
are not 'tfie investigating Officer.
On the, eqond officer Saunders
was not charged. Do you happen
to knowhow much damage was
done to the squad car?" Jetton,
inaudible.

To be continued in
the next issue Of the
Chronicle,
October 18, 2002.


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The Frnnklin C rhroniclel




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