Title: Franklin chronicle
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 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: August 20, 1999
Copyright Date: 1999
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00118
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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BULK RATE
SU.S. POSTAGE PAID
SAPALACHICOLA, FL
The 32320




Franklin chronicle


Volume 8, Number 17


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


August 20 -


September 3, 1999


Governor Jeb Bush (left), Attorney General Bob Butterworth the State Treasurer Bill Nelson are among
those listening to the Franklin County Resolution passed by the county government on July 20th,
supporting the acquisition of Bald Point, and expressing hope that the state will soon make improvements
to enhance the property's natural recreational assets. Aan Pierce (far right) presented the Resolution at
the most recent Governor and Cabinet meeting, Thursday, August 12th. Commissioner Jimmy Mosconis
also addressed the Governor and Cabinet. Commissioners Cheryl Saunders and Eddie Creamer accompanied


Grant Compliance Audit on
Conter-Mabrey House Concluded
Major finding by Dept. of State Auditor General: Historic
Apalachicola Foundation Is Behind Schedule
The finding of the Auditor General, Florida department of State, is
not surprising since there is, in fact, little visible change in the out-
side appearance of the Conter-Mabrey House since the project re-
ceived a Division of Historical Resources Special Category grant for
$,161,825 in October 1996.


Conter-Mabrey home as seen from 5th Street, Apalachicola.
One central point commented upon by the Inspector General, George
MacLafferty, is bound up in these statements:
"...final design documents have not been approved by
the Division of Historical Resources, as is required. In
addition, bid documents have not been finalized, a con-
tractor has not been selected and no work has begun on
the house..."
The Historic Apalachicola Foundation, Inc., is the local coordinator of
the Dept. of State grant. In a letter to the Inspector General, Presi-
dent Marie Q. Marshall, took sharp exception to the conclusion about
being behind schedule by stating,
"1. In response to the paragraph titled "Executive Sum-
mary" it should be noted that, as of this date, Historic
Apalachicola Foundation, ("HAF") is not behind sched-
ule in restoring the Conter-Mabry House. As noted on
page 3 of your findings, the initial grant period was from
October 31. 1996 to March 31.1998. A grant award
amendment extended the grant period from March 31,
1998 to December 31, 1998. A second amendment re-
quest extended the ending date from December 31, 1998
to September 30.1999. HAF fully intends to complete the
tasks necessary so that Grant funds will be encumbered
by September 30. 1999."
"2. In regard to the statement that the Project Architect
has prepared working drawings, it must be said that the
Project Architect is preparing working drawings based
upon the understanding of both the Architect and his
Consultant, Herschel Shepard. that the design approval
was given on April 9. The understanding of both profes-
sionals is that with the exception of relatively minor ar-
chitectural details, the project has received final design
approval which will be reflected in the final construction
documents. The architect has requested a meeting for
August 19. at which he will present working drawings.
project schedule and a proposed form of RFP for selec-
tion of the contractor for the project, as suggested by Mr.
Shepard."


'I'




I -


The north side of the house.


Continued on Page 12


Inside This Issue
12 Pages
Franklin Briefs................ Page 2 SE Fisheries Report ....... Page 6
Alligator Point .............. Page 2 'Franklin Bulletin Board... Page 6
Lanark Village................. Page 2 !Franklin School Board .... Page 7
Editorial & Commentary. Page 3 FCAN .............................. Page 8
Franklin All-Stars............ Page 3 Bookshop ................... Page 10
Charles Golden ............... Page 5 Commerce Street GalleryPage 11


Efforts to Preserve Crooked
River Light Station
By Tom Campbell
Formerly a U.S. Coast Guard
Light Station, the Crooked River
Light Station just west of
Carrabelle Beach is honored by
being listed on the National Trust
for Historic Places. The history
behind this light station includes
the fact that the Crooked River
Light Station was located on a 12
acre parcel, according to informa-
Carrabelle.
tion released by Folks Realty of T ,ppin

Built in 1895 for the purpose "of
increasing the lumber trade from
.the Apalachicola River to the .t'
Crooked River, this light station
replaced the former light which
was on Dog Island and was de-
stroyed in 1873. The Lighthouse
Board was convinced to place the
new light on the mainland. The
height is 115 feet above sea level.
The sequence of the light was two
flashes every ten seconds."
According to a Description of the
Crooked River Light Station Res-
ervation, Lots No. 3andNo. 4con- Help Arrives
tain a little more than 5 acres and
belong to Ms. Rosemary Reder. O
She is willing to sell at an asking nLi house
price of approximately $139,000.
In July of 1999, the Carrabelle Project
Lighthouse Association was
formed by a group of citizens in- By Rene Topping
terested in "preserving the
Crooked River Light Station for The group of people formed to
public use." President of the group preserve te Crooked River Light-
is Ms. Barbara Revell, who is also house and save it from public
a member of the Florida Light- auction by the Government Sur-
house Association Inc. Ms. Revell plus Administration (GSA) met
resides withher husband in St. with the Carrabelle City Commis
James, east of Lanark Village. sion on August 17 at 6:30 p.m. to
Discuss saving this piece of his-
At a recent meeting of their tory. Second District Congress-
Carrabelle Lighthouse Association man Allen Boyd has taken a spe-
on August 9 at the Carrabelle cial interest in the matter AND
Area Chamber of Commerce, the sent his aide Jim Norton to help
difference between a "Lighthouse" in the effort.
and a "Light Station" was ex-
plained to be structural. The Norton said that Boyd cannot do
structure of the light station is anything until either a municipal-
mainly of metal, as shown in the ity, county commission or a rec-
photograph. ognized group ask for assistance.
Norton added that the time is get-
The efforts of the Carrabelle Light- ting shortn a tht the ime is get-
house Association recently gained ing, at this time, to put the struck
momentum when resolutions in ture up for public auction, which
support f thesrlabos ere means that it could be bought by
passed by the Carrabelle Area an individual.
Chamber of Commerce, the City
of Carrabelle Commissioners and The Crooked River Lighthouse
the Franklin County Board of was built in 1895 and is on the
Commissioners. President Bar- Public Register of Historical Sites.
bara Revell said that Commis- Norton said that in the event it
sioner Cheryl Sanders is "very was bought by an individual, he
supportive of our efforts." felt that it could not be moved to
become an icon for some restau-
Mr. Jim Norton, District Repre- rant or other business.
sentative for Allen Boyd Jr.. Mem-
ber of Congress. 2nd District. He asked that the city commis-
Florida, has agreed to help the sion not wait too long to make a
Carrabelle Lighthouse Association decision. All of the Commission-
.any way that he can. ers expressed their feeling that
there had to be some way the
The association is interested in lighthouse could be preserved.
purchasing the house, the light Commissioner Pam Lycett said
station and some of the property. that she had reservations because
with the possibility of developing it seemed that no one presently
the project as a public service. It knew what strings would be at-

Continued on Page 9 Continued on Page 9


Jargon-laden Report To

Governor's Council About

Apalachicola "Sustainability"

A Report And Commentary By Tom W. Hoffer
The Governor's Council for Sustainable Florida (GCSF) is a statewide
forum, promoting leadership for a healthy environment, prosperous
economy, high quality of life and livable communities. In 1997-98.
the Council developed six core standards to help stimulate leader-
ship and advance the best management practices for "sustainability"
in all areas. These standards were "tested" by studying two Florida
communities, Orlando and Apalachicola. The Governor's Council
(GCSF) examined the structures for citizen involvement, consensus
processes and.measurements of progress in both communities. The
goal was to identify practical guidelines and best practices "...for
sustainability that are transferable to other Florida cities and towns."
The actual "report" was authored by Applied Sustainability Enter-
prises (Panacea, FL) Diane G. Delaney and Donald R. Lesh, consult-
ants to the Governor's Council (GCSF)."

Sustainability Defined
The report authors assert that "sustainability" is a concept with a
number of interrelated aspects, including ecological, environmental,
economic, technological, social, cultural,'ethical and political factors.
More than 100 "indicators" of sustainability were identified in the
Apalachicola study.
As close as one can determine, "sustainability" is partially defined by
a question in the interview protocol used by the study persons to find
out the "perception of whether (the) community is on a sustainable
path, i.e. with a good balance of economic productivity and job op-
portunity, environmental protection and stewardship of resources.
as well as social participation, respect for traditions and diversity.
and (a) satisfying quality of life..." The chief method used was de-
scribed as "community profiling" based on extensive interviews.
This was not a scientific study, but one in which the interviewees
were from a "...selected elite sample of opinion leaders and civic ac-
tivists." Then, interviewees were asked to name others, an approach
that produced "...a group of high-priority individuals..."
The interviews consisted of two parts: (1) a briefing by the project
administrators, Delaney and Lesh, on the concept of "Sustainability"
along with supporting documents, and (2) an interview protocol about
the interviewees "perceptions of the community." The interviews were
designed to gather basic information about the interviewee and build
a profile of the community, the report said. The data gathered by
Delaney and Lesh might also be used to encourage the formation of a
citizen's advisory committee or round table on "sustainability," as an
"adjunct to the political decision-making process." Another goal was
to broaden public understanding of the "Sustainable Florida Stan-
dards and the ways they could be applied at the community level."
While the report devoted roughly 50% of its space to'the Orlando
portion, only the Apalachicola portions are considered relevant in
this summary of the report. The following points were identified by
the report authors. Delaney and Lesh, as noteworthy under the head-
ing Apalachicola Community Assets.
Apalachicola Community Assets
These points were expressed by several community
leaders during interviews or at the community meeting
on July 8, 1999

1. Great original city plan
-good comp plan
-wonderful design and architecture
-quaint historic district with good restaurants and shops
-stock of soundly constructed older commercial buildings on
waterfront for rehabilitation and reuse
-seen as model for new urbanism

Continued on Page 4


4 *4


Barge traffic on Apalachicola Bay heading up the
Apalachicola River.








Page 2 20 August 1999


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Franklin

Briefs

August 17, 1999
The Franklin County Board of
Commissioners met August 17
and quickly approved minutes of
the August 3 meeting and the
payment of county bills.
A Mediacom representative was
scheduled to appear to answer
questions about the cable com-
pany, but no representative ap-
peared. Commissioner Bevin
Putnall stated that he was upset
over "some Cinemax stuff' that
had been shown with no warning.
"Awful stuff," he called it and said
that a lot of people would not want
their children to view such mate-
rial. The Commissioners directed
their attorney. Mr. Shuler, to write
another letter.' requesting a
Mediacom representative to ap-
pear at the next Commission
meeting to answer questions.
Superintendent Prentice Crum of
Public Works requested additional
funds for asphalt, limerock and
road signs.
Kendall Wade. Clerk of Court,
suggested that the total funds re-
uested be rounded off to
30,000. The motion was made.
seconded and carried.
Solid Waste Director Van Johnson
discussed the need for approval
of "disposal of scallop by-
products, 100 plus tons per
day," DEP permit is needed.
Johnson said that "as soon as Oc-
tober of this year, scallops could
start to. run." How to dispose of
the "waste water" is the main
problem. A solution needs to be
found.
Mr. C.E. Miller of Eastpoint has a
family owned business, and ap-
peared with criticisms he wanted
to make about the Sheriffs De-
partment. He was requesting ac-
tion, because he had called for a
deputy and no deputy showed up.
Commissioner Jimmy Mosconis
asked if Mr., Miller would be re-
ceptive to the idea of the three of
them, Mr. Mosconis, Mr. Miller
and Sheriff Varnes, stepping into
another room and "have a little
talk." Mr. Miller replied, "yes sir."
The three of them left the meet-
ing room, Mr. Wade offered his
office as a "meeting room," which
was accepted. Mr. Mosconis said
later, after the meeting was over,
that the three of them "had a good
talk, and Mr. Miller and the Sheriff
shook hands and agreed to work
out any differences." Mr.


Mosconis said it was just a lack
of communication.
County Planner Alan Pierce intro-
duced Jay Abbott. volunteer Fire
Chief of St. George Island, who
stressed the need for enforcement
of the law on the bicycle path traf-
fic. There are supposed to be "no
motorized vehicles." Apparently,
some businesses are renting
motorized vehicles and telling kids
they can use the rented motor-
ized vehicles on the bike paths. A
motion was made and carried that
the businesses should be in-
formed that this was to cease.
Alan Pierce stated that the Gulf
Coast Workforce Development
Board needs three new individu-
als appointed. The following
people are willing to serve: Betty
Crooms, Al Mirabella. from the
private sector, and James
Hamilton from the community
based American Legion. A motion
carried.
The County recently received a
Joint Project Agreement from DOT
related to the St. George Island
Bridge. The agreement refers to
the original position the county
took, which was that the county
would keep 0.6 miles of the old
bridge at either end. The
agreement offers the county
$1,520,000 if the county keeps
1.2 miles of bridge. The Board has
already voted to reduce the
amount of the bridge to 0.3 miles
at either end. Alan Pierce asked
what the Board wanted to do. I
There were some complications,
such as possibly having to light
the the parts of the bridge that
remain, and maybe build public
bathrooms. Alan Pierce said he
would "look into it and report
back to the Board of Commission-
ers for further action."
Freda White of Carrabelle Prop-
erties Limited referred to some
donations the company has made
to recreation and parks depart-
ments. She requested that the
county attorney prepare a letter
limiting the company's liability in
case of accidents incurred while
receiving these "donations."
Mr. Michael R. Singletary of Alli-
gator Point discussed the issue of
"public beach access recently be-
ing blocked off. There is no pub-
lic beach access anymore," he
said.
After some discussion, Commis-
sioner Mosconis asked the county
attorney to look into the situation
of public access to the beaches on
Alligator Point. Ms. Cheryl Sand-
ers seconded, the motion, and the
motion carried.
The meeting adjourned at 10:55
a.m.


Alligator Point
Taxpayers
Association
Meeting

By Tom Campbell
The Alligator Point Taxpayers
Association (APTA) meeting of
August 14 was long, informative.
and sometimes explosive.
President Rand Edelstein
continually pressed for orderly
and timely progression through
the list of almost twenty items of
business.
Sheriff Bruce Varnes and
Franklin County Commissioner
Cheryl Sanders were special'
guests at the APTA meeting,
responding to pleas from Alligator
Point citizens to give much needed
support from county government
and law enforcement.
About fifty interested citizens
attended the regular meeting of
APTA. The latest issue of Down to
the Point, the APTA Publication
which serves as a newsletter, was,
provided for each person.
A matter of continuing
importance is County Road 370,
which serves as the only.1
evacuation road in emergency
situations. In the APTA newsletter
a letter was quoted from Willie
' Norred, Chairman of the Franklin
County Republican Executive
Committee. That letter was
addressed to Governor Job Bush'
and said in part:
"At a recent meeting of the
Franklin County Board of County
Commissioners, the County
SAdministrator stated that County.
Road 370 should never have been
abandoned to Franklin County by
D.O.T., because County Road 370
falls within the definition or
criterion of a State road since it
is a primary evacuation road in
emergency situations."
After stating the case as. to
appeals to D.O.T. to accept
responsibility for the road 370,
Chairman Willie Norris concludes,
"It appears that the solution to the
existing problem of washout is to
build a massive breakwater and/
or move the road inland. Franklin
County officials contend that the
County is without the financial
resources to accomplish this
solution and can offer only
piecemeal, patchwork repairs. I am
at a loss to understand why the
local Democratic Legislative
Delegation has not responded to
this obvious problem in their
district."


