Title: Franklin chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00093
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: August 7, 1998
Copyright Date: 1998
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00093
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text

















-


.1 '-
~ 2' A


p- ~'' ':'


ra

~i ...
.%'


'd


4 4
3;


A T ..


BULK RATE
U. S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA. FL
32320
PERMIT 18


40.


ar


1
F;:
hi --"

-L .~. ~iESi~g~~i


"
Am(


B
: ;~


Published Every Other Friday


franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The move away from paper mills, railroads and pine forests


St. Joe Corporation Begins Transformation To

Real Estate Powerhouse A


Sandra Lee Johnson (left) and Pamela Amato

Johnson Steps Down as

Juvenile Justice


M ziAAChairperson

M -. By Brian Goercke
-_" --'-- ;.; .- :. St -, ".'' .'B" Apa Ia hicola resident Sandra Lee
-*.. .. ... -.- -. -. Johnson has served as chairper-
'.7',-' .; ,,'T-*, ,". .~ "son if Lhe Franklin County Juve-
S- I. .' nile Jl-tice Council for the past
opyit TW a Ic.R fy i t Fir ir n ptitd. lour :yars. At the council's previ-
For subrscnrtion information or to obtain a crpy of the AugustI 1998 issue of Plorida Trend ous meeting in June, she in-
featur;og the article on the St. Joe CororaUion, please call 1-813.892-2643 crsrn t step down from the po-
sition.


The map above depicts the amount of land in Panhandle counties owned
by the St. Joe Corporation.


For St. Joe Corporation watchers, there is a long cover story in the
August 1998 issue of Florida Trend (the magazine of Florida busi-
ness), describing Peter Rummel's challenges to transform Florida's
largest landowner into a real estate powerhouse. Recent history in
this transformation is retold, including the purchase ofArvida, a resi-
dential community builder, the pending purchase of Prudential Florida
realty brokerage, the purchase of a gulf course development com-
pany (Steve Melnyk) and joint-deals with the Codina Group (Miami)
and CNL Group (Orlando), and an interest in a company developing a
chain of football-theme entertainment centers, featuring the National
Football League.
The head of all of these recent activities is chief executive officer of a
"new" St. Joe Corporation, Peter Rummell. The article describes
Rummell in some detail, and updates to some small degree, the plans
of the land-holding colossus that will probably continue to have pro-
found economic, social and perhaps political impact in northwestern
Florida. After all, the roots of the "new" corporation go back to the
mid-1930s, and the acquisition activities of one Ed Ball, confidant,
speculator and buyer for Alfred du'Pont. That history has never really
been told widely, although there are plenty of Ed Ball anecdotes from
been told survivors who still remember him. The impact of the duPont
fortunes, including that of Alfred's wife, Jessee Ball duPont (Ed Ball's
sister), on the northern Florida economy, have also been profound.
The growth of the early phases of the St. Joe Corporation began with
Ed Ball and Alfred I. duPont.
The Alfred I. duPont Trust owns 56% of the common stock in the St.
-Joe Corporation, headquartered in Jacksonville.


Local School Registration
The Guidance Department of Apalachicola High School announced
on August 3, that pre-registration will be held. for all high school stu-
dents next week.
Students and parents should plan on attending the program at sched-
uled times. Information on Bright Futures Scholarships, and course
offerings will be distributed. Also, students will pre-register for classes
at that time. All students should be pre-registered before school be-
gins on Friday, August 14.
Schedule of pre-registration is as follows:
Seniors-Monday 8/10/98-1:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Juniors-Tuesday 8/11/98-8:30 a.m. 10:00 a.m.
Sophomores-Tuesday 8/11/98-1:30 p.m.. 3:00 p.m.
Freshmen-Wednesday 8/12/98-8:30 a:m. 11:00 a.m.
There is NO pre-registration for Middle School students. Schedules
are being prepared based on the survey done in the spring of incom-
ing middle school students,
Pre-registration will be on-going throughout the scheduled times with
new groups starting every half-hour.
The official registration for Apalachicola High School is scheduled for
Thursday, August 13th Middle School students should register be-
tween 8:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. High School students should regis-
ter between 12:30 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Schedules will be distributed
during registration, Students should bring one dollar to pay for their
locker at registration.


St. Joe Closes
Prudential

Florida Realty
Acquisition

The St. Joe Company said on
August 3 that it completed its
acquisition of the assets of CMT
Holdings, Ltd., doing business as
Prudential Florida Realty, the
largest real estate brokerage,
sales and services company in
Florida and the sixth largest in the
United States.
Included in the transaction are
title, mortgage, relocation and
property management subsidies.
The company will remain
headquartered in Clearwater,
Florida, where Prudential Florida
Realty has operated
independently since September,
1990, and originated in 1980 as
Merrill Lynch Realty.
The acquisition gives St. Joe an
established market presence
throughout the southern two-
thirds of Florida; a stable,
experienced management team;
and, an outstanding network of
more than 2,800 full-time real
estate sales agents in 74 offices.
In addition to the real estate
brokerage operation, Prudential
Florida Realty provides title and
mortgage services through its
Sunbelt Title Agency and
Preferred Florida Mortgages
subsidiaries. It has built
international sales and-relocation
divisions to take advantage of
growing migration of business
and individuals to Florida.
St. Joe paid $80 million at clos-
ing and expects to pay approxi-
mately $5 million additional con-
sideration based on the value of
the assets acquired. In addition,
as previously announced, St. Joe
will also pay as much as $20 mil-
lion in deferred payments over a
two-year period, and an additional
$10 million over time, if certain
performance targets are met.


