Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00103
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: January 8, 1999
Copyright Date: 1999
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00103
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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BULK RATE
SU.S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA, FL
32320
S PERMIT


Thek




franklin Chronicle


Volume 8, Number 1


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Williams Appointed

Commissioner and

Mayor Pro Tem


By Rene Topping


Jenni Sanborn became the first
woman to be named mayor of the
town, when the Carrabelle City
Commission met for their first
meeting of 1999 on January 4.
She received the unanimous ap-
proval of her three fellow commis-
sioners. She then went on to of-
fer her resignation as finance
commissioner to take the lead
position on the commission.


a few of the 1,100 people who live
in the city.
The pieces of note pad paper were
passed, written on by commis-
sioners, folded and then passed
to City Clerk Beckey Jackson.
Each time she solemnly read out
Raymond Williams, Raymond Wil-
liams, Fred Massey, Walt
Worthington.
It was an impasse. No one wanted
to change their vote. The minutes
ticked by. Members of the audi-
ence began to call for a special city
election. The seat that was finally


Raymond Williams appointed


It was not as easy to find a new
commissioner among the three
candidates nominated. Raymond
Williams, Fred Massey and Walt
Worthington had offered them-
selves for appointment to the seat
that was left empty when Buz
Putnal resigned at the last meet-
ing in 1998, on December 7.
Sanborn, who had been Mayor
Tempore since December, had al-
ready shown a real ability to use
the gavel and to keep the meeting
moving in an orderly fashion.
The voting for commissioner of fi-
nance began. Eventually Williams
became the newly appointed com-
missioner and by the end of the
meeting was appointed to also be
Mayor Tempore.
It was a difficult task apparently,
for the four commissioners, as the
votes were split between two for
Williams and one each for Massey
and Worthington. Worthington
was also backed by a petition with
almost 75 votes of city residents.
Mike Weaver said, "I think Walt
would make a good commis-
sioner." Rod Gasche said there
was a feeling against appointed
commissioners and said that citi-
zens were complaining about de-
cisions made behind "closed doors
and in the cafes."
Keuth Mock said that the folks
who are talking to Gasche are only


occupied by Williams is up for re-
election in September, at which
time the city holds its elections.
At one point Freda White asked
Jenni Sanborn if she was related
to Fred Massey. White said,
"Someone mentioned to me that
you are actually related to Mr.
Massey. Is this something that
makes you feel you should excuse
yourself from this vote?" Sanborn
replied, "I feel comfortable with
my vote."
Several people raised the idea of
having a special election Some
asked how much it would cost
and said that they would be happy
to raise the money for an election.
There was objection to the cus-
tom of appointing someone to an
office. Wood was appointed as a
commissioner upon the resigna-
tion of Charles Millender in the
summer of 1998.
Gary Reakes asked if the action
were tabled to another meeting
would any weight be attached to
the petition for Worthington.
Phillips said he always gave cre-
dence to petitions, but went on to
say "I still feel the same way. I've
got a responsibility to vote for the
person I feel is the most qualified,
has the most experience and can
do the best job."
Continued on Page 10


Nicholas Yonclas


Limerock

Objection Filed

By Bayou

Harbor Group

By Rene Topping
A "Verified Complaint" was filed
on December 30 at the Franklin
County Courthouse by Nicholas
Yonclas, Attorney for the Bayou
Harbor Homer Owners Associa-
tion. Members of the group are
concerned about the actions of
the Franklin County Commission,
when that body approved a re-
quest for an "accessory use" in the
C-1 zoning of property on Timber
Island. The use in question was
for the purpose of off-loading lime
rock that was transported to the
site by trucks, onto barges for
shipping elsewhere. The site of the
project which is being operated by
Gene Langston of Langwood In-
dustries, is a nine acre lot owned
by Ben Watkins and located ad-
jacent to the Dockside Marina, on
Timber Island.
According to the complaint, there
is no specific file and/or no spe-
cific written application at the
Franklin County Planner's Office
which could be used as a more
specific reference for the purposes
of the complaint.
Under Florida Statute 163.3215
(4) "As a condition precedent to
an action pursuant to this sec-
tion, the complaining party shall
first file a verified complaint with
the local government whose ac-
tions are complained of forth the
facts upon which the complaint
is based and the relief sought by
the complaining party." After the
complaint has been received, the
local government, in this case the
Franklin County Commission,
has a thirty day period during
which to respond. Should they fail
to respond, then the complaining
party may institute legal action.
The action must take place no
later than thirty days following the
thirty days during which the


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Inside
This Issue
Franklin Briefs ...... Page 2
Editorial & Commentary
............................. Page 3
Court Report Pages 4 & 5
Seafood ................ Page 6
Eastpoint Fantasy Page 8
FCAN .............. Page 9
Bookshop ......... Page 10




Franklin County Commission has
to take appropriate action.
The action complained about be-
gan as an oral request by the
County Planner's Office at the
November 10 meeting of the Fran-
idin County Planning and Zoning
Committee to discuss accessory
uses in the C-1 District, (C-1 is
the zoning for Commercial Fish-
ing).
After discussion, the members of
the P and Z had voted that the
off-loading of lime rock in that
particular C-1 district would be
an acceptable accessory use. The
P and Z recommendation came up
before the County Commission
during the meeting of November
17 and after discussion was
tabled. Subsequently however, on
December 1, the Commissioners
approved the "accessory use for
Mr. Langston's project." on a three
to two vote with Commissioners
Bevin Putnal and Cheryl Sanders
voting no and Commissioners
Eddie Creamer, Clarence Williams
and Jimmy Mosconis voting in
favor. The two commissioners vot-
ing against both represent the two
districts on the east end of the
county.
The verified complaint goes on to
state that the action taken by the
commissioners is inconsistent
with the Franklin County Com-
prehensive Plan and "the land
use, density or intensity and other
aspects of the development per-
mitted by such action is not com-
patible with and does not further
the objectives, policies, land uses
and densities or intensities in the
comprehensive plan and it does
not meet all other criteria enu-
merated by local government."
The complaint continues, "The
action of the commission "effects,
(causes) in reality, a change in
zoning for the specific property
involved to industrial, (C-1 to I-1),
contrary to the land use element
of the plan and is inconsistent
with the plan's future land use
map for that property and sur-
rounding property."
It also states, "Effects, under the
guise of an improper and errone-
ous use determination, a change
in the plan which because the
off-loading of lime-rock as con-
templated, could never be an ac-
cessory use to the specific uses
enumerated in the Franklin
County Zoning Code for C-l prop-
erty; and the determination was
made without following any of the
notice requirements of Section
125.66 Florida Statutes."
The Franklin County Commission
approval also "Allows industrial
activity, ie, significant transpor-
tation activities via trucks and
barges in a general area planned
for commercial and residential
activity, not only contrary to and
inconsistent with elements and
future use maps of the plan, but
also with the plan's stated goal of
ensuring that the character and
location of land use in Franklin
County minimizes the threat to
the natural environment or pub-
lic health, safety and welfare.

Continued on Page 2


January 8 21, 1999


Mr. Fred W. "Bill" Thomas, President and CEO of
PristineOyster.com.

Carrabelle's Pristine Oyster

Poised for Success


By Tom Campbell
For those who enjoy eating oys-
ters, Pristine Oyster of Carrabelle
recently proved to be a glimpse of
"oyster heaven." Mr. Fred W. "Bill"
Thomas, President and CEO of
PristineOyster.com, provided a
tour of his plant, which demon-
strated the company poised for
success.
Cleanliness and effectiveness
were the key words to describe the
facilities and the cheerful employ-
ees who were busy with their
work. Oysters are delivered,
washed, shucked, and washed
again as they are presented on
metal trays to a machine that
freezes them at about 35 degrees
below zero on the half shell.
The process employs a method
using C02 for the freezing. It is
called "Cryogenic freezing," and
freezes the oyster at -35 or -40
degrees with smaller ice particles,
therefore does not hurt the tex-
ture or flavor of the oyster.
At www.pristineoyster.com on the
Internet, the web page will inform


the interested reader all about the
company and the process. Owner
Bill Thomas explained that Pris-
tine Oyster is a "publicly held
company on the stock market" he
is President, CEO and majority
stockholder.
Pristineoyster.com was founded
by Bill Thomas and Bob Mills in
response to the need for a safe raw
oyster. Bill and his family have
been in the seafood wholesale in-
dustry for three generations. Bob
Mills has more than 30 years ex-
perience in planning and project
management. They hope to dis-
tribute "the finest oysters." Mr.
Thomas said he has lived in Fran-
klin County "most of my life," and
has been "in seafood all my life."
He has been a seafood broker for
about seven years.
In August of 1998, construction
on Pristine Oyster was started.
Production was started December
1, 1998. The plant on Timber Is-
land is currently the only location
for Pristine Oyster, employing 25
workers.
Continued on Page 7


125 Runners Compete

In Apalachicola River

Bridge 10K Race


L- 1/ '
I ,

said Fulmer. "We expected 150 to
By Aaron Shea 200 people." Those who did show
nt tJ nny nn t ni Cl J-n


The 2nd annual Apalachicola
River Bridge Race saw 125 run-
ners from Tallahasse, Panama
City, and Franklin County come
out and participate in the Janu-
ary 2 event. "Most of the runners
came from Tallahassee," said
Hobson Fulmer, who organized
the event and finished in 24th
place with a time of 40:51. "There
were not many from Franklin
County." The 6.2 mile race was
run over the Apalachicola Bridge,
through the waterfront of
Apalachicola, .and then through
the historic district.
Though there were 125 runners,
twice as many as last year,
Hobson Fulmer expected more.
'The weather scared people off,"


tJUL U11 OLt ,Al.,JULA L[ lKiHCj.
Tim Simpkins won the race with
a time of 33:48. Breeda Willis, the
second place finisher and first fe-
male to finish, had a time of
35:44. Bill McGuire, 51 years old,
was the first place, 4th overall,
grandmasters male finisher with
a time of 36:55. Sixtyeight (68)
year old Bob Shaw was first place,
47th overall, for the male great
grandmasters with a time of
44:48. Judie Kean was the first
place, 58th overall, female grand-
masters finisher with a time of
47:14. Margarete Deckert, at 65
years-young, was the first place,
97th overall, female great grand-
Continued on Page 10


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50








Page 2 8 January 1999


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Frsinklin

Briefs

At the January 5, 1999 Franklin
County Board of Commissioners
Meeting, the board listened to
bids for the construction of the
"Catpoint" boat ramp in
Eastpoint. Only one bid was sub-
mitted. The bid of $38,940 was
higher than the Board had
planned on. The Board agreed to
turn it over to architect David
Kennedy to review it.
Prentice Crum informed the
Board that as soon as materials
are milled in Carrabelle sometime
next week, the materials will be
taken over to the KOA camp-
ground and make the road
smoother.
Commissioner Eddie Creamer
suggested that the Board look into
a grant for the Health Depart-
ment's work-out programs.
County Clerk Kendall Wade and
County Planner Alan Pierce met
with architect David Kennedy
about the possibility of renovat-
ing or tearing down the old jail-
house. Kennedy told them that
renovation could be very costly.
The situation will be looked into
further.
County Attorney Alfred Shuler
told the Board that he thought it
was important for the county to
adopt a sexual harassment policy.
The Board agreed to have a policy
drawn up.
County Planner Alan Pierce in-
formed the Board that an offer
had been made to St. Joe for a
new sand pit. The offer was for
$800 an acre and it would be put
next to the old sand pit.
Pierce informed the Board that
Evelyn Pace has been terminated
as S91P administrator by the
Franklin County Senior Citizen
Center. Shirley Walker will replace
Ms. Pace.
Pierce told the Board that he has
advised Mike Robaluck of St.
George Island to move a structure
that he has built on county prop-
erty. The structure was originally
a floating dock, which Mr.
Robaluck converted into a fixed
dock within the right-of-way of
Bay Shore Drive. This could be-
come a liability problem for the
county according to Pierce and he
suggested the removal of the


dock. No decision was made at the
time.
The Department of Community
Affairs (DCA) suggested to the
Department of Corrections to seek
a land use change for the Lake
Morality prison site. They sug-
gested that the site to be changed
from agricultural to public facili-
ties. Alan Pierce spoke with Don
Esry of corrections and according
to Pierce, Mr. Esry said that he
has bids out now for site work and
he also plans on building a fence
around the property: According to
Pierce, Mr. Esry said Corrections
did not receive any legislative ap-
propriation to build a prison in
Franklin county. They only re-
ceived money to buy land. Noth-
ing will be done until the Legisla-
ture appropriates more money.
The Board did agree to have Cor-
rections begin the land use
changes.
According to Alan Pierce, Julian
Webb met with Eastpoint Sewer
and Water about the problem of
the 7 homes that should have
been furnished with sewage, but
were not. Mr. Webb had his engi-
neers look back over the situation
and it now appears that the 7
houses can be connected to sewer
for $60,000, instead of the origi-
nal figure of $100,000. Betty
Taylor-Webb, Eastpoint Adminis-
trator. said Eastpoint could pro-
vide $30,000 if the county could
come up with the other $30,000.
At this time, however, Eastpoint
cannot offer any payback on the
county money. Mark Curenton
learned that it is possible for the
Board to use its revolving loan
funds. The Board pointed out that
without any payback, it would be
losing $30,000 and that the re-
volving loan funds are needed for
emergencies. The Board agreed to
look for other ways of getting the
money.
Pierce informed the Board that
Walter Armistead's and Ron
Bloodworth's client is backing out
of the land use change that has
been discussed over the past few
months. His client believes that
it could be too big of a financial
gamble. This leaves the Alice
Collins tract as the only consid-
eration for land use change to the
Residential Estate category at one
unit per five acres. The Board
agreed to let Ms. Collins move for-
ward with the land use changes.
Alan Pierce gave an Emergency
Management update to the Board.
In, his update, Pierce told the
Board that it has been confirmed
that the county will receive
$40,000 in reimbursement for
damages caused by Hurricane
Georges. The bulk of the money
will be for debris removal.


Pierce's update also informed the
Board that DCA sent another let-
ter advising the county that FEMA
will provide some funding for Al-
ligator Point for the part of the
road that has never been dam-
aged. It will not fund any part of
the road that has been damaged.
The deadline for appeal of this
action is February 18. Pierce told
the Board that he had contacted
John Tatum about the letter and
explained his dismay over the
situation. He told Tatum that the
road is the only evacuation route
for several hundred homes. Pierce
requested that Tatum to come up
with a list of terms and conditions
that would allow the county to get
assistance from FEMA. Pierce
said that Tatum would speak with
his superiors and get back to him
in a week. Pierce suggests that if
nothing changes an appeal to the
letter should be drafted. The
Board agreed.
Alan Pierce gave his year end re-
port to the Board. In 1998, rev-
enues and permits were at a
record high for the planning of-
fice. In 1998, 709 county permits
were issued compared to 592 in
1997. Revenues were up to
$150,000 in 1998 compared to
$120,000 in 1997.
As part of the County Attorney's
report at the meeting of January
5, 1999, Al Shuler informed the
board that a Verified Complaint
had been filed by the Bayou Har-
bor Homeowners Association on,
the rezoring of the property on-
Timber Island. After explaining
the document he advised the com-
missioners that in his opinion
Franklin County had little to lose.
He said he felt that the property
owner has the most to lose. He
recommended that they should
vote not to change the action al-
ready taken.
Attorney Nicholas Yonclas said
that the essence of the complaint
was the change was not consis-
tent with the County comprehen-
sive plan, He added that the view
of the owners of the nearby prop'-
erty was that the process was not
properly followed.
Commissioner Eddie Creamer
made the motion seconded by
Jimmie Mosconis to leave the it
the way it is and not go back and
change the action.







a -


County Holiday Pay: A Continuing Controversy,


By Aaron Shea
The up and coming county pay-
roll was a hot topic at the Janu-
ary Franklin County Commission
meeting. The question was
whether or not to pay the Landfill
and Road Department workers for
their after Christmas Day off. Sec-
tion 12.03 part A of personnel
rules states that if the day after
Christmas falls on a Saturday or
Sunday, no holiday shall be ob-
served and employees shall not be
entitled to holiday leave or holi-
day pay for that day.
According to Ethel Jenkins of the
Finance Department, the Road
Department employees took Tues-
day off for their day after Christ-
mas Day off and the Landfill De-
partment employees took Thurs-
day off for their day after Christ-
mas holiday. "I just need to know,
do I pay them or what?" said Ms.
Jenkins.


&# 1:>






Rene
Topping
Associate
CARRABELLE REALTY
(the name says it all)

Office: (850) 697-2181
Home: (850) 697-2616
FAX: (850) 697-3870


LIST WITH ME.
I WILL GIVE
YOUR PROPERTY
EVERY
ATTENTION.

Please call me on
these listings. I will
be happy to show
anytime. Do not
hesitate to call me at
my home number
697-2616 or at the
office 697-2181.
Don't miss out on
these special homes.