He then closes the letter with an
appeal to the governor: "Governor,
would you please have someone
look into this situation and
determine if D.O.T. has plans to
reassume responsibility for
Franklin County Road 370. An
action by the State to take
responsibility for Road 370 would
be well received by the citizens of
this county."
Member of APTA, Ms. Bunky
Atkison, also addressed this
important issue in her column.
Road to Alligator Point, in the
APTA newsletter.
Some of the points that Sheriff
Bruce Varnes said he would "look
into" are cars and campers being
parked on Bald Point illegally,
litter in the area of Bald Point
where visitors are not cleaning up
after themselves and making litter
a problem, placing signs on Bald
Point which would "add teeth to
the laws for the sheriff to take
action," and people driving on the
beaches at Bald Point.
Sheriff Bruce Varnes said. "I can
assure you that patrolling will be
taken care of." Also, regarding
speeding on Road 370, where
some cars reportedly travel at
speeds of 50 or even 60 MPH, the
sheriff said, "I will see that my
department patrols and gives
tickets for speeding." The sheriff
smiled, "Now, if you get a ticket,
don't get mad with me." There was
general laughter in appreciation
for Sheriff Varne's sense of humor.
With the APTA members, the
sheriff also worked out a plan
through the Water Department for
listing accurately residents and
people who live in the area and
need to get to their property after
emergencies have passed, such as
a hurricane or storm. Sheriff
Varnes said he thought a special
deputy card for "everybody who
is a resident," might be the
solution.
Several problems were voiced to
the sheriff, who listened carefully
and promised to "look into"
possible solutions.
Franklin County Commissioner
Cheryl Sanders promised.
assistance to APTA-whenever she
could help. She asked the
members to "come to the
Commissioners' meeting" to let
them know of problems and
needs. She also urged attendance.
at an August 18 meeting at 2 p.m.
at the Emergency Management
Office, at the airport in
Apalachicola. Important issues
will be addressed, such as where
Franklin County is headed
regarding water and water
resources for the future.


Heated discussions evolved
around the subject of property
owners affected by the closing of
access to the public beach on the
former right-of-way at the end of
Sea Shell Avenue. Mr. W.A. (Bill)
Eaton of Lot A- 167 addressed the
issue in a two-page document,
beginning, "As you are probably
aware, access to the public beach
at the junction of Sea Shell
Avenue and Alligator Drive
(County Road 370) has been
closed by fencing ...these fencing
extensions include a gate with
padlock ...The area where the lots
abut had been used by the public
and landowners for access to the
public beach for over 50 years."
Ms. Myra Martin stated that her
family bought the property in
1985 and the county abandoned
the road. She pointed out that
there was "not a public access
since 1964."
The problem appeared to consist
,of confusion and lack of
communication regarding which
"accesses to the beach have been
legally closed." One suggestion for
solution was to "correct plats to
show legal modifications." Also.
that all realtors should be notified
when corrective re-platting has
been done. Public access to the
beaches should be clearly marked
by signs, was'one solution offered.
President Edelstein maintained
that a solution should be found
"internally," by the affected
' members of APTA. "The last thing
,we need," said President
SEdelstein, "is to litigate over this.
Or pull the county commission in.
I'd like to think that we can work
together."
President Edelstein maintained
*that the, citizens of Alligator Point
should "work together. ...If we
,don't work together," he said, "we
will be battling about everything."


Cause of "Gas
Scare" at Weems
Not Identified
At Weems Memorial Hospital in
Apalachicola on Tuesday, August
17, Director Susan Ficklen talked
about the "gas scare"' that oc-
curred on a recent Sunday. Dr.
Ramirez was the physician on
duty at the Emergency Room
when a woman was admitted.
Eventually, two staff persons were
also involved in the "gas scare."
Apalachicola Volunteer Fireman
Burt Simmons got the call for the
"hazardous material situation."
Simmons said that the ER was
"basically secure" when he arrived
there.
When Emergency Management
Director Butch Baker was called
and arrived at the scene, he called
Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP) to request that
somebody come and run some
tests. Baker then set up a com-
mand post in Administrator Su-
san Ficklen's office.
Ficklen said that the "entire emer-
gency" team of Franklin County
worked very well.
Dr. Ramirez concluded that it
would be some time before the
exact cause of the "gas scare" was
known. He said he thought the
whole situation was handled very
well.
Ms. Susan Ficklen said the
"symptoms were treated almost
immediately." She added that the
staff were kept about 16 hours
and "still have some residual
signs of organophosphate poison-
ing."
She said all of the officials in-
volved cooperated, including
Butch Baker of Emergency Man-
agement, the Apalachicola Police
Department, Sheriff Bruce Varnes
and his department, the officials
of the county, state and all depart-
ments of emergency management.
She said that with "state assis-
tance, we will create another in-
cident to practice fire as well as
hazardous materials to be sure
that we are in a state of prepared-
ness."
It may be some time before the
Exact cause of,the incident is
known.,Ms. Ficklen said, "The
cause of the apparent poisoning
was never identified.


Lanark Village Water And Sewer
Meeting


By Rene Topping
The Lanark Village Water and
Sewer Commission met for their
regular meeting at 3 p.m. on Au-
gust 17. Those present at the
meeting were: Chairman Jim
Lawlor, Field Manager Commis-
sioner Greg Yancey, Commission
Secretary Bobbi Winchester and
Attorney Tommy Thompson.
There was about ten residents
present. Among the items dis-
cussed was the metering of the
Lanark Village apartments.
Attorney Tommy Thompson re-
ported that the Resolution on the
bonds to finance the water ser-
vice to the apartments in the vil-
lage would have to be rewritten.
Lawlor told the small audience
that there had been a change In
the manner of financing the
project which has been made
mandatory by order of the court.
He said that the project will now
become a district-wide project. He
said that Rural Water changed the
bonds to Revenue Bonds instead
of Special Assessment Bonds. He
added, it was a "take it or leave it
proposition," and there was no
choice for the commissioners but
to accept it.


The change will affect the apart-
ment dwellers, in that there will
be the special assessment on the
apartment dwellers. However, un-
der the Special Assessment
Bonds, LVWSD would have been
responsible for both the plumb-
ing to the apartments and the in-
side plumbing to separate apart-
ments into individual services.
The Revenue Bonds call for the
project to be district-wide and
now the apartment owners will be
responsible for all the inside
plumbing.
Phil Shiver, a resident on U.S.
Highway 98, has been receiving
water tor three years, protested
the changes saying that those
people who were metered first
have been paying for three years.
After the meeting, Yancey told this
reporter that the project currently
stands at a cost of $330,000 of
which $50,000 will go for a gen-
erator, leaving the actual cost on
the apartments at $280,000.
Chairman Jim Lawlor said that
the project will get started as soon
as the commission receives a
number from project Rural Water.


~ A
*.
* t&


Nichols Walk-In Medical Clinic
78 11th Street
Apalachicola 850-653-8819

Board Certified Physicians
Photis J, Nichols, M.D.
Stephen J, Miniat, M.D,

Open Monday Friday
8:00 am. 5:00 p.m.


I,
~f~

I
I
1
''


Together again! The "firecracker" quintet, still unmarried, made a repeat appearance at
the Literacy Ice Cream Social, without recruiting any husbands.


Weems Medical Center -East
102 S,E. Avenue B
(Behind Harry's Georgian Res-
taurant)
Carrabelle 850-697-2223

Dana Holton, Physician Assistant

Open Monday Friday
8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.


Wednesday
8:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m,














Accepting most insurance, Workman's Camp, Medicaid/Medicare
Franklin Couty is a 911 Community. In case of emergency, dial 911.


- .-


MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

Your community hospital, committed to providing
quality care with compassion and kindness.


Our Services Include:
Laboratory, radiology, ultrasound, elective surgery,
acute cardiac care and cardiology services.


Physician staffed Emergency Room open 24 hours.



Weems Memorial Hospital

135 Avenue G (12th Street and Avenue G)

Apalachicola 850-653-8853



VISIT OUR TWO CLINICS


(3 V


.








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


20 August 1999 Page 3


EDITORIAL AND COMMENTARY


Watergate Reflections

By Capt. Howard J. Kerr, USN (retired)
Publisher's note: Captain Kerr has been retired from the U. S.
Navy for several years. He is now the Mayor of Lake Forest, Illi-
nois, having been in business after his naval career. His "reflec-
tions" on Watergate was initially published in the Lake Forest news-
paper on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of Richard Nixon's
resignation. Since his perspective has never been known widely.
and for the sake of adding to our knowledge about that historic
event, I feel the informed commentary especially valuable, and of
course very appropriate at this time. Moreover, his comments are
useful, if provocative, as criticism of the working press by one of
the participants who took part in journalism's "grand hour," the
Watergate story. An event, incidentally, that stimulated thousands
of wide-eyed young people into journalism, and helped Bob Wood-
ward skyrocket to fame and fortune. Howard and I served together
in the Navy aboard the aircraft carrier USS BON HOMME
RICHARD (CVA-31) in the early 1960's.
Tom W. Hoffer


Bob Woodward's new book "Shadow" is an interesting read but not a
significant book. It did bring back memories for me of events in the
summer of 1974 leading up to the resignation of President Richard
Nixon, and the assumption of that office, by Vice President Gerald
Ford. I was the Naval Aide to Vice President Ford. While not a princi-
pal, I did have an orchestra seat.
When I was assigned to Vice President Agnew's staff in March of 1973
the Nixon/Agnew era was already in a downward spiral. The Wood-
ward & Bernstein expose lead to the Watergate hearings that spring
and Agnew resigned in October. Congressmanf Ford became the first
Vice President under the 25th Amendment in December. Many Wash-
ington insiders believed that Nixon would not serve out his term mak-
ing Ford the next President.
The pressure and stress that engulfed the White House in 1974 was
real and affected everyone. Personality clashes were common and
Washington's favorite sport of trashing through the press was in full
bloom. The tension between the Nixon and Ford staffs smoldered
beneath a patina of cooperation. There was one unwritten rule on the
Ford staff: no one ever spoke of Mr. Ford becoming President and, to
my knowledge, this was never violated.
Where the Supreme Court decided President Nixon had to release the
tapes, and the contents were made public, everyone knew what the
end game was -- it was just a matter of orchestrating it.
Woodward begins his Chapter on President Ford and General
Alexander Haig on Aug. 1, 1974 in the Vice President's office. I was
scheduled to meet Ford at 4 p.m. that afternoon and take him to
Admiral's House at the Naval Observatory which was to be his new
residence.
Arriving at the Vice President's office I noticed the receptionist was
nervous and her schedule book recorded that Ford was meeting with
Rogers Morton Chairman of the Republican National Committee. Just
then General Haig burst through.the door and asked me why. I was
standing outside the Vice President's office, and if I had overhead
any conversation between him and Ford. He was tired, red eyed and,
most likely, already on his third pack of cigarettes. I told him I had a
meeting with the Vice President and that I had heard nothing. He
ordered me not to tell anyone about his meeting with Ford. I can still
remember the look on the Vice President's face when I entered his
office. He looked stunned and was surprised to see me. I reminded
him that Mrs. Ford was waiting at Admiral's House and his mood
changed and we left for what must have been an agonizing presenta-
tion on a residence he and his family would never occupy.
The Vice President was unusually quiet and pensive during the re-
turn trip to the White House. This episode reveals the careful role
Ford had to play while Nixon's final days were being managed. Gen-
eral Haig had earlier told Ford he should prepare to assume the Presi-
dency. The reality of the last eight months was setting in. Ford knew
he would be President. Yet, he conducted himself in public as though
Aug. 1 was a routine day. If he had not, the press and others would
have wanted to know why, and this could have led to speculation
that he was preparing to assume the Presidency. Ford was very sen-
sitive to this issue. If he were going to be President it had to be legiti-
mate. The Constitution had to play out correctly. He would not be
part of any deal to steal the office from Nixon.
This is where Woodward's book fails the reader and history. He fo-
cuses on the supposed deal between Haig and Ford (which I do not
believe happened) and misses the atmosphere, the drama and the
anecdotes that evoke the mystery and the tension surrounding the
countdown to Aug. 9, 1974.
When Gerald Ford was sworn in I don't believe he was thinking about,
let alone planning to run in 1976. His statement that "Our long na-
tional nightmare is over," was a big step toward reestablishing the
integrity of the Presidency and signaled his primary goal --truth and
honesty in the Oval Office. He knew what he wanted to do about
President Nixon and he was told repeatedly by his aides, particularly
Bob Hartmann, he would seriously damage his high popularity if he
pardoned the former President..


"os POST OFFICE BOX 590
S EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
>. 850-927-4023, 850-927-2186
1 Pr 850-385-4003 (TALLAHASSEE)
C o I Facsimile 850-385-0830, 850-927-4090
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 8, No. 17


August 20, 1999


Publisher ..................... ..................... Tom W Hoffer
Contributors ........................................... Tom Campbell
............ Barbara Revell
............ Rene Topping
......... Susan Gunn

Sales ............................... ............... Jean Collins
........... Kathleen Heveran
........... Tom W. Hoffer
........... Jonathan Capps
Advertising Design
and Production Artist............................... Diane Beauvais Dyal
Production Associate ............................... Andy Dyal
Technical Editor, Copy Editor
and Proofreader ......................... .......... Tom Garside
Director of Circulation ............................ Andy Dyal
Citizen's Advisory Group
Rand Edelstein ... .................. .......... Alligator Point
George Chapel ................................ Apalachicola
Sandra Lee Johnson .......................... ... Apalachicola
Rene Topping ............................. Carrabelle
Pam Lycett .................. ....................... Carrabelle
D avid B utler ............................................ C arrabelle
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung ........................ Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins............... Eastpoint
Pat Morrison .................................. .. St. George Island
Dominic and Vilma Baragona ................. St. George Island
Anne Estes ............................. .......... W akulla
Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue would
cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the Chronicle
for price quotes if you seek several different or similar
issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.
Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 1999
Franklin County Chronicle, Inc.


Ex-Inmates Of 'Alcatraz Of
The Army' In Fla. Enthusiastic
About Reunions
Reprinted with permission
of Elmer T. Home, Jr.


Community

Newspaper

Impact

Some facts regarding the im-
pact of community newspa-
pers on American society:
* 58% of community newspa-
per readers depend on their
local paper as their primary
source of advertising.
* 52% of community newspa-
per subscribers keep their lo-
cal newspaper available for
reference for-a week or longer.
* 83% of community newspa-
per subscribers read almost
all the material in every issue.
* 64% of all community news-
paper readers consider the lo-
cal newspaper their primary
source for local news.
* 43% of community newspa-
per readers enjoy an income
of at least $35,000 a year.
* 43% of community newspa-
per subscribers have children
under the age of 14 requiring
exceptional purchases of
Clothing, food and entertain-
ment.
* 52% of community newspa-
per readers have attended
college.
(From The National Newspa-
per Association)


Special to the Stars and
Stripes
Aug. 1, 1999
CARRABELLE, Fla. Of the hun-
dreds of WWII veterans associa-
tions that exist, no more than a
half-dozen are based on service at
a stateside Army camp, and one
of them is Camp Gordon
Johnston here in North Florida.
The concept doesn't seem too
promising because the tie that
binds the vast majority of veter-
ans associations is overseas ser-
vice as a unit.
On top of that the stateside
camps, especially those for
ground forces in the superheated
South, are remembered
-unlovingly: Camp Blanding, Fla:;
Camp Wheeler, Ga.; Camp Croft,
S.C.; Camp Butrier, N.C.; Camp
Breckinridge, Ky.; Camp Forrest,
Tenn.; Camp Rucker, Ala.; Camp
Van Dorn, Miss.; Camp Polk, La.;
and uncounted numbers in Texas
including Camp Fannin, this
writer's basic training camp.
Camp Gordon Johnston would
seem a particularly poor prospect
as a base for a veterans associa-
tion.
GIs who trained here hatedit cor-
dially. When they wrote home,
their inside return address some-
times read "Hell-By-The-Sea."
Training deaths were high. Men
drowned during exercises in the
waters of Crooked River to the
north and the Gulf of Mexico to
the south.


