Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00183
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: April 5, 2002
Copyright Date: 2002
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00183
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text





County Commission Approves
Resolution Supporting "Franklin's
Promise"

Coalition of community and government agencies
seeks grant to fund Franklin Health Care
Infrastructure
Organized by Dr. Shakra Junejo the Franklin County Health Depart-
ment sought and received.an endorsement from the Franklin County
Board of County Commissioners to support a $1 million grant re-
quest to improve the delivery and coordination of care for uninsured
and underinsured Franklin County populations. The grant is to be
submitted to the Health Resources and Services Administration to
develop an infrastructure to care for uninsured and underinsured
populations in Franklin County.
The infrastructure would consist of the following: (1) the Community
Resource Committee; (2) the Dept. of Children and Families; (3) Dept.
of Health; (4) Emergency Medical Services of Franklin County; (5)
Franklin County Government; (6) Franklin County Health Dept.: (7)
Franklin's Promise; (8)Hospital Advisory Board; (9) George Weems
Memorial Hospital and the (10) School Board of Franklin County. A
graphical description of the grant proposal for Franklin County is
depicted further down in this article about the grant proposal, identi-
fied as Chart 1.
In 1999, about 22 percent of the population between the ages of 18 to
64. were uninsured in Franklin County. The grant proposal pointed
out that the current health care system is hampered by. the region's
relatively high cost of health insurance, out migration of services, a
shortage of physicians and the isolation of practitioners from devel-
opments in their field. Currently, the county health- dept. and the
local Weems hospital are the only providers of medical care for the
uninsured and underinsured residents of Franklin.
Goal of the Proposed Project and Projected Results for
the Target Population
The goal of the Community Access Project would be to develop addi-
tional capacity for providers by increasing the efficiency and effec-
tiveness of service delivery, reducing duplication of services and pro-
viding efficient, high quality care. The Project would accomplish these
goals by: (1) increasing formal service coordination and reducing du-
plication of care by connecting providers electronically, (2) increasing
community awareness of the benefits of primary health care and the
service providers available though a community outreach and educa-
tion campaign, and toll-free telephone service, (3) increasing the num-
ber of clients enrolled in existing insurance programs by promoting
eligibility and availability of existing health insurance programs, (4)
increasing the amount of pharmaceuticals available to uninsured
patients by developing a community-wide indigent pharmaceutical
program, and (5) improved care for the uninsured through better care
management (disease management) at the service delivery level for
chronic diseases such as heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and
prenatal care.


(Left) Barry Gilbert, Weems Hispital Administrator and'
(right) Dr. Shakra Junejo, Tranklin County Health
Department Administrator.
Partners Collaborating,on. the Project
Franklin's Promise is a community coalition of concerned citizens,
business partners, health care agencies, religious organizations,
schools, social services, and mental health providers that coordinate
resources within Franklin County and address unmet and ongoing
needs. Providing quality, affordable health care for all residents of
Franklin County is a major goal of the coalition. In this environment,
Franklin's Promise has served as the catalyst to bring together con-
cerned citizens and agencies that serve them to improve services to
shared patients and to position themselves for the future of a healthy
Franklin County.

Projected Results
In terms of projected results, we believe that the proposed project will
(1) yield measurable improvements in the health care delivery system
and in the quality of life and health status of uninsured Franklin
County residents; (2) decrease the'number of uninsured in Franklin
'County; (3) decrease duplication of care among health care providers
and result in improved coordination among health care providers:
and, (4) allow uninsured individuals to receive more appropriate and
coordinated care, which will lead to better-health outcomes.

Community Needs Assessment
Franklin County is a state and federally designated rural county lo-
cated on the Gulf Coast of the Florida Panhandle. The population of
Franklin County is approximately 9,800 dispersed over a total land-
mass of 534 square miles. The number of people per square mile is
20.71, making the county the fifth least densely populated county in
the state. The region is a natural catchment area, with cities at least
2 hours away to the northeast (Tallahassee).and an hour and 10
minutes to -the west (Panama City); and two'hours to the north
(Marianna), the county borders on the south with the Gulf of Mexico.
The demography, economy and culture of this area are far more simi-
lar to those of southern Georgia and Alabama than to most of the
state of Florida. Residents of Franklin County make their living in
retail trade, government, fishing, manufacturing, construction, and
service related industries. The region has a disproportionate number
of people with incomes below the poverty level, lacking a high school
education, teenage mothers, the elderly and the chronically ill. Being
relatively close to the urban area of Tallahassee and a beach commu-
nity, the region has high tourist traffic for the summer months of
June through September. Many area businesses earn their living ca-
tering to these transient populations. Apalachicola is the.seat of county
government and the population and economic center of the county.
This grant proposal targets all of Franklin County, Florida, as its
service area. Franklin County is the fifth- least densely populated
county in the State of Florida, and includes Apalachicola, Carrabelle,
East Point and St. George Island communities.

Description of the Current Delivery System
The city of Apalachicola is at the epicenter of the service area. The
area has experienced a relatively slow growth in the medical commu-
nity over the past five years. The medical community consists of 8
physicians, 2 home health agencies, and a 25-bed Critical Access
Hospital. The only specialty physician in the service area is a cardi-
ologist. There are no OB/GYNs, no orthopedic or general surgeons.
and no radiologists. There is great potential for the Apalachicola phy-
sicians, the county health department and the hospital to form the
hub for delivery of health services throughout the area, if providers
were to cooperate to deliver care. Currently, primary care physicians
in the surrounding counties do not regularly refer patients requiring
specialized care to Apalachicola, partly out of concern that the pa-
tients might not return to them. There are also the traditional rival-
ries between contiguous rural counties that affect all enterprises, in-
cluding medical care.
Five hospitals are located within a 100-mile radius of Apalachicola.
Tallahassee and Panama City are the closest urban acute care hospi-
tal to the county. Tallahassee Memorial Hospital and Tallahassee
Community Hospital are 85 miles from Apalachicola, and Bay Medi-
cal Center located in Panama City is 58 miles from Apalachicola.
Another statutory rural hospital in Port St. Joe, Gulf Pines Hospital,
is 23 miles from Apalachicola and another statutory rural Critical
Access Hospital is located 90 miles away in Blountstown.
The local hospital is a county owned facility run by a hospital man-
agement company. The hospital has suffered from negative publicity
and due to increasing burdens of indigent care and shrinking volume
converted to Critical Access Hospital status in adherence with the
federally designated Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program. This
designation allows the hospital to receive cost based reimbursement
Continued on Page 4


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Franklin





Chronicle


Volume 11, Number 7 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER April 5 18, 2002


Inside This Issue-12 Pages
Franklin's Promise...... 1, 4, 7 Seagrasses ....................... 7
Fort Gadsden, Wright Lake 1, 3 Lanark Village .................. 7
School Board ............ 1 St. James Bay ..............7....
Apalachicola River.............. 1 Apalachicola ..................... 9
Franklin Briefs ............... 2 Bookshop ............. 10 ,
St. James-Lanark Fire Dept. 2 Congressman Boyd ......... 10
Editorial & Commentary..... 3 Newell Concert "Messiah" 11
Second Circuit Court Report Easter Sunrise ............... 12
...................................... 5, 6


Fort Gadsden Also Involved

Campers And Residents Voice
e Ray Pringle, Director of the Florida Fishermen's Federation
Complaints Over Proposals Seeking (left) and Andy Smith, President of the Apalachicola River
Keeper.
Change At Camel Lake And Wright Environmental Group Pronounces

Lake Sites Apalachicola River "Endangered"


Second Meeting Scheduled 4 April, 6:30 p.m. at
River Springs Middle School, Crawfordville
A Report and Commentary by Tom W. Hoffer, Publisher
-A "leaked:' interoffice memorandum apparently has set off a series of
complaints to the U. S. Forest Service concerning proposals'to turn
Camel Lake into a "day use only" facility and to completely close Wright
Lake to the public.
The interoffice memo was originated by Ranger Andy Colanino ad-
dressed to his supervisor Marsha Kearney. The proposal discussed
closing Wright Lake completely and modifying the public use of Camel
Lake.
A copy of the Andrew Colanino. memorandum has been obtained. The
document was written to his Forest Supervisor on February 20, 2002,
"...to inform you of those deliberations so that we can address any
issues raised and to solicit your support." A new phrase was used to
describe the proposed changes, "Recreation Realignment," an am-
biguous reference. The memo stated, in part:
"...We intend to close Wright Lake Campground and Day
Use on July 1, 2002. This move will eliminate developed
camping on the ANF (Apalachicola National Forest) and
should result in significant savings in recreation O&M
costs. With the campground closed to recreational camp-
ing, we would immediately begin exploring opportunities
to convert Wright Lake to a volunteer campground and
attempt to attract significant numbers of volunteers to
work in a variety of program areas."
The memo also mentioned Fort Gadsden in Franklin County. Keep in
mind no previous notice was given the county of these contemplated
plans. The memo continued,
"...We are also going to shift responsibilities for the Fort
Gadsden Historic site from* Recreation to the Heritage
Program by June 1, 2002. 1 feel this move will place Fort
Gadsden in a better position to be managed appropri-
ately and. we anticipate protection of the site would be
emphasized over providing recreational opportunities."
Ranger Colanino foresaw these changes, called "recreational realign-
ments" completely within his authority. His memorandum contin-
ued,.
... We are also making the decision, within my author-
ity, to close Blue Sinks to prevent further degradation to
the sinkhole and to let the area heal following rehabilita-
tion. This decision will be implemented by March 1, 2002.
I am asking that a permanent closure order be issued by
your office..."
SThen, the memo concentrates on "developing a communications plan
which would help us explain these changes to the public. We envi-
sion an updated signing strategy as integral to any communication
effort..." Ranger Colanino has more on his mind, as he closed the
memo. 'There are several other realignment proposals that I have
under consideration that are not yet ripe for decision..." whatever
they may be. He did not say.
A meeting between U.S. Forest Service representatives and Liberty
County residents was held last Thursday, March 21st in Bristol, where
many residents made it abundantly clear to Ranger Colanino that
Continued on Page 3

Principal Weiner And

Superintendent Gander At Odds

By Rene Topping
ABC Charter school Principal Jeff Weiner crossed swords with Su-
perintendent Jo Ann Gander at the School Board Meeting of April 2,
over how many students would be attending the ABC School in the
next school year.
Superintendent Jo Ann Gander said that it was only a matter of iden-
tifying returning students in order for the Franklin County Public
Schools to plan teachers and other needs. She said, "Now that the
Charter school is in the mix, I 'am asking for the proposed student
roster for the ABC School." She said she will compare rosters and
derive an approximate student count.
She said after the meeting that Mr. Weiner had this information in
hand before the start of the meeting.
Mr. Weiner made an impassioned statement in which he said In part.
"On July 5, 2001, you approved the charter school for five years. It
stated that we would begin with kindergarten to third grade in year
one, and we would grow by one grade per year through the eighth
grade."
He continued, "In that very same paragraph it specifically states, "The
governing board (ABC) reserves the right to deviate from the growth
of the school to accommodate needs as they arise." Mr. Weiner added,
"A contract is a contract."
He said the school was to start with 50 children year one with 15
more each year. A new law effective July 1, requires charter schools
to reveal by December 1 what their capacity would be for the next
year. Ms. Gander agreed that there would be no need for a cap. Chair-
man Jimmy Gander asked if we would agree to a cap for 65 in year
one and I conceded."
He accused Ms. Gander in that she had been dragging her feet since
November 29, 2001 the date he notified Ms. Gander that the ABC
School would have no more than 136 students In the year 2002-2003.
She had not responded.
He stated that they had 115 students enrolled for the next school
year and would advertise for a week in which parents can enroll their
children.


On April 2nd, the American River organization named Florida's
Apalachicola River as one of the nation's Most Endangered Rivers for
2002, citing repeated dredging and flow manipulations carried out by
the U. S. Army Corps. of Engineers in an effort to maintain a com-
mercial shipping channel that is barely used.
American Rivers President Rebecca R. Wodder said, "...Even the Corps.
admits that its work on the Apalachicola is not justified. It's time to
put an end to this failed endeavor and start restoring the Apalachicola
River."
The Apalachicola River and portions of its major tributaries in Geor-
gia and Alabama are part of the Inland Waterway system. The law
authorizes the Corps to repeatedly dredge the river in an attempt to
maintain a shipping channel deep enough for commercial barges. In
the process, the Corps has buried more than a quarter of the river's
banks under huge mounds of sand dredged from the river. These
piles smother habitat and vegetation and prevent water from enter-
ing the river's sloughs and side channels. In addition, the Corps.
periodically opens the spigot on upstream dams to create "navigation
windows" of high water that allow barges to travel upstream. These
man-made floods disrupt natural spawning cycles and strand many
spawning species in the floodplain when the high waters suddenly
recede. Apalachicola River sport fish populations have been in rapid
decline since this practice began in 1990, and the April 2000 naviga-
tion window resulted in an almost complete failure of sport fish spawn
along the entire Apalachicola' River and reservoirs upstream.

r; '


DeWitt Galloway, life-long resident of Apalachicola and Bass.
fisherman.
Considerable public attention to this continuing issue has been pre-
sented before. About one year ago, Senator Graham and U. S. Repre-
sentative-Alan Boyd staged a media trip on the river to show how the
dredging damaged the river. Tuesday afternoon, at the Florida Press
Center, representatives from about eleven environmental groups joined
together to mutually support the universal condemnation of the dredg-
ing practices. What seems to be lost in this bashing of the Corps of
Engineers is the fact that they take their orders and agenda from the
U.. S. Congress, not on their own agenda. For example, Georgia and
Alabama Congressmen do not uniformly agree on the dredging issue
and some continue to pressure the Corps to keep the channels open.
The Tuesday afternoon press conference was a recitation by each of
the environmental groups complaining about the dredging. Dave
McClain Executive Director of the Apalachicola River Keeper organi-
zation, listed four threats to the Apalachicola: (1) Dredging, (2) poten-
tial loss of fresh water, essential to the continued oyster industry in
Apalachicola Bay, (3) water quality and (4) uncontrolled growth. No
one addressed the last item-yet.

Lee Attorneys File Motion To

Enlarge Time


John Lee, through his attorneys,.
has filed a motion seeking "...an
enlargement of time" in order to
respond to the complaint filed by
former employees of the Apalaci-
icola Times seeking damages for
an alleged invasion of privacy.
Jessica Paterson, Debra Elliott
and Cynthia Nations filed their
lawsuit against John Lee, the
Apalachicola Timesand Apa-
lachee Publishing Company in
late February. The plaintiffs al-
leged that Mr. Lee invaded their
privacy by installing a video cam-
era in the unisex bathroom of the
Apalachicola Times four years
earlier, when the video devices
were first discovered. The trio also
allege that the company was at
fault for hiring John Lee, and at
fault, in his continued employ-


ment after the video camera was
discovered. Apparently, an un-
named employee of the Times in-
formed the Sheriffs office about
the installation.
Lee's attorneys, Michael Matti-
more of Allen, Norton and Blue
(Tallahassee), requested the mo-
tion for more time to respond to
the complaint filed by the three
former employees. His motion
stated, in part, "...The Defendant
has required additional time in
order to secure representation
and to investigate the allegations
raised..." in the lawsuit. Counsel
has attempted to contact the
plaintiffs counsel to determine if
there might be an objection to the
requested enlargement of time but
he has been unavailable.


Continued on Page 12


w




)o








Page 2 5 April 2002


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs

April 2, 2002
Present: Chairperson
SEddie Creamer:
Commissioner Clarence
Williams: Commissioner
Cheryl 'Sanders;
Commissioner Bevin
Putnal; Commissioner
Jimmy Mosconis.

County Extension Director
Bill Mahan informed the Commis-
sioners that he and Leslie
Sturmer will be teaching their first
Clam Aquaculture workshop for
the Franklin County clam farm-
ers on April 11 at.the FSU Marine
Laboratory at Turkey Point. The
topic for the first workshop will
be focused on buying,-handling
and planting clam seeds. The
workshop will be taught twice on
the same day with the first ses-
sion beginning at 3 p.m. and the
second session at 7:00 p.m.


9- r
U -
Bill Mahan
Solid Waste Director
The landfill began summer hours
on Monday, April 1st, effective
until September 30th. The hours
will be 7-5 Monday through Fri-
day and 9 1 p.m. on Saturdays.
During this period, the depart-
ment will be open for service 54
hours per week.
Van Johnson also informed the
Board that the Day of Baseball
will start the baseball season for
more than 300 boys and girls ages
5-12, throughout the County. The
local Dixie Youth Baseball League
annual Day of Baseball will be
- held on Aprl 13th at Sand's-Field
in Carrabelle ....
Van J.qhnsoil also i nonm.d the'
Board that Animal Control re-
moved two neglected wolf-hybrids
from the Eastern end of the
county last Friday, March 29th.
Van Johnson asked the Board to
'petition the County Court for a
Shearing to determine custody of
the animals. He also recom-
mended determining a way to ban
or regulate this breed in Franklin
County., Last November, he re-
ported, one such animal was in-
volved in an attack in the county.
The Board approved his request
to allow the County Attorney to
petition the County Court for cus-
tody of the two neglected
wolf-hybrids and to work on a
procedure that will regulate this
breed of animal in Franklin
County.
Director of Administrative
Services
Alan Pierce recommended a let-
ter be sent, opposing the legisla-
tive districts approved by the
Florida Legislature which takes
.the city of Apalachicola out of the
district that represents the rest of
Franklin County. The approved
plan has Representative Kendrick.
representing all of Franklin


/,
I




I


Van Johnson


SCounty except Apalachicola, and
Representative Alan Bense
(Panama City.) representing
Apalachicola. "They've done that
Sto us before," retorted Jimmy
Mosconis. Cheryl Sanders re-
called she and Willie Speed ad-
vised unidentified parties at the
Capitol to keep the county "intact"
as one unit, but "they did it any-
way." The letter will be sent "for
the record." The Chamber of Com-
merce, Apalachicola, met Monday
Night and also voted to forward a
letter of complaint, according to
attorney Tom Shuler.
The Board approved a 6-month
extension on the JPA for the air-
port road relocation.
Mr. Pierce forwarded a letter from
Donna Butterfield volunteering to
serve on the Board ofAdjustment.
Mr. Pierce presented a certificate
of public convenience and neces-
sity with the Tallahassee
Life-Flight so they may continue
helicopter emergency, transport
from the county. The certificate
was requested by Bobby Bailey,
Director of Life-Flight; Tallahas-
see Memorial Healthcare. Attor-
ney Tom Shuler recommended
that the County Attorney review
the certificate before any formal.
Action would be taken on the cer-
tificate. He would report back to
the Board.
The Board approved an amend-
ment to the Fish and Wildlife der-
elict vessel removal to add $8,000
to contract for the removal of two
additional boats, the Miss Fran
and Bonita. The Fish and Wildlife
Commission authorized these two
specific boats for that amount.
The money has to be spent by May
31st and there is not time to ad-
vertise for-bids.
Mr. Pierce informed the Board
that Dr. Clements has requested
that the Board NOT consider 22
letters of support for. the removal
of beach viewing platforms on St.
Geresa Beach as part of the
record Those letters w&6 sent
pritmatlelyi aid dd ri6t refldcl.the
views of the individuals w\\ho
'names appear 6in th letters as the
letters were sent before individual
approvals were obtained.
The Board could take over the old
Eastpoint Highway Patrol Build-
ing and the land around the
building for one dollar a year plus
maintenance and utilities if sub-
mitted to Ms. Nelda Parker of the
.Department of Motor Vehicles.
Then, the Board could sublease
out half of building to the county
ambulance service. The other half.
of the building.is being used for
the issuance of Driver's Licenses
two days a week. Also, on a sepa-
rate issue, Ms. Parker said that
the Dept. would like for Franklin
County to take over the issuance
of Driver's licenses. Mr. Pierce has
asked for information on the
amount of revenue the county
might obtain if it took on this
function. Bevin Putnal moved to
pursue the acquisition of the
building through the projected
lease. Commissioner Mosconis
did not think there was enough
activity to justify assignment of a
person, to handle licenses.
The Board approved a Resolution
naming all members of the Enter-
prise Zone Development Agency.