St. George Island resident Pamela
Amato agreed at the June meet-
ing to serve as interim chairper-
son. At the Juvenile Justice
Council's next meeting on Sep-
tember 8, members from the
council will decide whether Ms.'
Amato will become their regular
chairperson for a term of two
years.
Ms. Johnson applauded members
of the community for supporting
Juvenile Justice Council efforts
during her term as chairperson.
She acknowledged that it is not
always an easy task to draw
people together for a common
cause. "I think that pulling people
from the community into the
council and working for the same
cause was the most refreshing
thing," said Johnson.
During her term of service,
Johnson brought adults and
youth members together at the
Franklin County Courthouse in
honor of Juvenile Justice Week .
Community leaders and juvenile
justice advocates gathered at the
courthouse to celebrate the
county's youth. And youth mem-
bers provided banners and musi-
cal accompaniment to the com-
mon cause.
"During National Juvenile Justice
Week," Johnson said, "we were
able to get the kids involved; these
were the kids that we've been
serving and planning projects for.
We got them involved by making
posters, writing poems and other
things."
Ms. Johnson noted that the Love
Center Church in Apalachicola


had been extremely helpful dur-
ing one of the Juvenile Justice
Week events. '"They did a fantas-
tic job for planning that," said
Johnson, "and we had countless
kids that came and received
awards. That was very memorable
for me."
In 1996, the Franklin County Ju-
venile Justice Council began pro-
viding recognition certificates to
those community members who
had been making a contribution
to the county in a variety of ways.
The recognition became known as
the Volunteer of the Month. And
during each monthly meeting, the
council would recognize one or
more individuals from the com-
munity for their selfless contribu-
tions to residents of all ages.
"I realized that there are people
who worked in the community to
make things happen," explained
Johnson, "and they never get rec-
ognized or acknowledged. They're
just comfortable working in the
background. They're called help-
ers, more or less; and I thought it
would be good to bring in some of
those people, acknowledge them
and let them know that we appre-
ciate them and that they do make
a difference."
"I think that getting information
out to the community based on
what we've done is real impor-
tant," Johnson continued. She
extended her appreciation to both
the Apalachicola Times and Fran-
klin Chronicle for their efforts in
reporting important news infor-
mation from the Juvenile Justice
Council.
Some of the community members
that Johnson recognized as being
especially helpful to the council
during her service as chairperson
included Norton Kilbourne, Sara
Dahlman, Cliff Butler, Bill Mahan,
Commissioner Clarence Williams,
Eileen Annie and Pamela Amato.
"Along the line," said Johnson,
"different people have come in and

Continued on Page 9


August 7 20, 1998


Galloway And
Kendrick See
"Crisis" In

School Board
Budget

By Tom Campbell
Last week, Chairman of Franklin
County School Board Will
Kendrick spoke out against a pro-
posed one mill increase on Capi-
tal Outlay in the FY1998-99 Bud-
get. Superintendent Brenda Gal-
loway has recommended a one
mill increase in Capital Outlay.
Chairman Kendrick said, "We al-
ready have $427,066 to spend on
Capital Outlay, repairs, renova-
tions, this type of thing. There is
no need for this one mill increase."
The Chairman said that no spe-
cific need for the increase was
shown.
"Even with one mill increase, it
would not help the General Bud-
get shortage," he said.
Kendrick also pointed out there
is a Fund Balance of $6500, on a
seven million dollar budget." He
explained that personnel and ben-
efits have increased.
"My suggestion," he said, "in re-
gard to accrued leave and sick
leave, was that we make-a line
item for it. Basically, it would
cover us, in event of retirement
or someone leaving the system. If
we don't do this, and the leave
occurs, then our budget is shot."
Superintendent Galloway said, "I
would never make a recommen-
dation without thinking it out
with the Financial Services Direc-
tor (Louis Highsmith). Issues for
safety and renovation of the
schools need to be addressed."
She explained that she is a great
believer in the team effort getting
things done. "We are in a crisis
situation," she said, "but we have
been there since before I got here
(this job). We have been frugal. It's
a fact that Franklin County must
do something for themselves in
education."
She continued, '"This is not a po-
litical agenda. Before February (of
1999), we have tough decisions to
make."
Ms. Galloway said she is genu-
inely concerned about the inan-
cial situation of the county
schools.
She said, "The general concern,
at this point, is the quality of the
learning environment of our
schools Ior the good of our stu-
dents. That is of paramount im-
portance. The real major crisis is
lack of revenue in the General
Fund, which pays salaries of
teachers. The Superintendent and
the Board has the responsibility
,of looking at all the possibilities.
and we are there."
Continued on Page 9


Accident in
Eastpoint

Claims Life
By Tom Campbell
A vehicular accident on Highway 98
in Eastpoint Tuesday, August 4 at
approximately 5:23 p.m. resulted in
a fatality.
Corporal Michael Cross of the Florida
Highway Patrol said, "The accident
involved a white female by the name


of Melissa Cara Brown. P.O. Box 164,
Highway 65, Sumatra. Her date of
birth was 02-10-76. She drove a '98
Ford pickup."
Corporal Cross said that Ms. Brown
was "apparently driving at a high rate.
of speed," eastbound on Highway 98
in Eastpoint. A '94 International truck
tractor with a garbage/refuse trailer
was also headed eastbound in front
of Ms. Brown.
The truck was driven by Mr. Billy Ray
Casey, P.O. Box 62, Ebro. Florida. who
said he was traveling "about 35 to 40
miles per hour."


Apparently. Ms. Brown came up be-
hind the truck tractor and "she
couldn't stop." said Corporal Cross.
She apparently pulled onto the right
shoulder of the highway, trying to pass
the truck on the right, then pulled
back in front of the truck. She appar-
ently pulled back too close in front of
the truck tractor, which resulted in
her striking the right front of the trac-
tor truck. Ms. Brown's truck then
"flipped several times, crossing the
highway." She was ejected, as she was
not wearing a seat belt. Her truck
Continued on Page 3


W il
I ^^e "* ,
I-- _] F .