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To stimulate citizen participation

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public office a 15% discount in

their political advertising.


Please contact:
Jonathan Capps: 670-8638
Tom Hoffer: 927-2186 or 850-385-4003
Tom Campbell: 697-8358


The place crawled with rattle-
snakes and other venomous rep-
tiles. Men died from small-arms
fire and explosives.
Walter Winchell, famed contem-
porary newspaper and radio com-
mentator, called Camp Gordon
Johnston "the Alcatraz of the
Army" and Gen. Omar Bradley,
who brought his 28th Division
here for training, declaimed that
the Army should court-martial
the people who selected the site
for a training camp.
It would seem ludicrous to sug-
gest that a veterans association
could be formed of men who
served at. Camp Gordon
Johnston.
Yet when a group of North Florid-
ians began to consider the pros-
pects early in 1995, it was discov-
ered that a whole lot of people
were electrified by the idea. In
March 1996, Camp Gordon
Johnston vets came from all over
the country for a first reunion,
just as they had come from all


aThe

Tin



Shed;.







A t.lq 4es & Collectb les
SSpecdalizLg
LA Natdca1l
M^ Antlq es
170 Water Street
H storic DownttowvM
Ap [lcckLcolai, FL
(850) 653-3635


A umlqame blend of
antiques, nautica
items, fa rntarue,
collectibles, art,
books and mwano
more disti[ctLve
accent p pieces.

Lookjor tke big tin shed
on 170 Water Street
along the historic
Apalcackicol[ River.

P.O. Box 9
Apalack cola, FL 32329
Linda & Harry Arnold. Owners


over the country more than 50
years before when Uncle Sam
made them an offer they couldn't
refuse.
And every year since, in March,
there's been a Camp Gordon
Johnston reunion, and the fifth
one will take place March 10-12.
2000. (Write to Camp Gordon
Johnston Association, P.O. Box
1334, Carrabelle, Fla. 32322 for
more information.)
The reunions are the wave of the
'90s and a bit into the 21st cen-
tury for the Camp Gordon
Johnston Association. But for the
future beyond the reunions, the
association is counting on devel-
opment of an extensive.
well-housed and well-curated
museum from its current small
beginnings in a quaint structure
in downtown Carrabelle which
recaps the feel of WWII days with
a sign in front which reads,
"Camp Gordon Johnston orderly
Room. Please knock and remove
cover before entering" signed
"lst Sgt."


"Shadow" is a very good account of events leading up to the pardon.
but Woodward's conclusion is wrong.
After a couple weeks in the East Wing of the White House I was reas-
signed to Jack Marsh whom President Ford had named as Counselor
with Cabinet rank. This was not a normal assignment for a military
officer but the Commander in Chief had authorized it. One of Marsh's
responsibilities was the interface with the Nixon compound at San
Clemente, and one of my daily calls was from Ron Ziegler complain-
ing about the way the former President and his staff were being
treated, particularly by members of Congress who were in no mood to
appropriate any dollars under the former President's Act to support
Nixon.
In fact, one Congressman offered legislation to disallow Mrs. Nixon's
$20,000 a year pension in event of Nixon's death. The President was
outraged by this behavior and directed Marsh to insure that Presi-
dent Nixon "be treated like any other former President." Ford was
genuinely concerned about reports of Nixon's failing health and he
was coming to realize that even in disgrace, former President Nixon
was dominating the headlines and setting the national agenda.
Ford believed that as long as Nixon could be indicted and possibly
tried, the country would be distracted from addressing the real is-
sues it faced. He knew that the backdrop for his Presidency would be
the Nixon spectacle. Ford was determined to refocus the country on
the economy and pressing foreign issues while acting humane and
fair toward his friend of 27 years.
I was standing outside the Oval Office with General Haig and Tom
DeFrank (Newsweek correspondent) when President Ford announced
the pardon on national television. DeFrank bluntly declared that "Ford
just lost the '76 election" while Haig exclaimed that "he just made his
first Presidential level.decision."
President Ford made the right decision for the country. He did it with-
out concern for the polls or his political future. Woodward's conclu-
sion that Ford should have handled it differently reflects his bias as a
reporter. Ford acted like the statesman he is.


Dixie Partington (left) and Gayle Seaton.


By Tom Campbell
The Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola
continued its top quality summer
theatre presentations with "'A
Coupla White Chicks Sitting
Around Talking", which opens
August 11 and is scheduled to
continue performances through
an August 22 Sunday matinee at
2:30 p.m.
Directed by Tyson Stephenson,
Dixie Partington and Gayle Seaton
give excellent .performances in a
funny play which is set in
Westchester County, Now York.
One lady has just moved into the
neighborhood from Texas and the
other is well established and
rather "uppity." They don't have
much in common, but the new
arrival is determined that they are
going to become "the best of
friends "


The situation develops in surpris-
ing and' funny ways and the two
actresses have a wonderful time
as they display their talents.
Gayle Seaton is Program Director
for Music Theatre in the School
of Music at Florida State Univer-
sity. She was thoroughly delight-
ful earlier this summer in her per-
formance in "Oh Coward!" In her
role as Maude Mix, she grows
through the action of the play and
finally realizes her freedom and
Joy of Ie.
Dixie Partington is continuously
amazing as she explores and de-
fines new characters in play after
play. This current character,
Hannah Mae Bindler from Texas,
is another of a string of
well-defined, believable and pro-
fessionally toned performances.


Acknowledgment:
Thom Baird of TOTAL
PHOTO furnished the
pictures of the scout's
outing published in the
last issue of the
Chronicle. Thom's busi-
ness is operated on St.
George Island adjacent
to Sea Oats Art Gallery.


Everda, 'oeraderartu


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Dixie Theatre's "Coupla White

Chicks"









Page 4 20 August 1999


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Yes, Keli, You And Your All Star
Friends Can Be Proud


By Tom Campbell
Some people questioned how the
Pony Tail Fast Pitch Softball World
Series would effect the Franklin
County All Stars. There didn't
need to be any doubt.
A grandmother of one of the girls
stated her view, which speaks well
for many.
Ms. Marjorie Langley smiled, "I
consider it an honor to have been
able to attend the Ponytail Fast
Pitch Softball World Series and
watch my granddaughter, Keli
Brannan, compete in the World
Series in the first base position."
She continued,, "With this being
our girls' first year in fast pitch
softball, they have done extremely
well. Some of the other State Com-
petitors have been competing in
Girls Fast Pitch Softball for over
15 years, some starting as young
as age 5 in this sport."
Ms. Langley addressed the nerves
and the loss. "Going into the first
game against South Carolina, it
was apparent the girls, parents
and fans were extremely nervous
after watching some of the com-
petition. However, we all survived
the 22-2 loss. We were determined
to do our best the next day against
the North Carolina team."
Learning to enjoy the competition
is an important part of the game.


No matter who wins, you learn
something, and hopefully you
have a good time playing the
game.
Ms. Langley said, "At the start of
the North Carolina game, our
Franklin County girls were more
relaxed and enjoyed the competi-
tion. They started out doing very
well, but lost ground in two of the
remaining innings, losing to North
Carolina 9-0!"
Here is a key element which Ms.
Langley pointed out. "Florida had
a lot of support from the fans and
coaches of the other teams." Ms.
Langley said. "After the N.C. game
was over, we were encouraged
when the Alabama Coach cheered
us up, telling us to walk proud.
He told us not to forget that we
were one of only eleven teams, out
of fifteen hundred, to make it to
the World Series."
One of only eleven teams, out of
fifteen hundred teams, to make it
to the World Series. Hey, that is
pretty special!
And the Franklin County All Stars
did have a good time playing the
games, after all.
Yes, Keli, you and your All Star
Friends can be proud.
CONGRATULATIONS! You are the
State of Florida, Franklin County,.
All Star Champions.


stance, after being persuaded to
do so.
When and where does the Part-
nership meet? The partnership
meets monthly oti the first Thurs-
day of the month. These meetings
take place at various facilities
across our Franklin County. Ro-
tating between Apalachicola,
Carrabelle, and Eastpoint.
When does the Partnership accept
applications for youth-based
activity proposals? The Tobacco-
Free will accept proposals for four
(4) tobacco-free events for the pe-
.riod of July 1, 1999 June 30,
2000.
Who can submit a proposal? Any
group/organization who provides
activities for youth ages 11 17.
Is there, a deadline for submitting
a proposal? Yes. Anyone inter-
ested in submitting a proposal,
must submit a letter of intent by
September 1, 1999 at 5:00 p.m.
Who can be contacted to get more
Information? Temolynne Wintons,
FCHD Tobacco Prevention Coor-
dinator at 653-21 1 1


2. People love area
-very positive "outer" image
-small
-have access to everyone
-quiet

3. Number of banking establishments and commercial deposits

4. One of cleanest, most productive estuaries in the world
-excellent production of oysters and seafood
-excellent sports fishing
-opportunity for value-added seafood processing

5. Large airport with runways in place
-good area for development

6. St. George Beach rated in top. 10 in nation

7. ECO-Tourism Heritage:
-economic development agenda linked to preservation of the com-
mercial seafood industry and environmental quality of the bay

8. Major recreational and park facilities available

9. Feeling of being safe
-little serious crime
On the other hand, the perceptions of the interviewees gathered in
the interviews by writers Delaney and Lesh, cast a slight shadow of
"warning signs" that would have distinct implications for becoming a
more sustainable community.

Apalachicola Warning Signs
These points were expressed by several community
leaders during interviews or at the community meeting
on July 8, 1999

1. Lack of civility, collaboration, and/or cooperation among city
and city/county officials
-say one thing and vote the other way
-block voting
-long delays in decisions
-absence of open dialogue

2. No recognized public forum for community vision/discussions
-polarization among sectors and between outsiders and insiders
-more in common than they think
-need opportunity to work together

3. Lack of basic economic and social data
-no central repository for data
-much of economy is on a cash basis
-poverty/needs assessments are skewed because many in
population not counted


The Franklin County Tobacco-
Free Partnership is up and run-
ning. Plans are presently being
made for a fun-filled, education-
ally exciting year of Tobacco
Awareness Activities.
What is the Franklin County
Tobacco-Free Partnership? The
Franklin County Tobacco-Free
Partnership is the Tobacco Pilot
program at the local level. Re-
sponsibility for implementation of
the program rests with the com-
munity partnerships and the
SWAT (Students Working Against
Tobacco) teams they support.
The Franklin County Partnership
is currently and always open to
new members who are willing to
help our youth plan and imple-
ment tobacco prevention and con-
trol activities to reach their peers
and other community members.
What is SWAT (Students Working
Against Tobacco)? It is a statewide
organization created to inform,
youth about the myths of tobacco
advertising and the dangers that
go along with using this sub-


-available data should be made more accessible (radio show?)
-political decisions made without necessary background
information

4. School system rated "D" with high dropout rate
-community does not support school/has written them off
-some good achievements but no one knows about them
-no mentoring programs or donations of goods/services
-lack of good schools inhibits economic development
-deterioration of school will lower property values
-no strong parent-teacher association
-school advisory group inactive
-students not given opportunities to compete in regional
scholastic events

5. Workforce has few business oriented skills
-can't fill minimum wage service jobs
-workforce independent, not used to working for others

6. Seafood industry is susceptible to broad fluctuations (weather,
resource scarcity, water quality/quantity, regulation)
-seafood workers do not participate in community discussions
-perception that "white boots" only come to protest, not
cooperate

7. Wealth gap
-many residents either live in grand or substandard houses, with
little in between
-lack of affordable housing leads young professionals to leave area
-few black entrepreneurs
-many restaurants and shops too expensive for local citizens
-domestic abuse/violence prevalent in county
-drug sales major issue of concern on the 'Hill'

8. Increased second-home and retirement market
-part-time owners lack interest in local issues
-retirees don't want to pay for schools and services

9. Tax base must be broadened
-property tax base has risen 70% in last 5 years
-city/county must diversify tax base (hotel/motel bed tax.
developers' impact fees, etc.)
-St. George Island developments pay 40% tax base for Franklin
County without comparable representation

10. Poor water quality
-water has bad taste
-sewage treatment and old pipes have been chronic problems
(being fixed now)
-septic tanks used outside of Apalachicola (new aerobic systems
an improvement, but not the final answer)
-non-point source run-off not addressed
-no real promotion of xeriscaping
-data on water pollution not accessible

11. City & county government
-reactive, not proactive
-lack of enforcement and selective enforcement common
-can't maintain facilities, infrastructure lacking
-too rigid, need more permissive interpretations (restoration of
front porch on old homes not allowed)
Continued on Page 7


The John Gorrie Museum.


THE FRANKLIN COUNTY ALL-STARS


WOULD LIKE TO THANK FRANKLIN COUNTY FOR THEIR SUPPORT!


YOU HELPED MAKE IT ALL POSSIBLE!!


ME nm


GREG PRICKETT
RICK'S BP STATION
ANCHOR REALTY
GULF COAST REALTY
RESORT REALTY
GULF STATE BANK
MARKS INSURANCE
MOSELEY INC.
JAMES HAMILTON
BADCOCK
WILLIE B. AND JACKIE LEWIS
OYSTER RADIO
EARL AND MARTHA CASH
JEANNIE'S JOURNEY
ISLAND ADVENTURES
CARRABELLE REALTY /RUBY LITTON
MASON AND MARILYN BEAN
BARBER'S SEAFOOD,
SEAHORSE FLORIST
CHARLOTTE JAMES
BRENDA GALLOWAY
MILLENDER AND SON SEAFOOD
B.J.'S PIZZA
MAHR DEVELOPMENT/GEORGE MAHR
ST. GEORGE ISLAND CABLE/CHARLES SUMNER
SHANE PHILLIPS
SUNCOAST REALTY
T &M CONSTRUCTION
HARRY A'S
GOLD KEY CONSTRUCTION
FLINT EQUIPMENT CORP.