...no matter where you are-
ours is a service you can trust.

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The members are: Paul Marxsen,
Joe Knight, Earl Solomon, Cliff
Butler, Jerry Thompson, Curt
Blair (chairperson), David Butler,
Ron Walters. Dean Vail, Betty
Crooms, Chuck Marks, Rachel
Ward, and Ronald Crum.
The Board approved a motion to
ask the County Attorney to pre-
pare a contract for the acquisition
of Dr. Gomez's house on Alligator
Point for the amount of funds set
aside for purchase by FEMA,
which is for $97,500.
Mr. Pierce presented an offer
made by Mr. Middlebrooks on his
property at Alligator Point.
Middlebrooks is willing to accept
the FEMA settlement on his house
but he also wants to sell the va-
cant lot nearby. FNEA does not
buy vacant property so it is up to
the county to use local funds if
they want to buy it. The Board
could use funds from the Bald
Point Trust fund.. Jimmy
Mosconis moved that Mr. Pierce
continue to work on this matter.
No formal action was taken.
Ms. Mary Lee Jolley wanted the
Board to close on her purchase
by this Friday, April 5th. Mr.
Pierce was not sure how fast the
closing could be accomplished
since Mr. Shuler, the county at-
torney, was in the hospital at
present. Tom Shuler recom-
mended that all the sale docu-
ments be prepared but not signed
until closing.

Franklin Promise
Dr. Shakra Junejo, Dept. of
Health, Franklin County, and
Barry Gilbert, Administrator of
Weems Hospital, asked for an en-
dorsement from the Board of
County Commissioners for a
grant proposal designed to help
Franklin County residents. The
details of the proposal are ex-,
plained in an article published in
this issue. The Board approved
the request and a letter of sup-
port will be drafted.


St. James-Lanark

Volunteer Fire

.Department Saved

From Shutdown
By Tom Campbell
At a special meeting Friday, at 9
a.m. in the Courthouse in Apa-
lachicola, the Franklin County
Commissioners were able to offer
a solution which saved the St.
James-Lanark Volunteer Fire De-
partment from shutting down.
A notice had been sent out to resi-. ;
dents of the, Lanark Village; area
stating, that the' "St._ Jaries--
Lanark Volunteer Fire Departr .
ment (VFD) will close its-doors on
April 8, 2002, for a lack of funds.
The Fire Department is funded by
MSBU Funds (the $28.00 fee you
pay each year). This fund was
raised to $42.00 ($14.00 raise).by
the Franklin County Commission-
ers, too little too late for St.
James-Lanark. The Department
will not receive this raise till next
year. St. James-Lanark area resi-
dents will also lose their First Re-
sponders. Think about this!! No
longer under the 5 mile fire pro-
tection jurisdiction, insurance
rates will double ... if you can get
it. Carrabelle or Alligator Point
VFD responding to your'calls..."


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FRANKLIN COUNTY HUMANE

SOCIETY Says .., THANK YOU!!!

TO ALL BOW WOW BALL VOLUNTEERS, CONTRIBUTORS
& SUPPORTERS: The Georgian Motel, Gilbert Printing, Gulf State
Bank, Harry A's, T. Scott Walker S Cruz Control, Ed Tiley.
FOOD DONATIONS, ST. GEORGE ISLAND: BJ's Pizza, Blue
Parrott Oceanfront Cafe, Finni's Grill & Bar, Island Oasis, Juice &
Java By The Sea, The MarketPlace, New Paradise Cafe, Oyster Cove,
St. George Island Gourmet, John Henry &.Mary Spratt, Rita
Culbertson, Mary Ann Durrer. APALACHICOLA: Apailachicola
Seafood Grill, Chef.Eddie's Magnolia Grill, The Gibson Inn, Gulfside
IGA, The Hut, The Owl Caf6, Piggly Wiggly, Seafood Reef, Tamara's
Cafe Floridita. EASTPOINT: That Place on 98, Gayle Dodds
CARRABELLE: Harry's Restaurant, Julia Mae's.
PRIZE DONATIONS, ST. GEORGE ISLAND: Aunt Ebby's,
Castaway Liquors, The Cut, Hooked on Books, Island Adventures,
Island Emporium, Juice & Java By The Sea, Long's Video, Madinger
Jewelers; Sea Oats, Surf Hut, Total Photo, Tropical Trader.
APALACHICOLA: All That Jazz, Betsy's Downtown, Betsy's Sun-
flower, Richard Bickel Photography, Bridges South, Chesnut Tree,
Dixie Theatre, Fancy Details, Grady Market, Kid's Port, Lin Lea's,
Market Street Antiques, George McCreery, Ltd., OysterBones, River
City Trading, River Lily, Robinson & Son Outfitters, Rutabaga's,
Seahorse Florist, Someone's in the Kitchen, Victorian Way.
EASTPOINT: Barker Beach, Coastal Building Supply
CARRABELLE: Carrabelle Junction.
MANY HARD WORKING SERVERS! Best Dish Award: Rita
'Culbertson-Meat Lasagna. Best Restaurant Dish Award: Chef
Eddie's Magnolia Grill-Chocolate & Strawberry Cake.
We served approximately 200 people & raised a little
over $4,000 to benefit the Society's Spay & Neuter Fund.
Thank you all very much!


The notice then listed the Franklin
County Commissioners with ad-
dresses and phone numbers, and
requested the reader to "call or
send your opinion to your com-
missioner." It also listed the
County Clerk's office phone num-
ber and the Lanark-St. James
VFD post office box and mailing
address.
Chief Bud Evans of the Lanark-St.
James VFD and a group of his co-
workers attended the special
meeting of the Franklin County
Commissioners. All commission-
ers were present except for Bevin
L. Putnal.
County Planner Alan Pierce made
some opening remarks, explain-
ing that there was "a shortage of
funds," and pointed out that sev-
eral sources, including St. George
Island VFD, and other individu-
als, have agreed to help with do-
nations. He also stated that Barry
Brynjolfsson, President/CEO of
Apalachicola State Bank in
Apalachicola, could offer "loan
assistance, which might be a so-
lution."
The St. James-Lanark Volunteer
Fire Department, Inc., Treasurer
Jim Welsh, submitted a 2001-
2002 Treasury Report to eachof
the commissioners. This showed
'Total Income ... $32,277.24" and
a total. of expenses of $32,641.01.
And as of 3-20-2002... "'Total
Cash-on-hand... $8,596.18."
There was a letter attached dated
3/11/02 regarding Florida insur-
ance premiums of $2934 and
$3155.
Chief Evans said, "Our expenses
are going up, up, up." He sug-
gested that what he wanted to do
was close down and "pay off What
we owe."
County Planner Alan Pierce said
that St. James Bay would start.
building "this Summer" and were
depending on the St. James-
Lanark Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment..
It was pointed out that Summer
Camp, (the St. Joe Co./Arvida
development) is coming soon.
They have offered to help out the
VFD.
Banker Barry Brynjolfsson was
present at the meeting and said
that "fire protection for the com-
munity is essential. We will work
with you on this, as loni as vou


stay and protect those people in
the community. If you want to
resolve this issue,, it is done."
Commissioner Jimmy Mosconis
made a motion to take the bank's
offer to make a short-term loan
to the Fire Department, with de-
tails to be worked out. The mo-
tion was seconded by Commis-
sioner Cheryl Sanders.
The motion passed, which offered
the solution of not shutting down
the Volunteer Fire Department.
The meeting was adjourned at
about 9:35 a.m.


Sheriffs Office

Advises Civic Club
On Preparations For

Spring Breakers

On Thursday evening, March
21st, Major Mike Mock appeared
at the St. George Island Civic Club


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to speak on the Sheriff's prepara-
tions for the annual spring break-
ers coming into Franklin County,
and most likely, to St. George Is-
land and surrounding territory. A
schedule of officers and phone
numbers was distributed to inter-
ested members. If any emergency
arises, he would prefer a tele-
phone call to 670-8500 but a 911
call would be alright for bonafide
emergencies. Pam Vest spoke
spontaneously on the role of the
citizen in times of high security
concerns, mainly to remain vigi-
lant.
Bob Harper gave a brief report on
the status of the bike path in-
stalled by the Department of
Transportation. About one-third
of the path remains to be paved.
BINGO will start at the end of May
(Memorial Day) and continue
through mid-August.








Thp Franklirin ChroniclP


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


5 April 2002 Page 3


EDITORIAL AND COMMENTARY


Ralph Kendrick-A Very

Personal View

By Rene Topping
All I know about Tate's Hell State Park I learned from Ralph Kendrick.
in fact not only about Tate's Hell, but all the rest of Franklin County
and it's people.
Ralph was a giant of a man in stature. He had the bushiest beard and
his head was huge to balance off his body. His eyes would twinkle
when he knew he had the best of a conversation. You could set your
watch by the time he would come into town with his baggy pants held
up by red firemen like braces, ready to talk to his constituents.
Ralph Kendrick was elected to office on the Franklin County Com-
mission for the term of 1982 to 1986. This was a crucial time in the
politics of Franklin County. There was many a disaster during those
years. Franklin county was assailed by two hurricanes, a disastrous
woods fire on Buckeye land when a swift change in wind caused the
flames of a controlled burn to extend over a large area burning sev-
eral homes and many acres of land.
There was a sudden spate of spring storms that battered the coast of
Eastpoint and finally after eighteen years of trying, Eastpoint finally
was awarded a breakwater.
The residents of the east end of the county were in revolt when hun-
dreds of the citizens gathered together as Concerned Citizens on the
single member issue and when the black population in Apalachicola
strove and succeeded in getting a special district. The Concerned Citi-
zenis challenged the count on the East end of the county.
Judge William Stafford allowed the Concerned Citizens to enter the
suit as interveners and in the end took the citizen's census as more
correct than the federal census. It changed the face of politics in
Franklin County forever.
The oystermen were devastated after the two hurricanes, Elena and
Kate, buried the oyster beds under deep piles of sand. The economy
of the county was at an all time low. And as if those times were not
bad enough, a new weed covered the Apalachicola Bay promising to
suffocate all the marine life.
It is said by his family that getting a breakwater for Eastpoint was a
high point in Ralph's tenure. It was in March 1983, when things came
to a head and there was a time when on three succeeding Saturday
nights the boats and the docks in Eastpoint were severely battered.
Each Sunday morning the men would be out on the hill fixing their
broken docks and mending the holes in their boats. There had been a
outcry to Governor Graham to come and see for himself.
The breakwater was approved in August 1983, eighteen long years
after the Eastpoint people had started their proposal for a breakwa-
ter. Since it was put in place it has proved to be a safety net for
Eastpoint and to this day the shore of Eastpoint has never again
been so badly battered. Commissioner Kendrick fought alongside the
fishermen to get the breakwater.
In 1985 when Hurricane Elena brushed the-shores of Franklin County
and did much damage to roads and buildings on the water's edge
Ralph was there for the residents. Before the roads had been open
between Carrabelle and Apalachicola for about three weeks along came
Hurricane Kate that blew it's way to Tallahassee. Ralph was moving
about among the people getting their.views, listening to their prob-
lems and speaking out.
I felt that I was.truly a friend when I was given a liberal education in
the special places that Ralph held near his heart. He took this new
arrival from Arizona and taught her the lore of the beauty of the woods,
the awesome swamps, the unnumbered species of plants and animal
life of the place he loved the best, after his wife and children. It may
have been a Hell to Old'Tate-to Ralph it was the biggest backyard
playgound of all time. He taught me the ways of Franklin County
and:how not to offend even though I was an outsider.
One day he asked re to go with him in his pickup truck to tour Tate's
Hell and he promised me I would see something very beautiful that
was a well kept secret. He brought me to see the dwarf cypress and
swore me to-secrecy as only the natives and the workers in the Buck-
eye Company knew how to get there and the company wanted to
preserve this precious piece of property.
This jewel in the ciown of Tate's Hell State Park will soon be shared
with anyone who loves something beautiful.
The mystery that surrounds these small trees is why they only grow
just so many feet high. There will be walkover platform that will allow
people to see the trees from a wonderful vantage angle.
These trees have been almost a secret from everyone who is not.a
resident, but will be opened up on April 18th, 2002 and the road in
will be clearly marked.
He then took me to a place that he said was a small, primitive piece of
woods that had been kept under protection as it was pristine. "That
is Bear Country at its best," he said.
He unveiled each marvel as we rode along the dirt roads and crossed
many a bridge. His advice "Don't ever ask.why some of the bridges
are called female bridges."


iV POST OFFICE BOX 590
~EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
Phone: 850-927-2186
850-385-4003 (TALLAHASSEE)
OW Facsimile 850-385-0830
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 11, No. 7


April 5, 2002


Publisher Tom W. Hoffer
Contributors Tom Campbell
........... Sue Cronkite
...... Barbara Revell
........... Rene Topping
............ Jimmy Elliott

Sales .............. Diane Beauvais Dyal
.......... Tom W. Hoffer
Advertising Design
and Production Artist..... ... Diane Beauvais Dyal
Production Associates ............................. Andy Dyal
........... Michael Fallon
Director of Circulation ............................ Andy Dyal
Proofreader .. Michael Fallon
Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein........................................ Alligator Point
Karen Cox-Dennis ................................... Apalachicola
Rene Topping ........................................ Carrabelle
David Butler Carrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins................. Eastpoint
George Thompson ................................... Eastpoint
Pat Morrison ..................... St. George Island
Dominic and Vilma Baragona................. St. George Island

Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue would
cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the Chronicle
for price quotes if you seek several different or similar
issues. In-county subscriptions are-$16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county'subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 2002
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


He puffed with pride when he showed me a giant wasp nest.
I mean, I have never seen one so big. He knew all the plants and trees
by their simple names. He knew where the dewberries and blackber-
ries grew and when they would be ripe for taking. He took me to his
hunting place on the banks of the Ochlockonee River. This was where
he best found relaxation. His love and his knowledge of the wild area
was unparalleled.
Ralph and I were friends. You wouldn't know it if you would have
heard us debating some issue or.other. No matter who won we would
be back again at it each morning.
It was always easy to find Ralph. He would be parked on County
Road 67 between the newspaper office and the flower shop.
The truck was his office and his desk was the dash board of the truck
was always piled high with maps, plans, paperwork of every descrip-
tion.
He declared that he knew where everything was on the top of that
desk and proved it time again when some resident came up for a
document he needed.
He was the ultimate politician. Even when he was turning you down
on a request he would have gone through so many other subjects in
the end you began to agree with.his reasoning. You would walk away
and thinking it over you knew he had outwitted you.
To get the essence of Ralph's life you have.to see who he was as a
father and a husband. Ralph was married to Letha and he had two
daughters and one son. Lucretia was the oldest, followed by Cheryl
and finally his son Will. They were a tightly knit family. -
His daughter Lucretia also claims that her father was ahead of the
teens of today in the baggy pants issue. "He was first to appear in
public with the baggy pants so.popular with the teens of today. In-
deed our Momma finally had to get him a set of red.braces to keep
him from embarrassing her in public."
No story of Ralph would be complete without more memories from
his children. I had been told that:Ralph wrestled alligators. His oldest
daughter Lucy, said, "He definitely wrestled alligators! When I was
about 12 years old I remember my Momma taking my daddy and a
black man named Pate Reynolds, deep into the woods in an old Inter-
national truck and dropping the two men off. He would tell Momma
exactly where to pick them up on Sunday. Come Sunday, the two
men would be there waiting. out of the woods would come my Daddy
with a croaker sack full of alligator hides."
She added, "it was always an amazing thing to me that two men would
want to spent two nights in Tate's Hell." His second daughter Cheryl
. said "That was our food money in that sack." Lucretia also told of a
time when her Momma was helping to herd a 4 5 foot alligator found
in a ditch and covered with mud. There was a hole at the end of the
ditch and the alligator went into it. She said her daddy told her Momma
to take up a position at the end of the culvert. "The alligator came out
of the culvert and Momma jumped up on the culvert and did an In-
dian Dance. my daddy said," Get down there and keep him in." but
my Momma was not about to meddle with him and that alligator got
away."
Cheryl said, "You know my Daddy always imagined his heaven would
be just like those woods." She specially remembers him giving her
political wisdom in several maxims. Such as "if you have gone as far
as you can go-then go a little further"
Another went something like this "if a man won't stand up for himself
how.can he protect what is most precious?" and "Always listen t6 the
people"
He brought his love of-the area to his term of office on the Franklin
County Commission. He told me one time that the Apalachicola Bay
Swas the most precious asset to Franklin County and should always
be protected.
I cannot resist telling you a story on Ralph. I had protested to him
that the public did not have an agenda for each commission meeting.
;Ralph.said, "Miss Rene, it wasn't so long ago that the commissioners
met at C.C. Lanid's house on Mondiay night before the Tuesday meet-
ing date to figure out what we were going to do at the meeting." At
first nothing happened, but later on I thanked him for getting ann
agenda.
Two of Ralph's children, Cheryl Sanders and Will Kendrick, emulated
their father and went into politics. Cheryl is a Franklin county com-
missioner who was elected first time out in 2000 for Franklin County
District 2. In that same year, Will Kendrick was elected to be Florida'
State Representative for District 10. He,, too, was first time out for
that position but had readied himself for the job with years on the
Franklin County School Board.
Will campaigned on a motto of "I havewalked the walk." stressing he
was born here and the position he got over to the people was he was
passionate in the welfare of the place he was born in. He.said he
never would just 'Talk the Talk."
He has not been a quiet legislator and has spoken out for protection
of the sea food industry. He has spoken out on marinas being built
that could cause the fishing area irreparable harm.
He supports the saving of areas to State land such as Tate's Hell-
State Park, and Bald Point State Park, in order that more people, who
come to the area-to live will still have the same backyard to have a
place to see the other Florida as it was when he was a child.
I hope Ralph Kendrick was granted his version of-heaven and that he
will look down with pride on his three children who are following his
example to love the soil that grew them and to treasure Apalachicola
Bay for it's wealth of seafood, and always, each make their best ef-
forts to protect a unique place on this earth that has been called "The
Pearl of the Panhandle".





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Capitol Update: News From

Representative Will S. Kendrick

Lawmakers were close to completing business when the clock ran
out on the 2002 Regular Session last week. My colleagues and I will
return to Tallahassee on April 2 to vote on the budget, a rewrite of the
state's education code and a bill dealing with Cabinet reorganization.
The $49 million House spending plan for next year includes a
five-percent increase in education funding plus some money for busi-
i ness tax breaks and a nine-day tax holiday on back-to-school cloth-
ing and accessories late this summer. The Senate budget proposal
Does not include those items, so we'll have to come to some agree-
ment before we take a final vote on the.budget.
The rewrite of the state education code is ready to be voted on, but
Senators felt they didn't have enough time to review the massive docu-
ment before making their final decision. They'll have the week before
Easter to took over the bill before returning to Tallahassee, The legis-
lation updates state school laws to reflect the creation of a "seamless"
education system, governing kindergarten through graduate school.
That bill also includes a ban on "social promotion," the practice of
allowing a student who can't read to pass into the next grade. This
law keeps students who can't read at the third grade level from mov-
ing on to the fourth grade.
Meanwhile, legislation on its way to the Governor should boost lot-
tery dollars going to Florida classrooms. State economists estimate
the measure could increase education funding by up to $57 million
in coming years.
SMy legislation aimed at helping Florida's sheriffs handle the crush of
work following terrorist strikes passed both houses and is on the
Governor's desk. Florida sheriffs may use special deputy sheriffs, but
they must be bonded. In rare cases of emergency, such as a natural
disaster, those special deputies don't have to be bonded. My bill, House
Bill 1427, exempts the bonding requirement for special deputies mo-
bilized in response to an act of local terrorism or a national terrorism
alert.
Following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, many Florida
sheriffs used.mobilized special deputies to help with airport security
or provide law enforcement presence at bridges, government build-
irigs or other potential terrorist targets. This legislation eases the fi-
nancial burden on sheriffswho need to quickly respond to terrorist
threats.
Another bill I sponsored, is designed to protect homeowners from
predatory lenders, cleared the Legislature on unanimous votes and is
headed to Gov. Jeb Bush. I sponsored the House version of the bill
That aims to protect homeowners from falling so far into debt because
of bad deals that they lose their homes.