County Clerk Kendall Wade
pointed out that the minutes from
the July 21, 1998 county commis-
sion stated that "if the day after
Christmas falls on a Saturday or
Sunday, no holiday shall be ob-
served and employees shall not be
entitled to holiday leave or holi-
day pay for that day," said Wade,
"which means I cannot pay them.
I have to go by it (the rule) ... It's
very clear what I am supposed to
do, but I don't want the employ-
ees to get upset because they
didn't get paid you see."
According to Ms. Jenkins the
other county employees abided by
the rules. 'This has been an on
going problem for I know 20
years," said Commissioner Cheryl
Sanders. "Everv time thev (county
employees) go to take a holiday
off somebody has something to
say about It." Commissioner
Sanders made a motion to pay the
Landfill and Road Department


employees for the day off.
Before a vote was taken on the
motion, Commissioner Jimmy
Mosconis questioned if Commis-
sioner Sanders could make the
motion under the ethics rules.
Commissioner Sanders' husband
works for the road department. "I
am not making the motion on my
husband's job," said an incensed
Commissioner Sanders.
Commissioner Sanders' motion
was seconded by Commissioner
Bevin Putnal contingent on what
the County Attorney discovers on
the ethics of the motion. The mo-
tion was carried 3 to 2 on paying
the Road and Landfill employees
for the day off contingent on the
Attorney's findings. Commis-
sioner Mosconis then made a
motion to allow the employees in
question to take an annual day of
leave if the first motion by Com-
missioner Sanders does not hold
up. The motion was carried.


Selling the Pearl of the Panhandle
My Specialty area is Carrabelle Lanark -
Carrabelle Beach St. Teresa St. James Eastpoint
Let me be your guide to finding your
"perfect pearl" of a property.
Please call Rene for all your real estate needs, buying or selling.

THREE BRAND NEW LISTINGS


,- THE CARRABEI.LE RIVER--Small estate
S. with a large two bedroom stucco home
-w. ith a great room that extends into a
sun room. This home is fully equipped
down to an underground shelter if a
real storm came down the river. There
.~ I I ~ l1 is over 200 feet of deep water frontage.
On the highest lot on the river over 16
feet above mean high water. Dock along
_" pable of handling multi boats and sports
__ equipment. A small Party House with
bath. A self watering and feeding green-
house. You will not see the likes of this
ever again in our area. $299,000 for all.

Now TAKEA TRIP down to the Postum
Bayou for a two up and two down
bedrooms. Two baths upstairs.
Screen porch affording a million dol- iP
lar view on the sleepy bayou and the i-g r"
marshland between it and the har- .-..
bor. The property has a metal build- .
ing that was used as a selling artists i
studio known as the Bayou Art Gal- i W
lery. There is a dock and a boat ramp. | ,
Storage outside. Elevator to the up-
stairs. This is a UNIQUE spot to
accommodate your small business .
and home. $215,000 for all.

''- HAvE You BEEN LOOKING for a three
bedroom home in established neigh-
borhood? Look at this one on Carl
SKing Drive. The home is sited on two
lots nicely landscaped. Has enclosed
- garage could be used for extra room.
L.R., nice kitchen, sun room, back pa-
tio and a Pavilion. Only $66,900.

S 3 Bedroom Apartment
on front line in Lanark.
$300.00 per month.


Limerock from Page 1

The complaint is filed on behalf
of the residents of the Bayou Har-
bor area which is near the pro-
posed project and residents be-
lieve they will suffer an adverse
effect if the activity contemplated
by the accessory use determina-
tion is allowed to occur.
To this end the residents request
that the Franklin Count Commis-
sion reconsider the project acces-
sory use determination and then
vote not to approve same. The
matter is scheduled to be heard
as part of the County Attorney's
report to the commission at the
meeting to be held on January 5,
1999, at 9 a.m. at the Commis-
sion Room in the Courthouse.
Before resorting to legal action,
residents from the Bayou Harbor
area and other city residents on
the route of the trucks have at-
tended every meeting of the
County Commission and they also
attended the December 7, 1998
meeting of the Carrabelle City
Commission, since their subdivi-
sion is in the city limits. Their
pleas to city commissioners fell on
deaf ears as only one commis-
sioner, Pam Lycett, said she felt
that the city should ask for a re-
view of the project by the County
Commission.

Commissioner

Wood Requests

Declaratory

Judgment

By Rene Topping
At the January City Meeting of
January 4 Carrabelle City Com-
missioner Donald Wood made the
motion to "Request a declaratory
judgment, an unbiased judgment
from the courts to establish the
terms and conditions of his con-
tract, and let the courts decide
what land was leased to Mr. Bevis,.
and what land was not."
Commissioner Pam Lycett asked
Wood, "What work has com-
menced to go on?" Wood said that
the stop work order which is pres-
ently going through the process
had been violated by Bevis in that
he had poured a concrete slab,
and had put dirt under the slab,
had cut off and capped pilings all
of which he felt were in violation.
City Attorney Doug Gaidry said
that if they were to have a declara-
tory judgment they should in-
clude all items In which Bevis was
in violation of his contract." Wood
said that Bevis had to have 12
employees.
A motion was made by Wood to
have the attorney work on this
and it was seconded and amended
by Commissioner Jim Phillips to
include any other Issues the at-
torney saw fit to put in the
document.
Bevis had been in attendance but
had left the meeting room and was
not present during the heated dis-
cussion that ensued. Jim Lycett,
Chairman of the Carrabelle Port
and Airport Authority, asked
Wood what possible benefit there
was for the people of Carrabelle
in such a piece of litigation. "I am
not interested in spending my tax
dollars to pursue a venture that
can't seen to benefit the people of
Carrabelle. What is the purpose
of this?"
Wood mentioned that some of the
work was on land that was not
leased to Bevis. He also said that
there is a 60 foot street that is in
question and that a proper sur-
vey has not so far been obtained.
Lycett added, "You are the only
one who specifically said there is
a 60 foot street.". Wood responded
hotly, "I was there at the time Mr.
Bevis' lease was signed. I was ne-
gotiating." He added that he had
talked to 5 out of the 7 members
who were on the Authority that
time and they knew It was there."
Wood went on to say, "We can
never get an answer. We went on

Continued on Page 7


*-7 -- 7
Gulf State

SABAN. .%..7


Port Authority Fights Back On
Abolishment


By Rene Topping
Members of the Carrabelle Port
and Airport Authority met on
January 5 and continued their
fight to stay alive and to be en-
abled to be a separate entity. Al-
though they had previously noti-
fied the city of an action to that
end it had been noted in regular
meeting they had received no an-
swer from the city commission. So
their latest message was in the
form of a resolution Informing the
city commission that they are
seeking legislation in the 1999
Florida Legislative session that
would make the Authority a spe-
cial district.
They also noted that the city com-
mission had been non-responsive
and had frustrated their efforts to
develop Timber Island. Becoming
a special district would mean that
the Authority would be authorized
to permit docking, aviation and
port facilities within the district
and to provide for replacement of
members by the entity who origi-
nally appointed that member to
the Authority.
Members noted that the city had
responded with a notice In a lo-
cal newspaper on December 30
and signed by the Mayor Tempore
Jennie Sanborn, that it intends.
to request special legislation to
abolish the Authority.
The resolution goes on to say,
"The City of Carrabelle, contrary
to the Provisions of Florida Stat-
utes 189.428, has failed to con-
tact the Port Authority or to con-
duct a public oversight review
process and prepare a final report
regarding the (Port Authority in
order to develop and present facts
which would support its request
for special legislation to dissolve
the Port Authority."
The resolution adds "Section 1.
The City of Carrabelle be notified
of the Port Authorities opposition
to the City's proposed legislation.
Section 2. The Port Authority re-
quest that the City withdraw its
proposed special legislation and
comply with the oversight require-
ments of 189.428 Florida Stat-
utes. Section.3. The Port Author-
ity indicate its intention to fully
cooperate with such an oversight
process."
The Authority Attorney Suzanne
Brownless said that the Author-


ity should institute two special
public workshops to gather the
information necessary for the
oversight procedure. She also felt
that workshops would give the
citizens of Carrabelle a chance to
know what was happening and to
give their point of view.
These workshops would cover
such things as the Development
of Regional Impact (DRI) for Tim-
ber Island project, Franklin Com-
prehensive Plan, the Carrabelle
City Comprehensive Plan to see
that all the plans match up. A lot
of information will be brought
forward.
The first workshop will be held on
February 16 at 6 p.m. The next
regular meeting will be held on
February 2 at 6 p.m. and then the
second workshop will be held on
March 2 at 6 p.m. in conjunction
with a regular meeting.
In other business:
Members approved a notice to
appear In both local newspapers
and the Tallahassee Democrat
announcing the Authority Intent
to seek legislation in the spring
session of the Florida Legislature.
Received a letter from George B.
Maier to offer his services as a
member. The request was turned
down with regret as he noted he
still has a personal interest in the
airport and did not want to pre-
clude himself from making an ef-
fort in that area. Members felt that
it could be a conflict of Interest or
a least a perception of such.
Were informed of a letter from
Alan Pierce, County Planner in-
forming City Attorney Doug
Gaidry that he had investigated
an unplanned development by
Tommy Bevis on Timber Island.
It included a concrete pad 12 x
12, also two beams have been
embedded in the sand to allow the
travel lift. Pierce said he did not
issue a stop work on either of
these projects.
He also informed the attorney in
the last paragraph of the letter,
"Individual city commissioners
may desire me to be more helpful
in investigating these issues, but
I believe I need to limit my involve-
ment until directed by the city
commission."


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


8 January 1999 Page 3


Editorial and Commentary


Florida Compreheinsive

Abustumenit Test (FCAT)

Florida's Commissioner of Education has asked the state's newspa-
pers to help spread the word about The Sunshine State Standards.
These are guidelines indicating what students should know and be
able to do at various levels in school.
Recently, Commissioner of Education Frank T. Brogan said, "The
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) is a measurement of
how well students achieve the standards. The assessments require
one common, vital skill: Reading!"
Newspaper readers know the value of reading and understanding criti-
cal issues affecting their lives. Local newspapers can become real-life
textbooks in the home. Here are some ways you can help your child
become a better reader:
Discuss news photos, use the sports pages and ask
"who, what, when, where" and "why" questions.
Talk about heroes in everyday life. Compare real-life
heroes with those in the media.
Watch a television newscast with a youngster, then read
a news article on the same topic. Make a list of the facts
from TV and compare them with newspaper facts.
Ask a youngster to re-tell a newspaper story in his/her
own words.
Select a controversial topic and ask your child to ex-
plain his/her point of view.
Be prepared to say, "I don't know. Let's find out." Write
letters to the editor.
Set the example. If you are a reader, chances are you
will nurture a family of readers.
The newspaper is a valuable classroom resource that can be used by
every teacher and parent to teach and reinforce the standards for any
subject, at any grade level, helping students to reach and exceed the
Sunshine State Standards.
These standards were developed to help raise the educational level of
the public school system, in order to meet the challenges of today
and tomorrow. They are a collection of concepts that students are
expected to comprehend and to be tested on as they progress through
school.
Standards for each subject were developed in consultation with teach-
ers, administrators and parents. The subject areas are: language arts,
mathematics, science, social studies, the arts, health and physical
education, and foreign language.
What a second grader should know about math is far different from
what a high school senior should know. That is why standards for all
subjects are broken down into four levels: pre-kindergarten through
second grade, third grade through fifth grade, sixth through eighth,
and ninth through twelfth grade.
To measure how well students are learning these standards, the
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, or FCAT, was developed.

r' h, POST OFFICE BOX 590
J ~ EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
I 850-927-4023
S 850-385-4003 (TALLAHASSEE)
I-'V Facsimile 850-385-0830
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 8, No. 1


January 8, 1999


Publisher .................................. ...... .... Tom W Hoffer
Contributors ......... Tom Campbell
........... Sue Riddle Cronkite
............ Brock Johnson
............ Aaron Shea
........... Rene Topping

Sales.................................................... Jonathan Capps
............ Pam Rush
Advertising Design
and Production......................................... Diane Beauvais Dyal
............ Jonathan Capps
............ Jacob Coble
Production Assistant ................................ Jason Sanford
Computer Consultant ............................ Wayne Myers
Copy Editor and Proofreader................... Tom Garside
Circulation ..................... ..................... Larry Kienzle

Citizen's Advisory Group
George Chapel ...................................... Apalachicola
Sandra Lee Johnson ................................ Apalachicola
Rene Topping ........................................ Carrabelle
Pam Lycett ............................................... C arrabelle
David Butler ..................................... Carrabelle
Pat Morrison ................................. St. George Island
Dominic and Vilma Baragona ................. St. George Island
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung ..................... Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins ............ Eastpoint
Anne Estes ..................... ................... W akulla
Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue would
cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the Chronicle
for price quotes if you seek several different or similar
issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
SAll contents Copyright 1998
Franklin County Chronicle, Inc.


A Note on the Cartoon
Cartoons on political subjects
sometimes cast the wrong impres-
sion to the reading public concern-
ing the satire or public criticism be-
yond what might be called "fair
play." This one, printed to the left.
does not attack or ridicule any iden-
tifiable personality, but instead
brings out an opinion about the
process involved. Of course, recent
circumstances reported by the
Chronicle would probably serve to
identify individuals held up by criti-
cism. I hasten to add, that the
Chronicle does not choose to criti-
cally review anyone charged with
the responsibility of public office,
past or present, nor do I want the
cartoon to be misconstrued as a
criticism of particular individuals.
If the recent process of appointing
a new commissioner is like recy-
cling, that is a point-of-view that is
fully protected by the First Amend-
ment. I would also add that any-
one so willing to endure the politi-
cal machinations and abuse often
experienced at City Commission
meetings, should be commended.
If there is a perception out there
that the process was closed to all
comers, then a greater organizing
effort to get on the commission or
to campaign for special elections,
should be made. If there are more
dormant opinions out there, then
let's hear or see them (in the event
you have a knack for drawing your
opinion).
Tom W. Hoffer, Publisher


r :: ., \ ll -

Peace Corps Training Concludes

By Brian Goercke


Publisher's Note: When Brian Goercke left Franklin County for
his training in the Peace Corps, he left behind hundreds of read-
ers and friends in the panhandle. I am especially pleased to present
his first piece describing his training and travel experiences as
he proceeds from training to full Peace Corps service, namely
teaching in the African nation of Zimbabwe.
Tom Campbell pieced together several letters addressed to Ms.
Maxine Creamer to create our first published piece about Brian,
published in the Chronicle issue of November 27, 1998. Brian's
mailing address is: Brian Goercke, PCT, Post Office Box 4760,
Harare, Zimbabwe, Africa.


The training period for the eighth wave of US Peace Corps volunteers
in Zimbabwe has come to a close. The months of training, although
tiring and often frustrating, have been a worthwhile experience.
The final phase of training consisted of a two-week model school ses-
sion. During this part of the training, volunteers devised lesson plans
and taught between two to four classes daily.
Continued to Columns 5 & 6

The test will be used to assess students and to measure how well
schools reform, meet or exceed these standards. Schools that need
assistance will be identified, targeted and improved.
The Florida Sunshine State Standards and the FCAT are designed to
hold the entire community accountable for the citizens it produces.
The local newspaper can help prepare students by emphasizing read-
ing and comprehension, two skills essential to successful test taking.
All students must take the FCAT twice in elementary school (reading
in Grade 4 and mathematics in Grade 5), once in middle school (Grade
8), and once in high school (Grade 10). Only a few students in certain
special categories will be exempt; all other students must take the
FCAT.
It is currently planned that the FCAT will eventually replace the High
School Competency Test and the common college placement test.
In January of 1999, FCAT is to be administered to students in grades
4, 5, 8 and 10. In May of 1999, FCAT results are to be released,
incorporating FCAT achievement levels established in 1998. School
accountability for student achievement will begin.
There are hundreds of standards that students will be expected to
achieve, and there are hundreds of ways the local newspaper can
help them reach their goals. Those who have questions or are looking
for more information on the FCAT, Sunshine State Standards, or cur-
riculum resources, may write to the Florida Department of Educa-
tion, 325 West Gaines Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400, or
visit them on the World Wide Web at: http://www,firn.edu/doe/
doehome.htm or phone 904-487-1785.