KOA ,
FISHERMAN'S CHOICE
DAVID LANGSTON
TIM SAUNDERS
PRISTINE OYSTER
FITNESS FOR LIFE
TRADING POST PAWN
BAYOU BAIT SHOP
JULIA MAE'S
GENE LA'NGSTON
JACKSON'S ACE HARDWARE
MOORINGS
TIM'S RESTAURANT
CARRABELLE MARINA
APALACHICOLA STATE BANK
SASSY'S CARRABELLE
TIKI BAR.
CARRABELLE CAFE
FRANKLIN REALTY
DOCKSIDE MARINA
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
FRANKLIN BAIT
PARRAMORES
MARINE PATROL
FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMM.
CITY OF CARRABELLE
SHULER & SHULER
MAXWELL TIRES, CO.
APALACH BUILDING SUPPLY
WEFINGS MARINE
DONNIE WILSON
APALACH DIXIE LEAGUE
EASTPOINT LITTLE LEAGUE


QUALITY SEAFOOD
WATER STREET SEAFOOD
SCIPIO CREEK MARINA
SEAQUEST SEAFOOD
J.V. GANDER DIST
BUDDY WARD & SONS
POWERS
CHESNUT TREE
THE GRILL
MARY'S JEWELRY
BLUE WILLOW
SHAUN DONAHOE REALTY
CITIZENS FEDERAL BANK
LANIER PHARMACY
SUBWAY
DOROTHY COOPER
SPENCER LOVETT
AMERIGAS
KELLEY'S FUNERAL HOME
JIMMY MAXWELL
JANICE AND AMANDA SMITH
MARIE AND HEATHER LEE
LYNN'S QUALITY OYSTERS
SEWELL
LOCAL COLOR
APALACHICOLA BAY AMIMAL CLINIC
WATER MANAGEMENT
AQUA MAGIC
MARY LOU SHORT
ISLAND PAINTING
WET WILLIE'S
GRIMES INC.
AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY
WILLIAM AND RITA MILLENDER


EASTPOINT WATER AND SEWER
TIFFIN INTERIORS
THE RED TOP CAFE
BISHOP O'SULLIVAN COUNCIL KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS
ROSE NOGA
EDWARD AND MARGARET KUBICKI
PANAMA MARINE
HOWARD AND MARJORIE WAGONER
KATHRYN KEMP AND GAYLE WALKER
A-1 VINYL SIDING
SYBIL AND JAMES BROWN
ANNA BAILEY
FISH BUSTER INC.
JAN FULMER
ECKERD'S
THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND
ASSOCIATED LAND AND TITLE CO
BOATERS OUTLET INC.
SANFORD BRIDGE MARINE
HOLIDAY PEST CONTROL
TOTAL PHOTO
REGISTERS U-SAVE
NEEL'S
MINI MALL-JUDY'S
FOLKS REALTY
NERO'S
EVERREADY GAS
FORESTRY DIVISION
HO HUM R.V. PARK
SHIP'S STORE
VFW
GULF WATERS .
WAKULLA STATE BANK
CARRABELLE DRUG STORE


RED DAVIS
DONALD WOOD
HOLIDAY PEST CONTROL
THOMAS HALL
LONG'S VIDEO INC.
PENDLETON'S CITGO
CENTURY 21 COLLINS REALTY/COLLINS VACATION
RENTAL
AUNT EBBY'S
WILLIAM AND PAULA LUBERTO
THOMAS LEE BRANNAN
ALVIN MORRIS
LINDA GREEN
FAT JACK'S EATERY
TROPICAL TRADER
SHEAN'S SHANGHAI SALOON
CARRABELLE IGA
JIMMY CROWDER
ST JAMES-LANARK VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPT. INC.
TIMBER ISLAND YACHT CLUB
MARK R. HOUSEHOLDER
JIMMY ADAMS CONSTRUCTION INC.
R & L SHRIMP INC.
CARRABELLE LOVE CENTER INC. *
CURFEW LODGE NO 73 F & AM
CARRABELLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
WILLIAM AND MAXINE WELLS
SURVIVORS ISLAND BOAT & TACKLE I
CARRABELLE EXPRESS LANE I


Franklin County Tobacco-Free
Partnership News


V V


The Chapman Botanical Garden in Apalachicola.

Sustainability from Page 1


~steo








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


20 August 1999 Page 5


Kids Of All Ages Have Fun And
Literacy Wins!!!


el signers stirred up te-taig
Gospel singers stirred up toe-tapping music


By Barbara Revell
Kids of all ages joined the fun at
the old fashioned Ice Cream So-
cial at the firehouse in Eastpoint
on Saturday, August 14, 1999.
The social was the Franklin
County Literacy Volunteers of
America (LVA) annual fundraiser.
There were cake walks, gospel
singing, comedians, games for the
"younger" kids, ice cream and the
Silent Auction.
No figures on the dollars raised
were available at press time.
The inclement weather did not
dampen the spirits in the
Firehouse. The Saint City Singers


from Port St. Joe got the fun ott
to a rousing start and were quite
good. They were followed by the
01' Time Gospel Soul Seekers
Group. They claimed they were
right out of Las Vegas and were
so good that maybe they were
Cake walks took place through-
out the day and ten year old
Kristin Coulter was overheard
saying, "Grannyl We need you to
make a decision. Do we eat the
cake now or later?!" Pam Vest and
Bonnie Segree assisted with the
cake walks.
At the Silent Auction people could
be seen all afternoon checking the
bid books to make sure no one


ELECT


ALAN -


PIERCE

FOR

MAYOR
OF : .

APALACHICOLA

AND VOTE FOR:
New And Strong Leadership
Protecting The City's Waterfront
SSeeing That Your Tax-Dollars Are Wisely Used
Enforcing City Ordinances
I have the fiscal and general government experience to
be your Mayor. For the past eleven years I have man-
aged grants, and revenues from taxes at the county
level. I have a Master's Degree in Planning from the
University of Florida. I have current experience with
state government officials.
I WOULD APPRECIATE YOUR VOTE ON
SEPTEMBER 7, 1999. THANK YOU.
Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for and approved by Alan Pierce.



Steve Sternberg Studibs

IMusI LESSONS
SPiano Saxaphone Flute *-Harmonica *
17 Tears Experlence, M.Ed. *"l Styles, A1lAges
Phone: 653-S874
Tallahassee: ,
80-885-9981 I


had out bid them. If someone had,
the person really wanting the item
simply raised the bid. On the
other hand, one lady was relieved
when someone out bid her on a
bird house. She wasn't sure how
she was going to explain that bird
house to her husband! Helen and
Jim Marsh were in charge of the
Silent Auction.
Many literacy volunteers were
seen around all day as they en-
sured everyone had a, good time.
Maxine Creamer, Jim Miller,
Malcolm Nichols and Kitty White-
head took care of taking orders
for the generous servings of ice
cream. Jean Nichols sold soft
drinks. Kitty Whitehead, presi-
dent of the Franklin County LVA,
declared the event a success and
said, "I cannot think of anything,
after God, church and family,
more important than spending
time volunteering for literacy.






I


i'Gunn Electrical
Contractors
St. George Island
and
Gunn Heating and
Air Conditioning
Apalachlcola
Ollie Gunn
927-2277
E.R. 0008009
Routine Services
New Systems
Residential and Commercial
Jimmy Thompson
653-9771
R.A. 0052146
Licensed and Insured
L J


St. George

Island

Gulf View



"Doonesbury"


900 E. Pine Avenue


"Doonesbury", a two bedroom, two bath home with a large great room
area, is in excellent condition. Owners have replaced appliances, carpet-
ing, exterior door, sinks and ceiling fans within the last three years. The
home boasts a screened porch, work room, open decks and a view of the
beach or bay from the screened gazebo. Offered fully furnished for
$189,900. MLS#4096.


Prusoert Realty o
Prudential St. LGeorge Island


800-974-2666
850-927-2666


123 Gulf Beach Drive West St. George Island, FL 32328
An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.


There appeared to be two or three
Liz Sisungs. She was seen all over
the place! She assisted with the
cake walks, participated in the
cake walks, drew for door prizes.
assisted with the Silent Auction,
ice cream, etc. She did a little of
everything except sing!
Dedicated literacy volunteers.
Chuck and Becky Melton. enter
trained children outside when
weather permitted. The Melton's
had as much fun as the children!
In one of the games the girls com-
peted against the boys and the
girls won. They won by carrying
more water in plastic spoons from
a bucket of water to a styrofoam
cup.
LVA wishes to thank all mer-
chants and individuals who
helped make the event such a
rousing success.


i:


Alan and Betty Roberts in
front of their new quilt,
previewed at the social. This
is scheduled for a raffle at
the Seafood Festival, Fall
1999.






Fa l


Charles Golden Of Euatpuint Dies


Charles Buford Golden
Charles Buford Golden, Sr., 67.
of Eastpoint, Florida, died on
Monday, August 9, 1999 at Gulf
Coast Hospital in Panama City.
A native of Banks, Alabama, Mr.
Golden had lived in the Franklin
County area for the past 61 years.
He was a net-maker and the
owner of Golden's Net Shop in
Eastpoint, he was a former mem-'
ber of the Franklin County School
Board, having served for 10 years,
and was a member of the
Eastpoint Church of God in
Eastpoint.
He is survived by his wife, Audrey
K. Golden of Eastpoint; three sons
and daughters-in-law, Charles &
Deedre Golden and John & Jackie
Golden, all of Eastpoint, and
James & Jennifer Golden of
Apalachicola; two daughters and
sons-in-law, Charlene & Reedy
Holton of Carrabelle, and Betty &
Audy Webb of Apalachicola; thir-
teen grandchildren and 6
great-grandchildren; his extended
family of two sons & daugthers-
in-law, David & Maida Gilbert and
Ronnie & Jessie Gilbert, all of.
Eastpoint, one daugther and
son-in-law, Sherry & Tim Strand
of Apalachicola; ten grandchil-
dren and 12 great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held at 4:00
p.m., Thursday, August 12, 1999
at the Eastpoint Church of God.
Interment followed in the
Eastpoint Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to the Big Bend
Hospice/Franklin County, P.O.
Box 618, Carrabelle, Florida
32322.


St. George Island
SFish Fry And Bake
Sale Highlights
SLabor Day

Weekend


The 11th Annual Labor Day Fish
Fry, sponsored by St. George
Island United Methodist Church,
will be held on Saturday, Septem-
ber 4th, from 11:00 a.m. until
3:00 p.m. at the Church fellow-
ship hall, located at 201 E. Gulf
Beach Drive, on St. George Island.
For only a $5.00 donation, you
can be served a fantastic fried fish
platter, or take-out containers will
be available for those who wish
to eat at home. The traditional
scrumptious Bake Sale will ac-
company the Fish Fry, beginning
at 9:00 a.m. Your participation
and donation will support the
Church Building Fund, providing
expanded facilities for our grow-
ing community.


295

2951 APF


Judy's

Fashion Corner

Summer Clearance

Up to 50% off Selected Items

Men, Women, Junior clothing

Judy's has it ALL!
Juniors Misses Plus Sizes Men's 4
Wear Swimwear Costume Jewelry *
Eelskin Accessories
The hottest styles from coast to coast
South Beach LA New York
Located in the Carrabelle Mini-Mall
Complex on US 98 in Carrabelle.
Summer hours: Tuesday Friday 10:00 6:00
Saturday 10:00 4:00
Phone: 850-697-4222 VISA/MC are accepted
ItV*VVA1V1 *"A AAA A


It is impossible to captL re the es-
sence of a human be ihg in an
obituary. It is also difficult some-
times to see the end of an era
when you are still in that era.
There will be other net makers,
but there will not be another
Buford Golden.
Charles Buford Golden was very
articulate about the seafood in-
dustry. He provided one of the
most important items needed to
ply the trade of shrimping. Golden
nets were made with pride and
were as good as they get. Buford
Golden will be remembered by his
family and friends and by the
shrimping industry for his part in
developing the Golden net. This
famous net, as everyone agreed
to, was constructed from less
than 500 square feet of actual
webbing. The construction per-
plexed the Florida Conservation
Association so badly they at-
tempted to expand this 500
square feet of webbing to 953
* square feet by voodoo measure-
Sment. The Supreme Court wasn't
Going to fall for such a hoax when
they knew that only 500 square
feet of webbing was taken from a
box and there was some left over
after the net was finished. It was
undisputed that Buford Golden
used less than 500 square feet yet
FCA wanted it to measure almost
twice that size.
The Florida Supreme Court
rejected the FCA and DEP
Illogical argument and in their
January 18, 1996 ruling on
Case No. 85,880 (DEP et al v.
Bruce Millender, et al) said,
"Proposed methods of measure-
ment by the state and FCA
reach an absurd result and defy
common sense."
Needless to say the Supreme
Court ruling in favor of the Golden
net was greeted with great grati-
fication by.the Florida Shrimping
industry and with frustration and
dismay by the Texas based
Florida Conservation Association.
Thank you Buford Golden foryour
efforts on behalf of go many fish-
ermen. May your soul and the
souls of all the faithfully departed
Rest In Peace.
Bob Jones
Southeastern Fisheries
Association

The passing of Buford Golden rep-
resents the passing of an era.
Over the years, he has assisted
the fishing industry in countless
ways. It was more problem solv-
ing, and designing nets. Buford
was there for commercial and rec-
reational fishermen alike, willing
to offer suggestions and advice.
On numerous occasions, he as-
sisted Gulf Specimen Marine Lab,
coming up with better designs to
catch weird specimens, be they
jellyfish or electric rays. Buford
Golden was there to tackle the
unusual with practical advice.
He helped design nets with turtle
excluder devices that'the fisher-
men could better live with and still
make a living, a relief from the
ungodly contraptions first im-
posed by the government, thus
helping conservation, the turtles
and the men who fished the sea.
When the net limitation came on
in 1995, Buford Golden testified
in court that helped win a victory
that allows shrimpers to work to-
day. State limitation and the way
the Department of Environmen-
tal Protection planned to measure
nets would have put shrimpers
out of business.
Whether its commercial fishing
industry, the recreational fisher-
man or the scientific organiza-
tions like Gulf Specimen or the
FSU Marine Lab, he will be
missed.
Jack Rudlow
Gulf Specimen Marine Lab
Panacea


Gulf Council Takes
Final Action On Reef
Fish Amendment 17
And Mackerel
Amendment 12
The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Man-
agement Council (Council) took
final action on "Draft Amendment
12 to the Fishery Management
Plan for Coastal Migratory Pelagic
Resources in the Gulf of Mexico
and South Atlantic, Including
Environmental Assessment and
Regulatory Impact Review" and
"Draft Amendment 17 to the Fish-
ery Management Plan for Reef
Fish Resources, Including Envi-
ronmental Assessment and Regu-
latory Impact Review." Both of
these amendments seek to con-
tinue a moratorium on the issu-
ance of new commercial permits.
Both Mackerel Amendment 12


and Reef Fish Amendment 17
seek a continuance of a morato-
rium on the issuance of new com-
mercial permits for each fishery.
The proposed alternatives ac-
cepted by the Council seek exten-
sions of the moratoriums for 5
years. The major purpose of these
moratoriums is to allow the Coun-
cil time to evaluate controlled ac-
cess systems for the respective
commercial fisheries.


The cake walk.