Wright and Camel Lake from Page 1

they don't want to see any changes to the sites. Colanino began the
meeting explaining that his.memo was only a recommendation, add-
ing that his orientation was to manage tax dollars where demands
are high. The most dollars in managing the campsite were to go where
the most persons attend. This quasi-policy statement raises consid-
erable questions about the Federal orientation toward the public. Is
catering exclusively to public demand alone a sufficient rationale for
basing a management plan in the first place? There are other factors
that could be taken into consideration in developing management
policies of public lands, arnd these, it would appear, would be devel-
oped by varied interests in addition to the opinion of one forest ranger.
Ranger Colanino indicated that some kind of public input into these
matters would be sought but the meetings called thus far have been
the result of slovenly public notice, in light of the "leaked" memo. For
example, thus far, little notice has been provided Franklin County
concerning these proposals.
Earlier, letters from Panama City resident John G. Hentz were re-
ceived about Fort Gadsden. He was also concerned about a rumor
involving the possible administration of the Fort by. a private group.
Senator Robert Graham has also shared in correspondence back and
forth with the Forest Service on the issue of Fort Gadsden and its
future. Marsha Kearney, Forest Supervisor and the boss to Ranger
Andrew Colanino, wrote to Senator Graham, 'Traditionally, the U. S.
Forest Service has always welcomed public involvement with all is-
sues regarding the management of public land." However, Mr. Hentz
reported that the U. S. Forest Service has "followed a policy" of not
encouraging visitation to the Fort Gadsden park. Then, the internal
administrators can say that there is limited public interest in such
an area, and therefore justify the reduction of funding, or change the
preservation focus for the Fort in their management plan, if one ex-
ists. This word gaming is often a traditional part of government
decision-making used to justify reduction of services. One problem in
this issue, among. others, is that the Federal establishment did not
put much effort into affirmatively advising the public about any plans
or change in plans for the historic site. Note the difference in such an
affirmative responsibility contrasted with the language, "Tradition-
ally, the U. S. Forest Service has always welcomed public involve-
ment with all issues regarding the management of public land."
Marilyn Blackwell from Wewahitchka asked about Fort Gadsden,
which has been nearly ignored by the U.S. Forest Service in any man-
agement plan. For example, the road leading to this extremely impor-
tant historic.site in the history of the state and territory, the road
from State 65 is only gravel and typically floods during rainstorms.
This should have been paved long ago but actions follow stated inten-
tions, and the road remains difficult to negotiate year around. The
ranger said the U.S. Forest Service plans to "de-emphasize" Fort
Gadsden as a recreation site, which is news to us. The site is an
historic site, period. There is an interpretation center featuring the
talented work of Eastpoint's Bill Greer who has created a miniature
of the Fort as it was in the last century. The Forest Service "empha-
sis" on Fort Gadsden has simply'been to IGNORE the site. A com-
ment was made to allow the boat ramp to deteriorate to discourage
looters. Any perceptive and informed agency managing public lands
would have exercised considerably more interest in this historic site
,first by informing themselves of the significance of the site, and then
developing it to allow the public to visit and appreciate the local ef-
forts that have been done to recognize this history.
Eco-tourism is the name of the new game among the traveling public,
and an enhancement of this site by some realistic and competent
planning would help Franklin and Liberty counties instead of the
continued abandonment of our nation's history for the sake of saving
a few bucks. The Forest Service is soliciting public comments on what
should be done, but it remains to be seen whether something more
than mere lip service be given to genuine concern for the F'ort Gadsden
site. Formerly there were fulltime rangers assigned to the site. Now
only volunteers are available. It is time the Forest Service preserve
this history, or get out of the management altogether.


Real F Ntatp News

Prudential Resort Realty, St.
George Island Rental Division,
recently announced the addition
of Diana Prickett as Property
Manager. Diana brings over 19
years of property management
experience to the firm. Diana is
joined by an experienced manage-
ment team: Beth Brinkley as Ac-
quisitions Manager; Beth
Dearinger and Dana Ingalls as
Assistant Managers; Jamie
Martina as Customer Service
Manager; and Barbara Mathis as
Maintenance Manager.


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would itbe a very prestigious year round home, but an excellent rental property, if you want
a great investment. Located in the Plantation on the West end of St. George Island in the
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Paoe 4 5 Anril 2002


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Chart 1: A Graphical Description of the CAP Grant Proposal for Franklin County
(Shaded boxes indicate that component of this system will be developed, expanded or enhanced by the CAP program)

Hospital FC Govt
EMSFC SBFC

FP Key Players Input F
FCHD


DCP


P~i
II'i


COMMIJNICATE-ri'


A" B C D E


Dr. Shakra Junejo


All of theennly-level providers provide intake into FIN. which create joumal of all ltrnsaction and has CRIC input Tie FIN additionally screen for information regarding eligibility' for easing programs. The
eligibility template will develop a "report card" which will provide Ai t of programs for each person based olo information provided.
Abbr: CRIC = Community Resource Committee; DCF = Department of Children and Families; DOH = Department of Health; EMSFC = Emergency Mctlical
Senices of Franklin County FC Govt Franklin County Government; FCHD = Franklin County Healtl Department; FP = Franklins's Promise; ITAB =
Hospital Advisory Board; HOSP = George E. Weems Memorial Hospital; SBFC = School Board of Franklin County.
18.5% of the population are Medicaid recipients;


Franklin's.Promise from Page 1
for Medicare patients, which'constitute about 52% of the patient cen-
sus for the facility. The hospital was built in the 1960's and is sorely
in need of physical plant renovations, which due to negative profit
margins have gone undone. The State of Florida's, Rural Hospital
Capital Improvement Program, has. granted much needed Capital
Improvement dollars into the facility over the past three years. These
renovations coupled with a new management company are slowly
turning the tide in how residents view the hospital. Regardless of all
opinions of the facility, the hospital gives over $400,000 per
year in the category of charity care for the uninsured and
under-insured residents of Franklin County. The hospital has an
insufficient base to invest in a modern physical plant or specialized
equipment or personnel.
Hospital occupancy rates varied between 11% and 45% in 1999 due
to out migration. Fifty percent (50%) of residents leave the area, for
hospital inpatient care, driving to one of 5 tertiary hospitals in the
surrounding communities'. There are strong referral patterns to Tal-
lahassee and Panama.City for children's services and services to older
adults. There are also long standing ties between Apalachicola physi-
cians and Tallahassee or Panama City physicians which seem to su-
persede desires to build a more integrated system in these rural com-
munities.
The Franklin County Health Department maintains the primary source
of community-focused primary care, which includes pediatric and
adult primary care. The health department provides assessment, treat-
ment, health education, specialty referrals, prenatal care, well-baby
visits, family planning, immunizations and screenings and treatment
for STD, tuberculosis, and HIV. The health department treats pa-
tients regardless of ability to pay.
In addition to all of the resources discussed above, the county has
community mental health centers offering mental health and sub-
stance abuse services. Additional grant-funded programs in the County
target adults and children impacted by HIV and AIDS, mental health,
substance abuse, and homelessness, as well as legal immigrants,
refugees and the elderly.
Despite Franklin County's providers serving the uninsured popula-
tion, many uninsured patients do not receive coordinated care. There
is significant concern that some. patients may see multiple providers
withinrthe existing system of providers'serving the uninsured. Pro-
viders may be unaware of e.istmng patient conditions or treatments
that may affect patient care. Uninsured individuals may inappropri-
ately.utilize provider sites.. For example,,routine care may be deliv-
ered in emergency rooms. Gaps in service delivery are aggravated by
a number of factors, such as differing cultural health beliefs, inabil- I
ity to communicate with healthcare workers, inability to access trans-
portation to a primary health clinic, lack of knowledge of existing
resources, lack of education about preventive healthcare and a lack
of trust in the existing systems. Uninsured populations of particular
concern include immigrants, non-English- speaking individuals and
ethnic groups, indigent populations and the elderly. There are also
particular concerns regarding patient conditions that may require
intensive disease management, such as diabetes, heart disease, and
prenatal care.;
. For the sake of comparison Franklin County demographic data has
been aggregated with neighboring Florida counties that share a com-
mon border.


Total Per
County Population Capita
Income


* 15% of residents receive food stamp supplements; and,
* 19.2 % of the total population are uninsured.
Table 2
INFANT, MORTALITY, TEEN BIRTHS AND LOW BIRTH WEIGHT BABIES
Average Infant Teen Births Average % of Infants with
Mortality Age 10-19 Low Birth weight
Rate/1000 Live 1997-1999 1998-2000
Births
1998-2000
County All Races All Races All Races

Franklin 22.73 45.69 8.24
Gulf 14.78 32.16 7.64
Liberty ,8.06 34.76 7.26
Wakulla 7.17 28.47 8.83
STATE 8.2% 9.1% 8.08%
Rate is distorted by very small number of births. Chart data is from Florida Department of Health, Office of
Planning, Evaluation and Data Analysis, Public Health Indicators Data System 2002
Barriers to Accessing Health Care Services Include:
* Many needed services are not available or accessible in all commu-
nities, other services are unnecessarily duplicated to insure market
share.
* Tertiary care is an hour away in many parts of the service area,
particularly for residents who must travel miles on dirt roads in order
to reach a highway.
* Transportation is a major barrier to accessing services. No public
transportation exists in Franklin County.
* After hours primary care is a problem. On nights and weekends, the
hospital emergency room is filled with primary care patients, most
without insurance.
* The hospital experiences significant bad debt and charity care.
* Physicians practicing alone find it hard to leave the community for
continuing medical education.
* Few providers have installed systems to improve quality, manage
nsk. or expedite communication with other providers with whom they
share patients.

Target Population
The Rand Corporation in 1995 estimated distribution of the unin-
sured among various demographic groups in Florida, based on a sam-
pling study largely conducted in urban areas. If these numbers are
applied to the demography of the Franklin County, an estimated 20%
of the population overall is uninsured, and as'high as 32% of people
aged 18 to 34 years of age. We believe that a higher proportion of the
total Franklin County population is uninsured, closer to 25% plus. In
1999 the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) studied the
uninsured populations of Florida and estimated that Franklin County
had an uninsured population ages ,18 64 of 22%.
A nagausac rniei pip f ulss ua tin jUJ i biu .iL tnn 'ff rr tht ase..qil.


the physicians and other medical providers continue to receive rea-
sonable reimbursement from their insured patients, it is expected
that this tradition will continue. Public health shifts funds from Med-
icaid/ Medicare reimbursement to finance care of the uninsured.
Public health staff seeks specialized care for their uninsured primary
care patients by personal advocacy through numerous phone calls to
local and out of area specialists. Referrals of indigent patients appear
to be made disproportionately among the private physician commu-
nity, with the willing doctors receiving repeated requests. The medi-
cal staffs in most communities have agreed that physicians will con-
tinue with the indigent patients they first see in the emergency room,
until the episode of care is completed. This helps to equalize the re-
sponsibility for indigent care. Approximately 750 visits are made to
the local emergency room each year by indigent, uninsured patients
seeking non-emergency care (George E. Weems, Memorial Hospital,
2001).
Many County residents seek care only when they are symptomatic,
and do not follow-up with medications or subsequent appointments.
Two non-financial barriers contribute to this problem. One, trans-
portation to clinic appointments during the day is unavailable in many
uninsured homes. Secondly, manyresidents have not received suffi-
cient educational or cultural reinforcement of the importance of regular
medical care. Instead, there is a "self-reliance" value in some parts of
the community that argues against seeking medical treatment, par-
ticularly if you cannot easily pay for it. Some who likely qualify for
Medicaid, for example, will not complete the forms when asked in the
ER. For those residents who are severely economically disadvantaged;
"making it" from day to-day precludes concern about any but the
most serious illness. In fact, these families may have lifestyles (diet,
stress, unsafe automobiles) that contribute to accidents and illness,
including behavioral health problems.
The uninsured population is disproportionately composed of minor-
ity groups and the minority populations are disproportionately unin-
sured. Income is the single greatest indicator of insured status. Ac-
cording to 2001 data approximately 27% of county residents have
incomes below poverty level; approximately 24.65 % of county resi-
dents are at 100% of the poverty level and approximately 53.09. of
county residents are at 200% of the poverty level (Florida Depart-
ment of Health, Public Health Indicator Study 2001). The Florida
Health Insurance Study conducted in 1999 shows that 41.4 percent
of individuals in Franklin County earning less than the federal pov-
erty level (FPL) are uninsured. For individuals earning 101-150 per-
cent of FPL, 33.9 percent are uninsured; at 151-200 percent FPL,
29.2 percent are uninsured; at 201-250 percent FPL, 12.6 percent
are uninsured; and for individuals earning 251 percent or more of
the FPL, 7.6 percent are uninsured.

Most Urgent Needs and Targeted Communities
The 2000 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) pre-
pared by the Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology,
highlights many of the most urgent needs of the uninsured and
underinsured population in Franklin County. Although only small
percentages of the overall population reports "fair" or "poor" general
physical health, almost 25 percent of adults earning less than 200
percent of FPL characterized their health as "fair" or "poor." Ethnic
background is a significant indicator, with almost 20 percent of
African-Americans reporting "fair" or "poor" health. Because economic
status and race are also major indicators of uninsured status, it is
likely that members of the target population disproportionately rate
their overall health as "fair" or "poor."
In order to best address the urgent health needs in Franklin County,
we propose to target specific communities identified as being at ex-
treme health risk. The CAP grant program will in particular focus on
fostering community relations and health education in these com-
munity sites in order to improve outcomes. The communities we will
focus on are the following: Apalachicola, Carrabelle and Eastpoint.

Potential Changes in Insurance Coverage
The population of Franklin County has not experienced the boom in
population growth noticed in other Florida counties throughout the
1990's. The percentage of uninsured however has grown slightly since
1995 according to Rand Corporation data. In 1994-1995, the .per-
centage in Franklin County lacking health insurance was estimated
at 20 percent. In 1999, the estimate was 22 percent. Potential expla-
nations for the increased percentage of uninsured.include popula-
tion growth, growth in immigration from other counties, a growth of
smallbusinesses adding to thosewith no access to affordable health
care, and welfare changes resulting in displaced families no longer
having access to,health care. .. :;.
On the other hand, the implementation of Florida KidCare has also
had only a slightly significant effect on the non-insured rates in
Franklin County. Florida KidCare provides many low-income previ-
ously uninsured children with insurance coverage, however counties
are to provide a match amount of funding to ensure the availability of
open slots. Due to a lack of funds generated at the county level,
Franklin County, as other small rural counties, in Florida does not
have the matching dollars necessary to participate in the program.
The slots labeled for Franklin County are then given away to larger
Continued on Page 7


A SligniicantL proporUUonl Uo t pupulalUll la unllaue eU olalulu uet avail-
able commercial health insurance. Commercial insurance is expen-
,Table 1 sive in the Panhandle. There is insufficient population to attract HMOs,
and little competition to Blue Cross/ Blue Shield's PPO from less
d Poptllation Characteristics well-known carriers reluctant to market in such a relatively
unpopulated area. Self-insured employers who have negative claims
unemployment '% Percent % % w/no experience are paying as much as $7,50 per month for family cover-
Rate Below Elderly Non- H.S. Diploma age.. Even local government plans may cost $375 for a family, and
Poverty 65+ white that is for a plan with a large deductible and only 80% reimburse-
4.4 27.0 21.1 27.0 25% ment. Often the government employee is insured, but family cover-
age is declined as too expensive.


5.1 18.5 14.5 28.4 21%


Liberty 7,132 15,699 3.2 19.0 10.9 24.8 27%
Wakulla 19,171 "25,740 3.2. 17.9 11:6 17.9 18%
Chart data is from Bin Bend Health Council Big Bend At A Glance 2001 and HRSA
Community Health Status Report 2000

The following highlights are descriptive demographic and health indi-
cators for Franklin County:
' Designated as a rural county by federal and state authorities, 20.3
people per square mile;
* approximately 27% of the population with incomes below poverty
level;
*. approximately 24.65 % of county residents are at 100% of the pov-
erty level; and,
.* approximately 53.09 of count residents are at 200% of the poverty
leve;. ,
* county ranks 13th out of 67 counties in regards to percentage of
population that is uninsured;
' 25% or more of adults with less than a high school diploma;


In addition, Medicaid as the primary subsidized insurance program
is disenrolling many residents as a consequence of welfare reform.
Also, a significant number of elderly residents spent their work lives
in cash jobs which did not pay into social security, and so do not
qualify for Medicare. Approximately 16% of the population is enrolled
in Florida's Medicaid program, and about 14% are Medicare recipi-
ents.
Most Franklin County residents work in small businesses with 50 or
fewer employees: In the rural Florida Panhandle these businesses
tend to be in industries, which traditionally have fewer insured work-
ers, such as manufacturing, forestry products, construction and ag-
riculture.
Outpatient care for,the uninsured is provided primarily by the public
health department and hospital emergency room, and by private phy-
sicians in their offices under special referral arrangements. Children's
Medical Services refers many of its multi-problem children out of area.
The closest federally funded community health center is over 50 miles
away in Gulf County.
Most physicians and hospitals have a significant proportion of
"self-pay" patients, many of whose bills eventually become part of the
institution's or practitioner's "bad debt." There is a strong tradition of
providers accepting patients who cannot pay the full bill. As long as


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


5 April 2002 Page 5


Second Circuit

Court Report

December 17, 2001
By Sue Cronkite
The Honorable F. E. Steinmeyer
Prosecuting Attorney Adam Ruiz
Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger


All persons listed below are presumed innocent
until found guilty in a court of law.