Gulf View, West Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island.
"Nostalgia" Very unique classic beach cottage located in a cozy
beach view setting. Features include: 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, pine
floors, updated interior with lots of details, Florida room, large
sundeck overlooking the beach, screen porch, nice sized yard with
oak trees and native palm trees, approximately 1,100 sq. ft. of
living space, and more. $160,000 Fully Furnished.


SUNCOAST REALTY


224 Franklin Boulevard
St. George Island, FL 32328
800/341-2021 850/927-2282
www.coldwellbanker.com
E-mail: suncoast@gtcom.net


Bay Front! 323 Cook Street, St. George Island.
"Home Port" This private island residence is located in a picture
perfect setting onApalachicola Bay. Features include: large mas-
ter suite with private bath, 2 guest rooms with common bath,
separate den, office area, large sundeck overlooking water, pri-
vate dock with deep water, and more. Adjacent bay front lot is
also available. MLS#2486 $350,000


Serving St. George Island &
The Apalachicola Bay Area Since 1978
REALTOR'
Al Independenlly Owned & Operated Member 01 Coldwell Banker Real Eslale Cotrpoiatlon


Volume 7, Number 16


IRsdni- Inrie- i


' ,


'r r --4





,i
,
rr


*^


t


i *


t*.-


^


~~-~,"""d
i~Y


-


i


Page 4


Opl

71J~


-~ui1


v


rML. Adlik










Page 2 7 August 1998 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


Langston Lease

Approved; Airport

Contract Tabled

By Rene Topping
The Carrabelle City Commission ap-
proved a short term nine month lease
requested by Gene Langston at their
August 3rd regular meeting. Langston
wishes to use the area slated to be-
come part of the Riverwalk project
next year, to load and off-load lime
rock on a short term nine month lease.
Approval came after a number of citi-
zens raised objections to the lease,
while others rose to praise Langston
as an employer and for donations of
the lime rock to various organizations.
Copies of the contract were passed out
to the commissioners.
Putnal read a letter from Alan Pierce
in which he stated that the descrip-
tion offered in the Carrabelle planning
and zoning book did not specifically
state loading and unloading of lime
rock. However, he said that warehous-
ing was mentioned and if it was de-
clared commercial, the code might
permit the piling of lime rock and then
it could possibly be a use. The City of
Carrabelle acts as its own planning
and zoning commission and also its
own board of adjustment. Pierce said,
the commissions could offer addi-
tional uses to the ones stated in the
code.
Keith Mock said that Langston has
.several people working for him. Nita
Molsbee stated that historically the
area he wished to use had been an
area where barges had been loaded
and unloaded. Dr. Charles Lewos,
M.D. asked, "Wasn't this land pur-
chased by the city for recreational
use?" Mayor Buz Putnal responded
that the lease would not interfere with
the grants or the work on the
Riverwalk. Langston said he would be
all done before work could start next
year on the Riverwalk.
The attorney was questioned as to
whether the city had to ask for bids.
Gaidrey said that Apalachicola city.
who have leased parts of the airport
there, have never bid them out.
Gathena Parmenas, who lives on 30A,
asked Gene Langston, "Is this going
to be a personal lease in your name
or company? I thought it was surpris-
ing that your agenda does not specify
your company name, nor the terms
of the lease. For public information,
we could have been told at least as
much about this, as we did spell out
rip-rap on the next page."
Ms. Parmenas went on, "I would like
to ask approximately how many
trucks, what kind of tonnage, because
we have no big budget for road repair,
and if this truly affects our roads..."
At this point she was interrupted by
several people from the back of the
room. She went on "I am here partly
because I heard there were a number
of trucks with lime rock..." Here
Putnal interrupted with, "You are a
resident of Carrabelle?" "Yes, I am."
She picked up "...going down 30A.
Now this is the road that is designated
to be a bike trail, that has an inter-
section on it I call "slow and danger-
ous." That doesn't have a center line,
That I think would be somewhat in-
compatible with lime rock hauling, if
it constitutes any great number of
trucks going down there each day,"
She went on, "And I don't understand,
on a road that I believe Carrabelle is
responsible for maintaining, why this
would become a truck route rather
than going down 98. Other questions
were about everything from dust to
would the trucks be covered. Ms.
Lycett tried to make a motion to table.
Dr. Lewos said he was a property
owner on 30A and on Marine Street.
He went on to speak about 30A. "It is
used by people for a walking trail and
a bike trail, in town and the state does
repair the highway and I know the city
does not have monies to repair 30A,"
He said he felt that was basically his
concern. He felt that the lime rock
being moved down 30A, did constitute
a problem.


A truck driver who used the road fre-
quently to deliver, said that he had
no problems with passing on the road.
He said log trucks and seafood trucks
use the road regularly. Gene Langston
said that trucks had used the road
for many years. He said million tons
of logs went across on Lake Morality
Road. He added "I'm sorry these
people went out and bought property
on a truck route, but that is what
happens. It has always been a truck
route. It still is a truck route," he
added that trucks pay taxes to repair
and build roads through gasoline and
the tags they have to purchase.
Trish Messick said she had in her
hand a petition that listed 100 people
who objected to the lease. Putnal said
that it had names of people who are
not residents of Carrabelle. She' re-
marked that one man lived in
Eastpoint, but had his business in
Carrabelle. She was concerned about
the lime rock blowing around and
asked if the city had put any condi-
tions into the lease.
Langston said it will not blow around.
as it will only be brought when the
barges are in. He added that he will
water it down. She then asked, "What
is the city getting out of it?"
Sonny Bragdon said "I think you all
have made up your minds," and with-
out another word went down the
stairs. Rhonda Skipper said she would
like to say something about some of
the things Gene Langston has done
for the city. She said he has provided
jobs for local people and'lime rock for
evacuation routes, for Lake Morality
Road, for parking lots at the library
and churches.
Langston said that in return for the
lease, he would give the city 45 loads
of lime rock, worth according to
Langston, $110 a load. He promised
5 per month or money instead. He will
operate only between the hours of 8
a.m. and 5 p.m. Tommy Beavis asked
if the city attorney had read the con-
tract. Gaidrey said that he had not
seen it and Langston gave him a copy.
After the attorney had approved the
lease, the commissioners voted in fa-
vor of the motion made by Philips and
seconded by Wood.
George'and Pat Maier came before the
commissioners with the contract that
had been before the commission on
Thursday, July 30 and had been
changed to reflect the commissioners
wishes. Phillips said that he would not
consider the contract until he had
read it thoroughly, as he had seen the
revised contract as he sat down for
the meeting. The contract had been
faxed to the city on Saturday. August
2. In the end it was decided that the
commission would hear the contract
on August 8 and a vote was taken to
that effect.