I I __ I


1 927-295:7fl


m I


1, L N,- '. 1









Paae 6 20 August 1999


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Southeastern Fisheries

Association

Presidents Report June 18, 1999
Good Morning everyone... Welcome you to the 47th Annual Meeting of South-
eastern Fisheries Association. Forty seven years is something to be proud of
and I am. Thanks Steve for the nice introduction.
My role this morning is to report on the health and welfare of the association
and to some degree on the fishing industry in our region.
Let me state the obvious.
We are still alive and with just a little bit of luck will leap into the next millen-
nium with most of our marine resources being in good condition.
We are blessed to live in an area of the world where nearly 85% of the marine
resources we harvest are estuarine dependent.
And we are further blessed by all the work that is now going into protection of
wetlands and essential fish habitats.
Without the wetlands and clean water, we couldn't have the sustainable fish-
eries to harvest for the consumers to enjoy.
Protection of the wetlands, preservation of clean water and sustainable fish
harvest is something that most user groups could use as a way to join hands
for the protection and conservation of our natural resources. We continue to
offer SFA as an anchoring site for different views to meet and discuss the
issues in a professional atmosphere.
Since its creation in 1952, Southeastern Fisheries Association (SFA) has con-
sistently supported protection of nursery areas for shrimp and other.species
as well as fair and equitable regulations. It has, by the same token, opposed
regulations that were really nothing more than taking fish away from con-
sumers and reserving them to others. Allocation battles will always be the
most emotional as they determine, "Who Gets The Fish!." and therefore which
businesses and cultures will survive.


So how did we do this year?
Well, we continued to offer HACCP training to 100 fish folks this year and
surpassed the 600 mark. HACCP has the potential of making our industry
more cognizant of seafood risks, but in the final analysis, cooked seafood is
still the safest animal protein around.
We also got through this year without the need for a special dues assessment
which says a lot for how we are doing. We are strong and with the core group
of 300 + members we will continue to be an important part of fisheries man-
agement.
Early on this year, the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference placed Florida
shellfish operation on 'probation' alleging that the state program was not as
strong as the federal program and that when federal inspections were made.
more violations were found. After a lot of gnashing of teeth and many confer-
ences, a settlement was reached that didn't single out Florida for extra special
treatment. The DEP Inspection program is good and getting more professional
all the time.
This was the last year for the Florida Marine Fisheries Commission and it
went out swinging. It first off rejected a plan to close shrimping for an extra
three months in SW Florida which was in keeping with the agreement worked
out between shrimpers and crabbers many years ago. Later on however, the
MFC did close this important shrimping ground at the strong request of the
stone crab fishermen in that area. Once again the issue between shrimpers
and crabbers was contentious and I suppose that will always be the case.
The MFC worked closely with the calico scallop industry and developed a rule
that was accepted by'oveir 6%sof those in the fishery. It offered some protec-
tion for small scallops. SFA played a leders-hip role In getting the- industry
together in a setting where d logical solution coLld be reached it wasn't easy
but Is there anything easy in the word of Iling marr.ne res-ources "
SFA once again begged the MFC, NMFS and the Coast Guard to better protect
the Tortugas nursery area by giving more attention to catch those who poach
inside the line. Poachers give the seafood industry a bad image.
SFA was responsible for establishing this large nursery zone where No Trawl-
ing is allowed in order to protect the juvenile pink shrimp. From a shrimping
point of view, this is a marine protected area as no shrimping has been al-
Slowed for decades. We are still convinced the closure is best for the industry
and the resource. Shrimp need protection when they are the most vulnerable
and there is never any reason to catch shrimp so small that all you bring on
deck are eyeballs and small bodies.
The law enforcement officials are willing to give the Tortugas more attention
but it doesn't have enough financial resources or equipment available to them.
I am convinced that if we cannot keep the poachers out of the closed area.
NMFS will mandate the use of Vessel Monitoring Devices for all shrimp boats
in Florida including the few bays where shrimping is still allowed.
SFA continued to work for strict enforcement of roadside vendors who offer all
kinds of seafood to the public with relatively few sanitation safeguards. We
were glad the Florida legislature finally made it a serious crime for restau-
rants to buy seafood from non-licensed persons who, in many instances, never
report the catch and never report the income.
In California, sport Abalone divers were recently fined in excess of $10,000.
and their new van was confiscated. Other sport fishermen received jail time
for poaching.
In our world, we hear many reports from seafood dealers who watch people
take fish to the back door of restaurants and leave without them. SFA believes
if you are going to play you ought to pay. Fairness is all we want.
In January SFA Board met with the OFF Board for a wide ranging discussion
on fishery issues. At the end of the meeting, a list of people were agreed upon
for submission to the Governor for consideration to any Council or Commis-
sion vacancy. Several of the people on our joint list made the final cut for the
Councils.
This was a sad year for the fishing industry with the passing of Governor
Lawton Chiles. If ever there was a man who was comfortable around working
people, including commercial fishermen it was Lawton Chiles.
History will treat him kind for he was a.man of the people and had such
confidence in the young people of Florida. He was a great Floridian.
The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) filed a petition with the
Food and Drug Administration, that, if granted, will close down the bulk of the
oyster industry in the southeast. The petition from this group calls for a
"non-detectable' level of Vibrio vulnificus. a naturally occurring pathogen, in
oysters. Vibrios are in the environment. As long as the industry takes all pru-
dent steps to notify those with immune suppressed systems not to eat raw
oysters or any raw food for that matter, and endeavors to keep the oysters cool
and sanitary, then that's the best the industry can do. This is the same group
that filed the ALAR apple scare several years back that proved mostly to be a
scare tactic.
In March the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council proposed rules for
gag grouper that has set the reef fish industry on its head. You will hear more
about this from Bobby Spaeth. Steve Rash and Bob Jones but suffice to say
this has been one of the most heated management debates in recent years
and there is more at stake than just saving the male groupers.
I had the pleasure of walking the Halls of Wisdom in Tallahassee this year and
following with great interest the legislation that combined the Game and Fresh-
water Fish Commission with the Marine Fisheries Commission. I was sched-
uled to testify in early April but the House stayed in session for most of the
day and the hearing was postponed. It was during one ofmy trips to Tallahas-
see that I had the pleasure of meeting Allan Egbert, head of the Game & Fish
Commission.
Allan. Bob & I discussed the main issues we had pertaining to the combina-
tion of the two agencies which were: "ADEQUATE DUE PROCESS AND PRO-
TECTION OF FMRI AND THE SCIENTIFIC WORK THEY PERFORM."
In closing let me remind you that we lost one of our past presidents this year.
Jack Hill. Key Largo Fisheries. Truly a great American. As Bob Starr said.
"God must have wanted to go lobster fishing so He brought Jack home." Rest
in peace Jack Hill.
Thanks for allowing me to serve as your President this past year. I won't forget
it.
Joe Versaggi
President 1998-99

Evey ay m re e- er ae trnngtoth

FrnkinChon-d


The Eastpoint Firehouse sporting a new roof.

Sam Gibbs of Eastpoint

Finishes Roof of Fire House


Contractor Sam Gibbs of Sam's
Metal Roofs, Inc., 340 N.
Bayshore Drive in Eastpoint com-
pleted the lifetime metal roof on
the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire De-
partment at a cost of $19,874.
County Planner Alan Pierce said
August 17, 1999, that the roof
which was recently completed,
was a guaranteed "'lifetime roof of
metal that will withstand hurri-
cane force winds."
The Eastpoint Volunteer Fire
House also serves as a "Recovery
Assessment Of
Shrimp Stocks Given
To Council's Shrimp
Management
Committee

The National Marine Fisheries
Service (NMFS) presented the
1998 Stock Assessment Report to
the Shrimp Management Commit-
tee in Key West, Florida. In gen-
eral, shrimp stocks appeared to
be in good shape'. The brown
shrimp harvest was 79.4 million
pounds (MP) for 1998 and was the
largest harvest since 1991. Over
54 MP of white shrimp were har-
vested in 1998 and was the high-
est harvest since 1986. While the
1998 pink shrimp harvest (14.7
MP) has declined from 1996 and
1997 levels, 1998 landings were
higher than the historical average
of 10- 11 MP.
While catch-per-unit-effort
(CPUE) is still not as high as re-
corded in the 1960s and 1970s,
CPUE has leveled out from the
late 1980s. In addition, recruit-
ment for both brown and white
shrimp has steadily increased in
recent years. Recruitment levels
for pink shrimp have remained
constant.
Because shrimp are an annual
species. overfishing is defined in
terms of spawning population
size. For brown and white shrimp,'
this is the estimated number of.
7+ month-olds. For pink shrimp,
this is the estimated number of
5+ month-olds. Dr. James Nance
reported that for all 3 species, the
size of the parent stock was
greater than the overfishing
threshold values; particularly for
brown shrimp, it was over 2 times
the overfishing index level of 125
million individuals.

FWC Seeks Public

Input Concerning

Finfish Issues And

Biscayne Bay

Shrimping

The Fish, and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC) has
scheduled a public workshop to
receive comment on proposed
changes to shrimp harvesting
regulations, primarily for
Biscayne Bay in Dade County.
The workshop will take place 6-8
p.m. on Tuesday, August 31 at the
Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan Ameri-
can Dr. in Miami.
Proposed rules would eliminate
the count law (minimum size
limit) for food shrimp harvested
in Dade County, establish an Oct.
15 May 15 allowable harvesting
season for food shrimp in
Biscayne Bay (with a 6 a.m. Sat-
urday to 6 a.m. Sunday closed
period to food shrimp harvest
each week during this open sea-
son), and prohibit the use of frame
nets by recreational shrimpers in
Dade county.
Also, proposed rules would des-
ignate shrimp as a "restricted spe-
cies" statewide. The FWC will con-
duct a final public hearing on pro-
posed shrimp rules during its
October meeting in St.
Petersburg.
The Commission has also sched-
uled a series of public workshops
to receive comment concerning
finfish management issues. The
FWC is particularly interested in
receiving testimony regarding
management of spotted seatrout
and pompano, use of bridge gaffs,
standardizing how fish are mea-,
surecd, and any other issue of in-
terest to the public. Workshops
will all take place 6:30- 8 p.m.
at:
Thursday, August 26,1999
Department of Environmental
Protection
Twin Towers Building,
Room 609
2600 Blair Stone Rd.
Tallahassee
Thursday, September 16, 1999
Destin Community Center
101 Stahtman Ave.
Destin


Center" used in emergencies, so
it was essential that the roof could
resist hurricane winds.
County Planner Alan Pierce also
said that the $19,874 came from
Federal Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) funds, which re-
sulted from Hurricane Opal. That
hurricane occurred several Years
ago, about 1995.
Pierce said, "We're happy to have
the roof finished on the Eastpoint
Fire House and Recovery Center."


L*f.--^"1


Sam Gibbs

Commercial Shark

Fishing Closed

Until January 1st

In Florida

The Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC) has shut
down commercial sharkfishing in
state waters until January 1.
The National Marine Fisheries
Service notified the FWC the ac-
tion is necessary, based on catch
rates that indicate sharks have
been overfished in recent years-
a situation that could disrupt the
necessary environmental balance
in state waters.
Recreational shark fishing is not
affected by the order, but sharks
or shark fins harvested during the
closure period may not be bought,
sold or exchanged.

)The Gulf of Mexico Fishery
Management Council is one
of eight regional fishery man-
agement councils that were
established by the
Magnuson-Stevens Fishery
Conservation and Manage-
ment Act in 1976. The Coun-
cil is responsible for the de-
velopment and modification
of fishery management plans
(FMPs) that are designed to
manage fishery resources in
the exclusive economic zone
(EEZ) of the Gulf of Mexico
from state boundaries to the
200-mile limit.
Subscribe to GULF FISHERY
NEWS, c/o Gulf of Mexico
Fishery Management Coun-
cil, 3018 U.S. Highway 301
North, Suite 1000, Tampa,
Florida, 33619-2266. Tele-
phone: 813-228-2815 (toll-
ree 888-833-1844). Fax:
813-225-7015. E-mail:
gulfcouncil@gulfcouncil.org.


Si I urt nrin August 20 September 18,1999
Bulletin ,
Board By Tom Campbell

Thursday, August 19-Battery Park at the Apalachicola Community Center.
Candidate Forum for all political candidates running for office in Apalachicola.
Sponsored by the Apalachicola Area Chamber of Commerce. beginning at 7
p.m.
Saturday, August 21-Pet First Aid training course for pet owners of cats and
dogs. A four-hour class to learn how to provide emergency first aid to your
pets. Contact Bill Firestone. Capital Area Chapter. Red Cross 850-878-6080.
Thursday, August 26-Panhandle Poets and Writers meet at 7 p.m. at Pat's
Place in Carrabelle. Guest speaker will be Dick and Loraine Watley. authors.
Sunday, August 29-Candidate Day sponsored by Carrabelle Ministerial As-
sociation for all candidates for political office. From 2 to 4 p.m. at the Carrabelle
Senior Center.
Saturday, September 4-Fall Festival in Carrabelle from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
the Senior Center.
Tuesday, September 7-Voting Day in Carrabelle and Apalachicola for local
offices.
Monday, September 13-Family-Domestic Violence Task Force Meeting.
5 p.m. Call for location. 653-3313.
Saturday, Spetember 18-International Coastal Cleanup. Phone Apalachicola
Reserve at 850-653-8063 for more information.
Please send events with complete information to: Tom Campbell,
P.O. Box 451, Carrabelle, FL 32322, or phone 850-697-8358.














'A IAII 0'
not a profit m argin



(GENERALw CONTRATO


QUALITY W(


)RK JOHN'S REASONABLE RATES
CONSTRUCTION
of Franklin County, Inc.


Remodeling & Custom Homes
Roofing & Repairs,
Vinyl Siding
John Hewitt
850-697-2376 OWNER
GEN. CONTRACTOR LIC.
NO: RG0050763 106 St. James Avenue CARRABELLE
ROOFING CONTRACTOR LIC. 106 St. James Avenue CARRABELLE
NO: RC0051706 P.O. Drawer JJ Carrabelle 32322
I-


#130 A steal on the water. 2BR #80 Across from the Carrabelle
DW w/wrap around deck, great River, this 3BR/2BA home was built
room, breakfast bar, light & open in 1995 and has over 1600 sf of
w/gorgeous views. Rock seaway living area. Very nice inside with
with large overhanging deck lead- great room & fireplace. 6'x31'
ing to 200+ dock. Great fisherman's screened porch, back deck, double
getaway or vacation retreat. garage, storage shed, greenhouse
MLS#2588. $90,000. &. nice landscaping. MLS#4129.
$137,000.
We handle properties from Alligator Point to Eastpoint including
Dog Island. Check out our website at www.folksrealty.com.
Karen S. Folks-Lic. R.E. Broker: 697-2143
Sales Associates
Mary L. Bowman: 697-3759 E.T. (Bud) Ammons: 697-2639
Tom Shields: 697-2640 Bob Shepherd: 984-5129


11th Annual












CHURCH FISH FRY!


Saturday, September 4th

11:00 3:00 p.m.

St. George Island United Methodist Church
201 E. Gulf Beach Drive, St, George Island

$5.00 Donation

Served Indoors-Fellowship Hall
Take-Out Available


OUR FAMOUS BAKE SALE

BEGINS AT 9:00 A.M.