ARRAIGNMENTS
Ash, Craig: Charged with four counts of sale of controlled substance. Accord-
ing to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On September
9, 13. and 14. 2001, and on October 3. 2001, officers making controlled buys
of illegal narcotics in Apalachicola purchased from the defendant a material
which tested positive to be crack cocaine. Pretrial conference was set for Feb-
ruary 18, 2002, on all counts. Steiger represented the defendant.
Becton, Tony J.: Charged with two counts of sale of controlled substance
and violation of probation. According to probable cause report, the following
allegedly occurred: On October 2 and October 12, 2001, officers making con-
trolled buys of illegal narcotics in Apalachicola, purchased a material from
the defendant that tested positive to be crack cocaine. Pretrial conference set
for February 18. 2001. Steiger represented the defendant.
Benjamin, Marvin Ray Jr.:'Charged with possession of controlled substance
(crack cocaine) and aggravated assault on law enforcement officer. According
to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On August 19. 2001,
officers were conducting controlled buys of illegal narcotics in the Carrabelle
and purchased a substance which tested positive as crack cocaine from the
defendant. The defendant entered a written plea of not guilty. Pretrial confer-
ence continued to January 11, 2001.
Brown, Charles: Charged with three counts of sale of controlled substance.
According to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On Sep-
tember 3, 2001, officers were making controlled buys of illegal narcotics in
Apalachicola and purchased what tested positive-as crack cocaine from the
defendant on the corner of 8th Street and Avenue K: on September 4. 2001. a
buy was made on the corner of 9th Street and Avenue J: and on October 3. a
substance which tested positive as crack cocaine was purchased from the
defendant on the corner of 9th Street andAvenue L. Pretrial conference set for
February 18, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Brown; Elijah: Charged with two counts sale of controlled substance, dealing
stolen property, burglary of a structure, grand theft from retail merchant.
burglary of a dwelling, resisting arrest without violence, criminal mischief
under $200, and violation of probation for leaving scene of accident with inju-
ries. Probable cause previously published. Pretrial conference continued to
January 11, 2001. Atty. Barbara Sanders represented the defendant.
Brown, James Paul: Charged with burglary of a dwelling and grand theft.
According to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On No-
vember 15, 2001, officers noticed defendant and another man loading tools.
ladders, and vinyl siding on a truck. The next day the items were reported
stolen. It was later reported that the defendant had sold a drill which also had
been stolen from the same address. Defendant entered a plea of not guilty. An
appointment was made with the public defender's office and arraignment was
continued to January 11, 2002.
Cargill, Stephon: Charged with sale of controlled substance. According to
probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On October 21. 2001.
officers were making controlled buys of illegal substances and purchased what
tested positive as crack cocaine from the defendant at the corner of 9th Street
and Avenue J in Apalachicola. Pretrial conference set for January 11, 2002.
Steiger represented the defendant.
Collins, William J.: Charged with sale of controlled substance. According to
probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On September 9. 2001.
officers were making controlled buys of illegal substances. A substance which
tested positive as cocaine was purchased from the defendant at the corner of
10th Street and Avenue J in Apalachicola. Pretrial conference set for January
11, 2002. Atty. Ryan Davis represented the defendant.
Culpepper, Dennis: Charged with battery of law enforcement officer and driv-
ing under the influence (DUI). According to probable cause report, the follow-
ing allegedly occurred: On. October 21, 2001, an officer observed the defen-
dant driving an automobile erratically. While taking the defendant to jail for a
sobriety test, defendant threatened the officer, then at the jail attacked an-
other officer. Defendant entered a plea of not guilty. Pretrial conference was
set for January 11, 2001. Steiger represented the defendant.
Davis, 'plinton W.: Charged with sale of controlled substance. According to
probable cause 'report, the following allegedly occurred: On September 16,
2001, officers making controlled buys of illegal substances purchased what
tested to be crack cocaine from defendant on 23" Street in Apalachicola. Pre-
trial conference was set for January 11, 2002. Atty. Barbara Sanders repre-
sented the defendant.
Davis, Dwayne I: Charged with sexual battery. According to probable cause
report, the following allegedly occurred: on October 17, 2001, officers were
called to Weems Hospital in Apalachicola where they were'told the defendant
had forced himself on a young woman in his car in the Indian Pass area.
Arraignment was continued to January 11, 2002. Atty. Rachel Chesnut rep-
resented the defendant.
Ducker, Rekiya: Charged with sale of controlled substance. According to prob-
able cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On September 4, 2001.
officers were making a-controlled buy of illegal subst ance d purchased
green leaves which tested positive as marijuana from the defendant's resi-
dence between Avenue J and Avenue'K on 9th Street in Apalachicola. Defen-
dant entered a plea of not guilty. Pretrial conference set for January 1 1,, 2001.
Steiger represented the defendant.
Evans, John E.: Charged with throwing deadly missile into occupied vehicle.
According to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On Oc-
tober 27, 2001, officers were told that defendant had thrown a liquor bottle
and hit the side of a car. State chose not to prosecute. Steiger represented the
defendant.
Farmer, Harold: Charged with sale of controlled substance. According to prob-
able cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On September, 10,'2001.
officers making controlled buys purchased a leafy substance which tested
positive as marijuana on 15th Street in Apalachicola. Pretrial conference was
set for January 11, 2001. Defendant was to hire own attorney.


i'


Fender, Carl: Charged with driving while license suspended felony. According
'to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On November 6.
2001, an officer clocked the defendant driving 69 miles per hour on Highway
65. A check showed the defendant's driver's license had been suspended sev-
eral times. Defendant entered a written plea of not guilty. Pretrial conference
was set for January 11. 2002. Atty. J. Gordon Shuler represented the defen-
dant.
Geter, Lucille: Charged with two counts of sale of'controlled substance. Ac-
cording to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On October
1, and October 2. 2001, officers were conducting controlled buys of illegal
narcotics and purchased crack cocaine from the defendant on Southeast Av-
enue D in Carrabelle. Defendant was also arraigned for violation of probation.
Defendant entered a written plea of not guilty. Pretrial conference was set for
February 18, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Gloner, David Allen: Charged with grand theft of motor vehicle. According to
probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On November 1, 2001.
officers answered a call to 313 Water Street, on an attempt to steal a motor
vehicle. Defendant was described and when officers went to arrest defendant
in the attempt to take a Volkswagen truck, he told officers about the theft of a
Jeep with boat trailer he said another person had stolen. Defendant entered a
plea of not guilty. Pretrial conference was set for January 11, 2002.
Harris, Osheila: Charged with sale of controlled substance, resisting officer
with violence, battery of law enforcement officer, and escape. According to
probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: on October 11. 2001.
officers making controlled buys of illegal narcotics purchased crack cocaine
on the corner-of 8th Street and Avenue K in Apalachicola. On other charges
probable cause previously published. Defendant entered a plea of no contest
on sale of controlled substance, was adjudicated guilty, received 161 days in
jail, with credit for time served 48 days, one year probation, standard drug
conditions, to'pay $295 court costs and $100 to Florida Department of Law
Enforcement. On the charge of resisting officer with violence, defendant en-
tered a plea of no contest, was adjudicated guilty, given 180 days in jail,.with
credit for time served 67 days, one-year probation, and standard drug condi-
tions. Both sentences to run concurrent. On charges of battery of law enforce-
ment officer and escape, the state chose not to prosecute. Steiger represented
the defendant.
Jackson, James P.: Charged with sexual battery by threats reasonably be-
lieved and burglary with assault therein. According to probable cause report.
the following allegedly occurred: On March 11, 2000, an officer was dispatched
to Weems Hospital in Apalachicola where he was told that defendant forced
his way into a home, assaulted the woman who lived there, threatened her
and took money from her. Defendant entered a plea of not guilty. Pretrial
conference set for February 18, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
SJohnson, Angela R.: Charged with child neglect. According to probable cause
report, the following allegedly occurred: On November 2, 2001, an officer was
dispatched to the home of the defendant who stated her 16-year-old daughter
was no longer allowed in her house. When advised that the daughter was
underage, the defendant insisted on removing her from the home. Arraign-
ment was continued to January 11, 2001.
Jones, Travis N.: Charged with sale of controlled substance and resisting
officer with violence. According to probable cause report, the following alleg-
edly occurred: On October 23, 2001, officers conducting controlled buys of
illegal narcotics purchased what tested to be crack cocaine from the defen-
dant on 12th Street in Apalachicola. On October 31, 2001, officers arrived at
132 12th Street to arrest the defendant on an outstanding warrant. After
defendant was identified, he ran, breaking a television inside the residence,
then shoved officers. He was chased and apprehended two blocks away from
the residence. Pretrial conference was set for February 18, 2002. Steiger rep.
resented the defendant.
Longway, James Joseph Jr.: Charged with driving while license suspended
felony. According to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred:
Son November 16, 2001, while on routine patrol an officer observed a vehicle
with no tag. The defendant, nor his passenger, had drivers licenses, and no
insurance on the vehicle. A traffic check found the defendant listed as a ha-
bitual traffic violator. Arraignment was continued to January 11. 2002. Steiger
represented the defendant.
Lowery, George Andy: Charged with two counts of sale of controlled sub-'
stance. According to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred:
on October 1, and October 2, 2001, officers making controlled buys of illegal
narcotics purchased what tested to be crack cocaine from the defendant on
Southeast Avenue D in Carrabelle. Defendant entered a written plea of not
guilty. Pretrial conference was set for February 18, 2002. Steiger represented
the defendant.
Mathis, Raymond: Charged with possession of firearm by convicted felon
and discharge of firearm in public. According to probable cause report. the


following allegedly occurred: On November 16, 2001, an officer was dispatched
to 81 Dunlap Road in Eastpoint in reference to someone shooting a shotgun. PRETRIAL CONFERENCES
According to Georgia State Criminal History, the defendant had been con-
victed of burglary in 1979. Defendant entered a written plea of not guilty. Babbs, Cecil R.: Charged with aggi
Arraignment was continued, to January 11, 2002. Steiger represented the de- criminal mischief $200 to $1,000. St
fendant. Sanders represented the defendant.
O'Neal, Lorenzo: Charged with sale of controlled substance. According to Banks, Claude F.: Charged with agg
probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred- On August 21. 2001, set for January 11, 2002. Steiger re
the Franklin County Narcotics Task F1~6e 'i'a~ : cond ,uci ng con rolled buv\s of
illegal narcotics in the Carrabelle areahA substance which *ested posiu\e for
crack cocaine was purchased from the defendant on Southeast 7th Stieet. ContinUi
Defendant entered a written plea of not guilty. Pretrial conference was set for
January 11, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Ostrowski, Theresa M.: Deferred prosecution agreement made on December THE
18, 2000. Arraignment continued to January 11, 2002. Steiger represented
the defendant. EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Pearson, Jabara; D.: Charged with sale of controlled substance. According to WELCOMES YOU
probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On October 13, 2001.
officers making controlled buys of illegal narcotics purchased what tested
positive as crack cocaine from the defendant at 10th Street ard Avenue J in +
Apalachicola.. Defendant entered a written plea of not guilty. Pretrial confer-. |t" +
ence was set for January 11, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Robinson, Alpha Omega: Charged with sale of controlled-substance. Accord
ing to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On October 24,
2001, officers making controlled buys of illegal narcotics purchased a sub-
stance which tested positive as crack cocaine at the corner of 10th Street and
Avenue K in Apalachicola. Defendant entered a plea of not guilty. Public de-
fender appointment made. Pretrial conference set for February 18, 2002.
Sanborn, Harry: Charged with two counts aggravated assault with deadly
weapon. State chose not to prosecute. Atty. J. Ben Watkins represented the

Sanders, Mark Paul: Charged with grand theft of motor vehicle, grand theft,
and resisting officer with violence. According to probable cause report, the
following allegedly occurred: On November 1, 2001, an officer wascalled to pf
313 Water Street in reference to attempted theft of a gray Volkswagen truck.850-653-9550
Defendant was also implicated in theft of a 1986 Jeep Waggoner with boat
trailer. In violation of probation hearing on resisting officer with violence charge. Highway 98 & 6th Street
defendant admitted violation, was adjudicated guilty, given six months in jail. Apalachicola
with credit for time served 71 days. On theft charges, defendant entered writ- EST. 1836
ten plea of not guilty. Pretrial conference set for January 11, 2002. Steiger
represented the defendant. 7SUNDAY
Shiver, Johnny: Charged with sale of controlled substance according to prob- 730 A.M.
able cause report, the following allegedly occurred.: On October 2, 2001, nar- 10:30A.M.


A TWO-DAY EVENT!

April 27th and 28th, 2002

The 12th Annual

Riverfront.Festival

in Carrabelle, Florida

where the Carrabelle River

greets the Gulf of Mexico.


2002


RItVERFRONT
F-E-S-T-I-V-A-L
FE T---A


ravated assault with deadly weapon and
ate chose not to prosecute. Atty. Barbara

ravated assault with deadly weapon.Trial
presented the defendant. .

ed onPage 6


ST. GEORGE
ISLAND
UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
201 E. Gulf Beach Drive
St. George Island, FL 32328

Adult Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 9:30 a.m.
Children's Sunday School
And Nursery during Morning
Worship

Phone: 927-2088
E-mail: sgiumc@gtcom.net
Rev. James Trainer, Pastor


Picturesque Carrabelle is located on Florida's "Forgotten" coast. The
Fc.ni.Il 4lec Is, l.:aJcd on scenic Marine Street which runs along
I.:rrjhelle beautiful ri\er harbor between State Route 98 and the
il\ ner. i ren _.:uced Riverwalk and Pavillion. Festival hours will be
atjirdar 11.1a m ti:i 5 p.m. and Sunday 12 noon to 4 p.m.

The Arts Festival will-feature quality regional artists exhibit-
ing ri.injl, ;is ivell as limited and open edition prints. Craft
ArrIts .I1ll pre..ent authentic custom-designed works "
Including fine pottery, stained glass, sculpture, unique
metal irt, custom woodcarvings, yard art and more.

Festival Food will include a wonderful array of
Local and regional vendors offering a variety of
III I _. jefood specialties and old-time favorites.
^r^ -' ,
Music will be sponsored by Wicked Willies,
featuring the band Locomotive. For more
information call the Carrabelle Chamber
Sof Commerce at 850-697-2585.


Jfirt t japti t Cburid
St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor

Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!

Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 7:00 p.m"
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


.---- ---~------- Y


The
Franklin

Chronicle

Now distributed in
Franklin. Wakulla
and Gulf Counties


rc\-
,,


coucs task force officers conducting controlled buys of illegal narcotics in the
Eastpoint area, purchased oxycodone from the defendant at Lot # 7, Millender's
Trailer park. Public Defender appointment made. Pretrial conference set for
January 11, 2002.
Shiver, Kelley A.: Charged with battery of law enforcement officer, resisting
officer with violence and DUI. According to probable cause report, the follow-
ing allegedly occurred: on November 2, 2001, officers in Eastpoint observed a
blue Toyota traveling at a high rate of speed pass a vehicle in a no-passing
zone. Driver of the vehicle refused to stop on signal of red and blue lights, then
pulled into the EZ-Serve parking lot and continued to walk into the store,
where he refused to come out. When officers attempted to arrest him, defen-
dant became combative, stuck a cigarette onto an officer's arm, and refused a
sobriety test. Defendant entered a written plea of not guilty. Pretrial confer-
ence was set for January 11, 2002. Atty. Rendi Katalinic represented the de-
fendant.
Suddeth, Glen L.: Charged with sale of controlled substance. According to
probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On November 13. 2001.
Narcotics Unit officers .conducting controlled buys of illegal narcotics pur-
chased what tested positive as crack cocaine from defendant on the corner of
9th Street and Avenue K in Apalachicola. Defendant entered a plea of no
contest, was adjudicated guilty, given 48 days in jail, with credit for time
served 48 days, two years probation, standard drug conditions, was ordered
to pay $295 court costs and $100 to FDLE. Steiger represented the defendant.
Turrell, Ben: Charged with sale of controlled substance. According to prob-
Sable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On September 22, 2001.
officers making controlled buys of illegal substances purchased what tested
to be crack cocaine from the defendant. Defendant entered a plea of not guilty.
Pretrial conference was set for February 18, 2002. Steiger represented the
defendant.
Welsh, James J.: Charged-with exploitation of elderly. Probable cause previ-
ously published. State chose not to prosecute.
West, Raymond D.: Charged with two counts of sale of controlled substance.
According to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On Sep-
tember 4, 2001, sheriffs officers were conducting controlled buys of illegal
substances in Apalachicola and purchased what was tested to be crack co-
caine from the defendant at the corner of 9th Street and Avenue J. The defen-
dant entered a plea of not guilty. Pretrial conference continued on both counts
to February 18, 2001. Steiger represented the defendant.
White, Damien: Charged with three counts of sale of controlled substance.
According to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On Sep-
tember 13, 2001, officers making controlled buys of illegal substances in
Apalachicola purchased what tested positive as crack cocaine from the defen-
dant on the corer.of 9th Street and Avenue K. On October 13, 2001, officers
purchased what tested positive as crack cocaine from the defendant on the
corner of 9th Street-and Avenue J..,On October 17, officers purchased a sub-
stance which tested positive as crack cocaine from the defendant on the cor-
ner of 9th Street and Avenue L. Defendant entered a plea of not guilty. Pretrial
conference was set for February 18, 2002. A public defender was to be ap-
pointed on one count. On the other'two Steiger represented the defendant.
Williams, Alex D.: Charged with sale of controlled substance (crack cocaine).
According to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On Sep-
tember 8, 2001, officers making controlled buys of Illegal substances pur-
chased what tested positive to be crack cocaine from the defendant on the
corner of 9th Street and Avenue J in Apalachicola. Defendant entered a plea
of not guilty. Pretrial conference set for January 11, 2002. Steiger represented
*the defendant.
Williams, Freddie: Charged with two counts of sale of controlled substance.
According to probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On Sep-
tember 7, 2001, officers making controlled buys purchased what tested posi-
tive as crack cocaine from the defendant on the corner of 9th Street and Av-
enue J in Apalachicola. on October 14, 2001, officers purchased what tested
positive as crack cocaine from the defendant at 10th Street and Avenue J. In
court hearing motion for pretrial release denied. Pretrial conference set for
February 18, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Williams, Johnny Lee: Charged with battery domestic violence, aggravated
assault with deadly weapon, and sale of controlled substance. According to
probable cause report, the following allegedly occurred: On August 10, 2001.
an officer was dispatched to 254 9th Street in Apalachicola. where it was
reported that the defendant had hit a' woman and held a piece of broken
mirror to her neck. On September 4, 2001, officers making controlled buys of
illegal substances purchased what tested positive as crack cocaine from the
defendant at the corner of 9th Street and Avenue-J. On motion for pretrial
release, bail increased to $12,500. Arraignment on the battery and assault
charges continued to February 18, 2002, with pretrial conference on sale of
Scbntrolled substance set for the same day. Steiger represented the defendant.








Pape 6 5 Anril 2002


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Second Circuit Court from Page 5
Beebe, Dennis Lake: Charged with two counts of grand theft. Trial set for
February 18, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Brannan, Shirl Evans: Charged with battery of law enforcement officer. Also
violation of probation hearing. Continuance granted to January 11. 2002.
Steiger represented the defendant.
Brown, Shawn V.: Charged with resisting officer with violence, battery of law
enforcement officer. willful and wanton reckless driving. Case set for jury trial
Son January 11. 2002. Atty. J. Gordon Shuler represented the defendant.
Burns, Calvin R.: Charged with aggravated assault on law enforcement of-
ficer, reckless driving and possession of controlled substance. Pretrial confer-
ence continued to January 11. 2002. with trial by jury on aggravated assault
and reckless driving charges set for January 23, 2002. Steiger represented
the defendant.
Buzbee Christopher: Charged with criminal mischief 3rd degree felony, bur-
glary of a structure, and violation of probation on four counts of uttering a
forged check. Trial continued to January 11. 2002. Steiger represented the
defendant.
Calhoun, Myron G.: Charged with carjacking. Trial by jury set for February
18. 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Campbell, Robert L.: Charged with obtaining or attempting to.obtain con-
trolled substance by fraud. Trial continued to January 11, 2002. Atty. Bar-
bara Sanders represented the defendant.
Dykes, Clifford M. Jr.: Charged with two counts possession of cannabis more
than 20 grams. driving while license suspended felony, felony fleeing or at-
tempt to elude. cultivation of cannabis, and possession drug paraphernalia.
Trial by jury set for January 11. 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Ellis, David: Charged with grand theft third degree. Pretrial conference con-
tinued to January 11. 2002. Atty. Barbara Sanders represented the defen-
dant.
Estes, Gloria Vickery: Charged with three counts of tampering with a wit-
ness. Trial set for January 11, 2002. Atty. J. Gordon Shuler represented the
defendant.
Estes, Robert C.: Charged with aggravated battery with deadly weapon. Trial
date continued to February 18. 2002. Atty. Robert A. Rand represented the
defendant.
Fitzgerald, Sean Patrick: Charged with murder second degree. Pretrial con-
ference continued to March, 18, 2002, with trial on March 20. 2002. Atty.
Barbara Sanders represented the defendant.
Geter, Sylvia: Charged with grand theft. Trial set for January 11. 2002. Atty.
Barbara Sanders represented the defendant.
Glenn, Gerald D.: Charged with three counts of sexual battery by one in
familial authority and two counts of lewd and lascivious assault or act. Trial
set for March 18, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Gloner, Joseph R.: Charged with sexual battery with deadly weapon. Defen-
dant entered a plea of no contest, was adjudicated guilty, received 130 days
jail with credit for time served 130 days, one year probation, $295 court costs,
ordered to have no contact with victim, and possess no swords or weapons.
Steiger represented the defendant.
Golden, James Keith: Charged with possession outboard motor serial num-
ber removed. Trial set for January 11, 2002. Atty. Barbara Sanders repre-
sented the defendant.
Harrell, Deneen C.: Charged with grand theft. Trial set for January 11. 2002.
Steiger represented the defendant.
Hill, Travis Walker: Charged with driving while license suspended felony.
Failed to show for pretrial conference, bond cancelled, and warrant issued for
his arrest. Steiger represented the defendant.
Hurd, Preston W.: Charged with aggravated battery on pregnant victim. State
chose not to prosecute. Steiger represented the defendant.
Jackson, Del Romel: Charged with driving while license suspended felony.
Pretrial conference continued to January 11, 2002. with trial set for January
23, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Jones, Johnny: Charged with possession of controlled substance, cultivation
of cannabis, possession less than 20 grams marijuana, and possession drug
paraphernalia. Trial'set for January 11, 2002. Atty. Ryan R. Davis repre-
sented the. defendant.
Keith, Jason Derrick: Charged with burglary of a dwelling,, dealing stolen
property, and leaving scene of accident with injuries. Trial set for January 11.
2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Lane, Stacy R.: Charged with aggravated assault \uth deadly weapon Stite
chose npt to prosecute.'Atty'. Jan Hevier rereesented the defendant.
Lee, Christopher Brian: Charged with eultivation ofcanriabis, possession of
cannabis more than 20 grams, andipossession controlled substance intent to
deliver. Trial set for January 11, 2002. Atty. J. Gordon Shuler represented the
defendant.
McCullough, David P.: Charged with worthless checks over $150. Jury trial
set for February 18, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Millender, Jared Joseph: Charged with grand theft. Jury trial set for Febru-
ary 18, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Neel, Kimberly J.: Charged with aggravated battery, drug possession mari-
juana under 20 grams, drug paraphernalia use of possession, and trespass.
Trial set for.January 11,2001. Atty. Barbara Sanders represented the defen-
dant.