Students from around the town of Zhombe were brought to Rio Tinto
Secondary School, where the volunteers were trained, to participate
in the model school session.
And what did the volunteers learn during model school? They have
learned to devise lessons that will fit into a 35 minute time period,
the length of each class. They have discovered that students, as op-
posed to raising their hands, prefer to snap their fingers or make a
hissing sound. And they have learned how to "scheme."
As future instructors in the Zimbabwean school system, volunteers
will be required to maintain a journal of their lesson plans. This seem-
ingly simple task, referred to as "scheming," has proven to be incred-
ibly time-consuming.
Instructors are often required to have their lessons planned three
weeks in advance. The scheme books reflect the goals and objectives
of each lesson as well as general and specific comments about the
students' response. Those volunteers serving as English instructors
will teach a variety of subjects including: reading comprehension,
grammar, literature, composition and social register.
Social register requires the students to identify various types of be-
havior from any given situation. For example, the students may be
asked to identify the behavior of someone who refuses to share his
sadza with the poor. That type of behavior may be identified as greedy.
Once or twice a week, the schools will begin the day with an assem-
bly. During this time, the students sing the Zimbabwe National An-
them. It's beautiful! They also recite the Lord's Prayer.
The eighth wave includes future instructors from several fields of
study; most of the volunteers will teach English and help to maintain
and/or establish a library. Other volunteers will teach mathematics,
science and sports.
A total of 41 volunteers met on October 6 in Washington D.C. for an
orientation event. On October 7, they embarked on a 12 hour flight to
Zurich, Switzerland. On October 9, after a 10 hour stopover in Zurich
and 12 more hours of flight, the volunteers landed in Harare, the
capital of Zimbabwe.
Current US Peace Corps volunteers greeted the eighth wave with cheers
and banners flying. The volunteers were also greeted personally by
Sally Collier, Country Director for the US Peace Corps. The next four
days were spent in training in the town of Chitungwiza. And the bal-
ance of that training period has been spent in Zhombe.
Upon arriving in Zhombe, each volunteer was introduced to his/her
host family. My host family, consisting of Vincent and Marceline Mzira,
has been super friendly and generous. The volunteers refer to the
parents as Baba (father) and Amai (mother).
"We learn culture from the Americans," commented Vincent Mzira,
"and they also learn culture from being here. Since many of them
have come, they've been teaching very well. It's a good thing."
Marceline Mzira added, "all along, our children were afraid to see
white people. But, because of the program, some of the children have
become good friends with them."
Toward the end of December, the eighth wave will be sworn-in as
bona-fide US Peace Corps volunteers. And they will-say farewell to
their families and prepare to move to their permanent sites.
I have been assigned to Matsine Secondary School, which is located
in Mashonaland East (towards the border of Mozambique). I will teach
three different classes and help to develop and maintain the school's
library.
The training period has been thorough. We have received instruction
in language, culture and health/medical issues. I have received in-
struction in the Shona language.
The majority of Zimbabwean citizens (75%) speak Shona. Approxi-
mately 16% of the population speaks Ndebele. About one-fourth of
the volunteers received training in the Ndebele language. Other mi-
nor languages include Venda and Tonga.
Language is an important aspect of US Peace Corps training in that it
brings the volunteer closer to Zimbabwean culture.; By learning the
language, volunteers gain respect from the people they will work and
live with in Zimbabwe.
Mr. Saul Sigelagelani, Training Director for the US Peace Corps, com-
mented on the importance of language to the volunteer. "It helps vol-
unteers to be accepted in the communities," he said, "also, the rural
students are not as good in English as urban students. It helps if the
volunteers are able to explain the concept in the language that the
student understands." Mr. Sigelagelani added, "The commitment and
devotion by US Peace Corps volunteers really makes a difference. The
schools that they have come to and worked have really benefited from
their service."
The language lessons have been taught by nearly a dozen trainers
residing in Zimbabwe. Current US Peace Corps volunteers have been
assisted by Zimbabwean school instructors in coordinating the model
school sessions.
Mr. Themba Khumalo, a Zimbabwean instructor who has taught for
eight years, commented on the impact of Peace Corps volunteers in
the country. "The students gain immensely (from their interactions
with US Peace Corps volunteers). The volunteers have a wide array of
techniques and approaches. They are self-starters and have a great
deal of initiative."
Mr. Khumalo also reflected on his work with the students. "I think
that engaging with innocent minds and realizing the potential is ex-
citing and challenging for me," said Khumalo. He continued, "there's
an obligation to make the pupil understand his potential."
Volunteers have given up much in order to serve two years in Zimba-
bwe. The loss of running water and electricity seems trivial compared
to the friends and families volunteers have left behind. For many,
this was a dream that had to realized. David White, a volunteer from
Jacksonville, Alabama, noted that his service in the US Peace Corps
was a lifelong goal. "When I was 10 or 11 years old, I spoke with my
best friend about going into the Peace Corps. It was all we ever talked
about." He concluded, "this was something I needed to do. I feel like,
if I don't do this, I'll regret it later."


Cuidoominium

Meeting Set

The Department of Business and
Professional Regulation's Bureau
of Condominiums has scheduled
an Advisory Council on Condo-
miniums meeting on Monday,
January 11, 1999 at 4524 Oak
Fair Blvd., Suite 200, Tampa,
Florida, from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m.
Council meetings are open to the
public. For more information, the
public should contact Rosetta
Strickland, Bureau of Condomini-
ums, at (850) 488-0725.


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Pa e 4 8 January 1999


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Second Circuit

Court Report

The Honorable Judge F.E. Steinmeyer
Assistant State Attorney Rachel Chesnut
Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger
All defendants are innocent of the charges listed below until
proven otherwise in a court of law.

ARRAIGNMENTS
Scott Focht: Charged with one count of Criminal Mischief and Indecent Ex-
posure. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for arraignment on January 6.
According to the probable cause reports, on June 15, 1998 a police officer was
dispatched to the EZ Serve in Carrabelle. When the officer arrived at the scene
he was told by Lisa Harvey that a man in a dark brown vehicle had allegedly
exposed his penis in front of her. Ms. Harvey told the officer that she had
stopped at the EZ Serve to buy a drink. Ms. Harvey said she walked over to
her truck and was getting ready to leave the store when a man pulled his
vehicle up next to her truck. Ms. Harvey told the officer that the man was
winking at her and then he allegedly pulled down the top his shorts and alleg-
edly grabbed his penis and shook it. The officer was then informed that a
vehicle Ms. Harvey had described was at the Beachside Motel. The officer and
Ms. Harvey went to the motel where Ms. Harvey allegedly identified the vehicle
and the defendant, Scott Focht. On July 7, an officer was dispatched to the
Beachside Motel in reference to a criminal mischief call. The officer was told
by Brenda Gales that a couple that was staying in the motel had been warned
earlier in the day by the Sheriffs Department to not cause any disturbances
and take their belongings and leave the motel. When the officer inspected the
room later in the day, he allegedly found fresh paint on the walls and floors, a
bag of kitty litter dumped in the sink and toilet, and the air conditioner de-
stroyed. The damages done were estimated at over$S1,000.
Michael O'Neal: Charged with one count of Battery on a Law Enforcement
Officer, Resisting an Officer with Violence, and Affray. The case was trans-
ferred to county court where it will be continued for arraignment on
January 7.
Lionel Sanders: Charged with one count of Sale of Crack Cocaine. The defen-
dant pleaded Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case
for pretrial on February 15. The defendant was represented by Assistant Pub-
lic Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, on October 15, 1998 a confidential
informant (CI) was given $20 by police officers to make a controlled buy from
the Cove Apartments. The CI's vehicle was equipped with a video camera and
an audio device. At the Cove Apartments, the CI met with the defendant and
allegedly purchased a piece of crack cocaine. The substance was then field
tested by the officers. The substance allegedly tested positive for cocaine.
Cindy Fasbenner: Charged with one count of Grand Theft. The defendant
pleaded Not Guilty to the charge. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
pretrial on January 6. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, George Clark, an 82 year old resident
of Eastpoint; reported to the Franklin County Sheriffs Department on Octo-
ber 15 that two of his wallets, one containing $2,200 and the other containing
$350 had been allegedly stolen from his bedroom in his home. An investiga-
tion into the theft revealed the following: Mr. Clark was allegedly home all day
during the 15th, only leaving once to give the defendants a ride to Apalachicola.
Mr. Clark was allegedly visited by the defendants during the evening hours of
the 15th. The defendants allegedly cooked and ate with Mr. Clark that night.
Mr. Clark allegedly left the defendants alone in the house once and that was to
feed his animals after he finished eating dinner. Immediately after feeding his
animals, Mr. Clark allegedly took the defendants to 4th street in Apalachicola.
Mr. Clark returned home and allegedly discovered that his bedroom had been
ransacked and the wallets containing the currency were allegedly missing.
There was no forced entry and the defendants were the only visitors that he
had that day. On October 19, Mr. Clark allegedly picked out the defendants
from photo line-ups. One of them was allegedly the above defendant, Cindy
Fasbenner. One of the wallets,-a brown one, was allegedly found at the 4th
street home that Mr. Clark dropped the defendants off at.
Claudette Mullins: Charged with one count of Grand Theft. Judge Steinmeyer
has continued the case for pretrial dn January 6. The defendant was repre-
sented by Attorney Gordon Shuler.
The probable cause report is the same as above except for the following infor-
mation. On October 22, after executing an arrest warrant for Cindy Fasbenner,
she allegedly waived Miranda and allegedly gave sworn testimony that she
and another person were at Mr. Clark's residence on the 14th of October. She
then told police that she and Claudette Mullins were allegedly at Mr. Clark's
on the 15th. Fasbenner allegedly told investigators that while she was clean-
ing the kitchen, Mullins disappeared for a few minutes. Mullins then allegedly
showed Fasbenner a roll of hundred dollar bills and allegedly claimed that Mr.
Clark had given it to her. After being dropped off in Apalachicola. Fasbenner
claimed that Mullins gave her $ 20& Fasbenner said that Mtllins also lives at
the 4th street residence.
Ronald Burris: Charged with one count of Petit Theft and Dealing Stolen
Property. No information is available in this case.
Timothy Weimer: Charged with one count of Resisting an Officer with Vio-
lence, DUI, Possession of Marijuana Under 20 Grams, and Drug Parapherna-
lia Use or Possession. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on
January 6. The defendant was represented by Attorney Steve Glazer.
According to the probable cause report, on October 30, 1998 the Franklin
County Sheriffs were on the look out for a dark maroon Mitsubishi Mirage
with a white male driver traveling east on Highway 98. It was stated that the
defendant had allegedly pulled over another vehicle in Gulf County and alleg-
edly impersonated a police officer. A officer, who recognized the vehicle, pulled
behind the defendant and followed the defendant for approximately 2 miles
before stopping the vehicle. The officer allegedly asked the defendant 25 times
to step out of the vehicle. The defendant allegedly refused to get out of the
vehicle and locked the doors. More officers were called to the scene to attempt
to get the defendant out of his car. The defendant had to be physically re-
moved from his vehicle. The defendant was placed under arrest and taken to
jail. At the jail, a pipe and cannabis were allegedly found on the defendant. It
was also discovered the defendant was allegedly intoxicated.
Gary Lee: Charged with one count of Resisting an Officer with Violence, DUI,
and Fleeing Attempting to Elude. The defendant was transferred to county
court. The defendant is represented by Attorney Douglas Gaidry.
Gadson Segree: Charged with one count of Driving Under the Influence and
Causing Serious Bodily Injury. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pre-
trial on January 6. The defendant was representedby Attorney Douglas
Gaidrey.
According to a report, on August 11, 1998 the defendant was allegedly driving
under the influence and allegedly caused bodily injury to Stephanie Howard
and/or Jacki Hefner.
PRETRIAL
Richard Adkinson: The defendant has been charged with one count of Grand
Theft Auto, DUI, and Driving While License is Suspended. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for pretrial on January 6. The defendant was represented
by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Craig Ash: The defendant has been charged with one count of Possession of a
Firearm on School Property. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on
January 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender
Kevin Steiger.
Willie Baucham: The defendant has been charged with one count of Resisting
an Officer with Violence, Petit Theft, and Aggravated Assault. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for pretrial on February 15. The defendant was repre-
sented by Attorney Gregory Cummings.
Steven Beebe: The defendant has been charged with one count of Grand
Theft. The defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer
adjudicated the defendant guilty and sentenced him to 45 days of jail with
credit for 45 days time served. Judge Steirimeyer also sentenced the defen-
dant to 3 years of probation and fined him $275. The defendant was repre-
sented by Attorney Gordon Shuler.
John Beyrer: The defendant has been charged with one count of Burglary of
a Dwelling. The defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer
adjudicated the defendant guilty and sentenced him to 60 days of jail with
credit for 60 days time served. The defendant was represented by Assistant
Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Eric Campbell: The defendant has been charged with one count of Burglary
of a Dwelling. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on January 20.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.


Michael Campbell: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sexual
Battery with a Deadly Weapon, Burglary with Assault Therein, Aggravated
Battery with a Deadly Weapon, Aggravated Assault with a Deadly Weapon,
and Battery on a Law Enforcement Officer. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for trial on January 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant
Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
William Cargill: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sale of
Cocaine and Possession of Cocaine. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
pretrial on February 15. The defendant was represented by Attorney Barbara
Sanders.
Anthony Croom: The defendant has been charged with one count of a Sexual
Act with a Child Under 16. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on
January 20. The defendant was represented by Attorney Paul Komarek.
Daniel Davis: The defendant has been charged with one count of Divert or
Misappropriate Funds. Uttering a Forged Instrument, Uttering, and four counts
of Grand Theft. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for February 15. The
defendant was represented by Attorney Thomas Shuler.
Robert Dillon: The defendant has been charged with one count of Manslaughter
by DUI, two counts of DUI with Serious Injuries, and Aggravated Battery on a
Pregnant Victin. Judge Steinmeyer continued the firstthree charges for trial
on January 20 and the last charge has been continued for pretrialon Febru-


ary 15. The defendant was represented by Attorney John Kenny.
Wade Dixon: The defendant has been charged with one count of Burglary of a
Dwelling, Trespass Occupied Structure, and Lewd Lascivious Act in Presence
of a Child. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on February 15.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Frederick Estes: The defendant has been charged with one count of Dealing
Stolen Property. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on January
6. The defendant was represented by Attorney Gordon Shuler.
Curtis Gordie: The defendant has been charged with one count of Armed
Robbery with a Firearm and Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon.
Judge Steinmeyer has continued the case for pretrial on February 15. The
defendant was represented by Attorney Danielle Jorden.
Paula Gordie: The defendant has been charged with one count of Accessory
After the Fact. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on January
6. The defendant was represented by Attorney Barabara Sanders.
Etta Griggs: The defendant has been charged with one count of Robbery.
Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on January 20. The defendant
was represented by Assistant Public, Defender Kevin Steiger.
Glen Hammonds: The defendant has been charged with one count of Armed
Robbery with a Firearm. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on
February 15. The defendant was represented by Attorney William Webster.
Ronald Henderson: The defendant has been charged with one count of Ag-
gravated Fleeing and Eluding and Sale of Cocaine. Judge Steinmeyer contin-
ued the case for trial on January 20. The defendant was represented by Attor-
ney Barbara Sanders.
Thomas Hudson: The defendant has been charged with one count of Murder
First Degree, Armed Robbery with a Firearm, Burglary with Assault Therein,
Possession of a Firearm During Commission, and Grand Theft of a Motor
Vehicle. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on February 17. The
,defendant was represented by Attorney Gregory Cummings.
David Hutchinson: The defendanthas been charged with one count of Re-
sisting 'an Officer with Violence and Indecent Exposure. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for trial on February 17. The defendant was represented
by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Cornelius James: The defendant has been charged with one count of Traf-
ficking in Controlled Substances. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
trial an February 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger.
William Jones: The defendant has been charged with one count of Lewd and
Lascivious Assault on a Child Under 16. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for pretrial on February 15. The defendant was represented by Assistant
Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
William Key: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sale of a
Controlled Substance. The defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge
Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced him to 5 months
of jail with credit for 1 day time served. Judge Steinmeyer also sentenced the
defendant to 2 years of probation and he was fined $275. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Charles Kinchen: The defendant has been charged with one count of Bur-
glary of a Dwelling. The defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense: Judge
Steinmeyer sentenced the defendant to 4 months of jail with credit for 67 days
time served. Judge Steinmeyer also sentenced the defendant to 3 years of
probation and he was fined $275. The defendant was represented by Attorney
Barbara Sanders.
Karl Lowe: The defendant has been charged with one count of Grand Theft.
Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on January 20. The defendant
was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Joe Massey: The defendant has been charged with one count of Possession of
More Than 20 Grams, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Reckless Driv-
ing. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on February 15. The
defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Wayne Messer: The defendant has been charged with one count of Grand
Theft. The defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer
adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced him to 18 days of jail with
credit for 18 days time served. Judge Steinmever also sentenced the defen-


Franklin County

Baptist Youth

First Baptist Church of St. George
Island will have a taco dinner and
a Bible study on January 22nd
at 7:00 p.m. 4th through 12th
grades are invited to attend.
Youths wfit'be divided int? age^
groups for the Bible study. Make
plans to attend and bring a friend.


Florida Coalition

Against Domestic

Violence Offers

Training For

Battered Women

The Florida Coalition Against Do-
mestic Violence (FCADV) is spon-
soring an institute for abused and
formerly abused women in recog-
nition and acknowledgment of
their experiences. Battered and
formerly battered women are in-
vited to join FCADV for a day of
caring, sharing, inspiration, mo-
tivation and relaxation on
Wednesday, January 20, 1999 at
the Adams Mark Hotel in Daytona
Beach. There is no registration fee
and lunch will be provided. A lim-
ited number of travel scholarships
are also offered.
Battered and formerly battered
women are invited to share their
experiences with FCADV on this
day. This process will not only
allow for their self healing, but will
provide vital information on how
formerly battered women can help
end domestic violence. Topics will
include grassroots organizing,
history of the movement, and how
to join the movement to end do-
mestic violence. To provide the
necessary privacy and confiden-
tiality, the institute will only be
for women who self-identify as
being abused and/or was abused
by an intimate partner. To
self-identify is for'women to ac-
knowledge to themselves that they
have been or are being abused.
Women who need further infor-
mation can contact Pauline
Robinson at 1-800-500-1119x4.