-------a-


I









The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


20 August 1999 Page 7


Franklin County School Board


Thursday, August 5, 1999
Attending: Brenda Galloway. Su-
perintendent; Connie Roehr,
Willie Speed, Katie McNight,
Jimmy Ganders and Attorney,
Barbara Sanders
Absent: Will Kendrick
Visitoi Mary Ann Shields, Chair-
man of the Library Building Fund,
announced that the library has
received a 1/4 million dollargrant
from the State of Florida. Mrs.
Shields was before the School
Board to request the old gym be
given by the School Board to the
County for the library. Shields
stated, "It would be a centerpiece
for Carrabelle. When you think in
terms of that eyesore being gone
and a 1/2 million dollar library
being there... Shields also said,
"The central location would be
ideal."
Principals Bob McDaris,
Carrabelle High School; Denise
Butler, Apalachicola High School
and Ina Meyer, Chapman Elemen-
tary reported their. schools are
ready for school to begin:
Mr. Willie Speed reported on a
school conference he attended
recently in Ashville, North Caro-
lina.
Speed said one of the major top-
ics at the conference was school
safety. Speed said every school
needs a safety plan, "It can hap-
pen here and we need to be
ready." Speed further stated, The
world will look to the school board
if anything happens."
The Board approved student
transfer requests. Then they
agreed to participate in/PAEC
Consortium and PAEC/Gateway
Services (payroll, finance, etc.)
1999-2000. The Board adopted a
resolution:
"Florida's Missing Children's
Day". They agreed to dual enroll-
ment wherein a student can be
enrolled in.high school and Gulf
Coast Community College at the
same time. The following also was
approved: Speech-Language Ser-
vices, Pooser Communication; Oc-
cupational Therapy Services, Mr.
Thomas Kunkel; Rehabilitation
Services/Visual Impairment,
Wakulla county; Evaluation Ser-
vices, Florida State University;
Multi-disciplinary Center/ESE
Contract, Washington Co.
Mr. Gene Boone was hired as Co-
ordinator of Maintenance and
Transportation. Ms. McNight was
opposed to Superintendent's rec-
ommendation of giving Boone
credit for, 11 years of experience
which was not with the Franklin


County School Board. After ex-
tended discussion the Board
agreed three to one with Galloway.
Instructional personnel at
Apalachicola High School ap-
proved: Mr. Michael Todd, Ms.
Sherrie Stokes, Ms. Cassandra
Allen, Ms. Jeanie Gargiulo and
Robert Coursey. Instructional
personnel at Brown Elementary
School approved: Ms. Candace
Griffith, Mr. B.T. Hinton, Ms.
Heather Johnson and Ms. Andrea
Keuchel. Instructional Personnel:,
approved at Carrabelle High
School: Mr. William Pierine.
Non-instructional personnel ap-
proved at Chapman Elementary
School: Ms. Melissa West. Ms.
Louise Carrin, Apalachicola High
School was granted a leave of ab-
sence. Ms. Stephanie Beebe re-
signed from the position of School
Food Service and the Board gave
approval for the position to be
advertised.
In the area of Finance the Board
approved a purchase order for
carpet in the amount of $144,000.
The Board questioned Superin-
tendent Galloway's action in hav-
ing computers installed at Brown
Elementary without bringing it to
the Board first. Mr. Jimmy Gan-
ders said, "Why did you (Gallo-
way) get the computers before it
came before the Board?"
Ms. Galloway explained that in
order to get the computers from
the Work Force Development
Board it had to be done before the
end of their fiscal year which
ended on June 30, 1999. The
Work Force Development Board
offered Franklin County Schools
$25,000 in computers, however
Franklin County Schools have to
pay the $25,000 initially and get
reimbursed later. The other re-
quirement was that the comput-
ers be installed in a school with-
out a Title I reading lab. Gallo-
way said she knew that Brown
Elementary School did not have
the reading lab and therefore,
agreed to the installation of the
computers. The school board
members while adamantly dis-
agreeing with the fact that the
computers were installed without
their knowledge did approve the
purchase order for $25,000. Ms.
McNight voted against the Pur-
chase Order. The Board approved
payment of monthly bills and the
1999-2000 salary schedule.
Mr. Highsmith reported that
Franklin County Schools will the
100% connected to the Internet
within three weeks (of the Board
meeting) and that this is the only
county in The State of Florida to
be 100% connected!


Mr. Ganders recognized that Mr.
Speed's son, Oryan Speed re-
cently was hired as principal of
Potter Elementary School in
Tampa. Ganders also stated
proudly that Mr. Oryan Speed is
a product of the Franklin County
Schools!
Mr. Speed complimented and
thanked Mr. Highsmith for the
quality and detail of the Finance
reports.


Florida To

Receive $26

Million For

Reading

Education Commissioner Tom
Gallagher announced on August
16th that Florida will receive the
largest single competitive grant in
the state's history-$26 million-
from the U.S. Department of Edu-
cation for its reading initiative
over the next 3 years.
The competitive grant will concen-
trate on the Florida Department
of Education's primary goal of
having all children reading on
grade level by the end of grade
three. The grant, which is entitled
Florida Literacy and Reading Ex-
cellence (FLARE), also contains
components aimed at family lit-
eracy.
."Statistics indicate that as many
as 35% of our adult population
have a literacy problem,"
Gallagher said. 'This grant will go
a long way in helping us achieve
our goal-ensuring that adults
and children are capable readers."
School districts will be invited to
write competitive grant proposals
aimed.at the primary grades' in-
structional strategy for teaching
reading and bringing all students
to grade level by third grade. The
reading strategies must include
research-based methods and
materials as well as teacher staff
development activities. According
to Gallagher, special consider-
ation will be given to schools with.
D & F grades.
A Reading Summit will be held on
October 20, 1999, in Lakeland to
discuss grant applications' and
other components of Florida's
comprehensive reading progress.


Sustainability from Page 4


12. Sub-standard local medical care
-care for minor illnesses and ailments available
-basic maintenance of local hospital poor
-serious conditions and surgery often require travel elsewhere
13. Lack of opportunity for teens/young professionals
-no place to go at night
-no peer support group
-few opportunities for upwardly mobile
Authors Delaney and Lesh have made a series of recommendations
or "next steps". As presented in their report, these items are as fol-
lows:

Apalachicola Recommended Next Steps

1. Establish a Community Forum
-continue dialogue started on July 8 and involve others
-work on community vision
-establish priority issues
(water quality, historic preservation, economic development,
taxes, schools, community relations, etc.)
-select measurable targets/develop indicators
-compile data
-establish method for delaying data in understandable terms


Apalachicola taken from the Gorrie Bridge.
-develop regular reports
-measure progress
-continue to involve total community in process

2. Participate in Public Policy Process
-hold regular town meetings with elected officials
-discuss priority issues and acknowledge progress
-recognize problems and assist in their solution
-present leadership awards
-encourage voter turnout
3. Establish a Community Trust
-write and administer grants
-serve as centerpoint for data on community
-provide administrative services
4. Interpret the Working Waterfront
-construct walkways and public access points
-develop seafood processing signage and displays
-involve seafood industry in creating interpretive displays
seafood processing and the life of oystermen/shrimpers


Continued on Page 9


I


I


I P, I \ [. -
FURMTL "I


I _


Wood Duck Nest

Box Project

Completed

Ducks Unlimited (DU) in coopera-
tion with St. VincentNWR, the
National Fish and Wildlife Foun-
dation (NFWFj, Apalachicola Na-
tional Estuarine Research Re-
serve (ANERR), and the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) have placed
50 wood duck nest boxes in the
Lower Apalachicola River Basin.
The project was sponsored by the
Gulf Coast DU Chapter and St.
Vincent NWR. Boxes were erected
adjacent to ANERR, FWC, and
some private lands in the Lower
Apalachicola River Basin. The
boxes are spread out from White
City and Depot Creek in Gulf
County to Chipley Lake in
Franklin County.
DU and NFWF provided the funds
for the materials which were pur-
chased locally. Ken Bowman and
the carpentry shop students from
the Apalachicola High School do-
nated 88 hours building boxes.
Other boxes were built by local
volunteers. Phil Manor with FWC
helped build and erect boxes.
ANERR provided the boat as well
as Jimmy Moses and Pat
Millender for several days and
Chip Bailey on one day to put the
boxes up. Randy Cordray, Char-
lotte Chumney and Thom Lewis
from St. Vincent NWR also par-
ticipated in the project. Five of the
over 150 members of the Gulf
Coast DU Chapter worked on the
project. L.J. Wilkinson, H.
Quackenbush, Kit Mashburn III,
and A. Richards of the local DUI
chapter volunteered at' least one
day on the project. Without John
Drew from the local DU chapter
this project could not have been
completed. John donated 261
hours during the project and
I countless hours helping get the
Grant and finalizing the project.
Natural nest cavities were re-
duced in the Lower Apalachicola
River Basin by logging, thus re-
ducing available nest sites for
wood ducks. This partnership has
met several goals and provided
benefits to partners and the local
wood duck population. DU green-
wings and other youths had an
opportunity for hands-on experi-
ence during the construction of
the boxes. They will see the fruits
of their labor in future seasons
when hatching success is deter-
mined. Wood duck breeding sites
will be increased and local wood
duck populations will be en-
hanced. Nesting females will be
banded each spring to help meet
refuge banding quotas and in-
crease our knowledge of local
breeding populations.









Page 8 20 August 1999


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


FC,


Florida Classified


Advertising Network


Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience

of 1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!


The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper

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Hobo's Just Keeps On Getting Better


Huge Indoor Yard

Sale & 5K Run At

St. George Island

Methodist Church

The 11th annual Indoor Yard Sale
sponsored by St. George Island
United Methodist Church, located
at 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the
Island, will be held this year on
Saturday, August 28, from 8: 00
a. m. until 3: 00 p. m. Do your
shopping in cool air conditioned
comfort as you choose from hun-
dreds of household goods, fur-
nishings, appliances and clothing.
You'll find something for everyone
and help the Church expansion
program serving a growing com-
munity. If you have items to do-
nate, please call Shirley Hartley
at (850) 927-3154.
Earlier in the day the Church will
sponsor the annual 5K Run, with
a new feature this year which in-
cludes walking races for those
aged 55 and over! Registration will
take place at the Church parking
lot beginning at 7:15 a.m. and the
runners and walkers will take off
at 8:00 a.m. All participants will
receive T-shirts, medallions and
trophies for an entry fee donation
of $10. A "Fun Run" for children
ages 12 and under will be avail-
able for younger athletes. To reg-
ister or for more information,
please call Dr. Hobson Fulmer at
(850) 927-2510 or 670-8306.



ALL IN FRANKLIN
COUNTY AREA
Own your own home for $52
a week. CALLJoyce @ 850-297-
5995.
BEAUTIFUL!!! 3BR/2BA, $320/
month, $1,000 cash back to
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297-5339.
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7382.
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7382.
ATTENTION!!! Move in next
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vmono


Sea (Catb.




Featuring Local

Artists

qowunet & qift6,

Open Mon. Sat. 11:00 until
128 East Pine Street
St. George Island
850-927-2303






SPECIAL

PROPERTIES
APALACHICOLA- Roomy 2BR/1 BA
on two lots with detached 1BR
apartment. Great location,
corner. 17th/Ave. D. MLS#3117.
$189.500
EASTPONT- One acre building sites,
bayview and bayfront, Hammock
Shores and Indian Mound Shores
subdivision. From ................ $25,900
MLS#2416.
CARRABELLE COMMERCIAL -
Entire city block next to IGA. Across
from River-location, location,
location .... $600,000. MLS#3205.
APALACHICOLA BAYFRONT HOME
Circa 1910, beautiful property,
2,800 sq. ft. with garage/workshop.
Fine lumber throughout $325,000
MLS#2473.
HISTORIC DISTRICT Prime
commercial corner, income
producing 4,800 sq. ft. building next
to Dixie Theatre. .............. $450,000.
MLS#3869
ST. GEORGE ISLAND East end
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MLS#2947.
APALACHICOLA Entire city block
zoned R-2 multi-family residential....
................... $150,000.. MLS#3852.







[850) 653-8330
P.O. Box 666 17 1/2 Avenue E
Apalachicola, FL 32329


By Tom Campbell
This is the fifth season for Hobo's
Ice Cream Parlor and Hoagie
Heaven, just west of the
Carrabelle Bridge on Highway 98.
This is the place where you can
get "the best ice cream and the
best all-beef hot dog with all the
fixin's."
Owners are Richard E. and Carol
Noble, the husband-wife team
that does everything around the
place, and everything just keeps
on getting better every season.
Carol said, "We built all the tables
and chairs when we first opened."
They continue to improve the
place each season. They close in
November and re-open on
Valentine's Day each year. Dur-
ing December and January, they
take a break, visit friends and
relatives and think about what
they can do to improve Hobo's the
following season.
They wanted a little place where
they could serve good food in
pleasant surroundings. Books,
records and art objects are on all
the walls. They like to feature lo-
cal artists when they can.
Carol and Richard opened Hobo's
in the summer of 1995. They live
in Eastpoint, where they moved
in about 1982, according to Ri-
chard, who smiled, "I'm not very
good at dates. But it was about
1982." They spent 13 years oys-
tering. "We learned a lot," he
grinned.
Before that, they traveled all over
the United States. In the late
1970's, according to Richard.
"Someone said we should check
out Franklin County in Florida.


EThI m


We did and camped on St. George
Island, back when you could sleep
on the beach, if you wanted to. It
was beautiful. We loved the whole
area around Franklin County."
Carol and Richard first met in Ft.
Lauderdale "and have been to-
gether for close to 25 years," said
Richard. His favorite hobbies are
reading, writing poetry and es-
says. He has finished a book titled
"Hobo-ing America." He narrated
it on tape and said he may pub-
lish it eventually.
Back in 1997, a former writer for
The Franklin Chronicle, Sue
Riddle Cronkite, wrote and article
on Richard and Carol Noble. In
her article, Ms. Cronkite said:
"Hobo's customers may also
spend hours looking at pictures
from the Nobles' travels, reading
poetry written by' Richard, and
searching through a big selection
of used books. Catch the Nobles
in a lull and they'll tell you about
their adventures and how they did
what everybody threatens to do at
one time or another in their lives
(chuck everything and go on a
grand adventure)."
"I wouldn't trade our adventures
for anything," said Carol.
Would they do it again?
"Sure," answered Richard. "You
bet we would."
Treat yourself to a delicious sand-
wich, some ice cream or just good
conversation. Stop by Hobo's and
chat with Richard and Carol
Noble. You'll feel better about be-
ing alive.

Richard Noble


7` I


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1557 Highway 98
right across the road from "Julia Mae's"
850-697-3252
"White Dog Beach"-On Dog Island where there's fishing "
galore. House on 5 acres with dock, guest quarters, hot tub,
gazebos and decks, decks, decks: Owner says sell! $575,000
negotiable with owner financing.

"Bobby's Dream"-Dog Island canal lot with house
foundation and septic tank already there. Great view of
Tyson's Harbor and St. George.Sound. $43,500.

"Taters Place"-Located on Carrabelle Beach west. This
bayside home has a seawall and walk around deck. Don't
miss this one! $164,000.

"Beacon Ridge Phase I & II"-Nicely wooded lots close to
Carrabelle Beach. Zoned for mobile homes with restrictions.
One acre (some are larger). This is a really nice community.
$8,500 and up.