FSU Marine

Laboratory

Open House

The Florida State University Ma-
rine Laboratory, located near Tur-
key Point on U.S. Highway 98, will
hold an Open House on Saturday,
April 27, from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m.
Investigators will present their
ongoing research. Informational
talks and demonstrations will be
offered throughout the day. Dis-
plays of local marine animals, in-
cluding "touch tanks" for visitors
of all ages, will be available.
Boat trips will be offered (weather
.permitting), to demonstrate typi-
cal collecting techniques and to
examine and release the creatures
captured in the trawl net. Chil-
dren are welcome on the boat
trips, but must be 11 years of age
or in the sixth grade.
In addition, live diving demonstra-
tions by members of the Marine
Laboratory's Academic Diving
Program will be conducted on
board the research vessel Semi-
nole at dockside.
Food may be purchased on site
from Posey's Beyond the Bay Res-
taurant of Panacea.
The Open House takes place in
conjunction with the Carrabelle
Waterfront Festival and the
Apalachicola Antique Boat Show.
There is no charge to attend the
Open House. Parking will be di-
rected by uniformed officers, and
handicapped guests may park
inside the gate.
The Florida State University Ma-
rine Laboratory Is located In
Franklin County at 3618 U.S.
Highway 98, between Panacea (to
the east) and Carrabelle (to the
west): Call (850) 697-4095 for
more information



- W *^Frankl4mSSin
Chronicle

No % diIi il d ilIlill i


O'Neal, Michael: Charged with two counts sale of controlled substance, one
count possession of controlled substance. State chose not to prosecute one
count of sale of controlled substance. Atty. Robert Rand represented the de-
fendant on one count of sale of controlled substance. Pretrial conference con-
tinued to January 11. 2002 on other counts, with trial set for January 23.
2002, with Atty. Barbara Sanders representing the defendant.
Price, Jeffrey L.: Charged with interference with custody. Trial set for March
18, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Price, Park McLean: Charged with aggravated assault with deadly weapon
and disorderly conduct. Defendant entered a plea of no contest, was adjudi-
cated guilty, given six months probation on each count, with credit for time
served 10 days, to pay $250 fine, no contact with victim, no firearms. and
random drug testing. Steiger represented the defendant.
Ray, Sheryl: Charged with child abuse. Trial set for February 18, 2002. Steiger
represented the defendant.
Rose, Christopher Dwight II: Charged with burglary of a dwelling and deal-
ing stolen property. Trial set for February 18, 2002. Steiger represented the
defendant.
Rowland, Robert Lewis: Charged with burglary of a dwelling and grand theft.
Trial set for February 18, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Salter, Albert, Jr.: Charged with two counts sale of controlled substance.
Trial set for January 11, 2002. Atty. Ryan R. Davis represented the defen-
dant.
Sanborn, Keith: Charged with grand theft of a firearm. State chose not to
prosecute. Atty. Barbara Sanders represented the defendant.
Sanders, Anthony: Charged with sale of substance in lieu of cocaine and sale
of controlled substance. State chose not. to prosecute on charge of sale of
substance in lieu of cocaine. On sale of controlled substance, defendant en-
tered a plea of no contest, was adjudicated guilty and received 11 months, 29
days, admitted violation of probation, was adjudicated guilty, probation ter-
minated, received 11 months, 29 days, to run concurrent, with credit for time
served 223 days. Atty. Barbara Sanders represented the defendant.
Seaburn, Westley: Charged with attempted first-degree murder with firearm.
Pretrial conference'continued to February 18, 2002, with trial set for Febru-
ary 20, 2002. Atty. Barbara Hobbs represented the defendant.
Strops, Benny Ray: Charged with aggravated battery great bodily harm. Trial
set for February 18, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Tarantino, Thomas C.: Charged with three counts of dealing stolen property.
Defendant entered written denial of violation of probation. Trial set for Janu-
ary 11, 2002. Atty. J. Gordon Shuler-represented the defendant.
Thomas, Fred W.: Charged with five counts of worthless checks over $150.
and five counts of grand theft. Trial set for January 11, 2002. Atty. Steven P.
Glazer represented the defendant.
Thomas, Marlo M.: Charged with aggravated battery with deadly weapon.
Trial set for January 11, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Thomas, Cynthia Farland: Charged, with grand theft and uttering a forged
check. Trial set for February 18, 2002. Atty. Rachel Chesnut represented the
defendant.
Wallace, Darren Lee: Charged with sale of controlled substance, and two
counts of aggravated battery. Pretrial conference continued.to February 18.
2002, with trial February 20, 2002. Atty. Ryan R. Davis represented the de-
fendant.
White, Arthur S.: Charged with aggravated battery great bodily harm. Trial
continued to January 11, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
Williams, James: Charged with dealing stolen property. Pretrial conference
continued to February 18, with trial February 20, 2002. Steiger represented
the defendant.
Wood, Eric Elton: Charged with cultivation of cannabis and possession of
cannabis more than 20 grams. Trial set for January 11, 2002.
Wood, Larry David: Charged with burglary of dwelling and grad theft. Trial
set for February 18, 2002. Atty. Don Pumphrey Jr. represented the defendant.
Zabielski, Michael: Charged with possession of firearm by convicted felon.
Trial continued to January 11, 2002. At hearing on violation of probation on
the charge of stalking, motion granted for continuance to January 11, 2002.
Steiger represented the defendant.

VIOLATION OF PROBATION ARRAIGNMENT
Beaty, Michael S.: Charged with grand theft and uttering a forged check.
Defendant filed a written denial. Hearing reset for February 18, 2002. Atty.
Larry D. Simpson represented the defendant.
Cargill, Holly-Marie: Charged with-possession of cocaine with intent to sell
and conspiracy to,traffic in.cocaine. Defendant entered written denial. Hear-
ing reset for January 11, 2002. Atty.-Barbara Sanders represented the defep-
dant.
Jackson, Kenneth R.: Charged with grand theft. Hearing reset for January
11, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.
McDonald, Michael: Charged with violation of probation. Hearing reset for
January 11, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.


CLEANING OUT

THE CLOSET

The Franklin Chronicle'is making back issues avail-
able by the year-or volume at modest cost. Please send
your requests indicating the years involved at $8.00
per year for postage and handling. 26 issues per year.

Send request to: Franklin Chronicle, Post Office
Box 590, Eastpoint, FL 32328.




CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 03/22/02 Invoice No. 6888
Description of Vehicle: Make Chrysler Model Cordoba Color White
Tag No Year 1981 State FL VinNo. 3BJ52K1BR118220
To Owner: Maria Senat White To Lien Holder:
2502A Holton Street
Tallahassee, FL 32310


You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
03/17/02 at the request of FHP that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 356.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of
the lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 04/25/02 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 447 HWY 98 EASTPOINT, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of the
vehicle you must present personal identification. driver's license and PROOF
OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay the
charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


VIOLATION OF PROBATION HEARINGS
Anderson, Michael James: Charged with burglary of structure. Admitted to
violation, adjudicated guilty, ordered to either 20 weekends in jail or 10 days
in jail within first three months, new term three years probation, with all prior
conditions. Atty. Timothy Jansen represented the defendant.
Baxley, Paul C.: Charged with driving while license suspended or revoked.
Admitted violation, adjudicated guilty, received 60 days in jail, with credit for
time served 30 days, to turn self in on December 18, 2001. civil judgment.
Steiger represented the defendant.
Dillon, Robert J.: Charged with manslaughter by-autQ culpable negligence
and two counts of DUI with serious injuries. Hearing reset for January 11.
2002. Atty. Ryan R. Davis represented the defendant.
Edgecomb, Kristen R.: Charged with sale of controlled substance. Failed to
appear, bond cancelled, warrant for arrest issued. Steiger represented the
defendant.
Lowery, Clarence: Charged with two counts dealing in stolen property and
cultivation of cannabis. Motion for continuance granted with hearing reset for
January 11, 2002. Atty. Steve M. Watkins II represented the defendant.
Romeka, William: Charged with felony fleeing or attempt to elude. Admitted
violation, adjudicated guilty, received three years probation with 18 months
in Wakulla Bed Program, all prior conditions. Steiger represented the defen-
dant.
Strops,- Michael John: Charged with driving under influence third degree
felony and driving while license suspended or revoked. Admitted violation.
adjudicated guilty, received new term of two years with all prior conditions,
complete inpatient and aftercare. Steiger represented the defendant.
Woullard, Freddie: Charged with aggravated battery great bodily harm. Hearing
continued to January 11, 2002. Steiger represented the defendant.

HEARINGS/OTHER
Estes, Robert C.: Motion for statutory fees and extraordinary attorney fees
granted. Atty. Barbara Sanders represented the defendant.
Fitzgerald, Sean Patrick: Charged with murder second degree. Motion for
certification that case is extraordinary and unusual granted. Renewed motion
to set bond denied. Atty. Barbara Sanders represented the defendant.
Kwanzaa, Ayokunie O.: Charged with resisting arrest with violence, battery
on law enforcement officer, trespass structure or conveyance and corruption
by threat against public servant. Hearings reset for March 18, 2002. Steiger
represented the defendant. .
Robinson, Walter Ray: Motion granted to modify probation to extend for one
year administrative. Steiger represented the defendant.-
Salter, Albert Jr.: motion for certification that case extraordinary denied. Atty.
Barbara Sanders represented the defendant.
Williams, Freddie: Charged with three counts of sale of controlled substance.
Motion for pretrial release denied. Steiger represented the defendant.
Brown, Charles: Charged with sale of controlled substance. Supplemental
motion for pretrial release denied'. Steiger represented the defendant.
Seaburn, Westly: Charged with attempted murder with firearm. On motion
bond set at $75,000, ordered to 8 p.m. curfew, and no firearms. Atty. Barbara
Hobbs represented the defendant.
Tarantino, Thomas: Motion to set bail denied. Atty. J. Gordon Shuler repre-
sented the defendant.
Dykes, Clifford M. Jr.: Motion to revoke bond withdrawn. Steiger represented
the defendant.
Jones, Johnny L.: Motion to revoke bond granted. Atty. Ryan Davis repre-
sented the defendant.
Stripling, Holly: On motion to set bond, released on own recognizance, or-
dered to provide regular medical reports, receive random testing and to attend
Alcoholics Anonymous meetings. Atty. Barbara Sanders represented the de-
fendant.,
Collins, William: Motion to reduce bond deferred to January 11, 2002.
Davis, Clinton: Motion approved to set bond at $15,000.

JURY TRIALS
McCullough, David P.: Charged with worthless checks over $150. State chose
not to prosecute. Steiger represented the defendant..
Sanborn, Keith: Charged with grand theft of a firearm. State chose not to
prosecute; Atty. BarbaracSanders represented the defendant.
i : x .. .


St. George Island


Commercial Building Site



Alley

East Pine Avenue, St.

George Island Gulf

Beaches. Great

Commercial Location in

Heart of St. George's

Busy Shopping District.
Lots 1-2 Site Area is 6,750 Sq.Ft.

Unit -E (50'x 135'). $170,000
Please call for more

information


Exclusive Agent
Samuel D. Gilbert
Coldwell Banker Suncoast Realty


- ,.- .. ...... .*y., ,.1,yrmuiV .rw.c.Vm SUNCOAST REALTY

Coldwell Banker Suncoast Realty 224 Franklin Boulevard

St. George Island, Florida 32328

(800)341-2021 (850)927-2282 Fax: (850)927-2230
An Independently Owned And Operted Member of Cokhdwe Banker Reldntil Affilatee.


I


East Pine Avenue


www.uncommonflorida.cor
I; e-malam un.lj'1ji Ilnmmnn.nrin-, ,rnm


'Uk'' --'-- --- ~~ ;--------


Colivel ankr uncas Rell


~I
!~CEZI ;li








, The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


5 April 2002 Page 7


Implications for Summer Camp Marina

Seagrasses Important In

Florida


By Tom Campbell
Seagrasses are a valuable and
necessary part of Florida's marine
environment, but are disappear-
ing at an alarming rate, accord-
ing to many scientists.
Dredge-and-fill projects and de-
graded water quality are mainly
responsible for the decline. Pro-
peller scarring also damages
seagrasses.
With the enthusiasm of a dedi-
cated teacher, Linda Fitzhugh
described the importance of the
"Underwater World of Florida's
Seagrasses" in her lecture on this
important subject at the
.Apalachicola Research Reserve's
Nature Center on March 21, 2002.
Fitzhugh is Assistant Professor of
Biology at Gulf Coast Community
College (GCCC) and Program Co-
ordinator for the Seagrass Moni-
toring Project in St. Andrew's Bay
near Panama City.

What Are Seagrasses?
The average person may not think
much about seagrasses, but
Fitzhugh is trying to change that.
Seagrasses are grass-like flower-
ing plants that live underwater.
Although seagrasses occur
throughout the coastal areas of
the state, they are most abundant
in Florida Bay and from Tarpon
Springs northward to Apalachee
Bay in the Gulf.
Seagrasses occur in protected
bays and lagoons and'also in
places along the continental shelf
in the Gulf of Mexico. The depth
at which seagrasses are found is
limited by water clarity because
they require light.


Florida has approximately 2 mil-
lion acres of seagrasses, and they
perform many significant func-
tions. The most important func-
tions are:
* they help maintain water clar-
ity by trapping fine sediments and
particles with their leaves;
* they provide shelter for many
fishes, crustaceans, and shellfish;
* they can stabilize the bottom
with their roots and rhizomes in
much the same way that land
grasses slow soil erosion; and
* they and the organisms that
grow on them are food for many
marine animals and water birds.

Protection
The "forest" of seagrass leaves
protects young marine animals
from larger, open-water predators.
Some animals, such as manatees
and sea turtles, eat seagrass
blades. Other animals derive nu-
trition from eating algae and small
animals that live upon seagrass
leaves. These colonizing organ-
isms provide an additional link in
the marine food web.

5-Year Goal
Fitzhugh said she has a "5-year
goal" to spread the word of the
significance of seagrasses to lo-
cal area residents and others. She
wrote a grant and got monejr from.
National Oceanic and Atmo-
spheric Administration (NOAA).
Part of that money she used to
purchase an underwater camera,
because she plans to use under-
water video as part of her 5-year
goal of spreading the word.


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 03/19/02 Invoice No. 6890
Description of Vehicle: Make Cadillac Model Brougham Color Gray
Tag No Year 1987 Stae FL VinNo. 1G6DW51Y8H9751391
To Owner: Evelyn Marie Benitev To Lien Holder:
P.O. Box 1252
Lanark Village, FL 32323


You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
03/15/02 at the request of. CPD that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They'the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 296.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle fromn the lien of
the lienor; that subsection (4) of. Florida Statute713.78..

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 04/18/02' at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 447 HWY 98 EASTPOINT, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges piu all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited % ith the Clerk of the Circuit Court
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of the
vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and PROOF
OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the:address below and pay the
charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219



OCHLOCKONEE BAY REALTY
Tim Jordan, Li. Real Estate Broker:
984-0001 984-5734 146 Highway 98 or
P.O. Box 556, Panacea, FL 32346 '
ASSOCIATES: Marsha Tucker: 570-9214 Jerry Peters: 984-0103
Ed Brimner: 570-0014 Mike Gale: 567-2227
Pam Thomas: 349-9552 Eloise Weymouth: 962-9092 Janis Davis: 570-1145
Call us for a complete list of properties. Beach rentals & sales. A.--
web address: www.obrealty.com e-mail: obr@obrealty.com
FRANKLIN COUNTY
WATERFRONT HOMES
* Alligator Point! Peninsula Circle! 1306 sq. ft. w/2BR/2BA on pilings, CHA, large
great room, built in 1974, remodeled in 1998. A must to see with a view that is breath
taking! All on 2 oversized lots on Bay! Just $329,000. 136FWH.
* Alligator Point! Near the marina! Gulf to bay! 1BR/1BA up and 1BR/1BA down
with sleeping porch, 2 kitchens! Great investment property. All on 100'x600' gulf to
bay lot. Just $575,000. 137FWH.
SAlligator Point! Beachfront! 3BR/1BA, 1121 sq. ft., CHA, large open Old Florida
Beach Cottage across from the marina. $429,000. 139FWH.
* Alligator Point! Bayfront! Alligator Point! Fish from the back deck of this 2BR/
1.5BA, CHA, fully equipped kitchen. Great view! Great buy! Just $259,000.
140FWH.
HOMES WITH ACREAGE/LOTS140FWH
* Alligator Point! Beautiful Florida style home overlooking Alligator Harbor. White
stucco exterior with tile roof, inground pool, privacy fence, and screened porch. 4BR/
2BA, CHA, vaulted ceilings, ceiling fans, large master suite with his and hers clos-
ets, large storage room. Priced below appraisal at $224,500. 74FAH.
*Alligator Point! Beautiful, affordable home with view of Alligator Harbor Bay, 2BR/
2BA, Fla. Rm., deck, screened porch, fireplace, privacy fence, utility room, com.
boat ramp & more! Only $129,900. 75FAH.
* Gorgeous Lot! Alligator Point! 50x535+/- w/10' deeded easement to bay to build
a dock. Just $299,000. 36FWL.
*Alligator Point! Huge Gulf front lot! Large lot at Alligator Point with 140+/- on Gulf
and easement to bay for boating. This heavily wooded and deep lot is just $450,000.
A 38FWL.
* Gulf Front! Large beautiful lot near Bald Point State Park Preserve within Coastal
Barrier Act designation. The surf, sand and sea oats provide a serene setting for
your dream home. $399,000. Possible owner financing. 39FWL.
GULF COUNTY


She said seagrass meadows in the
bay "look like brown patches in
the water," but are very important.
There are three species of
seagrass in St. Andrew Bay: 1.)
Shoal-grass (Halodule wrightii) is
an early colonizer of vegetated
areas and usually grows in water
too shallow for most other species;
2) Turtle-grass (Thalassia
testudinum) is the largest of the
Florida seagrasses, characteristi-
cally with a deeper root structure
than any of the other sea-
grasses; and 3) Manatee-grass
Syringodium filiforme) is easily
recognizable because its leaves
are cylindrical.
Almost 20 percent of manatee-
grass acreage declined in the St.
Andrew Bay area from 1953 to
1992. Setting up a monitoring
program is part ofFitzhugh's plan
to save the seagrasses. She and
her students go "into the water"
of St. Andrew Bay regularly to do
their studies about the sea-
grasses-usually in the fall of the
year, because the water has more
clarity which aids in the studies.
Those interested may find out
more by going via email to
lfitzhugh@gc.cc.fl.us and will be.
most welcome as Fitzhugh said
she is constantly on the lookout-
for helpers in the studies.