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dant to 3 years of probation and fined him $275. The defendant was repre-
sented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Melvin Myers: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sale of a
Controlled Substance. The defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge
Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced him to 5 months
of jail with credit for 30 days time served. Judge Steinmeyer also sentenced
the defendant to 2 years of probation and fined him $275. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Jessica Poole: The defendant has been charged with one count of Burglary of
a Dwelling and Grand Theft. The state announced a no information on this
case. The defendant has been charged with one count of Forgery. The defen-
dant pleaded No Contest to this offense. Judge Steinmeyer sentenced the de-
fendant to 3 years of probation and fined her $275. In addition, the defendant
has been ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $30 to Johnny's Restau-
rant and pay $90 to Fishing Rod Components jointly/severally with Michelle
Massey.
Elex Pugh: The defendant has been charged with one count of the Sale of
Imitation Crack Cocaine and two counts of Sale of a Controlled Substance.
Judge Steinmeyer continued the Sale of Imitation Crack Cocaine case for trial
on January 20. The two counts of Sale of a Controlled Substance has been
continued for pretrial on February 15. The defendant was represented by As-
sistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Andre Rosier: The defendant has been charged with one count of Possession
of Cocaine and Possession of Cocaine with Intent to Sell. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for February 15. The defendant was represented by Attor-
ney Danielle Jorden.
Kenneth Rucker: The defendant has been charged with one count of Crimi-
nal Mischief and Violation of Injunction for Protection. Judge Steinmeyer has
set the case for sentencing on January 6. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
David Russ: The defendant has been charged with three counts of Sale of a
Controlled Substance. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on January
20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Jimmy Sanders: The defendant has been charged with one count of Posses-
sion of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon and Possession of Cannabis More
Than 20 Grams. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on January
20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Yolonda Sanders: The defendant has been charged with one count of Grand
Theft. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on January 6. The
defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Maurice Southall: The defendant has been charged with one count of Traf-
ficking in a Controlled Substance. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
trial on February 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger.
Natasha Stallworth: The defendant has been charged with one count of Ag-
ravated Battery with a Deadly Weapon. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case
or trial on January 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.
Larry Stevens: The defendant has been charged with one count of Aggra-
vated Battery with a Firearm and Shooting into an Occupied Vehicle. Judge
Steinmeyer has set the case for sentencing on January 6. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Samantha Stone: The defendant has been charged with two counts of P.W.B.C.
Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on January 6. The defen-
dant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Barry Thompson: The defendant has been charged with one count of Posses-
sion with Intent to Sell Cannabis, Possession of a Controlled Substance, and
Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
pretrial on January 6. The defendant was represented by Attorney Gordon
Shuler.
George Tolliver: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sale of a

Continued on Page 5


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


8 January 1999 Page 5


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PUBLIC NOTICE
State of Florida Department
of Environmental Protection

You are hereby notified that the Department of Environmental Pro-
tection has issued a permit under File Number FR-572 to LGR In-
vestment Fund, Ltd. for the construction of four driveways, parking
area and stormwater swales, new road connection, excavation, and
placement of fill, pursuant to Section 161.053, Florida Statutes. Project
location: Between DEP's reference monument R-226 and reference
monument R-229 off Bald Point Road, in Franklin County. The per-
mit and construction plans may be reviewed by appointment at the
office of the Bureau of Beaches and Coastal Systems, 5050 West
Tennessee Street, Building B, Tallahassee, Florida. Copies of the
permit may be obtained by contacting the Bureau of Beaches and
Coastal Systems at (850)487-4475, or by writing to 3900 Common-
wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 300, Tallahassee, Florida 32399.

A party to this proceeding has the right to request review of this or-
der by the Governor and Cabinet, sitting as the Land and Water
Adjudicatory Commission, in accordance with Chapter 42-2, Florida
Administrative Code, and specifically Rule 42-2.0131, Florida Ad-
ministrative Code. To initiate such a review, your request must be
filed within twenty (20) days of the date of this order with the Secre-
tary of the Commission at Florida Land and WaterAdjudicatory Com-
mission, The Capitol, Room 2105, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0001.
A copy of the request must also be served on both the Department
of Environmental Protection, Agency Clerk, 2600 Blair Stone Road,
Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399, and on any person
named in this order, within 20 days from the date of this order if the
request for review is to be effective.

Additionally, any person substantially affected by this determination
has the right to request an administrative hearing to be conducted in
accordance with the provisions of Section 120.57, Florida Statutes.
Should you desire an administrative hearing, your request must com-
ply with the provisions of Rule 62-103.115, Florida Administrative
Code, and by Rule 60Q-2.004, Florida Administrative Code. Requests
for such hearings must be sent to the Department of Environmental
Protection, Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boule-
vard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, and must
be received by the Department within twenty-one (21) days after
your receipt of this notice. Failure to respond within this allotted time
frame shall be deemed a waiver of all rights to an administrative
hearing.

In the event that a legally-sufficient petition for hearing is not timely
received, you have the right to seek judicial review of this order,
pursuant to Section 120.68, Florida Statutes, and Rule 9.030(b)(1)(c)
and 9.110, Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure. To initiate an ap-
peal, a Notice of Appeal must be filed with the Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection, Office of General Counsel, and with the ap-
propriate District Court of Appeal within thirty (30) days of the date
this order is filed with the Agency Clerk. The Notice filed with the
District Court must be accompanied by the filing fee specified in
Subsection 35.22(3), Florida Statutes.





PUBLIC NOTICE
State of Florida Department
of Environmental Protection
You are hereby notified that the Department of Environmental Protection
has issued a permit under File Number FR-571 to LGR Investment Fund,
Ltd. and Franklin County for the landward roadway realignment, exca-
vation, placement of fill, and other structures/activities, pursuant to Sec-
tion 161.053, Florida Statutes. Project location: Area A: Between ap-
proximately 200 feet south of the Department of Environmental
Protection's reference monument R-228 to 60 feet north of the Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection's reference monument R-230, in Fran-
klin County. Project address: Bald Point Road, Bald Point.

Area B: Between approximately 200 feet south of the Department of
Environmental Protection's reference monument R-235 to 100 feet south
of the Department of Environmental Protection's reference monument
R-239, in Franklin County. Project address: Bald Point Road, Bald Point.
The permit and construction plans may be reviewed by appointment at
the office of the Bureau of Beaches and Coastal Systems, 5050 West
Tennessee Street, Building B, Tallahassee, Florida. Copies of the permit
may be obtained by contacting the Bureau of Beaches and Coastal Sys-
tems at (850)487-4475, or by writing to 3900 Commonwealth Boule-
vard, Mail Station 300, Tallahassee, Florida 32399.

A party to this proceeding has the right to request review of this order by
the Governor and Cabinet, sitting as the Land and Water Adjudicatory
Commission, in accordance with Chapter 42-2, Florida Administrative
Code, and specifically Rule 42-2.0131, Florida Administrative Code. To
initiate such a review, your request must be filed within twenty (20) days
of the date of this order with the Secretary of the Commission at Florida
Land and Water Adjudicatory Commission, The Capitol, Room 2105,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0001. A copy of the request must also be
served on both the Department of Environmental Protection, Agency
Clerk, 2600 Blair Stone Road, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399,
and on any person named in this order, within 20 days from the date of
this order if the request for review is to be effective.

Additionally, any person substantially affected by this determination has
the right to request an administrative hearing to be conducted in accor-
dance with the provisions of Section 120.57, Florida Statutes. Should


you desire an administrative hearing, your request must comply with the
provisions of Rule 62-103.115, Florida Administrative Code, and by Rule
60Q-2.004, Florida Administrative Code. Requests for such hearings must
be.sent to the Department of Environmental Protection, Office of Gen-
eral.Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Talla-
hassee, Florida 32399-3000, and must be received by the Department
within twenty-one (21) days after your receipt of this notice. Failure to
respond within this allotted time frame shall be deemed a waiver of all
rights' to an administrative hearing.

In the event that a legally-sufficient petition for hearing is not timely re-
ceived, you have the right to seek judicial review of this order, pursuant
to Section 120,68, Florida Statutes, and Rule 9.030(b)(1)(c) and 9.110,
Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure. To initiate an appeal, a Notice of
Appeal must be filed with the Department of Environmental Protection,
Office of General Counsel, and with the appropriate District Court of
Appeal within thirty (30) days of the date this order is filed with the Agency
Clerk. The Notice filed with the District Court must be accompanied by
the filing fee specified in Subsection 35.22(3), Florida Statutes.


Court Report from Page 4
Controlled Substance. The delenaanL pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge
Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced him to 5 months
of jail with credit for 49 days time served. Judge Steinmeyer also sentenced
the defendant to 2 years probation and fined him $275. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Ben Turrell: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sale of Co-
caine. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on January 6. The
defendant was represented by Attorney Gordon Shuler.
Danny Wallace: The defendant has been charged with one count of Aggra-
vated Battery. Judge Steinmeyer has continued the case for Violation of Pro-
bation hearing on February 15. The defendant has also been charged with
three counts of the Sale of a Controlled Substance. Judge Steinmeyer contin-
ued that case for trial on January 20. The defendant was represented by As-
sistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
VIOLATION OF PROBATION (VOP)
Stevie Beebe: Charged with VOP. The defendant entered an admission to the
offense. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and reinstated
probation with all prior conditions reimposed. The defendant was represented
by Attorney Gordon Shuler.
Charles Clardy: Charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
VOP arraignment on February 15. The Public Defender was appointed to the
defendant in court.
Russell Cooper: Charged with VOP. The defendant entered an admission to
the offense. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to 90 days of jail with credit for 26 days time served. Public Defender Lee
Elzie was present with the defendant.
Lowery Croom: Charged with VOP. The defendant entered an admission to
the offense. Judge Steinmeyer sentenced the defendant to 45 days of jail with
credit for 45 days time served. Probation was reinstated and extended to in-
clude a period of 30 months. All prior conditions remain in force. Public De-
fender Lee Elzie was present with the defendant.
Curtis Gordie: Charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case to
February 15. The defendant was represented by Attorney Danielle Jorden.
Milton Joseph: Charged with VOP. The defendant entered an admission to
the offense. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to 6 months of jail with credit for 101 days time served. Public Defender
Lee Elzie was present with the defendant.
Sandra Massey: Charged with VOP. The defendant entered an admission to
the offense. Judge Steinmeyer reinstated probation and reimposed all other
conditions. Public Defender Lee Elzie was present with the defendant.
Jeremy Nowling: Charged with VOP. The defendant entered a denial to the
offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for VOP hearing on March 15.
Public Defender Lee Elzie was present with the defendant.
Kelly Dildy: Charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for a
hearing on January 6. Public Defender Lee Elzie was present with the
defendant.
Terry Holt: Charged with VOP. The defendant entered an admission to the
offense. Judge Steinmeyer sentenced the defendant to 45 days of jail with
credit for 45 days time served. Public Defender Lee Elzie was present with the
defendant.
Brent Roulhac: Charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
a hearing on January 6. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.
Holly Stripling: Charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer continued the.case for
a hearing on January 6. Public Defender Lee Elzie was present with the
defendant.
Freddie Williams: Charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case
for a hearing on February 15. Public Defender Lee Elzie was present with the
defendant.
William Wood: Charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for a
hearing on January 6. Public Defender Lee Elzie was present with the
defendant.


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AUTUMN

POPULATION

CONTROL
Low Cost Spay
Neuter Program


NEUTER/SPAY FEES
Dog Fees Cat Fees
Males: $35 Males $15
Females: under 40 Ibs. $35 Females $30
40 80 lbs. $45; 80+ Ibs. $55
These fees include pre-surgical examination, anesthesia, surgery and hospitalization.
Eligible pets must be healthy, at least 16 weeks of age, free of parasites and currently
vaccinated by a licensed veterinarian against contagious diseases (this may be done at
time of surgery), Extra charges may occur for pets that are pregnant, in heat, overweight,
have parasites, have complications and any additional requested procedures such as labo-
ratory tests, bathing, or pain medication.
REQUIRED VACCINATIONS/FEES
Dogs: Cats:
Kennel Cough: $9.75 Distemper/Respiratory
Dlstemper/Parvovirus: $9.75 Disease: $12.50
Rabies: $10.80 Feline Leukemia: $11.75
If you need transportation please contact one of the following volunteers: Franklin County
Animal Shelter: 670-8417; Gail Dodds: 670-8200; Franklin County Animal Control:
670-8167; Rene Topping: 697-2616; Nancy Mock: 227-2155; Barbara Holmes: 653-
8952. Thi program available for a limited time.
Hours: Mon. -Fri. 8 a.m. 5:30 p.m. Sat. 8 a.m. Noon
Earlier Dropoffs, late pickups available
Highway 98 West Eastpoint, Florida 850/670-8306


CALICO SCALLOPS
Marin RULE-Final Public
M ine Hearing
Ci< rk ris-'- ^


I I;o l.t1 1E Ia ,,,, -,, i
Commission
STATE OF FLORIDA
Chairman Patrick E. Geraghty, Ft Meyers
Vice-Chairman Barbara C. Barsh, Jacksonville
Commissioner Robert Q. Marston, M.D., Alachua
Commissioner George R. McEIvy, Crystal River
Commissioner Robert D. Woodward ii, Tallahassee
Commissioner Donald R. Hansen, Sebring
Commissioner Tony Moss, Miami

MFC Proposes

Emergency Rules

For Biscayne Bay

Shrimping & SW

Shrimp/Stone Crab

Line, Acts On

Other Saltwater

Fisheries Issues
Spiny Lobster & SW
Shrimp/Stone Crab Lines
Public Workshops
Scheduled
The Marine Fisheries Commission
held a public meeting December
7-9, 1998 in Islamorada and took
the following action:

BISCAYNE BAY
SHRIMPING-
Emergency Rule
The Commission received a re-
quest from Biscayne Bay shrimp
fishermen to suspend the mini-
mum size limit (47/70 count law)
for food shrimp harvested in the
bay. Public comment indicated
that there had been no enforce-
ment of the shrimp count law in
the bay until recently, and that
continued enforcement of this
rule would create a major eco-
nomic hardship in this area. In
order to create a "cooling off' pe-
riod to allow the Commission to
appropriately assess the situa-
tion, the Commission voted to
propose an emergency rule to
temporarily suspend the food
shrimp size limit in state waters
of Dade County. This proposed
emergency rule will go to the Gov-
ernor and Cabinet for approval on
January 26, 1999,. and will take
effect for a period of 90 days be-,
ginning on this date if approved.
The Commission intends to com-
pletely review its permanent
shrimp fishing rules for Biscayne
Bay and develop further options
to manage this fishery in the fu-
ture.
SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
SHRIMP/STONE CRAB
LINES-Emergency
Rule & Public
Workshop Scheduled
The Commission received scien-
tific and public comment regard-
ing shrimping closed areas and
Seasons in southwest Florida, and
voted to propose an emergency
rule to temporarily prohibit the
harvest of shrimp between the
Sanibel shrimping closure and
the federal shrimping closure:
This proposed emergency rule will
go to the Governor and Cabinet
orapproval onJanuary 26, 1999,
and will take effect for a period of
90 days beginning on this date if
approved. The Commission also
directed staff to schedule a final
public hearing during its next
regular meeting in February on a
proposed rule to close all state
waters in the Southwest Region
approximately south of Wiggins
Pass to the harvest of shrimp from
October I through May 31 each
year. In addition, the Commission
has scheduled a public workshop
to receive further comment on this
proposed rule. The public is en-
couraged to participate in this
workshop, which will take place
on Thursday, January 28, 1999
from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. at the State
Government Building, 2295
Victoria Avenue, West Wing, Room
165 C & D, in FORT MYERS.

SPINY LOBSTER-
Public Workshop
Scheduled
The Commission received scien-
tific and public comment and re-
viewed the status of the spiny lob-
ster fishery and the lobster trap
reduction program. The Commis-
sion also received a spiny lobster
bio-economic modeling report.
The Commission has scheduled
a public workshop to receive fur-
ther comment (both in English
and Spanish) on the management
of spiny lobster traps. The public
is encouraged to participate in
this workshop, which will take
place on Friday, January 29, 1999
from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the
Marathon High School Cafete-
ria, 350 Sombrero, in MARA-
THON.