,. a



County Adopts

New Land-Use

Ordinances

By Brian Goercke
Over several objections, members of
the Franklin County Commission
unanimously agreed to adopt two new
land-use ordinances, at their August
4 regular meeting.
One of the ordinances, which
amended Policy 2.2 of the Future Land
Use Element, win create a new zon-
ing category entitled Residential Es-
tate Category; this will allow the de-
velopment of one unit per five acres.
The other new ordinance, which
amended Policy 1.3 of the Future Land
Use Element, will restrict residential
densities above one unit per acre to
'the Eastpoint Urban Service Area.
"We already have that density," ex-
plained County Planner Alan Pierce
of the proposed category, "but it's
embedded in our general residential
land use category." Mt. Pierce said
that the Department of Community
Affairs (DCA) did have some objections
to the proposed ordinances.
"They wanted us to protect all wet-
lands," he said, "...but we refused to
do that. The state wanted us to put in
specific locational criteria, making it
adjacent to other residential areas. We
also agreed that wasn't necessary,
considering how little tax base we
have."
Mr. Pierce explained to board mem-
bers that the proposed land-use policy
did not protect those wetlands of the
Corps of Engineers to the same ex-
tent as those belonging to the state.
He also said that the location criteria
in the proposed land-use policy was'
contrary to what the state wanted.
"If you adopt this," said Pierce, "it's
possible that the state will appeal this.
It's possible that they won't, also; but
they have warned me that they don't
like this language and they may ap-
Deal it."
Continued on Page 8


Apalachicola City Commissioners


By Tom Campbell
In a lengthy meeting Tuesday, August
4, the Apalachicola City Commission-
ers heard a request from Sheriff Bruce
Varnes of Franklin County, seeking
conunued support !n the Shenfls De-
partmecnt fight against illen l drugsin
thecodunty: The Corimmissioners vowed
their :.onrti ruing n ygLSE [.
Ms. Karen Davis reported on the suc-
cess of the Battery Park Family Fun
Day, reporting a total of $5,665 in
donations for new equipment. She
asked the Commissioners to consider
a request for matching funds for the
parks efforts, in the budget for fiscal
year 1998-99, which begins in
October.
The Commissioners were cool to an
idea of a city swimming pool, fearing
the costs of liability and upkeep.
Appeals were made to "do something
positive and constructive for the
young people and young adults in the
community." It was agreed there are
problems and that something needs
to be done.


New Chairman For Port Authority


By Rene Topping
Ron Crawford was chosen as the
new chairman of the Carrabelle
Port and Airport Authority (CPAA),
at a special meeting held July 23
at 10 am, at Carrabelle City Hall,
Barry Woods will remain as
vice-chairman.
Members reluctantly accepted the
resignation of their attorney, Ben
Watkins. In a short letter of resig-
nation, Watkins wrote. "In order
to avoid the slightest suggestion
of impropriety or conflict by rea-
son of my ownership interest in
the fixed-base operation at the
Apalachicola Airport and my own-
ership of Carrabelle Properties, I
will be leaving as attorney for the
Port Authority as of the First of
July, 1998. It has been a pleasure
working for you good people. I will
be glad to assist you. on a volun-


tary basis, (for a reasonable
amount of time,) while you look
for another attorney."
The members agreed to place an
advertisement in a local paper, for
another attorney. The salary Is
$250 per month. They also de-
cided to advertise for any one who
would like to join the board and
serve out the remainder of the
term, of the seat vacated by Carol
Adams,
In other business, members ap-
proved a request from Jimmy
Crowder to reduce the amount of
slips already approved for the
waterfront on U.S. 98, from 84 to
78.
The next scheduled meeting of the
Authority is at 10 a.m. on August
13, at Carrabelle City Hall.


Volunteers Needed

Sheriff Bruce Varnes of the Franklin County Sheriff's
Office is seeking citizen volunteers for the Water
Rescue Team. Certified Divers, Dive Masters, Boat
Handlers and Spotters are needed. Please contact
Major Mike Mock at 850-670-4809 or 850-670-8500
for further information.




Carports-Trailers.
Kennels-Screened Rooms Ind 88uses o

Wakulla

Portable Buildings
319 South
Crawfordville, Fla 32327
850-926-8215 850-697-2638
Jerry Mathis or Barbara Snell
NO DOWN PAYMENT
IN A VARIETY OF STYLES, METALS, SIZES & COLORS.


Ms. Virginia Cole requested some help
in resolving a matter concerning her
property on Center Street and Myrtle
Avenue. After lengthy discussion,
Commissioner Van Johnson moved
that the Commissioners investigate
what could be done to help Ms. Cole
meet the requirements standards, so
that she could build on the property.
Mayor Robert Howell said, "If the plans
meet the set-back requirements, then
I see no problem." The motion passed.
Early Childhood Services requested
temporary use of four rooms on city
property, to aid young mothers want-
ing to continue their education. After
lengthy discussion, the request was
approved, contingent on the fact there
would be no conflict of city rental of
rooms, and with clean-up provided by
the Child Care Group.
Reports were heard on the water
projects, BDI update, water improve-
ments, and the Commissioners voted
to suspend a police officer accused of
drug involvement without pay.