LVSWD Turns

Down Carrabelle's

Offer On Water

And Sewer District

By Rene Topping
Lanark Village Sewer and Water,
District (LVWSD) Board members,'
Chairman Jim Lawlor and Mike
Hughes turned down a proposal
made by Baskerville and Donovan
Inc. Water (BDI) and was from the
city of Carrabelle. Jim Lawlor
made the motion which read:
"Upon the advice of the board's,
attorney and our other advisors
the board has decided not to get
into the proposal and will turn it:
down."
Lawlor had already reported that
there, was no legal way the Dis-
trict could stop the City of
Carrabelle from laying sewer
pipes on the right of way of US 9.8
going through the entire district.
Lawlor said, at the February meet-
ing BDI Engineers for the City of-


Carrabelle, Bill McCartney and
Dan Keck had brought a proposal.
Lawlor said he was the only com-
missioners present and so could
only listen to the proposal.
There were several options includ-
ing one in which the City of
Carrabelle would take over the
entire district.
Commissioner Mike Hughes had
also had a meeting with BDI but
Lawlor said that there had never
been a formal submission.
Lawlor said, "my opinion as a
board member is that they have
not submitted to us any viable
option that would bring a big sav-
ings to the district." He added the
last one they gave him was one
with the rates on it. He said that
presently the rates are $24 for
water and $24 for sewer. "Inside
and outside the city rates, our
rates are according to the chart
they gave our rates which will be
higher then those inside the city.
He said the only option for them
.would be to take over the whole
district."
Mike Hughes said that he would
go along with Lawlor; he said he
would like to look for other op-
tions.
Lawlor said the main force can be
put and they will be able to re-
cycle the sewer from St. James
Bay. Newt Badcock, our engineer,
came in at that time and Lawlor
brought him Up to date on what
had been discussed.
Lawlor asked the attorney the
engineers and operator to give the
two commissioners advice. He
said that he had seen several op-
tions but had not been too viable.
The board is responsible in a big
way to take care of the custom-
ers. He added that Carrabelle also
has a tax on all utilities.
Thompson said first of all, think
of it you have a house that has
collateral on it. You can't just go
ahead and sell the house when
there is a collateral on it without
the approval of the lender or pay-
ing it all off. You are going to have
to get approval from the people
who gave the district money over
the course of the years, and the
bondholders and that's some-
thing that is going to very oner-
ous to do. There will be a lot of.
legal work in it. He added that
even if the commissioners said
'"let's go," it would be something
of the nature of 6 or more months.
Also there would have to be a
voter's referendum. I think the


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date ofthis Notice .03/19/02 Invoice No. 6891
Description of Vehicle: Make Dodge :,Moodel~am" r White
i.. ._____ 1.F. T-,,,- ,,, .iB-FP2.-1D o-

To Owner: Judith Hicks To Lien Holder:
1095 Bluff Road
Apalachicola, FL 32320


You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
03/16/02 at the request of APD that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 230.00 plus storage charges bccuring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
da) from the date here.o:f will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of
the lienor; that.subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
. You and each of ybu are hereby notified that on 04/28/02 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will:be sold at public auction
at: 447 HWY 98 EASTPOINT, FL : From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of the
vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and PROOF
OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay the
charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
s Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


Franklin County Commission
would have to be notified, DEP
would have to be notified and
probably the Governor's office
because of the past financial
emergencies.
"Even beyond all that." He went
on, "There is the issue of to what
extent can a government author-
ity sell or give away its discretion
to act. He said he could see some
real legal problems.
Badcock and operator Jim
Phillips both found problems in
the district combining with the
City of Carrabelle. At this point
the motion was made to stay as
they are. Hughes said that he was
going to explore other possibilities
or the District.
Lawlor turned to the resignation
of Herschel Blanchett. He said at
first he felt that it was too close to
try for another member but had
changed his mind. Motion was
made to accept Blanchett's resig-
nation and an advertisement be
put into the local paper for any-
one who wished to serve.
Operator Phillips reported on sev-
eral problems and said that they
are all under control. He said that
he would keep on working on
maintenance.
With the list being long, Lawlor
said that it would be good if they
could hire a qualified certified op-
erator to be on the site.
Hughes asked if it would be fea-
sible to cut down on meter read-
ing monthly or to even go to con-
tract billing. This will be re-
searched further.
Badcock gave the engineers report
saying that he would look into
what was happening on the pro-
posed nearby water system.
There is still a problem on seal-
ing the manholes in Gulf Terrace.
Right now'numbers 5, 6 and 7
manholes are leaking. A represen-
tative from Liquid, Plastics had
talked with him. The cost would
be approximately $3,000 per
manhole.
The attorney said he had nothing
new to report. The meeting ended
after a short discussion of expan-
sion of water to the west and keep
on trying to broaden the customer
base. The next meeting will be
held on April 16 at 2 p.m.


City Approves

Take Over Of St.

James Bay Water

And Sewer

By Rene Topping
It took just 18 minutes for the
Carrabelle City Commission to de-
cide to take over the water and
Sewer service of St. James Bay.
City Attorney Doug Gaidry in an
opening report told commission-
ers, "We have late today retyped
and modified the contract you
have in your package. This has a
number of changes that would
strengthen the city side of the con-
tract."
Project Manager Engineer Ella
Mosconis of Baskerville and
Donovan (BDI) reviewed the
agreement on the city taking over
the water system at St. James
Bay. She asked the city to look at
Option B in which the city would
pay a lump sum of a negotiated
price of $725,000 for infrastruc-
ture instead of $1.25 million dol-
lars required in Option A. Eddy
Clark, the owner of the develop-
ment, said that he had already
put into the ground for the water
system equipment that totaled
close to $1,000,000.
If the commissioners chose Op-
tion A he would ask $1.25 mil-
lion for the system that was in and
would be repaid from the taps..
She said that the city would have
to have a guaranteed revenue
source.
Mosconis said that option B
would call for a lump sum of
$725,000. When the system was
turned over the city would receive
all the tap fees at $2,500 each tap.
It seemed as if three of the com-
missioners, Frank Mathes,
Raymond Williams and Mayor
Wilburn (Curley) Messer had their
minds made up as the little dis-
cussion came from only two of the
commissioners. Water and Sewer
Commissioner Phillip Rankin
asked had BDI been able to get a
loan and at what rates. Eddie
Clark said that the engineers told
him that "he needed to know what
he was getting." He said he had
discounted it to $725,000 for all
the infrastructure."
Continued on Page 9


Franklin's Promise from Page 4
counties with larger tax bases that are able to provide matching dol-
lars. The county health department has been involved trying to find
and enroll children and others eligible for KidCare or Medicaid in
Franklin County, but to date only 356 of the 500 available slots are
filled. One of the purposes of this CAP grant application is to allow
the county to foster and continue identification and. enrollment of
children and others eligible for some of the existing programs while
improving senice delivery for those whf are not eligible for the exist-
ing programs. The grant .will:use the community Outreach and edu-
cation objective to ensure,that .children that:are eligible 'for KidCare
are enrolled and covered by the benefits of this program.


"Antiques and old toys cheerfully
bought and sold."


fH e SCe^uti /Cree
DISTINCTIVE ANTIQUES
& ACCESSORIES
79 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320
WSY&ANNCHESNT STORE (850) 653-2084
WESLEY &ANNHOME (850) 653-8564


STAR. G ulf State e>

24 HOUR ATM M T I -Member EQUAL HOUSING
2 aNLENDER
BANKING BA DIC


LOWEST MINIMUM BALANCE Gtlf State

BANK 20
ORDER OF
919S.


FOR BASIC CHECKING V1



Stop by any Gulf State Community Bank

location to open that basic checking account with

ATM card and Gulf Link Internet banking!

Apalachicola Office Carrabelle Office Eastpoint Office St. George Isl. Office
(850)653-2126 (850)697-3395 (850)670-8786 (850)927-2511
Minimum opening deposit $ 100, daily balances less than $199 results in statement fee and debit charge.


Ti -he







Shed



Spedalitniln
Ll Ntuatircat
Andtiqmues
A iAnAque ble it of
antiy mes, nautical ItemVs,
fu-tr ture, collectLbles,
art, books and many
more ALst nctLve accent
Species.

Pkotos circa 1900, of area
LLg kthouses at St. Marks, St.
George Island, Dog Island,
S Cape San Bias.
Postcards, cLrca 1900, of old
S Apalacikcola.
Extremely nique naatical
items, arckdtectural stars,
turtle lamps and ch
mo re!

A tnques &
Collectib Les




Look or the big tin sked on
170 WaterStreet along the
historicApalachicola River.
170 Water Street
P.O. Box 9
Apalachkcola, FL 32329
(850) 653-3635
Lindta Harry Arnold., Owners


HAVE GRINDER
WILL TRAVEL:
Stump and root grind-
ing, reduced to chips. No
job too small or large.
Call Clarence DeWade in
Lanark Village at 697-
2562. FREE ESTIMATES.


I
)



I
i








i


WATERFRONT HOMES
SIndian Summer! "The Georgia Peach" Lg. 1500+/- sq. ft. home, 1st tier lot, 3BR/
2BA, balcony opens from large great room and large balcony off master bedroom,
completely furnished. Gated community with large pool and clubhouse across the
street from this peachy beach house. Great rental record. Just $389,900.100GAH'
To view all of our sales listings and beach rentals go to:
www.obrealty.com


.









Pawe 8 5 Anril 2002


- --e- ----- --


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


FAFlorida Classified


VFCUl Advertising Network



Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience


of 1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!


The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper

with the FLORIDA REACH at 850-385-4003, fax: 850-385-0830.


Antiques

ANTIQUE SPECTACULAR-Charlotte, NC. April 4-7.
Early Preview on Wednesday, 4/3. 1500 Dealers. Call
(800)824-3770 for details. Bring ad for discount! Free
Parking.

PICCADILLY ANTIQUE & COLLECTORS SHOW.
South Florida Fairgrounds, West Palm Beach, March 29 to
31. Hundreds of antiques and collectibles. For information
call (561)640-3433. www.piccadillypromos.com

Auctions

Auction Property DG-1550 Active Interstate 75 Exit Site!
6.15- Acres at C.R 326 4 1-75. Ocaa. FL. Call (888)404-
9977 10% Buyer's Premium Tranzon Driggers Walter J.
Drggers, Ill, CAI, AARE Lie. Real Estate Broker AU707 &
AB1237

Business Opportunities

*"*WANTED: SERIOUS people to work mailorder/internet
business for international company. Will train. Upto $1500-
$7500 PTIFT. (888)329-1555. Free Information""

VENDING MAKES A GREAT SMALL BUSINESS, Any
Size Town! Ouick Start up. FT or PT,.Low Over Head,
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SOUTHERN LIVING AT HOME. New Catalog Party Plan
Division of SL/Magazine looking for consultants in your
area, $199. Star Director, Shari Hyde. (205)437-9993
www,.sharitaylorhyde.com

Business Opportunities

OWN A DOLLAR STORE. (800)227-5314.
www dollardiscount.com

A DAY AT THE BEACH. $1000 Richei. MedAVend
pays while you Play! Non-prescriptionmedicine vending.
Huge cash return on investment. (615)673-8291.
www.getrealsmart.com M/C, Visa, Financing.

Risk Free Route-$8000/MO. (Proven) No Competition,
40 local vending sites. $30,000 Cash required. (866)391-
5976 (Toll Free)

M &M MARS-FL $3,000/mo. (realistic) 20 local vending
sites, no competition, 6 hrs/mo: $10,500 required.
(800)268-6601 (24 hrs.) AIN#99-007

Risk Free Route-$3250/MO. (Realistic), No Competition,
plentiful vending sites. $9945 Cash required. (800)268-
6601(24hrs) AIN#99-007

ATTENTION: National Prefab Co. seeking area'dealers.
Construction/Sales. Experience an asset! Excellent in-
come opportunity! Details (888)755-2538.

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Doyou earn $800 inaday?
Your own local candy route. 30 Machines and Candy. All
for $9,995. Call (800)998-VEND. AIN#2000-033.

Financial

I iBEl T LLUMilP'.itIC.l.;H$iCAS''H ~ '.l,:r.u' N.ralc.rn
Ca:1-. r.:, ,ou, Louer, pjmenr.u, S .rucured int.ui.r.ce
Settlements, Jackpots, Annuities, Sweepstakes'Prizes, In-
surance payouts. (800)981-5969 www.ppicash.com


Financial

$$CASH$$ Immediate Cash for structured settlements,
annuities, real estate, notes, private mortgage notes, acci-
dent cases, and insurance payouts. (800)794-7310.

*FAST CASH*FOR HOMEOWNERS $15,000? Pay
$94.81'/mo! $50,000. Pay $316.03*/mo! $70,000? Pay
$442.45*/mo! Debt consolidation, cash out. Home im-
provement, no one is faster than Global Consultants!
Closings arranged in 24 hours. Call (877)536-3483 ext.
2000. Today! Reg. Mtg. Brokerin Florida Bankingdepts.
Loans thru 3rd party providers. *Based on 30-year fixed
rate mortgage of.6.5% (6.75%APR) for qualified appli-
cants only. Rates subject to change without notice.

TUFFLOAN.COM When others have failed, we helped.
All credit situations considered. The closest thing to a
guarantee in the mortgage business. Apply online or call
(888)804-7767.

STOP COLLECTOR CALLS! We help lower payments.
Reduce interest. Stop late fees. Debt consolidation. Free
debt counseling. Nonprofit. Call Auriton Solutions toll
fred: (877)245-5855.www.debtcutters.org

For Sale

2-ROOM DIRECTV SYSTEM including installation
$9.95(after $59 credit on first month's bill) Must sub-
scribe to one year Total Choice programming. Details:
(800)859-0440 www.I-LOVE-MY-FREE-DISH.com
REPOSSESSED. Must sell 3 Steel Buildings. Brand New,
never erected. One is 30 X 40. Sacrifice prices. (800)334-
8411.

FREE DIGITAL CELL PHONES.($130 retail value) Guar-
anteed credit approval!!! Free nationwide long distance.
Call Adilson Lopes toll free (877)224-5150 Habalamous
espanol.


Health & Misc. For Sale


DIABETES? PAIN free testing. Get all-your diabetic
testing supplies at little orno cost to you. Medicare, BCBS,
OHI, etc. Pharmacy Distributor Services (800)440-2417.

MEDICARE PATIENTS USING INHALERS. Albuterol-
Atrovent-Combivent-Serevent-Azmacot-Floventandoth-
ers. Having difficulty? Breathe easy again. Medicare cov-
ered liquid therapy may be available if you qualify. MED-
A-SAVE (800)224-1919 ext. FL1302

Help Wanted
AVON. Entrepreneur wanted. Must be willing to work
whenever you want, be your own boss, and enjoy unlim-
ited earnings. Let's talk (888)942-4053.

GOVERNMENT POSTAL JOBS. Up to $47,578. Now
hiring. Full benefits, training, and retirement. Forapplica- .
tion and info. (800)337-9730 Dept. P-335. 8am-Illpm/7
days.

CAREER OPPORTUNITYI Earn Excell6nt income pro-
cessing medical claims for local doctors. Full training
rro..ided Co npuler iequred Pr',):i,. anl & hCalth Care
De.elopmenit 188i 'j.'-blScli:e 4312"


Help Wanted

WORK FROM ANY LOCATION stuffing envelopes.
$4000 Mo. P/T. Receive $4.00 for every envelope pro-
cessed with our sales material. Call 24 hrs. Recorded
message (858)492-8624.

MAKE $$S DELIVERING new cars, vans and RV's,
locally or nationwide, 18 years or older. Call toll free,
(877)520-1007 ext. 376.

EASY WORKI Great Pay! Earn $500 plus a week.
Mailing circulars & assembling products. No experience
necessary. Call toll free (800)267-3944, ext. 104.
www.easywork-greatpay.com .

$2,000 Signing Bonus. Plus 1,000$ more plus commission
as part of a 12 week performance based guarantee! 2-3
confirmed appointments daily Benefits Available.
(888)563-3188.

FRIENDLY TOY'S AND GIFTS has openings for party
demonstrators & managers! Home Decor, Gifts, Toys,
Christmas. Earn cash, trips, recognition. Free information
(800)488-4875.

JOIN OUR WEEKLY HIGH Earners Club $6060 Weekly
Goal Potential.$75,000 to $100,000 Yearly Opportunities
2-3 qualified appts, Daily 28 million inquiries to date.
Benefits availEst.1967 Call Eric Kraft (888)563-3188.

"ATTENTION-Now iringor2002. Postal Jobs $13.21'-
$24.50/hr. Full benefits/Paid Training/No experience nec.
Accepting calls 7 days (888)726-9083 ext. 101.

Legal-Services

DIVORCE $175.00' COVERS children, property divi-
sion, namechange,military, missingspouse,etc. Onlyone
signature required. *Excludes govt. fees,' uncontested.
Paperwork done for you (800)522-6000 ext. 22. B. Di-
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NEEDA LAWYERA-A-AAttorney Referral Service.24
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(800)733-5342.
Real Estate

GATED WATERFRONT COMMUNITY ON LAKE
JAMES, NC. Developers first offer on phase Ill. Pre-
developed discounts. Mountain views. 90% financing.
Limited availability. nclakefrontproperties.com(800)709-
LAKE (5253).

$0 DOWN HOMES Gov't & Bank Foreclosuresl HUD,
VA, FHA. No credit OK. For listings Nowl (800)501-
1777 ext 1699.

NEW LOG CABIN on 3 acres with free boat slip & private
lake access. Tennessee mountains. Near 18 hole golf
course. $69,900. Terms Call (800)704-3154 ext. 231.

SOUTHERNCOLORADO MOUNTAINRETREAT!35
acres with well-$99,900. Pristine acreage near.thousands
of acres of recreational land. Fabulous mountain views,
fields, Ireei NeaF s~,'.ld.~cljj ri ininl &. rtnrig Year
round iacesi Elcellen financing Call no.* (866)696'
5263.


Real Estate

GOT A CAMPGROUND MEMBERSHIP or timeshare?
Well take it! Selling, buyingorrenting? Call the best. Don't
use the rest! World Wide Vacations (800)423-5967.
www.resortsales.com

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS. Enjoy
cool NC Mountains and relax. Homes, cabins, acreage.
Cherokee Mountain Realty Inc. 1285 W. US 64, Murphy,
NC 28906. Call for free brochure. (800)841-5868.

Smokey Mountains Best Buy! Five secluded acres with
stiram incl. building site. Fantastic view! 3400' paved
road. Dead end. Bryson City, NC. $45,000. Owner
financing. (800)810-1590 www.arthurwilliams.net

Blowing Rock Area New Log Home 20 ac on Pisgah Nat.
Forest New 2800 sq ft. log home w/fireplace, hugh hard-
woods, mtn. viewsbeautiful mtn. setting,mins. to Blowing
Rock,just $179,900 EZ Financing(800)455-1981 ext225
LAKE BARGAIN! 3+ ACRES $24,900. Free boat slip.
Beautifully wooded spectacular views, deeded access to
35,000 acre recreational mountain lake in Tennessee -near
18 hole golf course! Paved roads, utilities, perked. Excellent
financing. Call now (800)704-3154, ext 277.

Special Events

TICKETS TO ALL EVENTS-Masters, US Open, KY Derby,
Nascar, all concerts, Braves. Buy/Sell/ Trade (866)44-
TICKET. OrderonlineatEventMarketplace.com WIN FREE
TICKETS.

Wanted to Buy

WANTED: Used satellite receivers and systems-Direct TV
and Dishnet ONLY- PAYING CASH!!! Mystique Market-
'jng Corp. CALL (800)249-9166 No large dish systems
please.

Weddings/Personal .

ROMANTIC CANDLELIGHT WEDDINGS. Ordained
Ministers, Elegantly Decorated Full Service Chapel. Pho-
tos, videos, honeymoon cabins. Fourth night free. Gatlinburg,
TN (800)933-7464. www.sugarlandweddings.com e-mail
weddings@sugarlandweddings.com. i..

TanningBeds/Misc for Sale'

AFFORDABLE, CONVENIENT, -WOFF TANNING
BEDS. Low Monthly Investments. Home.delivery. FREE
Color Catalog Call TODAY: (800)711-0158
wwwv.np.etstan.com

Travel

CARIBBEAN? EUROPE? Call for Quote, Will beat any
offer: (727)392-4715, Toll-free (877)256-2213. Affiliate
of Travel Planners, International. Register on our website
for weekly specials. www.travelkingcentral.com


The Chronicle is now accepting classified ads, up to 40 words each, for
$5.00 per ad; Please send your copy to: Franklin Chronicle, 2309 Old
Bainbridge Road, Tallahassee, FL 32303, by Monday on the week the
Chronicle is published. Type your ad, or print in block letters all the infor-
mation you desire in the ad. If the word and number count exceeds 40.
the cost will be an additional $5.00. Discount rates available. Please re-
member, the Chronicle is published twice monthly, with this issue carry-
ing the date of April 5, 2002. The next issue will be April 19. 2002. Thus.
ad copy, your check and your telephone number must be received by
Tuesday, April 16. 2002. Please indicate the category in which you want
your ad listed. Thanks.