Audie E. Langston Licensed Real Estate Broker
Sales Associates
Janet Stoutamire 697-8648
Mike Langston 962-1170 Cliff Willis 697-2816


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The Chronicle is now accepting classified ads, up to 40 words each, for
$5.00 per ad. Please send your copy to: Franklin Chronicle. 2309 Old
Bainbridge Road, Tallahassee. FL 32303. by Monday on the week the
Chronicle is published. Type your ad, or print in block letters all the infor-
mation you desire in the ad. If the word and number count exceeds 40.
the cost will be an additional $5.00. Discount rates available. Please re-
member, the Chronicle is published twice monthly, with this issue carry-
ing the date of August 20, 1999. The next issue will be September 3.
1999. Thus, ad copy. your check and your telephone number must be
received by Tuesday, August 31, 1999. Please indicate the category you
want your ad listed. Thanks.
FOR SALE


FOR SALE
Very attractive undeveloped 3.5
acres just off Old Bainbridge
Road in Tallahassee city limits,
only minutes from shopping
malls and I-10, highway 27 in-
terchange. Backs up to city
Sweet Bay swamp, a pictur-
esque park-like wild area. 850-
385-4003.
FOR SALE
Estate sterling silverware in
Louis XIV pattern by Towle;
place setting for eight. Miscel-
laneous pieces. Please call 850-
385-4003.


Lanark Village East next to
woods. One bedroom, one bath,
full dining room, eat-in kitchen,
spacious living room with 2
sleeper couches, screened in
porch. Custom built house fully
furnished. $35,900. Phone
697-3247 or 697-3517.

FOR SALE

Three bedroom home in Astoria
Park, Tallahassee: large family
area, laundry room, compact
kitchen, remodeled bathroom
adjacent to bedroom plus a
central bathroom. 850-385-
4003.


Every day, mre rea esi returingtothe


L 9 __ 9








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


20 August 1999 Page 9


Sustainability from Page 7
Report Conclusions fL .
In their summary comments, authors Delaney and Lesh. see Orlando '
and Apalachicola responding "...to precisely the same complex of pres- -'1
sures of rapid development and rising demand for jobs. housing and "
other social services while striving to protect its cultural and historic
identity and preserve the natural systems on which the health and
wellbeing of its people ultimately depend."
At this point, the summary statement falls into ambiguity. Here is an I
example.
"Oni the other hand, Apalachicola, which was a bustling inter-
national seaport with a lucrative cotton trade through the time
of the Civil War, has not really "happened" yet in the modern J i "I
period. Only recently have its citizens begun to grase the full
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http://www.azLearning.com The risk is making assumptions on the basis of uncertain factual
matters about a given situation, or event. For example, the "finding"
by Delaney and Lesh is that the school system is rated "D". Officially,
based on a more scientific analysiS of test scores, only two schools in
teacher led preparation classes for the Franklin District have.recently been rated as "D". Three others
the PSAT. SAT, GMAT and LSAT are '"C rated schools; The statement "community, does not support


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TIMBER ISLAND REALTY
PO BOX 1059, CARRABELLE, FL 32322, 850/697-3252
1557 Highway 98
right across the road from "Julia Mae's"
850-697-3252
"White Dog Beach"-On Dog Island where there's fishing "
galore. House on 5 acres with dock, guest quarters, hot tub,
gazebos and decks, decks, decks. Owner says sell! $575,000
negotiable with owner financing.
"Bobby's Dream"-Dog Island canal lot with house
foundation and septic tank already there. Great view of
Tyson's Harbor and St. George Sound. $43,500.
"Taters Place"-Located'ori Carrabelle Beach west. This
bayside home has a seawall and walk around deck. Don't
miss this one! $164,000.
"Beacon Ridge Phase I & II"--Nicely wooded lots close to
Carrabelle Beach. Zoned for mobile homes with restrictions.
One acre (some are larger). This is a really nice community.
$8,500 and up.

Audie E. Langston Licensed Real Estate Broker
Sales Associatee
Janet Stoutamire 697-8648
Mike Langston 962-1170 Cliff Willis 697-2816


LOVE CENTER
Holiness Church of the Living God
151 Tenth Street Apalachicola 653-2203
Schedule of Services
Early Worship Sunday Mornings............................. 8:00 a.m.
Sunday Bible School ....................... ........ ......... ... 9:30 a.m.
M morning Worship Service ......................... ............ 11:00 a.m.
Mid-Week Services-Wednesday ........................ 7:00 p.m.
"Love is what it is!"
Dr. Daniel White, Overseer Dr. Shirley White, Pastor
Everyone is welcome to come and worship with us.


school has written them off' is only partially complete and thus inac-
curate. There are some very active advisory groups in the district. It
is true, however, that there is not what is considered to be a strong
PTA group. The statement concerning the lack of mentoring programs
or donations of goods/services is simply not accurate. There have
been reach programs in place according to the school district au-
thorities.
The method used in the study for determining the "warning signs" is
not a 100% viable method for validating the community situation.
The fact that a number of interviewees were uninformed on those
particular matters is the real finding, and that could speak to the
lack of community dialogue, or moreover the desire among those in
the so-called "high priority" groups that are not interested in learning
more about their own community.





--9k
,__ -


-- -- --
.- 7 .------
.-- -


-0
Tongers at work, pulling up oysters.

Under item 3, the statement "much of economy is on a cash basis" is
ambiguous, without any follow-up statement as to what the implica-
tion of a cash economy might be for Apalachicola,




,- --









Apalachicola's historic cemetery near Highway 98.
The statements about "sub-standard" medical care are simply
out-of-date and inaccurate. Under new management at Weems Hos-
pital, major heart operations have been successfully conducted by
physicians in Apalachicola. Other physicians locally have been prac-
ticing here for years and are among the most experienced in the area.
Again, these "findings" are perceptual, but may skew decision-makers
in the community to wrong conclusions and perhaps patterns of
action.
Overall, the authors of the study seeking application of sustainable
community standards to two very dissimilar communities, fail to rec-
ognize the role of rumor throughout the county. Despite the presence
of electronic media signals, two county newspapers and a shopper,
and the availability of Panama City and Tallahassee dailies, rumor
channels provide pathways for a great deal of inaccurate, and often
extorted, information flowing within the county towns, and outside of
them. This is not as prevalent as it once was, say 20 years ago, but
rumor still plays a role in the flow of information, how persons find
out about what's happening in their town and what they may think
about what they hear. Chronicle surveys conducted in 1991, 1992
and 1993 affirmed the chief source of information were interpersonal
channels, such as the post office lobby, or church meetings. Newspa-
pers ranked second; and radio was a distant third among samples
taken over a three year period. Among groups surveyed from larger
cities, such as Atlanta or Jacksonville, media sources were listed in
first place.

S FIRST
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Patton Dr. at David St.
670-8875
11 a.m. Worship
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ALL WELCOME!
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THRIFT SHOP OPEN
Mon/Fri/Sat
10 am 2 pm
Phone: 670-5443


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nrinitp

850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:00 A.M.


NOTICE OF PROPOSALS

TO PROVIDE YOUTH TOBACCO FREE ACTIVITIES

The Franklin County Tobacco-Free Partnership will accept pro-
posals for four (4) tobacco-free events for the period of July
1, 1999 June 30, 2000. Any group/organization that provides
activities to youth (ages 11-17) may call Temolynne Wintons at
653-2111 for additional information and a plan form. The dead-
line for accepting letters of intent will be September 1, 1999 at
5:00 p.m.


r -.-- -.-A l
RANEY HOUSE


ifl- J.L i1 t

Efforts to Preserve
from Page 1
has been pointed out that the light
station could generate tourist traf-
fic and aid the Franklin County
economy.
Attorney at Law Ann Cowles has
volunteered her efforts to help the
association. She brings experi-
ence to the group in the area of
"incorporation as a non-profit or-
ganization."

Help Arrives from Page 1
tached and what the responsibili-
ties would be If the city were to
sponsor the project.
Norton suggested that a confer-
ence call could be set up In which
the commissioners could ask
questions of the authorities at the
GSA. Commissioner Don Wood
said he felt that this was a spe-
cial meeting and that the City
should step forward ana sponsor
the project right away. He sug-
gested that an organization such
as the State Forestry Service sur-
rounded the area with Tate's Hell
Forest. In the end it was decided
that it would be very cumbersome
to try a conference call as the City
does not have a speaker phone
and City Clerk Jackson was asked
to receive questions from each
commissioner and relay them to
the GSA.
As assurance of the heartfelt sup-
port of the congressman, Norton
said that the congressman was
"...Eager to help and prove him-
self to the constituents."
Meanwhile, he said Commission-
ers can be talking to other mu-
nicipalities and the county com-
missioners to solicit their help in
the preservation. If you are inter-
ested in aiding the effort to pre-
serve and save the Crooked River
Lighthouse, you can get further
information from Barbara Revell
at 697-2054, David Butler at the
Carrabelle Branch of The Gulf
State Bank, at 697-3395 or Ann
Deloney at the Garden Gallery,
697-4464.


U I I


I I g I


Coombs House Inn-a restored 1905 home, now a bed and
breakfast owned by Lynn Wilson and Bill Spohrer.
costs and benefits, of potential development. Several of the city's
long-time residents pointed out in interviews that, as recently
as the late 1980s, a visitor with ready cash could have bought
half of the handsome, substantial older buildings in the water-
front area, then standing rundown and empty, for unpaid taxes.
But no one was interested. In the past year, sales of some of
the same buildings in that area have begun to approach half a
million dollars. It is ironic that the historic waterfront area
survived largely intact as a direct result of a protracted period
of poverty and isolation."
Then, the report writers borrow a paragraph from William Warren
Rogers in AT THE WATER'S EDGE...
"Should you go to Apalachicola: it will seem to you like a town
where something happened at one time, a time that was long
ago. In a strange but pleasant Way the outsider who, by chance
or intention, visits Apalachicola is affected by a feeling dream-
like and far away. An air of loneliness (but not emptiness) hangs
over the small city. Until recently, it did not seem like a place
where something was about to happen. If some momentous
event whatever it might be were seeking a proper setting,
a place to occur, Apalachicola, if it could talk, would summon
from its warm lethargy, the words, 'Not here.'"
The summary "result" of their study appears to beg another question,
"If here, what?" In my opinion, given the money paid for funding this
investigation, this is not a very useful conclusion.
Additionally, the report is laden with jargon and bureaucratic phras-
ing that contains too much ambiguity. Materials from other cities
undergoing similar "studies," added presumably to illustrate certain
points in the "model," tend to clutter the paper, and add confusion,
especially in the light of the absence of a clearly stated definition of
sustainability.
The narrative concerning Mayor Howell, the tour given the authors,
and his vision for Apalachicola are more to the point. Unfortunately,
this description is buried near the end of the study, not the begin-
ning. The point about involving the entire community in developing a
vision statement is integral to sustainability concepts. A great deal of
material listed as the ambiguous "deliverables" is mostly administra-
tive and orchid letters that provide little value to the study conclu-
sions.

A comment about the method used in this study.
While the identification of community assets is probably more of a
perceptual matter, the use of the same method to determine "warn-
ing signs" is questionable. Authors Delaney and Lesh run the risk of
accepting interviewee's perceptions, to identify in reality, what are
labeled as "warning signs". This method then amounts to little more
than measuring or determining rumor, not facts.







Pape 10 20 Aueust 1999


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


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CARRABELLE OFFICE CENTER
Office spaces for rent-common reception area-price
according to size. 203 5th Street, Carrabelle, Florida.

Franklin Realty
Downtown Carrabelle, FL 32322
Phone: 850-697-8111 Nights: 850-697-2836
Fax: 850-697-8240
Custom built triple wide on 5 acres Lighthouse Point. Fireplace/den/
above ground pool/screened porch/deck/will consider lease with
option to buy. ............................. ...... ............ $105,000
Historic Langston Hotel-reduced ........................................ $175,000
Gulf front lot on Dog Island .................................................. $112,000
Double wide on 1.5 acres School House Road .....................$90,000
Fully operational restaurant- Highway 98, Carrabelle .......$295,000
Two 1.5 acre lots, white'sand beach-Carrabelle...... $149,000 each
House and two mobile homes on 4 commercial lots. Downtown
C arrabelle .......................................................................... $150,000
Commercial lots fronting Highway 98 and Airport Road.
8 acre island at mouth of the Carrabelle River.....................$950,000
J. Ben Watkins, Broker
Nita Molsbee,Associate Broker 697-2836
Raymond Williams, Sales Associate 697-3434
WE SPECIALIZE IN COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES.
Visit our website: www.franklin-realty.com
E-mail: frealty@noblestar.com





FOSTER'S
31 Avenue E Downtown Apalachicola 653-9800







Authorized :LLtEL L Agent
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Electronics Office/School Supplies
Craft/Art Supplies Printing, Graphic Design, Typing
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Laim b. A -- -
(21) New. University Of
Florida Press. William
Roger's History, Outposts
On The Gulf: St. George Is-
land And Apalachicola
From Early Exploration To
World War II. Sold region-
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(255) Pigskin: The Early Years of Pro Football by Rob-
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versity Press, 1997, 228pD. In time for football season
now a mammoth billion-dollar enterprise. Beginning in
1920, professional football was born in an auto show-
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the reader up to the television era. Sold nationally for
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rI T








(185) Florida Indians and
the Invasion from Europe
by Jerald T. Milanich. Hard-
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often neglected period from
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(186) Perspectives on Gulf
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historic cultural events and
processes on the Gulf
Coast, different from those
of the interior river valleys
to warrant examination of
the coast as a region. In
terms of time, the essays
cover coastal prehistory
from 1000 B.C. through the
early years of European
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A.D. There are overviews of
earlier research and a con-
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(145) Updated Atlas of
Florida Guides Tour of
Ever-Changing State. The
adverse effects on high-tech
industries from cuts in de-
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ing southerly shift of the
citrus industry, the steady
growth of contract Hispanic
labor in agriculture, and the
mechanism of Florida's
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documented in the revised
"Atlas of Florida."
The 288-page reference vol-
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section on the origin of
place names.
First published in 1982, the
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book was revised from new
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(16) New. Andrew: Savagery
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Bookshop price: $4.00.





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Ii AMiERICAN0tk
SCOLIN

POWELL
w";;" with Joseph E. Persico
(52) My American Journey:
Colin Powell with Joseph E.
Persico. In time for the po-
litical season, Colin Powell
is also the embodiment of
the American Dream. Born
in Harlem to immigrant par-
ents from Jamaica, he knew
the rough life of the streets.
For the first time, he tells us
"how it happened" in a
memoir distinguished by a
love of country and family,
warm good humor and a
soldier's directness. He
writes of the anxieties and
missteps as well as the tri-
umphs that marked his rise
to four-star general, Na-
tional Security Advisor,
Chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, mastermind
of Desert Storm, and some
argue, the man many would
like to draft as a candidate
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(53) New. Picture History,
American Painting 1770-
1930. Edited by William
Ayres. Rizzoli, New York in
association with Fraunces
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In twelve profusely illus-
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Bookshop price = $29.00.
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Amrlcanil aintin" 1,70-193
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(34) New. The Red Hills of
Florida, 1528-1865. By
Clifton Paisley. "A superior,
very superior, example of lo-
cal or regional history...The
research is especially
strong; it is exhaustive, solid
and first rate" (Gilbert C.
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A history of Leon County,
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Gadsden, Jackson,
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290 pp. Sold regionally for
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(1) New. How To Get More
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Improve your gas mileage by
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(5) New. Monthly Interest
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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


20 August 1999 Page 11


acid-free matting and acid-free
backing, which will appreciate in
value as time goes by. The mat-
ting, backing and framing thus
enhance the beauty as well as the
lasting value of the art work.
Nan Reninger explained, "When
you get the art work (such as
lithographs from John Gould's
The Birds of Europe'), most of the
pieces we buy now come with the
original page, the preceding page
of type explaining the print." This
preceding page may give the name
of the lithograph and other infor-
r.:<"tion, and this page is also your
."ertificate of authenticity.


deep appreciation of art, and also
the art of matting and framing.
These artists the husband-wife
teams of Nan and Greg Reninger
and Jenni and Mac Morgan were
inspiring to watch as they went
carefully about the work of hang-
ing the antique prints.
This permanent gallery has added
another element of restoration
and appreciation to downtown
Apalachicola.
The downstairs is now open, as
is The Gallery Upstairs, Monday
through Saturday. 6 days a week.
from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. The


The Gallery "upstairs" with Linda and Harry Arnold and granddaughter Meagan Morgan.