VI


Problems

Stop paying for nebulizel medications.

Call Express-Med today.



1- 800 290 6442
Aavertisement

Hate Diets? Try Vinegar to Lose Pounds, Inches
No wonder Ms. Galend is smiling. She found an
eas- %ay to lose pounds without pills, diets or
calorie counting Her seceti? The hcalih) negar
plan '-I dropped 30 powuds so fast i scared ni, "
she writes. Just a few tablesp'cns of vinegar daily,
will have you feeling and looking better as you melt
a'ay unhealthy pounds. For FREE information
packet without obligation, write to: The Vinegar
Plan, Depi. FD2555, 718-12th St. N.., Box 24500,
B' Canton, Ohio 44701. To help us cover printing
and postage, 1S would be appreciated, but not
Als. Jeaine Galend necessary. CI T4 WO FMoiitr~s





PennvysWorth

Thrift Shop Consignment Shop


Re-opening August 18th


ALL FRESH

MERCHANDISE


Tuesday & Wednesday-10:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Saturdays-10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
Corner of 16th & Highway 98
Apalachicola, Florida


A Community Service of Trinity Episcopal Church
L


Simulated Oil

Spill Clean-up

Crucial to Area

By Tom Campbell
Local, State and Federal Agencies
cooperated July 23 in a simulated
oil spill cleanup on the
Apalachicola River. Emergency oil
spill cleanup plans were put to the
test with Department of Environ-
mental Protection's Bureau of
Emergency Response. The site for
the exercise was Bay City Land-
ing and areas to the north of
Apalachicola.
State and federal emergency re-
sponse teams worked with local
representatives from area govern-
ment and businesses to test cur-
rent contingency plans for effec-
tiveness in dealing with such a
spill.
Franklin County Emergency Man-
agement Director "Butch" Baker
said that the.large group of agen-
cies and personnel worked well
together. "Overall," Director Baker
said, "the exercise was a success.
We learned a great deal."' ,
A tabletop discussion took place
in the morning, prior to the field
exercise. The test, on the
Apalachicola River in the after-
noon, examined the feasibility of
blocking with booms, the St.
Marks and East Rivers, to keep
the petroleum products contained
to the main channel of the
Apalachicola River, for easier
recovery.
Dog food and oranges were used
to simulate the oil spill. These
were easily recognized as they
floated on the water, indicating
where the oil slick might be lo-
cated. Proper authorities at the
Department of Environmental
Protection were contacted ahead
of time, to get approval for the use
of dog food and oranges as sub-
stitutes' harmless to the
environment.
Southern Waste Services, the
Panama City cleanup contractor,
was tested as to how long it would
take to reach the site, Bay City
Landing, and begin cleanup op-
erations. Communications among
the various teams involved in the
emergency exercise, were also
tested. VHF radios were used, as
well as cellular phones. Commu-
nication worked well, but broke
down in one area, revealing a need
for a common, independent radio
source to talk boat to boat, like
walkie-talkies.
Departing from Bay City Landing
at about 12:30 P.M., the Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection
C-Hawk, powered by twin out-
boards, was captained by Patrick
Millender, Marine Mechanic with
DEP. The C-Hawk was loaded
with seventeen members of coop-
erating teams in the exercise and
members of the media, including
TV Channel 6 newscaster Jeff
Cunningham and others..
By 1:30 p.m., Environmental Ad-
ministrator Gregory R. Lee stated
that "the boom is in place to pro-
tect the sensitive estuaries of St.
Marks and East Rivers."
The most crucial revelation was
that the sensitive estuaries feed-
ing into the Apalachicola
Bay could be saved in such an
exercise.


An oil spill on the Apalachicola
River could be a disaster because
of death to mullet, grouper, cat-
fish, shrimp, oysters, clams and
other marine animals, fish and
fowl, dependent on healthy estu-
aries.
In a disaster, habitat and feeding
areas for young fish,, shrimp, and
crabs are eliminated.
The oil spill cleanup exercise July
23, insured one way of protecting
the estuaries.
Gregory R. Lee, Environmental
Administrator of the Bureau of
Emergency Response, Division of
Law Enforcement, DEP, said,
"This oil spill exercise is vital to
protect the sensitive estuaries of
St. Marks and East Rivers." He ex-
plained that the boomideployment
was to keep. any oil spill in the
river and out of the estuaries. In
the river, a spill can be limited and
removed. Once an oil spill gets
into the estuaries, the damage can
kill all kinds of plants and fish.
Captain Jerry J. Kichner, P.E.,
Commanding Officer in charge of
Marine Inspection, U.S. Coast
Guatd. Mobile, Alabania, said,.,
"We've boomed rivers.-before, but
every new site is unique. The lo-
gistics here involved how to get
in this area of the Apalachicola
River-how to deploy. You can't
just drive up here. These are is-
lands and estuaries and there
aren't any roads up here. The lo-
gistics of how to get stuff
up here-this was all very
complicated."


Shane Hitchcock of the Emer-
gency Response Program for
E.P.A., said, "Getting on the scene
with proper equipment in such an
emergency, is essential." Air-
planes, helicopters and boats
were used here, today."
Captain Kichner explained, "The
biggest problem here is that it's a
remote area and hard to get
equipment and people in. It's hard
to start an effective response. Try-
ing to get the boom in place to
control the spill was crucial. To-
day, we learned it's probably
about four plus hours to get the
company in Panama City to re-
act-a good company with a lot
of equipment. The biggest prob-
lem is the remote area and get-
ting equipment in. The current is
running faster. The boom can
work in a current of one knot. The
current here is 1-1/2 to 2 knots.
It's tricky. Tributaries can be
blocked by the boom and keep the
oil in the river, where it can be
removed."
The tributaries were blocked
properly in the oil spill cleanup
exercise and the cooperating
agencies learned from the experi-
ence. Franklin County Emergency
Director "Butch" Baker said he
was proud of the cooperation of
everyone involved and considered
the exercise a success.