DONATIONS NEEDED
Refuge House clients are in
Need of the following in good
working condition: washer,
dryer, bunk beds and mat-
tresses, chest of drawers. If you
can provide any of the above,
please contact our office at 653-
3313.Thanks.
FOR SALE
S- 5,815 sq. ft. commercial build-
i ing with 7 storage units located
i on 215'x250' lot in the Lanark
Village Retirement Community.
$238,000. Call 850-697-3395
.... (697-3183 nights/weekends).
I-


FOR SALE
Fostoria Glass, American Pat-
tern #2056, for eight persons,
clear glass dishware housed in
cherry cabinet. Extensive set
priced at $2000. Must be seen
to be appreciated. Please call
850-385-4003 for appoint-
ment.


FOR SALE
Tea-cart of solid walnut with
fold out leaves and silverware
drawer, mounted on two wheels
and shelves made by Amana,
Iowa furniture makers. $375.
Please call 850-385-4003.


FOR SALE
"As Is-U/Move" ... 12'x50' mobile homes ... $350 each ... 7 left
... must move to make room for apartments between FSU and
TCC. Open House: Noon Saturday @ 2411 Jackson Bluff Road,
Tallahassee ... stripped frames $50 each ... concrete blocks 50t
... chain link fence posts $1.00 ... 850-556-0709.




The, Fra Chronicl


A.: ir,. isaB a


I ll n IT, r9T 17, W. iJM


We're Looking for a Few

Good People!

Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc., a leader in Florida's vacation/
Hospitality industry, is seeking to fill various full and part
time office positions with people who are dependable,
enthusiastic and have a strong work ethic. If you can work
well with others, possess basic computer and other office
equipment skills, have courteous telephone manners, and
can handle a busy office atmosphere with calm and compe-
tent efficiency, WE WANT YOU! Collins Vacation Rentals,
Inc. offers competitive Wages, paid vacations, health insur-
ance, and flexible hours. Applicants must be available to
work some weekends.
Application forms are available at:
Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc.
60 East Gulf Beach Dr.
St. George Island, FL





CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE

Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 03/27/02.. Invoice No. 6897
Description of Vehicle: Make Chevy Model Cavalier Color White
Tag No Year 1990 State FL vin No. 1GLJC84TOLJ248559

To Owner: Sergio Armando Aristizabal To Lien Holder:
21013 County Creek Road
Boca Raton, FL 33428


You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
03/21/02 at the request of FCSO that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 230.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of
the lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 04/25/02 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 447 HWY 98 EASTPOINT, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of the
vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and PROOF
OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay the
charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


JS Licensed & Insured.
JOHN r S RG0050763
CONSTRUCTION RC0051706


Quality Craftsmanship For Over 40 Years
Specializing in Custom Homes-Remodeling
Additions-Vinyl Siding-Roofing-Repairs


850-697-2376
Fax: 697-4680


E-mail Johnscons2@aol.com
P.O. Drawer JJ Carrabelle, FL 32322


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE

Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 03/22/02 'Invoice No. 6898
Description of Vehicle: Make Datsun 'Model 280ZX color White
Tag No Year 1983 State in No. JNIHZ04SIDX579990

To Owner: Joshua Eugene Harmon .E HI, .i
5628 Wolf Creek Drive
Jacksonville, FL 32222


You and each of you-are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
03/18/02 at the request of FCSO: that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 400.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of
the lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 04/25/02 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 447 HWY 98 EASTPOINT, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of the
vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and PROOF
OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay the
charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


St. George Island, Beachside: "Islescape" Enjoy incredible
Gulf views from this 3BR/2BA 1st tier home. Features include:
fireplace, family room, irrigation system and well. Soon.to be com-
pleted swimming pool will add to rental income potential. $599,000.
MLS#91541.
Select Land Value
St. George IslandBeachview-Lot 9, Savannah Cove, East End. Extraordinary 1
acre nicely wooded lot offers great Gulf views, easy access to the bay and a
community.pier on the bay. $249,000. MLS#91968.


| Prudential Toll-Free: 800-974-2666
SResort Realty Phone: 850-927-2666
..123 Gulf Beach Drive West e-mail: info@stgeorgeisland.com
St. George Island, Florida 32328
www.forgottencoastrealtor.com
An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.


CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 03/20/02 'Invoice No. 6889
Description of Vehicle: Make Chevy Model Camaro Color Blue
Tag No D888429 Year 2002 Siate FL vin No. 2G1FPZZG522141572

To Owner: Martin Ernest Barber 3 To Lien Holder:
3037 Rain Valley Circle
STallahassee, FL 32312


You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
03/16/02 at the request of FHP that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 290.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of
the lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 04/28/02 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 447 HWY 98 EASTPOINT, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of the
vehicle you must present personal identification. driver's license and PROOF
OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and pay the
charges.

SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


I J. a-.., -%.v ".








A nOCA LLY nWNED NEWSPAPER


5 April 2002 Page 9


St. James Bay from Page 7
Mosconis went on to explain, "It
will be a stand alone system. It
will not interface with the City of
Carrabelle. The city will be re-
sponsible for setting the meters
and for maintenance after they
take it over."
Dan Keck, BDI engineer told the
commissioners that the $1.25,
million was figured on calcula-
tions that the city would borrow
$725,000 for seven years at 6 per
cent that turns into $1,127,000.
If the build out comes- in before
seven years there will be an ad-
vantage to the developer. If it takes
longer than seven years there is
no more risk to the City-in fact
there will be absolutely no risk to
the City at all.
Mosconis went on that $1.25 mil-
lion was divided by 450 homes
and some commercial and the
only revenue source available is
the pay back of the taps. The col-
lection of fees would be after the
city had accepted the system.
Then they would be responsible
for setting the meters and main-
tenance of the system.
Eddie Clark said that the devel-
opment had 77 signed contracts
in hand. Mosconis said if the city
wanted to move forward it would
be to choose Option A or Option
B.
Gaidry said the new agreement he
had written combined both the
water and sewer in Option B. He
said that the feeling of the com-
missioners there seemed to be
that there was more money in
water than in waste water and so
he wrapped them both up in the
one agreement.
Rankin asked if the disadvan-
taged grant on the waste water
will stand. He was told that it was
already in the agreement they had
reached at their last meeting.
Rankin was assured that if per-
mits could not be approved or the
city could not obtain financing,
the agreement would be termi-
nated. Gaidry said that if the city
for some.reason could not do the
waste water he would specify that
they would want to do the water.
,Keck said he had verbal assur-
ances that both of the programs,
the water and the waste water
would go thorough. commissioner
Ed Saunders asked about the
mileage from the city that was or-
dairied to be five miles "only.
Gaidry said, "Don't be concerned
about that rule." He said they will
be working directly with the de-
veloper and that should take care
of that. Gaidry said he found two
experts and the case copy to back
it up."
Saunders said, "if you say it is OK
then I am satisfied." Commis-
i


sioner Raymond Williams said he
had to rescue himself from the
voting. Messer made the motion
seconded by Commissioner Frank
Mathes that "The commissioners
approve the draft that had been
placed before them with the
changes in language and several
more offered by Mosconis." There
was short discussion of the time,
between the time, that the waste
water is complete and that there
will have to have a method to get
the waste water to the Carrabelle
Sewer Plant. The developer has
said he will Pay for someone to
haul it over to sewer plant.
Rankin said this is a most impor-
tant matter to the city and de-
serves more than a few minutes.
The engineers explained the way
they calculate how much space is
needed at the sewer plant for the
waste water.
The vote on the matter by Mathes,
Messer, Rankin and Saunders
made it unanimous. Williams re-
cused himself from the vote.



"Flagpole

MPmorial

Garden" Brick

Campaign

Many people stepped up and
helped earn $250,000 to match a
Florida State grant of like amount
that allowed a seemingly impos-
sible dream to build a new library
in Carrabelle, Florida be realized.
However, the cost of some fur-
nishings, window blinds and
other large and small items was
not covered in the original
$500,000.
So, another "Memorial Brick"
campaign to meet those financial
needs is being held. If you missed.
the first engraved brick campaign
or would like to purchase addi-
tional bricks, now is your chance.
For a $70.00 tax-deductible do-
nation, you can have your name
or that of a friend or family mem-
ber inscribed on a brick and
placed in the "Flagpole Memorial
Garden." Your help with the re-
maining expenses will be greatly
appreciated.
Order forms can be obtained at
the Carrabelle Library. Payments
should be .mailed to Carolyn
Sparks, Assistant Librarian, P.O.
Box 285, Carrabelle, Florida
32322. Checks should be made
out tb CARRABELLE LIBRARY
BUILDING FUND.


Join us for the 4th annual
Apalachicola Antique & Classic
Boat Show April 27, 2002. Stroll',:,
along the streets of historic down-
town Apalachicola where antique
boats and classic examples of tra-
ditional vessels will be on display
This festival will emphasize the.
maritime .history of our pictur-
esque coastal town. Special high-
lights will include the Governor
Stone, an authentic, fully restored
Gulf Coast schooner that embod-,
ies the rich fishing history of
Apalachicola Bay. Plus authentic
oyster boats, workboats and a
'wide array of small classic and-
antique boats.
Enjoy a display of antique out-
board engines and a model boat
exhibit, nautical arts and crafts
and nautical, antiques. For.
more information please call!
.(850) 653-9419 or chamber
@digitalexp.com

Call For Entries
Apalachicola is staging its 4th'
annual Antique & Classic Boat
Show April 27, 2002. If you have
an antique boat built prior to
1970, or a classic example of a
traditional vessel and are inter-
ested in showing it, please con-
tact the Apalachicola Bay Cham-i
ber at (850) 653-9419 or by email
at chamber 1@digitalexp.com.
Entries must be either a classic
example of a traditional craft or
built prior to 1970, sail or power.
Entry fee is $15.00. All entries will
receive a plaque for participating.


TALLAHASSEE TRACT


Parcel 2122200110000 Leon County, FL
'Scale 1:3600

0 150 300 450 600 750 Feet

Zoned MR-1 Medium Density
Residential District

1. District Intent
The MR-1 district is intended to be located
in areas designated Mixed Use-A, B. or C
on the Future Lend Use Map of the
Comprehensive Ran. in close proximity to
more intensive non-residential uses.
including commercial and office uses; and
to residentially compatible public facilities
such as schools, parks, and transit
facilities. The MR-1 district shall provide
for a wide range of residential'housing
types. The maximum gross density allowed
for new residential' development in the
MR-I district is 16 dwelling units per acre.
while the minimum gross density allowed
is 8 dwelling units per acre, unless
constraints of concurrency or
preservation and/or conservation
features preclude the attainment of the
minimum densities.



Lighthouse

r, Realty


This property is a "developer's
dream!" There are no comparable
properties this size within the city
lim its.

Listed exclusively with Marion Miley,
LIGHTHOUSE REALTY of St.
George Island, Inc., (850) 927-
2821. 61 West Gulf Beach Drive,
Suite C., St. George Island, Florida
32328.


2. Prncipal Uses
(1) Community facilities related to residential uses, including
religious facilities, police/fire stations, and elementary, middle,
and high schools. Other community facilities may be allowed in
accordance with Section 18.1 of these regulations. (2) Day care
centers. (3) Golf courses. (4) Multiple-family dwellings. (5) Nurs-
ing homes and other residential care facilities. (6) Passive and
active recreational facilities. (7] Single-family attached dwellings.
(8) Single-family detached dwellings. (9] Two-family dwellings.
(10] Zero-lot line single-family detached dwellings.


- Of St. George Island, Inc.

S(850) 927-2821 office/(850] 927-2314 fax
^ <^ B^^ '


U. S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary, Apalachicola,
Florida
By Art Little
CPR training was conducted for
Flotilla 15 at the Emergency Man-
agement Center at the airport on
Tuesday, March 12th. Twenty-two
Flotilla members completed the
course and received their certifi--
cation cards from the American
Heart Association. Educational
Associates of Tallahassee pro-
vided the equipment, instructors
and training during the four hour
course.
The water training phase of boat
crew qualification was started on
Wednesday morning, March 27th
at the Coast Guard Dock on Wa-
ter Street in Apalachicola. Ten
new members reported for the
exercise starting at 9:30 a.m. Two
member owned vessels were pro-
vided by Coxswain Stanley M.
Weber, a 22 foot Glacier Bay
Pbwer & Catamaran and Cox-
swain/Flotilla Commander Frank
S. Stephens. The class began on
shore with a review of the patrol
checklist and safety proceedings,
checking personal and boat safety
and emergency equipment.
Instruction" in approaching and
docking procedures, the use of
VHF marine radio, man overboard
drills, treatment for hypothermia
and shock, and burning vessel
approach techniques were dem-
onstrated and practiced. Vessel
Stowing was demonstrated with
two vessels, -and twin engine op-
eration was instructed for steer-
ing. 5s.nchronizing engines and
maintaining course. Additional
water training is being scheduled
for the students working to
achieve boat crew rating..
,Those participating in the exer-
- cises included:
"Jerry Cook, Vice Commander;
Michael Doyle; Carlton Ethrige;
SDavid, C,. Haraugh; Victor Ray
Moody; Lucile Pilcher;.Charles
Shadel; Robert G. Shepard; Jerry
Thompson; Thomas M. Whitney.
Instructors were: -
SCoxswain Stanley M. Weber; Cox-
swain Franklin Stephens (Flotilla
Commander); Coxswain Arthur H.
Little; Crewman Robert W.
"-3Barnes; Crewman Marianne
Scholer.


Historic Apalachicola Classic &

Antique Boat Show


Sea Oats (frt aIIler j
Your Destination for Art on this Unforgettable Coast
FEATURING OVER FORTY FINE AREA :
ARTISTS AND CRAFTSPEOPLE
Original Oils Watercolors Hand Built Pottery JO JOYCE ESTES
Turned Wooden Bowls Carved Waterfowl Consultant & Organizer
Painted Silks Collectible Prints Serving Franklin County
Joyce Estes Original Art ,/


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and Batiks bi S af Catering. Tuxedos *'-
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260 HIGHWAY 98 EASTPOINT, FL 32328 (850) 670-8931 (800) 929-8931



Livingston New Construction

Electric Remodel & Repair
Certified f All Work Done
certified
Electrical / By Owner
Contractor Reasonable Rates
984-4898 Licensed & Insured
Beeper #489-0281 #EC0002922





Salon Services
Manicures Pedicures Acrylic Nails
(850) 670-1336

Jeannie DePriest
Lic. Nail Technician Highway 98
Lic. Skin Care Specialist MC VISA Eastpoint, FL


Community

Theatre Is

Cooperation

By Tom Campbell
This is what community theatre
is all about. Here is a good ex-
ample of the people in a commu-
nity coming together to cooperate
in creating a production which
looks good, is well-performed by
local actors and is entertaining for
the audience.
"Plaza Suite" by Neil Simon was
first presented in -New York City
on February 14, 1968. They were
three one-act plays all taking
place in the same suite at the
Plaza Hotel.
The Panhandle Players have
elected to do only the second and
third plays, the one called Visitor
From Hollywood, and the other,
Visitor From Forest Hills.
The set, of course, is designed to
look like Suite 719 of the Plaza,
and should be attractive. Since
the action takes-place in Spring,
S1968, it was decided to try to find
suitable chandeliers for the living
room/bedroom of the stage set..
No easy matter.
People began looking around to
find "the perfect pair of chande-
liers." After much searching, the
two "perfect" chandeliers turned
up at the Harbor Electric Supply,
Inc., at 631 West U.S. 98 in
Apalachicola. The owner is
Charles Elkins, who turned out
to be a very likeable man.
Mr. Elkins listened patiently while
the President of Panhandle Play-
ers, Royce Hodge, told him about
the urgent need for the chande-
liers. Then he graciously volun-
teered to donate the use of the'two
chandeliers on the set of "Plaza
Suite."
When Laura Moody (Props &
Stage Manager) needed some
flower arrangements, The
Seahorse owner, florist Ouida
Sack came to the rescue. Ouida
said to just come in the store and
the Panhandle Players could have.
any arrangements that were on
display in the store for their pro-
duction of "Plaza Suite", Living in
a small town is wonderful!
This is cooperation for the good
of the community, and that's what
makes community theatre work.
People like Charles Elkins and
Ouida Sacks-we need you!


Free Fishing Days

The Fish and \'ildlie Conserva-
tion Commission (FWCJ has des-
ignated April 6-7 as Free Fresh-
water Fishing Weekend in Florida,
the fishing capital of the world.
During the Free Freshwater Fish-
ing Weekend, anyone, including
non-residents, can sport-fish in
any public freshwater lake or river
in Florida without a fishing li-
cense. The Free Freshwater Fish-
ing Weekend does not apply to
anglers fishing in saltwater.
During the free fishing period, all
other fishing laws and regulations
will remain in effect. A copy of the
Florida Freshwater Sport Fishing
Guide and Regulations Summary
is available at no cost from any
fishing license vendor or FWC of-
fice.


%Lft%,F I %A U%- %OW I I I tJF%7L

April spec I al!

GE N El Will) ftS

10% OFF
11,111,11 111111SAD


Dave or Nero
SE 1 Oth Street &
US Hwy. 98
Carrabelle, FL 32322


-- a ,- -

Saturday Aril 27th 2002 Floti la 1



Saturday April 27th, 2002 FI tilla 15 -


It's Time To

Buy Five-Year

Freshwater

Fishing

Licenses

If you're planning on buying a
five-year freshwater fishing li-
cense, now is the time to do it.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC) has
a special deal for anglers buying
a five-year freshwater fishing li-
cense for $61.50 during April or
May. They will receive more than
$60 worth of "fishing tackle and
magazines. Purchases of lifetime
licenses and five-year combina-.
tion licenses that include fresh-.
water fishing privileges also are
eligible for this promotion. In ad-
dition, the package will include
special deals and rebate offers. In
effect, you get five years worth of
freshwater fishing virtually for
free.
Licenses are available at tax
collector's offices or from an
on-line vendor' (such as
eAngler.com where a $1.95 sur-
charge applies), or through FWC's
instant license number (call 1-
888-FISH-FLOrida, where a $3.95
surcharge applies to these credit
card transactions). Anglers can
start fishing right away, and an
attractive plastic license along
with the bonus package will ar-
rive in the mail within a month to
six weeks. Five-year and lifetime
licenses automatically cover any
fee increases that may occur be-
fore the license expires. Anglers
can set the activation date for as
long as 60 days after they make
the purchase if their current li-
cense has not expired.
Long-term license revenues are
important to the FWC because
they ensure a stable funding base
for fish and wildlife conservation
in Florida.



5 Purple

io Martin
-- Nurseries -

Great selection
of Salt Tolerant
Plants including
Palms







Great selection of
vegetables,
including Heirloom
Tomatoes, Old
Fashion Tomatoes
with great taste.
Tue.-Sat. 9am-6pm Sun. llam-5pm
.1554 Crawfordville Hwy.
926-8335
The Gulf Coast
A Great Place To Grow...


SCoastal Trailer


& Hitch 0
Sales & Service
Medirt, FL
Across from Medart Elementary
984-0728



DRAW-TITE

All Types Of Trailers
We also sell parts
We make Axles
Road service available .