The Commission held a final pub-
lic hearing on a proposed rule to
manage Florida's calico scallop
fishery. This proDosed rule would:
- prohibit the harvest of calico
scallops between the
Hillsborough/Manatee counties
line and the Big Bend/Northwest
regions line
- prohibit the use of scallop trawls
in all state waters closed to otter
trawls, and within 1 mile from the
COLREGS line (except in Frank-
lin, Gulf, and Wakulla counties-
within 3 miles from :1.,- COLREGS
line)
- prohibit the possession of more
than 250 processed calico scal-
lop meats per pound measured in
a 1 pound sample taken in any
containerss, with no tolerance for
undersize scallops
- allow the use of specified trawls
for the directed harvest of calico
scallops only, and allow the use
of a try net
- establish a minimum webbing
size of 3 inches stretched mesh
throughout the body and bag of
the net, a minimum net twine size
as #84 nylon, a maximum
headrope length of 40 feet (120
feet perimeter), and a maximum
net mesh area of 500 square feet
- establish a maximum net tow
time of 25 minutes, and allow
turtle excluder device exemptions
for specified calico scallop trawls
if federally approved
The Commission intends to take
this rule to the Governor and
Cabinet for approval on January
26, 1999.

BLACK AND GAG
GROUPER RULES
(MONROE COUNTY)-
Final Public Hearing
The Commission held a final pub-
lic hearing on proposed rules for
all Monroe County state waters
that would:.
- increase the minimum size limit
for black and gag grouper from 20
to 24 inches total length
- establish a 2 fish daily recre-
ational bag limit (within the 5 fish
daily aggregate limit for all grou-
pers) for black and gag grouper
- prohibit the harvest, possession,
or landing of black and gag grou-
per in excess of the recreational
bag limit and the purchase, sale,
or exchange of black and gag
grouper during March and April
The Commission intends to take
this rule to the Governor and
Cabinet 'for approval on January
26, 1999.

MARINE LIFE RULE
The Commission reviewed a draft
rule regarding the management of
certain tropical ornamental ma-
rine life species, which would:
-designate porkfish and
blue-legged or tri-color hermit
crab as "restricted species"
- rename star-shells (Astraea
americana or Astraea phoebia)
"starsnails" (Lithopoma ameri-
canum or Australiumphoebiwu) in
the marine life rule restricted spe-
cies list, due to changes in no-
menclature in the scientific lit-
erature
- rename Stenocionopsfurcata
"Stenocionopsfurcatus in the
marine life rule restricted species
list
- establish minimum size limits
of 3 inches in length for Cuban or
spotfin hogfish, and 11/2 inches
in length for porkfish
- establish daily 50-fish per per-
son/100-fish per vessel (which-
ever is less) commercial limits for
Spanish hogfish and Cuban or
spotfin hogfish
- establish a daily 75-fish per per-
son/150-fish per vessel (which-
ever is less) commercial limit for
porkfish (
- establish a daily commercial
limit of one gallon per person/twp
gallons per vessel (whichever is
less) for starsnails
- establish a daily commercial
limit of one quart per person or
vessel for blue-legged or tricolor
hermit crabs
The Commission directed staff to
schedule a final public hearing on
these proposed rules in February.
The Commission also held a pub-
lic workshop on marine life lim-
ited entry issues.

BLUE CRAB TRAP
DEGRADABLE PANELS
The Commission received scien-
tific and public comment on pro-
posals to amend rules regarding
degradable materials allowed to
be used in blue crab traps. The
Continued on Page 6


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Page 6 8 January 1999


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Marine from Page 5
Commission directed staff to
schedule a final public hearing, if
requested, on proposed rule
amendments that would allow the
use of:
trap lid tie-down straps secured
at one end by a loop composed of
rnon-coated steel wire measuring
24 gauge or thinner
2 x 3/8 inch non-treated pine
dowels or squares to replace the
hook on tie-down straps
-'a 3 x 6 inch panel attached to
the trap opening with 24 gauge
br less wire or single strand jute
These rule amendments would
also eliminate a current provision
allowing the use of a 24 gauge
hook or tie-down strap.
APALACHICOLA BAY
OYSTERS
The Commission considered a re-
quest to amend oyster manage-
ment rules for Apalachicola Bay,
and directed staff to schedule a
final public hearing, if requested,
on proposed rule amendments
that would:
allow the harvest of oysters in
Apalachicola Bay on Tuesdays
through Saturdays from July 1
through September 30 each year
eliminate the commercial vessel
bag limit for oysters in
Apalachicola Bay during the win-
ter season only

APALACHICOLA BAY
SHRIMP
The Commission considered a re-
quest to allow the use of skimmer
trawls to harvest shrimp in
Apalachicola Bay, and directed
staff to schedule a final public
hearing in February on a pro-
posed rule that would allow the
use of skimmer trawls in an area
b'f the bay known as Zone 6 for a
period of two years.

AMENDMENT 5
The Commission received public
comment and discussed issues
regarding the constitutional
amendment recently passed by
Florida voters that will create Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWCC) effective July 1,
J999. The Commission voted
unanimously to recommend that
the new agency include marine
research, law enforcement, and
administrative support programs
and personnel now housed in the
Department of Environmental
Protection.
COMMISSION
,WORKPLAN
The Commission received public
comment and considered-its
rVorkplan for 1999, particularly in
regards to the pending merger of
the Commission into the new
FWCC. The Commission intends
-to:
-schedule late February/late May
joint meetings with the Game and
-,Fresh Water Fish Commission
adjunct to regular Commission
meetings to consider issues, re-
Jated to the upcoming merger
- finalize action on proposed rules
,now before the Commission (as
,described elsewhere in this re-
lease) by early spring for submis-
?sion to the Governor and Cabinet
- make final decisions on several
."housekeeping" and non-contro-
-versial adjustments to current
,rules during the Commission's
"February meeting for submission
to the Governor and Cabinet, in-
,cluding: 1) reestablishing the 12
finches minimum size limit for
;Spanish mackerel; 2) eliminating
all references to recreational traps
in the spiny lobster rule; 3) requir-
ing each commercial blue crab
trap fished in Florida waters to be
permanently marked with the
harvester's saltwater products li-
cense number, and deleting rule
language that requires 1 -inch
'identification numbers on blue
crab trap buoys; and 4) changing
! the rule definition of "cast net" to
replace the reference of a
"cone-shaped" net with' a cor-
'rected reference to a "circular" net
in order to match the specifica-
tion for measuring the maximum
mesh area of a cast net by means
of its radius (NOTE: a legal cast
net may have a radius no greater
than 12 feet 7 inches in length)
- direct staff to begin work on sev-
eral key issues to be presented to
the FWCC after July, 1, 1999, in-
c eluding pompano management,
catch and release policy, federal
, conforming regulations for bill-
fish, sharks, swordfish, and tu-
nas,. oyster habitat rehabilitation
in Charlotte County, and other
issues suggested by the Florida
Marine Patrol and the public

OTHER MEETING
ACTION


The Commission received a stock
assessment of the red drum fish-
ery and intends to continue its
current management of this fish-
ery, continued development of
stone crab limited entry legisla-
tive recommendations, and con-
sidered federal fisheries manage-
ment issues. The Commission
also received a Florida Marine
Research Institute status and
trends report and re-elected
Patrick Geraghty to serve as
Chairman and Barbara Barsh to
serve as Vice-Chairman for 1999.


Red Snapper Recreational Bag Limit

Reduced To 4 Per Person In Gulf Of
Mexico Federal Waters


The red snapper recreational fish-
ery opens January 1 under a bag
limit of 4 fish per person in or from
Federal waters of the Gulf of
Mexico, announced Dr. Andrew J.
Kemmerer, Regional Administra-
tor, Southeast Region, National
Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).
The changes are being imple-
mented in an emergency interim
rule (EIR) published in the Fed-
eral Register. The EIR is expected
to avoid angler confusion by re-
taining tile 4-fish bag limit that.
was in place when the fishery
closed in September 1998 and
avoid associated increases in fish-
ing mortality. Also, the EIR will
slow the rate of harvest and ex-
tend the recreational fishing
season.
The EIR implements part of the
Gulf of Mexico Fishery Manage-
ment Council's (Council) request
for an emergency action, but does
not implement a delay in the


opening of the 1999 Gulf of
Mexico red snapper recreational
fishery from January 1 until
March 1 or bag limits of zero for
captain and crew of for-hire ves-
sels; or a minimum size limit of
14 inches, total length, for per-
sons fishing under the recre-
ational or commercial quotas for
red snapper. Economic analyses
by NMFS of the regulatory im-
pacts of the seasonal delay, zero
bag limit, and requested size limit
measures, indicated that insuffi-
cient justification exists to imple-
ment those measures via an EIR
and without opportunity for prior
notice and comment. Since the
zero bag limit for captain/crew of
for-hire vessels was not included
in the EIR, the recreational bag
limit of 4 fish will apply to cap-
tain and crew of for-hire vessels
when the fishery opens January
1, 1999.


Council Advisory Groups To Review

Sustainable Fisheries Act Amendment


The Scientific and Statistical
Committee (SSC) and an Ad Hoc
Industry Advisory Panel (AP), con-
sisting of recreational and com-
mercial fishery representatives,
will review the Sustainable Fish-
eries Act (SFA) Amendment. Pub-
lic testimony is scheduled begin-
ning at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday,
January 13. The AP meeting will
be on January 5 and the SSC
meeting on January 6, 1999. Both
meetings will be held at the
Doubletree Hotel, 300 Canal
Street, New Orleans, Louisiana,
and will begin at 8:00 a.m. and
conclude by 4,00 p.m. each day.
In 1996, Congress passed the
SFA. The SFA implemented new
requirements for marine fisheries
managed by the Gulf of Mexico
Fishery Management Council
(Council) and other regional coun-
cils. The Council has responded
to this by developing the SFA
Amendment which includes alter-
native management measures for
reporting of bycatch by Gulf fish-
ermen, for minimizing bycatch or
bycatch mortality, for specifying
higher standards for overfishing
criteria that will restore fishery
stocks to maximum sustainable
yield (MSY), for rebuilding periods
for overfished stocks (e.g., red
snapper, king mackerel, and red
drum) and a section identifying
communities economically depen-
dent on fishing.
Under the section on reporting of
bycatch, five alternatives related
to submission of data by
fishermen and vessel observers
are considered. The Council
proposes that National Marine
Fisheries Service (NMFS) have
authority to collect bycatch
information by the most
appropriate methods, but to use
mandatory observers only when
the Council agrees.
Under the section on measures to
minimize bycatch or bycatch mor-
tality, the Council proposes that
stone crab traps used in federal
waters be constructed according
to Florida law.
Under the section on overfishing
criteria and rebuilding period for
stocks, the Council has proposed
that MSY, optimum yield (OY),
and the overfishing thresholds be
set at higher standards as follows:
* At 26 percent spawning poten-
tial ratio (SPR) for red snapper
(with OY set at 36 percent SPR)
* At 30 percent SPR for red drum,
all the coastal migratory species
(including the mackerels) and for
all reef fish species except red
snapper, gag, Nassau grouper,
and jewfish


* At 50 percent SPR for Nassau
grouper and jewfish


* The Council has not selected
proposal for gag.


a


The rebuilding periods proposed
for overfished stocks are as fol-
lows:
* Red snapper by year 2033
* King mackerel by 2009
* No rebuilding periods are pro-
posed for red drum, Nassau grou-
per, orjewflsh because there was
insufficient information to com-
pute the periods.
Similarly, the amendment does
not contain proposed overfished
thresholds for any of the finfish
stocks because there was insuffi-
cient information to compute
these parameters in terms of bio-
mass (weight). Alternatives for
overfished thresholds in terms of
SPR are included.
The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Man-
agement Council is 1 of 8 regional
fishery management councils that
were established by the
Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Con-
servation and Management Act of
1976. The Gulf of Mexico Fishery
Management Council prepares
fishery management plans that
are designed to manage fishery
resources in the U.S. Gulf Of
Mexico.


Carrabelle

Chamher

Open Again

By Tom Campbell
A fire in Judy's Fashion Corner
in the Carrabelle Mini-Mall East
forced the temporary closing of
the Carrabelle Area Chamber of
Commerce in December because
of smoke and water damage to the
Chamber office, which was next
door to the fire.
Executive Director of the Cham-
ber Bonnie Stephenson said the
fire wall is what saved the
Chamber's equipment.
The Chamber has now relocated
its new office across the street in
the Mini-Mall East, in the same
general area, across from the old
office.
Ms. Stephenson said last week it
was good to be open again for
business as usual. The Chamber
invites all community-minded
businesses and individuals to join
for the new year.
Timber Island Yacht Club was
selected for the 1998 Member of
the Year award, for its dedicated


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t1i


Letter To The

Editor

Last week we announced that the
fishermen would exhibit a dem-
onstration by deploying a rectan-
gular net less than 500 sq. ft. de-
scribed to be legal under Article
10 Section 16 of the Florida Con-
stitution and 370.093 Florida
Statute. This will exhibit whether
the Florida Marine Patrol is en-
forcing a "Political Net Ban" or
Constitutional "Marine Net
Limitation".
The location for the demonstra-
tion has been moved to Wolley
Park on Dickerson Bay in Pana-
cea in order to accommodate the
public that has already notified us
of their concern and that they
have a desire for the rest of the
story. We will gather at 9:00 a.m.
January 12, 1999, with the net
deployment at 11:00 a.m. Fish-
ermen that have citations using
gear less than 500 sq. ft. will be
there to explain their side of the
issue.
This is an opportunity for the pub-
lic to see for themselves the simple
problem made complicated by
mixing politics with law. Seventy
two percent of the people voted for
a "Marine Net Limitation" not a
"Net Ban".


Coffee and donuts will be served
from 9.00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. for
people wanting to be informed.
Also net exhibits will be displayed
to better illustrate the problems.
I'm asking you to come for a
,couple of hours to become in-
formed and help us keep our lim-
ited jobs and your right to fresh
Florida Seafood at a reasonable
price.
Protecting Florida's Natural Re-
source-Feeding the People.
Thank You,
Ronald F. Crum
support and commitment to the
youth of the community. The Club.
sponsors a Youth Fishing Class
the second Saturday in July and
a Youth Fishing Tournament the
third Saturday in July, both on
Timber Island.
In an effort to involve the school,
families and young people, the
Chamber sponsored a contest for
Carrabelle students to design the
Chamber T-shirt for the Water-
front Festival in April 1999. Josh
Davis, 7th grade student, won
First Place for his art work show-
ing a smiling fish leaping with joy
for the Waterfront Festival.
Other winners in the contest were:
2nd Place Heather Shiver, 12th
grade; 3rd Place -Jessica Schultz,
5th grade; 4th Place Ellen Keith,
7th grade; and 5th Place- Zack
McAnally, 3rd grade. Honorable
Mention went to John Goodson,
Daniel Gray, Jimmy Foots, Sarah
Beaty and Wendy Alvarez.
For Christmas Awards, Best
Decorated Stores: 1st Place Wet
Willie's; 2nd Place Carrabelle
Medical Pharmacy. Thanks to
I.G.A. for donation of bags and
bags of candy for the kids.
The next Chamber meeting is
scheduled for Thursday, January
21 at 7 p.m. The next Waterfront
Festival meeting is scheduled
January 7 at 7 p.m. Meetings are
at the Chamber office. The Cham-
ber currently has 165 members.
For more information, phone
850-697-2585.