LUBERTO'S
SAND & STONE INC.

SITE PREP CONTRACTOR
MATERIALS SUPPLIER

LAND CLEARING BUSH HOGGING
CUSTOM PONDS & DRIVEWAYS
FILL DIRT LIMEROCK BUILDERS SAND
COMPOST TOPSOIL CYPRESS MULCH
PALM TREES ASSORTED STONE & GRAVEL
RIVER ROCK CRUSHED GRANITE ETC.
CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
850 670 8143
153 HWY 98 EASTPOINT FL





PUBLIC COMMENT
State of Florida
Department of Environmental Protection

The Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Facili-
ties, is soliciting public comments on an application for a coastal con-
struction control line permit submitted by LGR Investment Fund, L.P.,
pursuant to Chapter 161.053, Florida Statutes, and 62B-33, Florida Ad-
ministrative Code.
This application is for the construction of a new county road CR-370,
removal of existing road and construction of 4 driveways, parking lot for
public beach access, "middle" road for lot access, seaward of the con-
trol line. Project address: County Road 370 (Bald Point), Alligator Point.
Plans for this proposed project are available for public inspection at the
office of the Bureau of Beaches and Coastal Systems at 5050 West
Tennessee Street,'Building B, Tallahassee, Florida, from 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m.
This public comment notice is being distributed in order to assist the
Department of Environmental Protection in developing facts on which
to base a decision on the permit application. For accuracy and com-
pleteness all comments should be submitted in writing with supporting
data, evidence, or rationale to furnish a clear understanding of the ba-
sis for the comments. The decision as to whether a permit will be is-
sued will be based on an evaluation of: (1) The design adequacy of the
proposed construction. (2) The expected impact of the proposed con-
struction to the beach/dune system. (3) The expected impact of the
proposed construction to adjacent properties. (4) The expected impact
of the proposed construction on lateral public beach access. (5) Appro-
priate siting of the proposed construction with respect to local setback,
zoning restrictions, and maximum usage of upland portions of the prop-
erty. (6) The expected impact of the proposed construction on nesting
sea turtles and hatchlings and their habitat.
Comments should be sent to the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection, Bureau of Beaches and Coastal Systems, 3900 Common-
wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 300, Tallahassee, Florida 32399 within
14 days of this notice, and should refer to File Number FR-571.


Check for our
"TPR"
L (Temporary Price RedUction)
SPECIALS
Son every aisle of our stores!

Sc^ Rose Street Sopchoppy
962-2231
Prices good from August 6 to August 15, 1998
MEAT:
Boneless Beef Sirloin Steak .............. $1.99 Ib.
Lean Ground Chuck ........................... $1.59 Ib.
Lee's Smoked Ham Shank or Butt ...... $ .99 lb.
Wilson Jumbo Franks-16 oz ............... $ .89

GROCERY:
Lipton Family Tea Bags-24 ct............... $1.79
Parade Bath Tissue-4 roll................... .... 690

CLIP CLIP CLIP CLIP CLIP CLIP CLIP
r ----------------.---. I

I This coupon redeemable for I

1 FREE 12 pack Pepsi

I Product with a $25.00 I

grocery order (excluding
tobacco products).
I Good from August 6 through I
I August 15, 1998.
L--- ---------------- -
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAA


" I








Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 7 August 1998 Page 3


EDITORIAL AND COMMENTARY


Lack of Competition in State

Races Highlights Need for

Amendment 11

The high number of uncontested seats, as well as races, that will be decided
in the party primary, point to the need to pass Amendment 11 this fall, ac-
cording to Common Cause Florida. The nonpartisan citizens' lobbying organi-
zation made its assessment after reviewing the list of legislative candidates,
who qualified for the ballot last week.
When Florida voters go to the polls this fall, they will face few choices among
state legislative candidates. In both House and Senate, large numbers of can-
didates face no opposition. Many other legislative seats will be decided in the
Democratic or Republican primary, effectively disenfranchising thousands of
voters who cannot cast a ballot in the primary. The lack of competition in
these races highlights the need to pass Amendment 11 in November.
Amendment 11 would establish fair ballot access for all candidates in Florida.
One reason for the current lack of competition is that Florida law makes it
virtually impossible for independent and minor party candidates to get on the
ballot. Although those registered with minor parties or as independents com-
prise 15% of the electorate in Florida, no minor party candidate qualified for
any legislative seat and only two independents may qualify-pending certifi-
cation of the required number of petitions.
Current Florida law allows a Democratic or Republican candidate to qualify'
for the ballot by paying a fee or by petition. Under the petition method, a
major party candidate must submit signatures from 3% of his or her party's
registered voters in the district of the office sought.
By contrast, a minor party candidate or an independent has much tougher
requirements. That candidate must pay the filing fee and submit petitions
with the signatures of 3% of all the registered voters in the district-many
times more signatures than required of Democrats and Republicans. This
blatantly discriminatory requirement has meant that minor party and inde-
pendent candidates rarely get their names on the ballot.
Under Amendment 11, the requirements for a minor party candidate or an
independent would be no greater than the requirements for a candidate from
the party with the largest number of registered voters. The amendment was
placed on the ballot by the Constitution Revision Commission.
The amendment would also allow more people to vote when a race is to be
decided in the party primary. Under existing law, only those registered with a
political party may vote in that party's primary. The amendment provides that
when only one patty fields candidates in a race, any elector can vote in the
primary for that office. This provision effectively enfranchises thousands of
Floridians and ensures that candidates will represent all of their constitu-
ents-not just those with the controlling votes in their own party.
"Amendment 11 gives more people a voice in our elections," said Sally Spener,
Executive Director of Common Cause Florida. "It's a way of enhancing demo-
cratic participation in the state."
According to the list of qualified candidates released by the Secretary of State's
office, 11 of 21 senate races have only one candidate. Similarly, in the House,
out of 120 races, 50 candidates will be elected without opposition. Passage of
Amendment 11 should mean greater competition for office in the future, as
more candidates would be able to qualify.
Additionally, 3 senate races and 22 House races will be decided in the party
primary this year. The one-party races are nearly evenly divided between Demo-
crats and Republicans. Under Amendment 11, in future years all voters in
those districts would be able to have a voice in choosing their elected officials.
Amendment 11 would affect not just legislative elections but other elections
as well, such as those for county or statewide office. Other provisions of the
amendment would allow a gubernatorial candidate to wait until after the pri-
mary to select a running mate, mandate nonpartisan school board elections,
and provide for campaign spending limits and public campaign financing for
statewide races.