Rolls Aluminum Boat Trailers
Performance Boat Trailers
Utility Trailers
Hours: 8:30 6:00 M-F
9:00 3:00 Saturday
.www.coastaltrailerandhitch.com









^^E1.r^^


I ne r ran511iin t pr1onicte


I


The, F i-ain~iiI Phirainiv I -







Page 10 5 April 2002


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Congressman Allen Boyd Speaks

In Eastpoint .,lm a,


By Tom Campbell
Congressman Allen Boyd spoke to
a gathering of about 65 Franklin
County residents at the Eastpoint
Volunteer Fire House on Tuesday,
March 26, 2002. Delicious Apa-
lachicola Bay oysters were served,
along with turkey, cheese and
various snacks.
The Apalachicola Bay Oyster
Dealers Association sponsored
the event, along with the Apalach-
icola Bay Chamber of Commerce
and others,
The question and answer period
covered topics from the
re-districting of the area, which
splits Franklin County, to Sep-
tember 11, 2001, attack on New
York and Washington, D.C.
Congressman Allen -Boyd de-
scribed where he was when the
attacks occurred-at work in
Washington, D.C.-and itching
the events on television. When he
and others went out of the build-
ing, they "saw the Pentagon burn-
ing." It was a "time for grave con-
cern, and the nation has re-
sponded well, he said. He also
said he thinks "the President is
doing an admirable job in pros-
ecuting the war on terrorism," and
that the President has good ad-
visers around him, like Collin
Powell, Dick Cheney and others.
Congressman Allen Boyd said
he is "concerned about the
President's tough talk rhetoric
regarding Iraq, North Korea and
Iran. "The President is a man that
says what's on his mind," said the
Congressman. "His advisers have
probably advised him to tone it
down a bit." Allen, then. referred
to President Theodore Roosevelt
who advocated "'talk softly but
carry a big stick."
Congressman Allen Boyd said we
are fortunate to live in the best
country in the world. "We have
one-twentieth of the worlds
people, and, one-quarter of the
world's wealth," he said.
However, he warned that if our
nation's government goes the way
President Bush is trying to steer
it, "Weare going back into deficit
spending. We should not do that."
Someone from the audience
said, "We're curious about the
re-districting that's been done
which affects Franklin County."
Congressman Boyd smiled and
said, "I'm curious about it myself."'
He got a big laugh from' the audi-
ence. He explained that the Re-
publican state legislature in Tal-
lahassee picked up four addi-
tipnal seats by the way they did
the re-districting. He pointed out.
that Franklin County is split in
two. "That dilutes your influence
in the legislative process," he said.
He also said that the re-districting
"will go to court. I will decide in
the next 10 days or so, if I want
to join that suit." He suggested
that each person should write to
his/her legislator and tell them
"what you think on the subject."
He said he wanted to point out
that his beef was not with
Kendrick (Dem. Carrabelle) and
Lawson (Dem. Sen.). "It is with
those voting Republican.." He said
that "Monticello is my hometown"
and they (Republicans) took it out
of his district, 'They will be in the
district that takes in Jackson-
ville."


On the subject of the Tri-state
compact (the water-sharing effort
that has been going on for 10
years among Georgia, Alabama
and Florida), be pointed out that
there was federal involvement.
The talks "have been extended 90
days." That happened on March
18, just before midnight.
Boyd said, "We're all on the same
page. The important issue is how
much fresh water comes into
Apalachicola Bay." He said in
Georgia, their interest up around
Atlanta is to keep the water levels
of Lake Lanier up. That's where
the recreation areas are up there.
Their voters are watching them
very closely.
On the dredging of the Apa-
lachicola River, Boyd said the is-
sue now is what do we do with
the spoils. "We're working with the
Corps of Engineers on that."
Joyce Estes, who is Vice Chair on
the Northwest Florida Water Man-
agement District, pointed out that
Miami has offered a great deal of
money for the .sand from the
Apalachicola River. She said she
wants to see Alligatol Point get
some of the sand, before it all goes
to Miami. Boyd said that when
Alligator Point gets ready for the
sand, they will get it.
Grady Leavins, President of the
Oyster Dealers Association, said
they have two more years to come
up with a solution to the
post-harvest treatment of oysters.
Boyd' promised to work closely
with them on that.
Someone asked about the "secret
government" that might take over
in an emergency in Washington,
D.C. Boyd said, "We are an open
society, and we will know more
about that."
Additipial points were made
-about the important of seagrasses
from Alligator Point to East Pass.
These seagrasses make the wa-
ters of this area bountiful. Protec-
tive measures are needed to pro-
tect these areas to save the
seagrasses. They make this area
bountiful. "Give the fish a break."
Boyd thanked the Apalachicola
Bay Oyster Dealers Association,
President Grady Leaviris, Apa-
lachicola Bay Chamber of Com-
merce, Director Artita Gregory,
and others who sponsored the
meeting and the lunch. He said
be thought it had been a good
turnout and productive meeting.


Now is the time to
subscribe to the

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(296) Don't Tell Dad by Pe-
ter Fonda. Published by
Hyperion, 1998, 498 pp.
Hardcover. Now the public
is treated to the real Peter
Fonda-the man behind the
legend who has never be-
fore been revealed. He
spares no details about his
cold and distant father, his
mother's suicide and their
effects on him and his sis-
ters. He provides many an-
ecdotes about growing up
with Jane, their coming of
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(301) I'm Not Really Here
by Tim Alien. Published by
Hyperion Productions,
1996, 255 pp. Hardcover.
Now, Tim Allen takes a look
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relationship to wives, chil-
dren, friends, the universe,
God and why it's so tough
to get a good night's sleep.
This book is a culmination
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(300) Banjo Eyes by
Herbert G. Goldman. Pub-
lished by Oxford University
Press, 1997, 466 pp. Hard-
cover. While author Gold-
man extends Eddie Cantor
to the lofty heights of the
"birth of modern stardom",
his biography is neverthe-
less a splendid work, trac-
ing Cantor's career from
vaudeville, to Broadway, to
movies and then radio. (The
birth "right" of "modern
stardom" really belongs to
Charlie Chaplin and Mary
Pickford. If you remember
them, I know who old you
are.) Eddie Cantor's influ-
ence is still vast and impor-
Stant. He founded the March
of Dimes. For those hunger-
ing for a look behind the
show business curtains of
yesteryear they will find this
book a beloved comedian
determined to do more than
"make 'em laugh." Sold na-
tionally for $35. Bookshop.
price = $14.95.



flflnJOEES


Lddic Camor aiuJ
rd Birli oroful ,L,ri j aro,.,

'- -
HEA ]T G. GOLmA



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BENEATH

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. .. ... .. ... .. ... .. ... ....


SUPERHERO





CHRISTOP R



REEVE


(299) Super Hero: A Biog-
raphy of Christopher
Reeve. By Chris Nickson.
Published by St. Martin's
Press, 232 pp, hardcover.
The world watched in hor-
ror when tragedy struck the
Man of Steel who was
thrown from his horse and
paralyzed during a riding
competition. Faced'with
death, told he might never
breathe without a ventila-
tor again, Reeve chose to
live. This .is a glimpse into
the life of an American leg-
end; a lonely child who sky-
rocketed to megastardom
without losing his soul.
Sold nationally for $22.95.
Bookshop price = 13.95.

(21) Outposts on the Gulf
by William Warren Rogers.
University of Florida Press,
Hardcover, 297 pp. In this
book, Rogers traces and
documents the economic,
social and political emer-
gence of the Gulf coast port
ofApalachicola and the pris-
tine barrier island, Saint
George. From the earliest
times, both the island and
Apalachicola have become
intertwined. The account of
the machinations of contro-
versial developer William Lee.
Popham is the first phase of
area development, later
leading to the controversial
struggles of the 1970s when
environmentalists and sea-
food industries fought to
determine the ecological and
economic fate :of the Bay
area. The Chronicle has
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newly reprinted volumes
at an attractive price.
Available elsewhere for
$35.95 plus shipping and
handling. The Chronicle
Bookshop price is much
cheaper at $25.00 per
volume.


(298) Stars Beneath The
Sea by Trevor Norton.
Carroll -and Graf, Hard-
cover. Publishers, Inc. New
York: 282.pp. This is a col-
orful history of the origins
and development of deep-
sea diving over the past two
centuries. These pioneers
invented and experimented
with a variety of ingenious
devices to enable them to
explore the secret, seduc-
tive depths of the sea. Sold
nationally for $25. Book-
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(297) For Laughing Out
Loud: My Life and Good
Times by Ed McMahon
with David Fisher. Warner
Books, 1998, 355 pp. In
this warm and sometimes
hysterically funny autobi-
ography, the man who
made it all look so decep-
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brightest stars and the
most embarrassing mo-
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couch and out of camera
range. Sold nationally for
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(126) Shipwreck and Ad-
ventures of Monsieur
Pierre Viaud From 1768,
the sensational story of a
shipwreck near Dog Island,
and the adventures of Pierre
Viaud and his search for
survival. Published by the
University of Florida Press,
139 pp. Hardcover. Sold
nationally for $24.95.
Bookshop price = $20.95.


(22) New. University Of Ala-
bama Press. Fair To
Middlin':The Antebellium
Cotton Trade Of The Apa-
lachicola-Chattahooche
River Valley. Sold nation-
ally at $26.95. Available
through the Chronicle
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(283) We Interrupt This
Broadcast by Joe Gerner,
with forward by Walter
Cronkite, compact disc nar-
rated by Bill Kurtis. Pub-
lished by Sourcebooks,
1998, overside, Hardcover,
153pp, with two compact
discs containing excerpts of
broadcasts "that stopped
our lives." Brought to life,
the famous and infamous
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Wesley Chesnut-

By Tom Campbell
The beautifully performed "Mes-
siah" by George F. Handel was
presented March 24 by the Bay
Area Choral Society in the Historic
Trinity Church in Apalachicola.
This was Part Two of the "Mes-
siah," sometimes called the
"Lenten-Easter version," accord-
ing.to Eugenia Watkins, Chair-
man of the Ilse Newell Concert
Series.
SSqgist. .ee, CynthiaJ.hey,, so,
prano; Anne Nott, alto; Larry
Gerber, tenor; Merel Young, bass;
and Wesley Chesnut, bass. Con-
ductor was David Nott, and this
.was his third time as conductor
for the Ilse Newell series.
Organ was played by R. Bedford
Watkins; contrabass, Luciano
Gherardi.
From the opening chorus of "Be-
hold the Lamb of God," to the cli-
mactic chorus of "Hallelujah! For
the Lord God omnipotent
reigneth," the performance was
flawless, or so it seemed, and the
congregation was moved.
The next presentation of the con-
cert series is scheduled for April
21. Meriyn van Driesten, concert
pianist, will perform. He is well
known throughout the Nether-
lands and Germany,"and will ap-
pear in Apalachicola as part of his
S pring concert tour in the United
States.


Anne Nott


Larry Gerber


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(Upper left) Eugenia
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FWC Met
April 3-4 In

Tallahassee

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC) met
in the state Capitol Wednesday
and Thursday, April 3-4.
Wednesday's agenda included a
proposed rule to lengthen the an-
nual two-day antlerless deer sea-
son to seven days on private
lands. FWC biologists proposed
the rule to improve the quality of
the deer herd in Florida.
Another proposed rule, for con-
sideration Wednesday, would
change hunting season dates for
ducks, light geese and coots. The
proposal would split the season


Conductor David Nott taken a


into two phases-the Saturday
before Thanksgiving through the
Sunday after Thanksgiving (No-
vember 23 December 1 this year)
and December 1 January 20.
Although the. two phases overlap
this year, they will not during
most years:
Also on Wednesday, Commission-
ers considered final action on a
proposed rule to prohibit inten-
tional feeding of black bears',
foxes, raccoons and sandhill
cranes. The four species pose
public safety hazards when fed.
Artificial feeding also tends to con-
centrate these species in close
proximity to the human popula-
tion, which also increases the risk
of depredation to pets and trans-
mission of diseases from wildlife
to domestic animals.
Other items on Wednesday's
agenda include acreage adjust-
ments, regulation changes, quota
hunt procedures and permit fees
for public hunting lands and es-
tablishment of new hunting areas.
Commissioners also plan to con-
sider whether to continue oper-
ating the Triple N Ranch Wildlife
Management Area as a special-
opportunity hunting area or to
manage it as part of the Bull


t rehearsal
t rehearsal


The clean-up


Creek Wildlife Management Area
or to pursue other options.
Other rule proposals would pro-
hibit harvest of minks in Florida
and amend alligator management
efforts.
Regarding freshwater fishing is-
sues Wednesday, Commissioners
considered a rule revision that
would delete the prohibition
against freshwater fishing tourna-
ments on lakes Jackson (Leon
County), Lochloosa, Orange and
Okeechobee from July through
September.
Another proposed rule change
would increase the bag limit from
five to 10 and reduce the mini-
mum length limit from 14 to 10
inches total length for redear sun-'
fish in Merritts Mill Pond Fish
Management Area (FMA).
Concerning marine issues, the
FWC conducted a final hearing
Thursday on a proposed rule to
reopen the recreational harvest of
bay scallops in state waters be-
tween the Suwannee River and
the Pasco-Hernando county line
and prohibit harvest of bay scal-
lops in state waters west of the
Mexico Beach Canal in Bay
County to the Florida-Alabama
border. The proposed rule is in


response to changes in regional
abundance of scallops.
Another final hearing took place
Thursday on proposed amend-
ments to stone crab trap limita-
tion rules, including increasing
the number of trap certificates to
be allotted by the advisory and
appeals board to settle disputes
from 100,000 to 180,000, and
extending the life of the board to
July 1, 2003. A proposed rule to
allow importation of spiny lob-
sters into Florida during the
closed season under certain con-
ditions was also slated for final
action by the Commission.


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A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


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5 April 200l .Paoye 11








A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chrnniele


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Easter "Sunrise" At St. George Island


The St. George Island Community Sunrise Service was held
on the island Sunday morning, March 31st with only the
slight appearance of the sun. Rev. Mike Whaley and Rev.
Jim Trainer of the St. George Island Baptist and Methodist
Churches, respectively, conducted the service for over 100
people who braved the mists to celebrate the Resurrection.
After the 6:40 a.m. service, a continental breakfast was
served at the St. George Island Methodist Church, 201 East
Gulf Beach Drive.
Weiner vs. Gander from Page 1
There was a parade of about seven parents, mothers and fathers,
who stepped up to the podium to relate success stories on their
children's schooling at ABC.
Board member David asked one mother if she was afraid that the
board was going to try to close the school. She said that she felt that
was possible. Hinton said, "Neither I or anyone on this board are
thinking that way."
The board backed the superintendent in that they said it would be
impossible to know how to plan the school year without a roster. It
would be necessary to know where the children enrolled in ABC the
school and if they came from in the district.
Ms. Gander said that she needed to have the roster on her desk by
April 15 and Principal Weiner said, "It will be there tomorrow." Attor-
ney Barbara Sanders was asked if she could envision this becoming a
legal problem. She stated that she could notsee it that way and she
said that it seemed to her that the superintendent and the ABC prin-
cipal were still negotiating


Fish Fry Brings First Payment Of

Legal Fees

The fish fry, sponsored by the Wakulla Commercial Fishermen's As-
sociation was held Saturday, March 23rd at VFW Post 4538 at Pana-
cea. There, Ronald Fred Crum, announced that the group had raised
$3000 in donations that will go towards their legal fees in the current
wave of litigation. Their attorney, Ron Mowrey, reviewed the legal his-
tory and cases that brought the group to the current appeal involving
Judge Sauls' decision which declared the Pringle-Crum net in con-
formance with the requirements of the Constitutional Amendment
that limits the use of nets in-shore and near-shore waters.
The state has appealed the Sauls decision to the First District Court
of Appeals. Mowrey told the group that he expects the appeal court to
hold oral arguments in late summer but, because of certain Consti-
tutional issues, he also expects the case to make it to the State Su-
preme Court. The Sauls decision, in making the Pringle-Crum net
constitutional, also opined that the State cannot arbitrarily deny fish-
ermen their right to make a living by using nets permitted by the
Constitution.
Mr. Mowrey, stated, in part,
"...The smaller the mesh, all you are going to do is kill off
the juvenile fish and kill off.the resource. The spawning
potential ratio bears that out and always has. This was
back in 1997 when the case was initially filed. We filed a
case asking the Court to approve a rectangular net. A
net less than 500 square feet, made out of
non-monofilament ... made out of nylon. By construc-
tion, it was not a kill net because it .was made out of
nylon. ...It can't be a seine net because it doesn't have
wings and a panel. On top of that, both of these nets are
so small, using historical precedent-the Supreme Court
told us in Millender-these nets are not gill nets, are not
seine nets and you can't use them as such. So, there-
fore, they can't be a gill net, can't be a seine net. There-
fore, it is one of those.other rectangular nets provided for
in the Constitution...
"...made out of non-monofilament, less than 500 square
feet. It historically cannot be a gill or seine net because
they are too small. Seemed to a reasonably simple, clear
argument.


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The problem is the mentality of the Attorney General and
the Marine Fisheries is "it's bury the small fishermen" in
my opinion, "It's driven them out of existence. It's war."
That's all there is to it. So, we had a long trial with Judge
Sauls..."
He continued,
"...Rules adopted by the FWC has done nothing but re-
duce mesh sizes... types of twine-and other matters,
purely trying to slowly close in on the remaining net,
which you can still use,'by trying to determine and con-
clude that they are all gill nets. The problem with that is
that defeating the purpose of the Constitutional Amend-
ment. Remember, we re supposed to make sure that
whatever, we're to protect the resource. In reducing the



:iE i

1_ -- tr l


size of the mesh, all we're doing is just the opposite. (Snar-
ing the baby fish). Nobody thought that was true..."
"...Based upon the government's own experts, every one
of them, based on biological, marine science and experi-
ments they've done, it's clear what we said is true... we're
not hurting the resource. I believe we convinced Judge
Saul of that very point. Any further attempt to prohibit
the use of this hybrid net, if you will, that's not a gill net,
that's not a seine net, is nothing but an unreasonable
attempt to just drive small fishermen out of the water.
"...Fishermen are entitled to due process of the law and
equal protection of the law ... We believe they (the state)
are intentionally trying to interpret to do nothing but ban
nets and deny you due process and equal protection of
the law..."
"...Sauls added another test in the use of a net. You've
got to look at the resulting catch. He adopted a rule that
says it takes three things It can be constructed as a gill
net; you can use it like a gill net; or third, if the resulting
catch meets the test: minimum 90 per cent of the fish in
the net are gilled. The hybrid net is permitted by the lan-
guage of the Constitution.
"...The Millender case made it clear that you have to con-
sider the commercial viability of the net. There were no
tests or experiments on the hybrid net to demonstrate
that it would hurt the resource. The State "suggested"
that it would hurt the resource. Experts so testified..."
"...Our argument can be plain and simple. We didn't write
the Constitution. We're not trying to overturn the Con-
stitutional Amendment. All we want is what the Consti-
tutional Amendment allows. It talks about gill nets and
seine nets, and other bag-type nets and other rectangu-
lar nets. This is a rectangular net. It's not by construc-
tion a gill net; its made out ofnon-monofilament. We don't
use it as a gill net. And, the resulting catch is less than
90 gilled ... it's not a gill net. It's not a seine net because
it doesn't have wings and a bag..."


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CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) File No.
Date of this Notice 03/18/02 Invoice No. 6879
Description of Vehicle: Make GMC Model Safari ColorBlue
TagNo 589FCZ Year 1986 state GA vinNo.' 1.G5DM1571GB503271
To Owner: Mary Ann Thomas To Lien Holder: Payhere Used Cars
314 Arnold Blvd. 403 N. Davis Dr
Warner Robins, GA 31093-3266 Warner Robins, GA
31093-3351

You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was towed on
03/10/02 at the request of FCSO that said vehicle is in its
possession at the address noted below. They the undersigned claim a lien for
towing, storage and costThe vehicle will be sold after 35 days from the date of
impound free of prior liens. Payment by the above date of notice in the amount
$ 230.00 plus storage charges occurring at the rate of $ 20.00 per
day from the date hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of
the lienor;.that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL
VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78
You and each of you are hereby notified that on 04/18/02 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 447 HWY 98 EASTPOINT, FL From the proceeds will first be paid all
towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any excess
will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release of the
vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and PROOF
OF OWNERSHIP (title. registration, etc.) at the address below and pay the
charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


The Franklin Chronicle
is read across the Florida Panhandle because
This newspaper has the largest staff of experienced contributors
writing reports, analyses, and commentaries that accurately
reflect life in the northern, rural Florida area...
The Chronicle has more photos, local news, informed editorials,
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Post Office Box 590 Eastpoint, FL 32328
850-385-4003 or'850-927-2186 Fax: 850-385-0830


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