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


8 January 1~3 Page 7


SPECIAL

PROPERTIES
CARRABELLE 10.5 acres includes
tidal pond overlooking bay and Dog
Island........... $115,000 MLS #2410,
EASTPOINT One acre building sites,
bayview and bayfront, Hammock
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subdivision. From .................. $25,900
MLS#2416.
SCIPIO CREEK High ground, heavily
wooded acreage with deep water
creek frontage, accesses Apalachicola
River, bay and gulf, includes fully
renovated 1,500 sq. ft. cypress log
cabin. Perfect for corporate retreat.
Call for details. MLS#2609.
HISTORIC DISTRICT BUILDING SITE
7th Street overlooks Apalachicola City
Marina, bay and islands......$79,900
MLS#2819.
APALACHICOLA Historic 3,500 sq.
ft. home, corner Hwy. 98 and 5th St.
Perfect for offices, studios w/upstairs
apartments. $425,000 MLS#2766.
APALACHICOLA 3BR/1BA, good
neighborhood. New appliances,
kitchen cabinets, CH/AC, close to
schools. Move right in ..........$69,500
MLS#2728.
APALACHICOLA BAYFRONT HOME
Circa 1910, beautiful property,
2,800 sq. ft. with garage/workshop.
Fine lumber throughout.. $350,000
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1,100 sq. ft. 1BR/1BA house with
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[850) 653-8330
P.O. Box 666 *17 1/2 Avenue E
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City Of Apalachicola Reports

On Renovation Of Water

Treatment System


Packing Oysters


Oyster from Page 1
-This process of freezing oysters on
the half shell using the C02
method of freezing started about
four years ago. There are cur-
rently only four vendors in the
country that use this method, of
which the Carrabelle plant is one.
The plant in Carrabelle operates
five days a week and is closed
Saturday and Sunday. Mr. Tho-
mas said he likes to "cross-train"
the employees so that they are
able to do every step in the
process. He currently has 25
employees.
Oysters are delivered to the plant,
where they are washed. After the
washing, they are brought into
the facility where workers shuck,
leaving the oyster on the half
shell. They are placed on stain-
less steel trays, about four dozen
per tray. The trays are placed on
a rack and immediately placed on
a conveyor where they are washed
again, and conveyed through the
machine which freezes them at 35
to 40 degrees below freezing, with
the C02 solution.
At 8 a.m., the workers start
shucking. Eventually, Mr. Tho-
mas plans to have two shifts
working. Most of the oysters come
from Texas and Louisiana. Ex-
pansion of the facilities is being
planned. He said. "on an average,


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between 100 to 150 boxes of oys-
ters are packed a day. We hope to
get up to 250 boxes a day." Each
box contains 12 dozen oysters.
Mr. Thomas has orders to ship to
Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Chicago
and Boston. "We ship to places
where they can't get fresh prod-
uct," he said. The Carrabelle Pris-
tine oyster has a one-year shelf
life. The product is kept frozen
until it is used. "Large casinos use
our product," he said.
Eventually, he plans to do a re-
tail pack. "Later on, we'll do a
Rockefeller topping and a Casino
topping," he explained.
He said all the oysters, whether
Florida, Texas or Louisiana, must
be a special size. "Small oysters
just don't work," he said. "It's a
premium product, and size and
presentation are very important.
By sight, dealers know what I
want, three-inch uniform oysters,
or a cup oyster."
He continued, "Representative
'Janegayle Boyd visited the plant
about a month ago and found it
very interesting."
The oysters are put on the shelf
in a manner designed to pass U.S.
Department of Commerce inspec-
tion. "We are ready to be certified
by them," Mr. Thomas said. Each
oyster is washed twice before
and after shucking, just before
freezing. "The freezing process at
35 below zero in the machine
eliminates bacteria up to 99 per-
cent," he explained.
Twelve dozen oysters are packed
per box, frozen and ready to ship
"They stay frozen until they-are
used," he said. Simply put, the
process is wash, shuck, wash,
freeze, and wash by spraying
which freezes on the frozen oys-
ter, pack and then ship. The pro-
cedure is simple; but meticulous
and exact.
"Eventually," Mr. Thomas said,
"we will export world-wide. The
process is safe and we are trying
to get the Food and Drug Admin-
istration to recognize this. We
want them to inspect and certify
our method."
The Pristine Oyster is beautifully
presented. Mr. Thomas explained
that "the unique process of freez-
ing oysters on the half shell is not
new, but was started by a com-
pany out of Texas about four
years ago." The process kills 99.9
percent of bacteria in the oyster,
Using a C02 freezer. The texture
and flavor of the oyster remain
true.
"We decided to locate in
Carrabelle, because we knew the
area needed jobs," Mr. Thomas
explained. Because of a close re-
lationship to Mr. Tim Saunders,
the Saunders" facilities on Tim-
ber Island are being used. Mr.
Saunders owns the property and
Mr. Thomas leases from him.
Mr. Thomas said, "You can thaw
and serve Pristine Oysters on the
half shell. It's safe and delicious."
This writer left the plant with his
mouth watering, ready to enjoy
some.


I a


By Aaron Shea
In his report to the City of
Apalachicola Commission on
January 5, City Attorney Pat
Floyd informed the Board that a
consent order with the Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection
(DEP) has been signed, but the
Teats have petitioned. This means
that this will stop the renovation
process of the water treatment
system until an administrative
hearing is finished. The adminis-
trative hearing will allow the Teets
and their lawyer to go before DEP
representatives and plead their
case. The hearing has not been
scheduled at this time. The Board.
agreed to refer the situation to
Attorney Chris Bentley, who
helped the city in the Teat case.
In other matters:
The City Commissioners agreed to
block Water Street between Av-
enues D and E from 12 p.m. to 8
p.m. for the Grady Market Grand
Opening on Saturday, January 9.
They also agreed to allow the Love
Center Band to play in the down-
town area from 3 p.m. to 4.30
p.m.
A representative for the Philaco
Women's Club went before the
Apalachicola City Commission
requesting a square of land from
the city so they can put a club-
house on it. The club went before
the city a month earlier with the.
request. The club got a little fur-
ther this time around. The Com-
missioners highlighted some pos-
sible areas that the clubhouse can
be put on. Two possible areas
would be across from the city ten-
nis courts or possibly land near
the high school. The Commission
did not make a decision on the
land because they had just re-
ceived the information on possible
areas the night of the meeting and


there were also questions on le-
gal matters. The club is interested
in a 100 year lease and the cost
of a lease will be looked into by
the city attorney. The club already
has a building to put on the land.
Dan Garlick went before the
Board to get approval on a addi-
tional building for the Cipio
Creek Marina. The plan had al-
ready been approved by planning
and zoning. The Board approved
the new building contin-
gent on the four corners of the
building being staked out so the
Board can see exactly where the
building would be. The B o ar d
wants to make clear that the
building is not going to be on any
wetlands areas.
The Fire Department requested
that the Board look in-to the pur-
chase of a new fire truck. The de-
partment currently has two
trucks. One is a 1988 firetruck
and the other one is a 1974 truck.
The 1974 truck according to the
Fire Chief is no longer operational.
According to the Chief it is neces-
sary to have two trucks. Some
inquiries have been done and it
was found that a new fire truck
would cost in the vicinity of
$132,000. The Board agreed to
have the fire department (jet some
more estimates and the city would
look into financing.
Commissioner Van Johnson
brought a couple of citizen re-
quests before the Board. The first
request was by Clifford Williams.
Mr. Williams would like to see a
pedestrian crosswalk put on 12th
Street. The Board, however, was
unable to do anything because the
street is on a state road. The sec-
ond request was for street lights
on 24th Avenue. The Mayor
pointed out that there have been
numerous requests for street
lights in other areas. Due to the
costs of street lights it may not
be possible to fill these requests.


Dixie Theatre Volunteers from left are Tom Campbell,
Kathleen Heveran, of Lanark Village, Barb Siprell of
Apalachicola, and Pat Harrington of Eastpoint. The quartet
performed holiday poems, short stories and songs which
viewers said "brought out the kid in them." Directors Rex
Partington and Cleo Holladay are preparing announcement
of future readings at the Dixie Theatre, which will be
announced soon.


Trio

Internazionale

In Concert

The Ilse Newell Fund for the Per-
forming Arts is pleased to spon-
sor the Trio Internazionale on
Sunday, January 24, 1999 at
4:00 p.m. EST in historic Trinity
Church on Highway 98 at 6th
Street in Apalachicola, Florida.
Martha Gherardi, violin; Luciano
Gherardi, contrabass; and Dr.
Bedford Watkins, retired profes-
sor of keyboard, Illinois Wesleyan
University, piano; will present
their annua concert of popular
favorites from their classical and
semi-classical repertoire.
A donation of $2.00 may be made
at the door for those not holding
season tickets. Children under 12
should be accompanied by an
adult. The Ilse Newell Fund is
sponsored by the Apalachicola
Area Historical Society, A501-(c)-
3 Educational Incorporation.








Wood from Page 2

to the Attorney General, we went
to the Port Authority and the City.
The only way we are going to get
the answers is to go before the
judge."
Cary Reakes, a former chairman
of the Port Authority, said, "What
good does this do the City Com-
mission?" He went on to say that
it seemed to him that Wood went
out of his way to stop any action
going on out at the Dockside Ma-
rina. He added "It is difficult to
understand where the City of
Carrabelle benefits from this on-
going harassment let alone getting
m to spend money for litigation."
He added that the Dockside Ma-
rina had employees seven or eight
people who are residents of the
city.
Gaidry said that we have to pre-
serve the integrity of the permit-
ting process. "What better way
can we have but to put the mat-
ter before Judge Steinmeyer, We
will put the facts before him." He
went on to say that he could work
with the Port Authority Attorney
and Bevis Attorney and put to-
gether a petition we could all work
together on.
Reakes said that he hoped that
the city and the Port Authority
would all work as hard to help
such a petition as they work to
hinder it. He said it has been go-
ing on for eight years and that is
unfair. "We ought to get in gear
and work together."
He remarked on, the negative at-
titudes and Commissioner Jim
Phillips, "You're say we are all
negative and he is all positive?"
Sanborn banged the gavel and the
motion was approved on a vote of
3-1.


I Before

You Jog

A Single

Block

Exercising is
essential for
keeping yourself
in good health.


But far too many

7. people jump right
into exercise
before consulting
their doctor.


Starting a
lifetime of
sensible exercise
S is one of the many
healthy ideas we
S actively endorse.


." Before you jog a
single block, stop
in and see your
family doctor.





MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

12th Street
Apalachicola, Florida
32320
Phone (850) 653-8853


Gus Carpenter


James Parham


0%l w w e ley a ntew yeawea, tive ia om) cO-i'a ln aciA6t.

67Q'emcym cwlat,, me amdciwA/t/ ( `e/ ca.z/Ice yuj
comuea n(a daw- cu1 a4 we en-ywto' co Q7c ecayu/ l \ewst1vu /Tee (a CXe



ee ale c/lwuA tn"i. (l & wt, t dA a ),/4/1i;1y Q ea





APALACHICI LK

STATE BANK* 1897

Main Office: 22 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 850/653-8805 FAX 850/653-2232
Carrabelle 850/697-4500 Eastpoint: 850/670-8501 St. George Island: 850/927-2561 FDI(


1


L.A", 1.- 1. 1


I


C








Page 8 8 January 1999 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER The Franklin Chronicle


THANK YOU

To Everyone Who Shopped


T he 4 aqa&i4e
IN CARRABELLE

This Holiday Season.
I Really Appreciate Each Of You!

May 1999 Be Filled With Happiness.


The .qeaOu., Q0a




Drug Task Force Makes Arrests

During The Holiday


SBy Aaron Shea
On December 22, 1998 the Fran-
Sklin County Sheriffs Drug Task
Force executed a search warrant
on a duplex apartment on 7th
street in Carrabelle. The execu-
Stion of the warrant resulted in
three arrests. Wardell Clinton.
SGordon, who is from Marion
County, Florida, was arrested for
Possession of a Controlled Sub-
stance to-wit, Crack Cocaine with
SIntent to Sell or Deliver, Tamper-
Sing with Physical Evidence, Re-
sisting an Officer without Vio-
lence, and Possession of Drug
SParaphernalia. Gordon is also
; being held without bond on out-
standing warrants from Marion
County for Possession of Cocaine.
--Calvin Burns was arrested for
Possession of Less Than 20
Grams of Cannabis. Sylvia
Yvonne Geter has charges still
pending against her.
There was a fourth suspect, who's
name is being withheld at this
time, at the residence during the
execution of the search warrant.
But according to Lieutenant Mike
Moore, Commander of the Narcot-
ics Unit, the suspect did not have
any pending charges or outstand-
ing warrants. "He was searched
and he was released," said Moore.
"He wasn't involved with anything
in the house." Moore went on to
explain that the man is still un-
der an open investigation, how-
ever. He is from Tampa. "There is
a influx marijuana and crack
coming from the Tampa area,"
said Moore.
The search warrant was applied
for after Sheriff Bruce Varnes re-
ceived information that there were
illegal drugs in the apartment be-
ing prepared for distribution on
to streets. After further investiga-
tion into the allegations by the
Drug Task Force, a search, war-
rant was granted.


On December 24, 1998, Harold
"Buddy" Frederick returned from
a furlough authorized by a Fran-
klin County Judge. Following
Franklin County Sheriffs Office
policy and procedure, Lieutenant
Lewis Julius and Sergeant Steve
Jones searched Harold Frederick
before returning him into the jail
facility. During the search, 34
white pills were found in a dental
floss container that Frederick had
brought with him. It was discov-
ered that the pills were a generic
brand of Lorazepam. Given that
Frederick had no prescription for
the pills, he was charged with
Possession of a Controlled Sub-
stance and introducing a Con-
trolled Substance into a County
Detention Facility.
On December 26, 1998, Derrick
Meredith of Carrabelle was taken
into custody for Possession of
i Less Than 20 Grams of Cannabis
! and Possession of Drug Parapher-
nalia by the Drug Task Force af-
ter they received information that
Cannabis was being used and
possessed on U.S. Highway 98
between 8th and 9th streets in
Carrabelle.
The officers approached a group
of people around a Chevrolet
truck at the above location. With
the strong odor of burning Can-
nabis coming from the truck, the
officers had probable cause to
search the vehicle. Upon search,
officers found a plastic bag of
Cannabis in the ash tray, four
partially used Cannabis cigarettes
were found in various areas of the
car, and rolling papers were
found.
"The illegal sale and abuse of ille-
gal drugs and controlled sub-
stances has to stop in order for
us to have a better environment
for our children," said Sheriff
Bruce Varnes.


Eastpoint Fantasy Land New Disaster

Delights Neighbors and Services
it, Intructor At


V I1bVU FA
By Tom Campbell
A Fantasy Land in Eastpoint has
been delighting neighbors visitors
all during December of 1998,
thanks to Mr. Jim McWhinnie,
who lives with his wife Pat at 255
Highway 98 in Eastpoint.
Mr. Jimmy Miller, who lives next
door to Mr. and Mrs. McWhinnie,
has volunteered to make a drive-
way across his property for next
year, in order to accommodate the
traffic of visiting cars, so the visi-
tors can just drive through and
exit behind Mr. Miller's home.
The Fantasy Land consists of vari-
ous holiday scenes, including
Santa's Toy Land, the Manger and
Baby Jesus, and Santa climbing
a ladder to the top of the
McWhinnie's home. There are
over 200 pieces; all made by Mr.
McWhinnie himself. He smiled,
"My granddaughters help to paint
them, and I finish up."
He explained that he started put-
ting up the decorations "in about
1993. The first year there was
just a manger scene and Santa
and some lights. The decorations
have grown through the years,
now including archways leading
from Highway 98 up the driveway
to the McWhinnie home, lights in
all the trees, several Santa's and
various animals, all handmade
-and painted by Mr. McWhinnie.
There are over 200 pieces in the
collection. "I used to keep up with
how many lights we had," he
smiled. 'Two years ago I know we
had over 10,000 lights, and we
keep adding. This year, we put up
41 more sets of lights, 100 to a
set. This is not counting the spot-
lights." All total, there are prob-
ably nearly 20,000 lights. He es-


timated that there is "over $4,000
involved in the investment."
Having the lights turned on each
night in December usually adds
about $50 to the light bill. "I'm not
sure about this year," he chuck-
led, "because it was so warm, we
had to keep the air conditioner
going a lot, so that will add to the
bill."
He continued, "We turned the
lights on Thanksgiving night this
year. Over 30 cars drove up our
driveway to get a closer look. We
became aware we needed a drive
through the property, because
there were such traffic jams with
folks trying to drive in and out.
The whole neighborhood gets into
the fun. Folks get out of their cars
and walk around. Children some-
times talk to Baby Jesus in the
manger, and to Santa Claus and
the elves."
He laughed, "Florida Power used
to check out the electrical situa-
tion when we had everything up."
He explained that he has a bigger
box and eight breakers, with
trenches dug for the wires and
electrical outlets. "We got the right
kind of wire. Electricians checked
it out, everything, including look-
ing at the electrical box. Florida
Power doesn't bother to check it
6ut anymore.
Mr. McWhinnie said he doesn't
consider charging any admission
or even taking donations. "No," he
smiled. "Watching the little kids
is all the joy we want. I like to give
something to people. I en3oy do-
ing it. That joy is all I want."
Mr. and Mrs. McWhinnie are from
Boston and have lived in
Eastpoint about eleven years,
since he retired from the Army.
He now drives a truck for Flowers
and Sons Seafood in Eastpoint.
They belong to the Church of God
in Eastpoint.
Will they continue to put up the
Fantasy Land next year? "I'll prob-
ably add a few more pieces he
said. "And my neighbor Mr.
Jimmy Miller has agreed to extend
the driveway exit across his prop-
erty."
Mrs. McWhinnie smiled, "Kids of
all ages love it." There is a good
possibility they will continue the
tradition, while everybody seems
to be having so much fun.


,.', '


t f .
r ( -8 .


|w f
K^


Tri-River Agreement Extended

Until December 1999


Florida, Alabama and Georgia
were supposed to finish plans for
dividing the waters of the
Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-
Flint river basin by the end of this
month, but the state's governors
agreed to extend the deadline for
one year, to December 31, 1999.
The compact among the three
states creates a commission that
'will govern the use of water by the
three states, but recent months
have involved numerous meetings
to design a way to allocate water
to each state from the Apalachi-
cola-Chattahoochee-Flint system,
shared by the three states, and a
second river system, the













Joyce Estes
Bayside Gallery
and Florist
Art of the Area
Art Supplies
Gifts and Collectibles
Custom Frame Shop
Flowers for All
Occasions
Complete Wedding
Services & Event
Planning

1-800-929-8931
Hours: 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Highway 98 P.O. Box 585
Eastpoint, FL 32328
Office: (850) 670-8931
Res.: (850) 670-8323


1.* S S.co /bysd


Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa sys-
tem, shared by Alabama and
Georgia.
The tri-state compacts followed a
1990 lawsuit started by Alabama
to prevent Georgia from taking too
much water because of high de-
mands from the Atlanta area.
Florida later became involved be-
cause of the downstream needs,
extending all the way to
Apalachicola Bay. Locally, the
Research Reserve, has been one
key party involved in the extended
negotiations. The states agreed to
suspend litigation while the U. S.
Army Corps of Engineers re-
searched the needs of the river
systems.
The meeting establishing the new
deadline was held in Montgomery,
Alabama, on December 20th.