Franklin County Schools Calendar
1998-99
August 10. 11, 12,13 .................... Teacher Planning
August 14 School Opens (1st day-students)
September Labor Day (no school)
September 24 End 1st 6 weeks
October 2 Report Cards
October 12 No School
November 5 End of 2nd 6 weeks
November 5 (Report Cards-November 13)
November 11 Veterans Day (no school)
November 26-27 Thanksgiving Holiday (no school)
December 18 End of 3rd 6 weeks
December 18 (Report Cards-January 13)
December 18-January 3................ Christmas Holiday (no school)
January 4 Teacher Planning
January 5 School resumes [students return)
January 18 MLK Holiday (no school)
February 15 Presidents Day
February 17 .. End of 4th 6 weeks
February 26 Report Cards
March 4-5 Teacher Inservice Days
April 1 End of 5th 6 weeks
April 2-9 Easter Break (no school)
April 12 School resumes (students return)
April 16 Report Cards
May 27 AHS Graduation
May 27 Adult School Graduation-Apalach.
May 28 CHS Graduation
May 28 Adult School Graduation-Carrabelle
May 28 End of 6th.6 weeks
May 28 Last day of school
May 31 Memorial Day (teachers off)
June 1-3 Teachers Post Planning
June 14 Summer School starts
June 28 End of 1st Semester
June 29.. Beginning of 2nd Semester (SS)
July 15 End of 2nd Semester (SS)


.v oR POST OFFICE BOX 590
S EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
850-927-2186
oN 850-385-4003 (TALLAHASSEE)
"pios Facsimile 850-385-0830
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 7, No. 16


August 7, 1998


Publisher .. .................. ..... Tom W. Hoffer
Contributors ..................................... ... Tom Campbell
............ Sue Riddle Cronkite
.......... Brian Goercke
............ Bonnie Segree
........... Aaron Shea
........... Rene Topping

Sales .................. ......... ............... Jonathan Capps
........... Pam Rush
Advertising Design
and Production......................................... Diane Beauvais Dyal
.......... Jacob Coble
Production Assistant ................................ Stacy M. Crowe
Copy Editor and Proofreader .................... Tom Garside
Circulation ......................................... James Andrew
.......... Larry Kienzle
Citizen's Advisory Group
George Chapel .................................... Apalachicola
Sandra Lee Johnson ................................. Apalachicola
Rene Topping ........................................ Carrabelle
Pam Lycett ..................... ................... Carrabelle
David Butler .......................................... Carrabelle
Pat M orrison ........................................... St. George Island
Dominic and Vilma Baragona ................. St. George Island
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung ..................... Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins ................. Eastpoint
Anne Estes .................... ................... W akulla
Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue would
cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the Chronicle
for price quotes if you seek several different or similar
issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 1998
Franklin County Chronicle, Inc.


Statewide

Donor

Coalition

to be

Launched


Florida's donor programs have joined the National Coalition on Do-
nation to provide a unified voice about the critical need for trans-
plantable organs, tissues, and eyes. The message "Share Your Life.
Share Your Decision." is delivered by one of the world's most recog-
nized spokespersons, Michael Jordan. The Florida Coalition on Do-
nation was formed to motivate Floridians to: make a positive decision
about donation; join the statewide registry as a donor; and contrib-
ute to the Florida Organ and Tissue Donor Education Fund.
More than 1,600 Floridians and 60,000 Americans await an organ
transplant; tens of thousands await tissue and eye transplants; yet
ten people die every day in the United States because of the inad-
equate supply of organs and tissues. This shortage is not the result of
an unwillingness to donate; rather, it is due in part to the lack of
.family discussion about donation. To build awareness, the Florida
Coalition on Donation is announcing "Michael Jordan Days" in twelve
driver license offices throughout the state, beginning July 28 through
September 30. Eventually, every driver license office will be targeted.
According to Charles McCluskey, chairman of the Florida Coalition
on Donation, "We are pleased to provide Michael Jordan posters to
persons who designate 'organ and tissue donor' on their license, and
contribute to the statewide donor education trust fund. Mr. Jordan
graciously agreed to provide his name and likeness to materials pro-
moting organ and tissue donation."
McCluskey adds, "Sharing the decision to be an organ and tissue
donor with family members is just as important as making the choice
to donate."
The Florida Coalition on Donation's founding members include: Cen-
tral Florida Lions Eye and Tissue Bank; Central Florida Tissue Bank;
Florida Lions Eye Bank; LifeLink of Florida; LifeLink of Southwest
Florida; LifeLink Tissue Bank; Medical Eye Bank of Florida; North
Florida Lions Eye Bank, Inc., TransLife; TransLife Tissue Bank, Uni-
versity of Florida Organ Procurement Organization (OPO), University
of Florida Tissue Bank, Inc.; and University of Miami OPO. The Coa-
lition welcomes participation and support from other interested par-
ties. For more information on the Florida Coalition on Donation, please
call (toll free) 877-FL SHARE.