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Commerce Street Exchange


and The Gallery
By Tom Campbell
Apalachicola has another grand
location to add to its growing list.
The Commerce Street Exchange
is downstairs at 75 Commerce
Street in downtown Apalachicola.
Upstairs is The Gallery. Owners
Harry Arnold and Jenni Morgan
are proud, as well they should be.
"You would have to go to London,
New York or Chicago to find such
prints as these in The Gallery," he
said. "And now, you can come to
Apalachicola to enjoy them." The
City of Apalachicola now is indeed
included in that "international
coterie".
The ambience is unmistakable
and unmissable when entering
the Commerce Street Exchange
and The Gallery Upstairs. The
building itself has a total of about
4,000 square feet. The natural
light of The Gallery Upstairs is
perfect for displaying the art ob-
jects. The deck behind the second
story overlooks the Apalachicola
River and is adjacent to The Con-
sulate and The Grady Market.
Next door is The Owl Cafe. The


Upstairs
as well as antiques. Other items
include mirrors and wall hang-
ings. It is a permanent gallery,
which includes leathercaft, Lane
furniture' and furniture from En-
gland and France.
On Thursday and Friday, August
12 and 13, four artists were hard
at work, hanging and arranging.
They were two husband-wife
teams, Nan and Greg Reninger,
and Jenni-and Mac Morgan.
Hanging the antique prints is an
art in itself, as they demonstrated.
If you schedule a visit, plan to
.spend some time exploring and
admiring.
One of the featured artists is John
Gould, along with his wife Eliza-
beth. Five volumes of prints, "The
Birds of Europe," were printed in
London between 1832 and 1837.
There were 448 hand-colored
lithographs which were printed by
C. Hullmandel. Some of the plates
were drawn and lithographed by
Edward Lear. The balance were
done by Elizabeth Gould (wife).
The paper size was 14 inches by
21 inches.


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Grand Opening will be announced
later, probably some time in late
September of 1999. Phone
850-653-1027 for further infor-
mation.
Artist Nan Reninger explained
that in "cromolith~ographs the
works seem to glow with secret
techniques the artist has used to
get the colors just right." The Gal-
lery Upstairs and The Commerce
Street Exchange also seem to glow
with similar secret techn'gues.
The highest quality, custom tram-
ing is available here.
The naming adds to the lasting
ruait of the art work, and the
faig thus becomes integral
with the life and beauty of the

work.
Harry Arnold said-, "This gallery
is ~perfect for Apalachicola,
St. George Island and Franklin
County as a whole. The building
is late 1800's and was once the
early Post Office. The second floor
was the Masonic Lodge. These are
the original walls and floors. It's
a work of love and has been re-
stored to the original grandeur."
You don't have to go to London,
New York or Chicago, Just go to
The'Commerce Street Exchange
and The Gallery Upstairs and
nourish your soul.


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I


Jenni Morgan admiring a print.


In matting and framing, Reninger
pointed but, the artist decides
what looks complimentary with
the art work. "It should look
pretty,". she smiled, "but compli-
mentary, and not overpowering.
The focus is on the art work, not
on the framing." Likewise, the
moulding should be compatible
with the time of the piece, and
perhaps reminiscent of color and
style.
The matting varies in style, color
and size, as Reriinger pointed out,
depending on the size and texture
of the art work. Always the mat-
ting and framing should be redo-
lent of the art piece, which should
always remain the focus.
The next step for the artist in
framing is to prepare the backing,
and of course, it is acid-free back-
ing. "Everything you use is going
to be archival quality," she said.
Basically, the artist hinges with
tape 100 percent acid-Iree ev-
erything is 100 percent acid-free,
in order to keep the art work in
mint condition, "The higher the
price," she smiled,. "the more care
in treating without adhesive or
glue, always preserving the qual-
ity and color in archival condi-
tion."
Reninger explained that she and
her husband have a "family-run
business" in Jacksonville. Their
children have- grown up with- a


!'.I






i


building has been beautifully re-
stored to its 19th Century splen-
dor. 1
In addition to, the international
flavor, local artists are also rep-
resented in the downstairs collec-
tion, which has been, selected by
Linda Arnold, Trisha McLemore,
June David, P.J. Trowell and
Betsy Doherty.
Betsy said, "We have an eclectic
collection' here, including an-
tiques, collectibles, nautical ac-
cessories, gifts and Apalachicola
logo merchandise." Included are
English and country antiques.
In The Gallery Upstairs, there are
approximately 200 pieces of art
work in the exhibit. Throughout
the downstairs and The Gallery
Upstairs, there are popular, tra-
ditional and modern art objects,


Artist-framer Nan Reninger ex-
plained the paper size is one in-
dication of original work, as op-
posed to fake. She explained that
in the 19th Century, people
bought these beautifully illus-
tratedd books to identify plants and
birds as field~guides.
Another artist represented in the
collection is William Curtis, who
was the originator of the botani-
cal magazine. These featured
beautiful works suitable for fram-
ing, on real hard "rag paper"
S(acid-free paper). "The quality
lasts and lasts," said Artist Nan
Reninger, "and the colors stay
true. The process used was origin
nal copper plate engraving with
coloring heightened with gum ara-
bic. All the pieces were printed on
heavy rag-paper." These were
printed around 1872 on five and
one-half inch by nine inch paper.
There are over 100 different art-
ists featured in The Gallery Up-
stairs exh~ibit.
An American is featured in the
exhibit also. John William Hill
(American) printed in Albany in
1844. There were 141 hand-
colored lithographs, printed first
and then hand-colored..
Studer's folio size Popular Orni-
,thology, "The Birds of North
America" are displayed with


Nan and Greg hanging a print.


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Page 12 20 August 1999


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


'-.L


The rear of the Conter-Mabrey House.


The structure was built between 1840 and 1850. Considerable re-
search was completed by Willoughby Marshall and his consultant.
Herschel Shepard. For example, removal of a portion of the porch
ceiling, revealed the present-day very low roofed porches were not
original to the structure, nor similar to the original porches. They
found above the porch ceiling notched seats for the original, much
higher porch ceiling and roof rafters. This discovery was very helpful
in that raising the porch roof several feet will lift a veil from over the
porches, exposing the very strong, handsome Greek Revival front and
rear elevations of the house. These "complexities" apparently were
unknown to the auditors, as Mrs. Marshall. President of HAF. com-
mented in her letter response to the Inspector General's criticisms.
"...The foundation's April 22 minutes, which record the visit Qf the
Inspector General and Department representatives to the
SConter-Mabry site, reflect that both Mr. Taylor and Mr. MacLaffertv
were surprised by the complexity of the project." She added that sev-
eral items in the Foundation's grant were omitted from the Scope of
Work described in the Grant Award. These now have to be added to
the working drawings in progress.
Thus, the Historic Apalachicola Foundation has until September 30
1999 to encumber the remaining project funds by obtaining a con-
tractor, final drawings, all with the Department of State approvals. If
the money is not encumbered, the Department of State is planning to
request return of the grant.
The date for substantial completion is scheduled for December 30.
1999.


'Ira


On April 9, 1999, the Inspector General and Robert Taylor met with
the project architect, Willoughby Marshall and Historic Foundation
officials and consultants. The Inspector Report stated,
"On April 9th, we met with HAF's project architect and
historic preservation consultant to discuss the status of
the project. We reviewed free-hand plans and elevations
showing the conceptual design, field notes for the mea-
sured drawings and preliminary measured drawings of
plans and elevations. The Division architect was in agree-
ment with the general conceptual approach of the project.
However, he indicated that before the project may pro-
ceed to construction, the Division would need to approve
the design and development and final construction docu-
ments along with the owner/contractor agreement. Dur-
ing this meeting, concern was expressed regarding the
lack of project progress. As a result, a site'visit was sched-
uled for April 22."
"On April 14th, the Division grants manager followed up
with HAF's architect on the April 9th meeting. The grants
manager stated that project funding must be' fully en-
cumbered by September 30, 1999 deadline. He also indi-
cated that no additional extensions of the deadline would
be authorized and that any funds not encumbered by
the September 30 deadline must be returned to the De-
partment of State. Furthermore, all of the grant assisted
work must be completed and ready for inspection no later
than December 31, 1999."
"On April 22, we performed a site visit of the Conter-Mabry
House. We inspected the project with HAF's President
and project architect."
"On May 10, the Division's historic preservation archi-
tect wrote HAF's architect to reiterate the
architectural-related discussions that took place at the
April 9 meeting. He stressed that project funding must
be fully encumbered by September 30, 1999. In order to
accomplish this, he requested receipt of the project sched-
ule along with project design and construction documents
as soon as possible to allow sufficient time for review
'and incorporation of review comments into the final bid
documents."
"On June 10, HAF's architect wrote the Division historic
preservation architect to request approval to include cor-
ner pilasters on the front porch. On June 28, the Divi-
sion approved his request. In his letter, the Division ar-
chitect again noted that he needs to approve the design
development and final construction documents along with
the owner/contractor agreement. He stated that since
funding must be fully/encumbered by the September 30
deadline, it is important that he receive the project sched-
ule along with the other documents as soon as possible."
"On August 5, the HAF architect wrote the Division ar-
chitect to schedule another meeting on August 19 to
present drawings and discuss the Request For Proposal,
the document needed in order to advertise for construc-
tion bids."


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The Inspector General then concluded,
"We have concerns with HAF's ability to complete the
project on time. From the beginning of the grant project
in October 1996 to April 9, 1999, no work has been per-
formed on the house. At the April 9th meeting, we stressed
the urgency to get the project under contract. The Divi-
sion has also written HAF twice since April 9, to stress
this requirement. To date, four months later, this has
not occurred."
President Marshall concluded her letter to MacLafferty with,
"...HAF (Historic Apalachicola Foundation) has every in-
tention to complete the project on time, i.e. encumbrance
of funds by September 30, 1999, and the architect and
his consultants are working diligently to that end."
The Project
When the Conter-Mabrey house in Apalachicola is restored, it will
serve as an art museum, arts education center and a center for the
historic preservation activities of HAF. The scope of the work includes
repair of the foundation, windows, floors and ceilings; install a cedar
shingle roof; installing electric and air conditioning systems; install-
ing insulation; and repairing porches, ornamental plaster and fire-
places.


Grant Project Analysis
Grant accounting records revealed the following grant receipts
expenditures from February 12, 1997 through April 24, 1999:
Receipts


Grant Revenue
Interest Income
Total Receipts
Disbursements
Architectural Services
Administrative Charges
Sign
Interest Remitted to the State
Total Disbursements
Cash Balance as of April 24, 1999


and


$161,825
13,763
$175,588-


$ 6,500
1,600
228
13.763
$22,091
$153,497


The antebellum Conter-Mabrey house is located at 96-5th Street in
Apalachicola. This was a 19th century home of the Fry family of
riverboat renown, and in the first half of the 20th century, the home
of Dr. Gugustus Conter. During' the heyday of river boats on the
Apalachicola, Dan Fry was a prominent river captain. Dr. Center lived
in the home from about 1922 to the mid-1900s.


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(850) 697-2297 4.


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Adjacent structure with missing plank.


Obituaries

Ruth Lee Smith
Ruth Lee Smith, 72. the loving daugh-
ter of the late Rev. Sidney T. Moore
and the late Rev. Zena L.
Crowder-Moore, passed into the spirit
on Sunday, August 15, 1999 after a
lengthy illness of cancer. Born on Oc-
tober 28, 1926, and living her life in
Eastpoint, FL, she was a homemaker
and was retired from the seafood in-
dustry. She spent her earlier years liv-
ing in Miami, FL where she worked
as a handbag framer at J.R. Hand-
bags for fourteen years. While work-
ing there Mrs. Smith gave seminars
at the local Burdines Department
Stores demonstrating the quality of
the framing of the handbags. She is
preceded in death by two. sisters,
Louise Lolly (Lellion) and Mildred
Frances Moore. She is survived by her
husband, Wesley A. Smith, who was
her partner in life for twenty-seven
years. Mr. and Mrs. Smith were mar-
ried on March 24, 1972. She leaves
behind a son, Francis L. Hand (Judy)
of Eastpoint: two daughters, Brenda
C. Hand and Shirley R. Randolph
(Chris Blanchard). all of Eastpoint and
an'adopted son, Jordan Wesley Smith


of Eastpoint; six grandchildren and
seven great-grandchildren: three
brothers. Charles Moore (Mazziann).
Rev. Marvin Moore (Joy), and Milford
Moore (Vicky), all of Eastpoint: and
two sisters. Eunice Ard (Carl) of
Eastpoint and Maxine Taylor (A.J.) of
Bloody Bluff. Funeral services were.
-held on Tuesday, August 17, 1999 at
the Highland Park Community
Church in Apalachicola. interment
followed in the Eastpoint Cemetery in
Eastpoint, FL. All arrangements were
under the direction of Kelley Funeral
Home, Apalachicola. FL.

Ras B. Hill
Life long resident of Sumatra, Florida
Ras B. Hill, age 71. died on Sunday.
August 1, 1999. He was retired from
the Apalachicola Northern Railroad
and the Liberty County School Board.
Mr. Hill served in the U. S. Army for
12 years. He was the owner of the
Sumatra Grocery and a member of the
Sumatra Assembly of God Church.
Survivors include his wife Betty Hill
of Sumatra. and son Phillip E. Hill of
Atlanta, Georgia, and daughters
Joann Fant.of Sumatra and Pat
MoncriefofNewnan. Georgia. Services
were held in Sumatra on August 5.
1999 with burial in Sumatra Cem-
etery. Magnolia Funeral Home.
Bristol, was in charge of arrange-
ments.


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FOR ALL YOUR TITLE NEEDS:

J1 ARnnfIATED LAND
TITLE GROUP, INC.
DANIELLE E. ZAHN
VICE PRESIDENT/IIANAGER
LAUREN LUBERTO
MARK WILBANKS
235 W. GULF BEACH DRIVE, SUITE E (850) 927-3600
ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FLORIDA 32328 FAX (850) 927-3666


GARLIC ENVIRONMENTAL
ASSOCIATES, Inc.
SERVING FLORIDA'S COASTAL AREA
Offices in Apalachicola, Panama City
.r' and Tallahassee
SPECIALIZING IN ENVIRONMENTAL
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Environmental site assessments and
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48 AVENUE D P.O. BOX 385
~l./ APALACHICOLA, FL 32329-0385
ij (850) 653-8899 FAX (850) 653-9656


I _


.. I




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