LOVE CENTER
Holiness Church.of the Living God
151 Tenth Street Apalachicola 653-2203
Schedule of Services
Early Worship Sunday Mornings.................................... 8:00 a.m.
Sunday Bible School............. ...............9:30 a.m .
Morning Worship Service ........... 11:00 a.m.
Mid-Week Services-Wednesday ................................ 7:00 p.m.
"Love is what it is!"
Dr. Daniel White, Overseer Dr. Shirley White, Pastor
Everyone is welcome to come and worship with us.


*yIPvc,('S? Rl-


QUALITY WO


GEN. CONTRACTOR LIC.
NO: RG0050763
ROOFING CONTRACTOR LIC.
NO: RC0051706


RK JOHN'S REASONABLE RATES
CONSTRUCTION
of Franklin County, Inc.
Remodeling & Custom Homes
Roofing & Repairs
Vinyl Siding
John Hewitt
850-697-2376 OWNER


106 St. James Avenue CARRABELLE
P.O. Drawer JJ Carrabelle 32322


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU











I rinitp

850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:00 A.M.


Lanark Village

The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross announced
that Don McLean has become a
Disaster Services Instructor. Don
who lives in Lanark Village be-
comes the first instructor in Fran-
klin County. By having an in-
structor in Franklin County the
Chapter's Disaster Services Office


will be aole to train many more
Disaster Services Volunteers than
ever before.
If you would like to become an
American Red Cross Disaster Ser-
vices Volunteer please give us a
call in Tallahassee at 878-6080 or
in Apalachicola at 653-3952
or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross. If
you are an employee of the State
of Florida you are eligible for 15
days of Disaster Leave by becom-
ing a trained American Red Cross
*Disaster Services Volunteer.


MARILEE COSMETICS

Exciting new line of skin

care, hair care, makeup

seeking representatives to sell,

establish and service accounts.

Call (800)794-3159


1~H-H~H71 r


- Tatnara' .

eAFE FLORIDITA

^ ( ,i Is Now OPEN in Apalachicola..


I
41/ i

, i


(next to the Dixie Theater)
653-4111


Lunch and Dinner,
WEDNESDAY through SUNDAY


; Fresh Florida FL
i '' South Ameri

Please Join Us SUNDA
fExtraordinary Spec

I T n1 'M1


Sales
Mary L. Bowman: 697-3759
Tom Shields: 697-2640
Leon Taylor "Dog Island":
567-5858


avors with a
ican Flair


LY For
*ials


Associates
E.T. (Bud) Ammons: 697-2639
Bob Shepherd; 984-5129
Nick & Ruby Saporito:
697-8013 or 335-0714


Interiors Etcetera
Bridal Registry Beanie Babies All Occasion Gifts Lamps
Furniture Wallpaper Fabrics, etc.
Come see our variety
of unique gifts!
Hours: 10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. .l.. .:
Tuesday Saturday
505 Reid Avenue I
Downtown
Port St. Joe, FL
(850) 229-6054


Greenware & 5
Bisque Glazes
Stains Firing
Free Instruction
Finishwork
SLIP
Hours: 10-5 Tues-Fri
10-4 Sat

Mini Mall, Hwy 98
Carrabelle


850/697-4270


FOLKS REALTY, INC.
100 East U.S. 98 P.O. Box F Carrabelle, FL 32322
Telephone: (850) 697-2332


#95- One Acre Riverfront lot on the Carrabelle River. Beautiful building
spot at River's edge. $73,900
#108-Gorgeous White Sand Beach lot with 2BR, 1.5 Beach cottage. Built
approx, 5 years ago, it has great room with sliding glass doors to screened
porch and L-shaped deck. C H&A, aerobic septic system. Excellent for a week-
end retreat and at an affordable price. $129,500.
#100-Neat As A Pin. This 2BR mobile home sits on two lots in Lanark in
nice area with paved street. Carport, screened porch, all in excellent condi-
tion. $34,500.
#72-Good Buy on a double unit apartment. Sits right on the Golf Course in
Lanark Village with an excellent Gulf View. One bedroom unit is nicely fur-
nished with large screened porch on one side and patio and extra storage on
the other. Connecting Studio apartment is connected by screened porch.
$36,000.
#29-Excellent Location close to the beach but off of Highway 98 for pri-
vacy. One acre with 2BR, 1BA mobile home that has been remodeled. Has
metal roof over, complete new bath, remodeled kitchen and new flooring.
Neat and clean. Extra storage shed. Good buy at $34,900.
We handle properties from Alligator Point to Eastpoint including
Dog Island. Check out our website at www.folksrealty.com.
Karen S. Folks-Lic. R.E. Broker: 697-2143


GENERAL CONTRACTOR


I


--Mm


A LOCALLY OWNED) NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


.Page 8 8 January 1999


3J


1'


tr"








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


8 January 1999 Page 9


FN Florida Classified


FC AN Advertising Network


Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience

of 1.8 million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!

The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper
with the FLORIDA REACH at 850-385-4003, fax: 850-385-0830.


AUTOMOBILES


SEIZED CARS from $175. Porsche,
Cadillac's, Chevy's, BMWs, Corvettes. Also
Jeeps,4 WDs. Your area. Toll Free. (800)429-
3660 Ext. A4304.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

AREA PAYPHONE ROUTE. 45 Estab-
lished High-traffic Locations. No Gim-
micks! Earn Up To $165K/year. Mini-
mum Investment, $12,500. Call Now!!!
(800)519-3201. AIN#1998-018.

LOCAL CANDY ROUTE, 30 Vending
Machines. Earn apx. $800/day. All for
$9,995. Call (800)998-VEND.
AIN#1998-040.

WE'LL SHOW YOU THE MONEY!
(Call any of our clients!) 5 hrs./wk.
"talking"Phone card machines. $10,880
req'd. Free Sample! CardMart of
America, Inc. (800)876-3326.
AIN.#1998-077.

WORK IN YOUR SPARE TIME! Good
Money! Processing Mail! Free Suppliesl
Bonuses! Rush SASE: Greenhouse/4217
Highland/N, Waterford, MI 48328-2165.

FINANCIAL

$$$ for a variety of long-term income
streams. J.G.Wentworth (888)231-5375.

$$WE BUY$$ *Seller Financed Notes
*Insurance Settlements *LandNote Port-
folios. Colonial Financial (800)969-1200
Ext. 50.

A DEBT-FREE LIFE! Free confidential
help. Cut monthly payments. Reduce in-
terest. Stop collection calls. Avoid bank-
ruptcy. Nation's largest nonprofit: Ge-
nus CreditManagement. (800)295-7415.

CASH LOANS HOMEOWNERS only.
Bad credit/good credit. Cash for any
reason. (800)USA-MONY.

WANT A VISA CARD? $12,000+,
Unsecured. Bad/No Credit Is O.K., Low
Fixed Interest. Everyone Welcome.
(800)365-3499.

REFINANCE & SAVE $100s EACH
MONTH. Consolidate debt, improve your
home or get needed cash. Custom programs
for every need: Good & problem credit, no-
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FAIRBANK MORTGAGE (888)577-8671
ext. 552 FLLic. ML9700547.


FINANCIAL

HAVING FINANCIAL PROBLEMS? We can
help! Good or bad credit. FREE application
and assessments. Fast results. Call (800)234-
3332.


FOR SALE


FACTORY DIRECT POOL HEATERS.
Heatpump, Solar, or Gas. Major brands.
New/Used. Do it yourself or installed.
Free Phone Quotes. (800)333-WARM
(9276) www.solardirect.com Lie.
#CWC029795.

FOR PENNIES MORE, get the latest tech-
nology in liquid wormers. HAPPY JACK
LIQUI-VICT delivers actives better than older
formulas. Farm, Feed & Hardware Stores.
www.happyjackinc.com

POOL HEATERS (Heat Pumps) 10 yr.
warranty. World's most efficient. $1795
/up. Also Central Cool/Heat Systems.
Mobile Homes/ Commercial. $895./up.
byEco Energy. J. Archie Gay.#CMC056.
Delivery/install anywhere/any-
time.(800)474-7120. 24 hours. 7 days.

SAWMILL$3795. Saws logs into boards,
planks, beams. Large capacity. Best
sawmill values anywhere. Free informa-
tion. Norwood Sawmills, 90 Curtwright
Drive#3, Amherst,NY 14221. (800)578-
1363.

WORLD'S BEST purple martin bird
houses. $29.95 &S/H.Telescopic Poles/.
Accessories Available. Great Gift Idea!
Free Catalog. Order Today!Call
(800)764-8688. www.purplemartin.net

STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 5,000+ sizes.
40x60x14, $8,032; 50x75x14, $10,625;
50x100x16, $14,073; 60x100x16, $15,712.
Mini-storage buildings, 40x180, 36 units,
$18,269. Free brochures.
www.sentinelbuildings.com Sentinel Build-
ings, (800)327-0790, Ext. 79.

HELP WANTED

AIM HIGH. UP to $9,000 enlistment bonus,
if you qualify! Air Forcetraining and educa-
tion can help you reach your goals. For an
information package, call (800)423-USAF
or visit www.airforce.com

NATIONAL COMPANY NEEDS account ex-
ecutives for local sales position. Seeking some-
one positive, energetic, and career-oriented.
Base salary of $20,800 plus commissions and
bonuses. Benefits include majormedical insur-
ance, vacation, and 401K. Excellent training
program. For information call (888)841-6461.


dven ,r u-:,

Quick Vinegar Weight Loss Shocks Woman
Now Ms. Galend has reason to smile. She found an
easy way to lose pounds withoutt pills, diets or
calorie counting. Her secret? The healthy vinegar
plan. "I dropped 30 pounds so fast it scared me,"
she riles. Just a few tablespoons of vinegar daily
I 11i ha. e you feeling and looking better as you melt
a'%a unhealthy pounds: For FREE information
packet without obligation, write to: The Vinegar
Plan. Dept. FD2672,718-12th St. N.W., Box 24500,
Canton, Ohio 44701; To help us cover printing
and postage, $1 would be appreciated, but not
Als. Jeanne Galend necessary. 01998 TCO FD0200S02



Now is the time to
subscribe to the

FRANKLIN

CHRONICLE
The Chronicle is published every other Friday.
Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County
are $16.96 including taxes for one year, or 26
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HELP WANTED

AVON PRODUCTS-Start your own
business.Work flexible hours. Enjoy
unlimited earnings. Call Toll Free
(888)942-4053.

CONTINENTAL EXPRESS needs OTR
& Regional drivers. Late model equip-
ment. Rider Program. Females encour-
aged to apply. Students Welcome. 90%
no-touch freight. (800)365-1337/
(800)727-4374. EOE.

DRIVER COVENANT TRANSPORT
Coast to Coast runs. *Teams start 35c-
37c $1,000 Sign-on bonus for Exp. Co.
Drivers. For Experienced Drivers and
Owner Operators (800)441-4394. For
Graduate Students (800)338-6428.

GET PAID $15-$30 per hour processing
insurance claims for local doctors office.
Complete training provided. Computer
required. Call (800)259-6661 ext. 204.

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED! Covenant Transport has
immediate openings for entry level
drivers. Earn 37K-42K. No experience
needed! Training availablethrough T.D.I.
(800)435-5593.
SChoicePoint, Inc. needs EXPERIENCED in-
dependent contractors to check various court
records in the state of Florida. Please call or
write: Records Manager, 2885 Breckinridge
Blvd., Suite 200 Duluth, Georgia 30096,
phone (800)456-6003, ext. 3581, 4024, or
4025.

DRIVER.. SWIFT TRANSPORTATION
Now Hiring Drivers for Our New Ocala, FL
Terminal. Excellent Pay, Complete Benefits,
Assigned Equipment, Consistent Miles, Job
Stability. (800)633-4346 (eoe-m/f)

DRIVERS-OWNER OPS feel like your in
neutral? No Canada, NYC & NE, min. 23 yr.
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HAPPY NEW YEAR! Account Executive
Manager Trainee. National Company. Will
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nuses! Benefits! Growth Organization. For
Interview Information. Call (888)841-6461.

COMPUTERUSERS NEEDED: WORKOWN
hours. $20K-$75K/YR. (800)348-7186 ext.
9013.
PLACE YOUR 25 WORD OR LESS
advertisement in over 100 papers for
$325.00. Your ad will also appear on the
Internet.. For more information on this
program, call this paper.


LEGAL SERVICES

ARRESTED? NEED A LAWYER?
DUI*Bond Hearings. Criminal Defense.
A-A-A Attorney Referral Service.
(800)733-6337.24 hours. Felonies, Mis-
demeanors Traffic, Domestic violence,
Search/Seizure, Major crimes, Juvenille
parole/probation.

DIVORCE $150* Covers children, prop-
erty division, name change, military, miss-
ing spouse, etc. One signature required.
*Excludes govt. fees, uncontested. Pa-
perwork done for you. (800)462-2000.
Budget Divorce.

ACCIDENT VICTIM? INJURED? All Injury/
death cases. (Including Workmens'Comp.) All
Personal Injury Claims. 24 hrs. Call Now!
AAA Attorney Referral Service (800)733-6337.
(800)733-MEDS.

NOTICES

FOR PENNIES more, get latesttechnol- '
ogy in liquid wormers. HAPPY JACK
LIQUI-VICT delivers actives better than
older formulas. At GOLDKIST.
www.happyjackinc.com

REAL ESTATE

SOUTH CAROLINA WATERFRONT!
Point lotwith 400 feet frontage on 50,000
acre recreational lake. Only $79,900.
Waterfront from only $59,900!! Unbe-
lievable bargains!! Now,(800)715-5533.

"FORECLOSED GOV'T HOMES" Save up
to 50% or More! Minimum or no down
payment! For listings call novw (800)429-
3660 ext. H 5445.
FREE LAND LISTNorth FlaProperties. Acre-
age, Hunting Land, Residential. (800)294-2313
ext. 2936. A Bar Sales, Inc. A Licensed Real
Estate Co.

STEEL BUILDINGS

BUILDING SALE...No Salesman. Go Di-
rect and Save. Final Clearance. 20 x 26
$2,600.00. 25 x 30 $3,145.00 30 x 40
$4,750.00. 35 x 50 $6,100.00. 40 x 60
$7,800.00.48 x 90 $12,000.00. Others. Pio-
neer (800)668-5422.


TANNING


WOLFF TANNING BEDS. Tan athome.
Buy DIRECT and SAVE! Commercial/
Home Units from$199.00. Low Morthly
Payments. FREE Color Catalog. Call
Today (800)842-1310.


rigitte's 0 Romantic Retreat
European Bed & Full Breakfast


Visit our web site at:
www. tallahassee.net/-ken


Old World hospitality in a quaint
Victorian Setting.
Brigitte Schroeder, Prop
101 Sixth Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
(850) 653-3270


Grand Opening Festivities January 9 from 4-7 p.m.
Music, Refreshments, Merchandise Drawings, Tours

C THE

SSuites GRADY MARKET
in Historic Apalachicola -
i Antiques, Art, Gifts
& Clothing in Apalachicola's
Historic Grady Building


Located in the recently restored Grady .
Building, the Consulate luxury suites
overlook the Apalachicola River.
Two night/weekly.
76 Water Street. Apalachicola, Florida 32320
For Reservanons, contact: Anchor Vacation Propertnes
(800) 624-3964 htp://fla-beach.cuom


76 Wter Street, Apalachlcola. FL 32320
(850) 653-4099


Costin's Bookkeeping Service


Tax Returns A Specialty

Cathy Costin, Owner

200 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850) 229-8581


.


Director Rex Partington with actress-daughter Dixie
Partington in lobby of Dixie Theatre enjoying after-the-show
discussion with some of the theatre-goers, Ms. Mildred
Mirabelle, back to camera left, and Allan and Betty Roberts
at right, who attended the holiday show at the Dixie Theatre
in Apalachicola.


NOTICE OF INTENT TO
AMEND SPECIAL LAW

The Carrabelle Port & Aviation Authority gives notice
of its intention to seek special legislation amending
Chapter 86-464, Laws of Florida during the 1999 ses-'
sion of the Florida Legislature. The short title shall be:
"An Act Amending the Powers of the Carrabelle Port
& Aviation Authority". The substance of the bill is to
amend Chapter 86-464, Laws of Florida, to grant the
Port Authority the exclusive authority to permit dock-
ing, aviation and port facilities within the territory con-
trolled by the Port Authority; to provide for replacement
of Port Authority members by the entity who appointed
that member and to provide for an effective date.

JAMES LYCETT
Chairman, Carrabelle Port & Aviation Authority




Thank You From Refuge House

The Spirit of Christmas truly lives and Refuge House experienced
it through the generous hearts of the Lanark Village American
Legion Auxiliary. These marvelous ladies did not ask if there was
a need, they simply asked how they could meet it. And meet it
they did, with ABUNDANCE. They didn't just wrap gifts, they
adorned them. Their message was clearly LOVE. Many thanks
also to the Bowmans and to Sopchoppy First Baptist Church for
their support and gifts.
And speaking of support, Refuge House is in need of good condi-
tion/working furniture, appliances (large and small), automobiles,
volunteers, especially for gentlemen with trucks available for pick-
ing up and delivering donations.
May this year bring a stemming of the tide of violence in our
community and may it bring a tidal wave of citizens willing to
work for healthy and safe homes. For information regarding Ref-
uge House, its programs, services and needs, call 697-3983.


10th Anniversary Passes With Most

Florida Underground Tanks In

Compliance With Federal And State

Contamination Rules

The deadline has past for owners and operators of facilities with un-
derground storage tanks that are not protected from corrosion. Un-
der Federal rules of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
(USEPA), underground tank owners must upgrade their units. All
tanks containing petroleum and hazardous wastes must be upgraded,
- replaced or closed if they do not protect against spill, overflows and
corrosion. Owners and operators of such facilities installed before
December 22, 1988; were given ten years to comply with federal rules.
Moreover, in addition to Federal requirements, Florida's Department
of Environmental Protection (DEP) is requiring secondary contain-
ment to protect Florida sensitive groundwater resources.
Over the past ten years, about 40,000 tanks have been removed in
Florida. There are 172,489 underground tanks in use throughout
Florida. About 2600 are not in compliance with Federal and State
rules, according to a DEP spokesperson interviewed by the Chronicle
this week. The table below shows the number of underground tanks
in Franklin, Gulf and Wakulla counties. Only four in the three county
area are in need of upgrades to meet Federal requirements. Facility
compliance can only be verified by a physical site inspection.


Tri-County Underground Tanks And Compliance
County Number of Facilities Requiring
Facilities Upgrades to
Federal Requirements
Franklin 43 2
Gulf 54 0
Wakulla 63 2


The DEP advises that consumers may experience some delays or tem-
porary inconveniences from these tank and piping replacement ac-
tivities during the next several months. The protective measures will
help prevent contamination of our current and future drinking water
resources.


Hill "
Where you find the unusual.

Herbs, Incense,

Silver Jewelry, Books

and Other Necessities.

653-CURE
(653-2873)
29 Avenue E
Apalachicola, Florida ,







Page 10 8 January 1999


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


125 Runners from Page 1
masters finisher with a time of
55:59.
Here are the top 20 finishers from
Sunday's race:


1. Tim Simpkins
2. Breeda Willis
3. Lee Willis
4. Bill McGuire
5. David Yon
6. Justin Andrews
7. Doug Gorton
8. Karl Hempel
9. Tim Unger
10. Bobby Taylor
11. Mike Labossiere
12. Ronnie Godwin
13. Matt Minno
14. Slade Ward
15. Francisco Sandoval
16. Bill Hillison
17. Garth Grumme
18. Jay Silvanima
19. Mike Sims
20. David Rigby
In other matters:


33:48
35:44
35:45
36:55
37:06
37:15
37:17
37:19
37:31
37:55
38:27
38:29
38:43
38:45
39:00
39:19
39:58
39:58
40:12
40:25


The Apalachicola track team will
have its first practice on Tuesday,
January 19. "Any kids that want
to do it should come out," said
track coach Hobson Fulmer. For
more information on the track
team call Hobson Fulmer at
937-2510 or 670-8306.


Williams from Page 1


Lycett asked Phillips if, when he
got the job, did he have experi-
ence. She added, I agree with you
that Mr. Williams has a lot of ex-
perience, but the rest of us had
to start somewhere."
Phillips said, "You have to vote
your conscience. I'm certainly go-
ing to vote mine." Cindy Sullivan
remarked, "If we are going to table
this for a month why don't we use
this time to start an election?"
Lycett said "I make a motion to
leave the seat vacant until the
September elections." There was
no second.
Tony Millender said, "I don't feel
it would be good for Carrabelle to
leave it open. We should appoint
someone and whoever that per-
son is, who is appointed, will have
the opportunity to run for that
seat and anyone else who chooses
to will have the opportunity."
Tommy Bevis said, "I would like
the commission to take into con-
sideration that Raymond was in
office and at the most recent elec-
tion, lost the election to someone
else who had no experience, and
the voters voted him out, basi-
cally. First of all I think you need
to give the voters a chance to vote
for somebody. But if you are go-
ing to appoint somebody you need
to take that into consideration."
Mike Robeluck said, "We need to
appoint someone with experience.
The commissioners voted again
with the same result.
Sanborn said, "We can be here all
night." Stan Arnold said, "You
guys are right. You can be here
all night doing this and it's really
a shame, you sit there and do this
and get frustrated. You have done
three or four votesalready and we
know how you stand."
"You have to figure out if you are
going to have an election or leave
it vacant: that's what you are go-
ing to have to decide on." He went
on to say, "You are not going to
break it this way. Somebody is
going to have to break it. You owe
me -I owe you. That's the way it
has been in the past. Soyou all
really need to decide if you are
going to have an election or leave
it open. At this point Fred Massey
said he would withdraw and
wanted his vote to go Williams.
Someone asked "Why is a special
election so scary?" This brought
response from Donald Wood "It's
not scary. It's the time frame. By
the time we could have an elec-
tion, it will be September anyway.
By the time you get the Secretary
of State to set the time, do all the
advertising, get the candidates,
you have to have a qualifying time.
You have to have all these things.
Then you have to have the elec-
tions."
Jim Lycett said, "Change the elec-
tion time to coincide with the na-
tional elections." He cited the fact
there would be more participa-
tion. Phillips asked, "What are you
going to do if somebody runs and
they resign six months after they
have been in office? Hold another
special election?"
Pam Lycett said, "They would
have to sign a blood oath that they
would not resign," There was a
wave of laughter.
Meanwhile, they had voted one
more time. This time the Clerk,
said Walt Worthington, Raymond
Williams, Raymond Williams and
Raymond Williams.
Williams then took the oath of of-
fice and was sworn in by City At-
torney Doug Gaidrey. At the end
of the meeting he accepted the
position of Mayor Tempore.


(181) Florida Hurricanes
and Tropical Storms. Re-
vised Edition 1997, 148 pp.,
Paperback. A comprehen-
sive guide to hurricanes,
tropical storms and near
misses to impact Florida
since 1871. Authors John
M. Williams and Iven W.
Duedall explain
meteorological terms and
demonstrate the use of the
Saffir-Simpson Scale. Sold
nationally for $12.95.
Bookshop price = $9,95.

(217) Rose Cottage Chron-
icles. The civil war letters
of the Bryant-Stephens
Families of North Florida.
Edited by Arch Frederic
Blakey, Ann Smith Lain-
hard and Winston Bryant
Stephens, Jr. These letters
and the narrative are as
fresh and poignant today as
the time they were written,
capturing the heart of ev-
eryday life during the Civil
War. The letters were writ-
ten from 1858 to the
mid1865 by two genera-
tions of the Bryant and
Stephens, ordinary Confed-
erate folk whose members
includes successionists,
moderates, and a few
Unionists. Despite the war,
the letters also tell a love
story in the courtship of
Winston Stephens and Tivie
Bryant. Their married life at
Rose Cottage was nearly
perfect-andbrief. Virtually
all of the letters, more than
one thousand exchanged
between 12 correspondents
survive in this family saga,
a riveting family chronicle
set in the Civil War. Sold
nationally for $34.95.
Bookshop price discounted
to $28.95. 389pp, Univer-
sity of Florida Press, 1998,
Hardcover.


~. :.,
44;S ,S^


THE FEVER X1AN
A Blograpby of Dr njon (orrie


~- r

(192) Vivian Sherlock's bi-
ography of John Gorrie,
The Fever Man, is available
once again after being
out-of-print for more than
a decade. This is the story
of John Gorrie, young phy-
sician who invented an "ice
machine" that many argue
was a forerunner to air con-
ditioning dozens of years
later. His cooling device was
developed to provide relief
to his suffering yellow fever
patients. A museum in
Apalachicola to this day
marks the work of John
Gorrie just across from his
last resting place in Gorrie
Square, down from Trinity
Church. This book tells
what is now known about
Dr. Gorrie, his work and his
ice machine. Paperback,
New, 151 pp. Bookshop
price = $10.00
(186) Perspectives on Gulf
Coast History. Edited by
Dave D. Davis. "A signifi-
cant contribution to our
understanding of South-
eastern Indians...will un-
doubtedly become a land-
mark book." American In-
dian Quarterly. 1984,
379pp, illustrations, maps,
index. Hardcover. Sold na-
tionally for $49.95.
Bookshop price = $37.50.


the Chronicle Bookshop


SMail Order Service *

2309 Old Bainbridge Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303


FLORIDA

LIGHTHOUSES




(183) Florida Lighthouses
by Kevin McCarthy; Paint-
ings by William L. Trotter.
A concise history of
Florida's 30 lighthouses
and one light station. Also
contains maps and dire
ctiors for reaching each
lighthouse along with info
about tours and fees. Pa-
perback, 1990, 134 pp. 30
color illustrations. Sold na-
tionally for $12.95. Book-
shop price = $10.00












(232) Searching For God In
America by Hugh Hewitt.
The companion volume to
the acclaimed public TV
series. Published by Word
Publishing, 1996, Hard-
cover, 515 pp. The history
of the American people is in
large measure the story of
an adventure of faith and
belief. From the Mayflower
Compact to today's awak-
ening of spiritual con-
sciousness, Americans
have always accorded God,
and the search for the eter-
nal, a special place in their
lives and thoughts. This
companion volume offers
one of the most comprehen-
sive recitations of that re-
markable history ever as-
sembled. Sold nationally for
$40.00. Bookshop price =
$21.95.


(233) Neil Simon Rewrites:
A Memoir. Published by
Simon and Schuster and
Colophon, 1996, 397 pp.
Hardcover. Neil Simon's
plays (Barefoot in the Park,
The Odd Couple, Plaza
Suite, the Goodbye Girl, the
Out-of-Towners) and mov-
ies have kept millions of
people laughing for almost
four decades. In Memoirs,
he has written a funny,
deeply touching book, filled
with details and anecdotes
of the writing life and rich
with personal experiences
that underlie his work. Sold
nationally for $25.00.
Bookshop price = $16.95


BOUNCING BA(K
I've Survived Everything...
and I Mean Everything
-and You Can Tool



.M J


(234) Bouncing Back: I've
Survived Everything and
I Mean Everything and
You Can Too! By Joan Riv-
ers. Published by Harper
Collins, 1997, 231 pp.,
Hardcover. A fiercely hon-
est, hilarious and moving
tale of how one of comedy's
stars survived the worst
that life could throw at her.
Sold nationally for $23.00.
Bookshop price = $10.95.


(184) Florida's History
Through Its Places. Prop-
erties in the National Reg-
ister of Historic Places, by
Morton D. Winsberg. A
catalogue of more than 800
historically significant
buildings and sites in
Florida. Paperback, 1997,
158 pp., illustrated. Sold
nationally for $19.95.
Bookshop price = $15.95.








(145) Updated Atlas of
Florida. The 288-page ref-
erence volume, produced by
Florida State University's
Institute for Science and
Public Affairs (ISPA), covers
many other facets of
Florida, including natural
environment, history, cul-
ture, population, economy,
tourism, recreation, infra-
structure and planning,
plus a section on the origin
of place names.
First published in 1982, the
atlas was completely over-
hauled in 1992 with statis-
tics from the 1990 U.S.
Census. The latest revision
is the first since then.
Sold in bookstores for
$49.95. The Chronicle
Bookshop price is $35.95.
KBm. .. W


ATLAS OF


Tlori


(163) It Wasn't .1
Easy, But I Sure H
by Lewis Grizzard.
the book Lewis wa,
ing on when he died
20, 1994. It contain
he thought represer
best of the last decac
writing. Villard
Hardcover, 311 p
nationally for $
Bookshop price = $
jIM B ..^a


I.

-4I'i
Ze -l


(229) Time Present, Time
Past, a Memoir by Bill Bra-
dley. Published by Alfred
Knopf, 442 pp, Hardcover,
1996. Bill Bradley was a
three-time basketball All-
American at Princeton, win-
ner of the Sullivan Award
as the country's outstand-
ing amateur athlete, a gold
medal recipient at the To-
kyo Olympics and a profes-
sional player for ten
yearsmith the New York
Knicks. He was elected to
the United States Senate in
1978, 1984 and 1990.
David McCullough, from
PBS's The American Expe-
rience and an historian,
wrote: "Senator Bill Bradley
has written a marvelous
book. It is thoughtful and
wise, filled with vivid scenes
of turning points in his own
and the nation's life..; It has
been a long time since any
American in public life has
written as valuable a book
as this." Sold nationally for
$26.00. Bookshop price =
$14.95.

I Now Thai I 'I II


7',''


/' -I i ocil


Why Isn't

E vr y t h i n g


I r/ecI 9

I i iE .


(223) Now That I'm Mar-
ried Why Isn't Everything
Perfect? The 8 Essential
traits of couples who thrive,
by Susan Page, author of "If
d I'm So Wonderful, Why Am I
Still Single? Little, Brown
l and Co, 1994, 241 pp,
Hardcover. In her ground-
'"'""'" breaking new book, Susan
Always Pages shows the reader how
(ad Fun to escape from the common
This is marriage myths and
s work- strengthen the actual quali-
, March ties that make for a suc-
ns what cessful long term partner-
ited the ship. Sold nationally for
de of his $19.19. Bookshop price=
Books, $10.95.
p. Sold
20.00.
11.95. (227) Walt Disney's Snow
d1.95. rl5nm .-A +16-


CC WIu

n2
rrt'CPjiric

i~~-AAr


. -- I


LEWIS--R------


r-----------
Ord
Mail Order Dept.
(Please Print)
Your Name
Address
ITown St
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4-5 books .... $4.00 S"
6-10 books... $5.00 ha
Bookshop List of
8 January 1999 To
Amount enclosed by check
Please do not send cash.


WhILe andu ne Seven
Dwarfs: An Art in Its Mak-
ing. This is a Disney Min-
iature book, hardcover,
featuring the collection of
Stephen H. Ison. 192 pp,
1994 by Hyperion, N.Y. This
work describes the process
involved in making Disney's
first animated feature.
Many illustrations are in
color. Sold nationally for
$11.95. Bookshop price =
$6.95.


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ales tax (6% in Fla.)
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handling
total
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All book orders must be ordered on this
completed, please mail this form and yoi
money order to: Franklin Chronicle,
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Sadd sales tax and shipping charges. Incom
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form. When
ur check or
2309 Old
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plete orders


(176) Flexible Sigmoidos-
copy: Techniques and Uti-
lization. Edited by Melvin
Schapiro and Glen A.
Lehman. Hardcover, 227
pp, 1990, Williams and Wil-
liams publishers. A com-
prehensive treatise with a
uniform and appropriate
emphasis on practical con-
siderations, according to
author of the forward, Dr.
Norton J. Greenberger.
Here is the definitive vol-
ume about an apprehensive
and diagnostic procedure
recommended for most men
overthe age of 50, at peri-
odic intervals of 3-5 years.
An important volume that
could save your life. Sold
nationally for $25.00.
Bookshop price = $7.95













1sTheM s d ian i







(218) The Apalachee Indi-
ans and Mission San Luis
by John H. Hann and
Bonnie G. McEwan. Paper-
back, 193 pp, University of
Florida Press, 1998. Now,
the story of Mission San
Luis is brought forward
through the new Florida
Heritage series of books for
the first time. During the
first two centuries of Florida
history, the European
colony was under Spanish
rule. The Spanish Crown
and the Catholic Church
brought European ways of
life to Florida through a sys-
tem of mission settlements.
San Luis was the principal
mission town of Apalachee
Province in the Florida pan-
handle serving as adminis-
trative and religious capital
of a chain of missions
stretching from St. Augus-
tine. Mission San Luis sites
were acquired by the State
of Florida in 1983, and un-
der the ground were the
archeological remains of
this important 17th Cen-
tury town so important to
Florida's history. The park
is now open to the public
in Tallahassee, and this
book, based on the archeo-
logical digs and documents
from Spanish archives, tells
the story of the town and
the native American and
Spanish peoples who lived
together for two centuries.
Sold regionally for $19.95.
Bookshop discount price =
$14.95. Lavishly illustrated
in color.


Please Note
Books from the mail service of the QChronice T- \ .. -and
used, and are .. l e.i ,1 .. i eel ., .' .... t
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will be made, normalb- in 14 lday, ioAk ae shI Min s ri ..i
normally. Some r . . .~ ,. '.. ..
rem ainders orcuWe T'n I li, I 1 .1 '' .s ..r ,i 1, ^ I ... i[, i.- ,1., s.ri,-1
and at these T ,rii-, 11 1,' .,.11 .. .; I, ..,, 1 :., 1 m i,,i r
money will he i .- '1. .-. , .i ., i 'i ..
prices all o1 rers must I r ,, r'..,. an tl d not accept
credit cards.

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