URGENT

Senior Citizens in

Our Community

Need Your Help!!!

We need volunteers to deliver meals
on wheels. Only one hour a week
or month to deliver, and what a help
you'd be to our seniors in our com-
munity. The volunteer hours can be
used towards the Share Program.
Please call Franklin County Senior
Citizens Office, 697-3760 or
697-3792.


Accident Claims Life
Continued from Page 1

flipped two cars parked at C and S
Service on the north side of the high-
way and struck a pine tree in midair.
Her vehicle damaged two vehicles in
the. parking lot, flipping over them.
Those cars were owned by Olympic
Motors, but parked on C and S prop-
erty.
Homicide investigator. Corporal
George Bedingfield with the Florida
Highway Patrol investigated. Ms.
Brown was pronounced dead on the
scene, where she had been thrown
from her vehicle.


Imaginative Comedy 'Sylvia' At Dixie Theatre


From left, Maureen McCarthy, Dixie Partington, Tim Sheridan (in one of three roles he
plays), and Charles Leader in the comedy "Sylvia," playing at the Dixie Theatre, 21 Avenue
E, Apalachicola through August 16.


By Tom Campbell
The imaginative comedy "Sylvia"
by A.R. Gurney opened the Inau-
gural Season July 31 at the Dixie
Theatre, 21 Avenue E in
Apalachicola, with an all-star cast
that lifted the roof with laughter.
A funny situation involving a mar-


riage ana a stray dog, the play in-
volves actresses Dixie Partington
(Sylvia) and Maureen McCarthy
(Kate) in a fascinating battle for
the affections of actor Charles
Leader (Greg). It is a deliciously
frustrating tangle for any'hus-
band and father, and the audience
enjoys the fray.


THE MARKET STREET



EMPOR IUM

Open: Monday Saturday 10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
75 Market Street Apalachicola (850) 653-9889


Browse in a relaxed atmosphere. We offer
the ultimate shopping experience. We fea-
ture local artists and crafts, collectibles, and
a wide variety of souvenirs. There's some-
thing for everyone in the Emporium, from
antiques to local T-shirts.

Visit us at www.homtown.com


Each of the actors displayed a
good sense of timing, and the poi-
gnant moments, when they came,
were genuinely moving.
Maureen McCarthy as the jealous
wife was perfect and charming.
Charles Leader's performance as
the husband and father, torn be-
tween his loving wife and pet, was
outstanding. Dixie Partington's
fine acting in a difficult role, was
delightful, enhancing an already
fun-filled play.
In Shakespeare's time, a young
man often played a young woman
very effectively. The same was
true here. Actor Tim Sheridan
deftly handled three characters;
Torn, Phyllis and Leslie. It's hard
to imagine any performer more
flexible, as he allowed the char-
acters to lead him in extending his
comic flair in three different di-
rections.
Director Fred Chappell, visiting
guest artist from Florida State
University, kept the whimsical
play bubbling along at a fast boil.
Adult language was toned down,
so that nobody needed to be
shocked, but could appreciate the
stray dog.
The staff and the Dixie Theatre
Association managed a
smooth-running show. Technical
Direction and Lighting Design by
Tim Frost and Production Stage
Manager Agnes Albright are su-
perb. The ghosts of Dixie Theatre


UI


SPa. pol. ad. -Paid for and approved by the
campaign account of Jimmy G. Mosconls. (Dem.)


Re-Elect for County Commission District #4

Jimmy C.


osconis

4 Aav eAea d ite4 AIA Q4 ci Viio &7a 4 9 & at4 te
When the hospital was about to close and Franklin County residents
were facing the life and death choice of going out of town for major
medical care... Jimmy rolled up his sleeves and went to work.

Now, because of his leadership and vision, the George Weems
Memorial Hospital is under new management and the care there is
better than ever. His commitment to the people might well be the
difference between life and death for someone you know.


Chairman
Williams:
Commissioners
to Hold Millage
Rate to
"Probably 7.35"
By Tom Campbell
Franklin County Board of Com-
missioners Chairman Raymond
Williams said last week that a bed
tax proposal for the county, which
was brought before the Commis-
sioners by Mr. Donnie Wilson, was
being researched by County At-
torney Al Shuler. A bed tax would
produce revenue for the county
and has proved successful in
other counties.
Chairman Williams said the Com-
missioners were awaiting a report
from Attorney Shuler. "A bed tax,"
said Chairman Williams, "would
have to be used to promote tour-
ism, parks and recreation, in
some way. It may be used for ac-
quisition and operation of conven-
tion centers, sports stadiums,
tourist promotion, conventions,
tourist bureaus, fishing piers,
museums, parks and nature cen-
ters."
Asked if he thought this might
include the Camp Gordon
Johnston Museum, he said he
thought it might. "As long as it
promotes tourism," he said.
Also included may be the St.
George Island bridge project,
tourist related piers and fishing
piers.
'To keep taxes low," he said, "we
need to look at all the possibili-
ties. Development needs to pay its
own way. Local taxes should not,
in my opinion, pay for develop-
ment."
The County Commissioners are
showing good fiscal responsibility,
according to the Chairman. "We
have lowered the millage rate con-
sistently over the last four years,"
he said. "This year the millage rate
will probably be about 7.35."
He also mentioned the Grand
Opening of the new Health De-
partment Building in Carrabelle
August 12, 1998. "We're proud of
this," he said.
As an update on the prison con-
struction, Chairman Williams
said they closed on the property
and are working on construction
documents for the work site, and
utilities, and will be putting in for
environmental permits in August.
By October, bids should be al-
lowed for work to begin.

had fun on this inaugural night,
promising many more zestful oc-
casions.
Don't miss "Sylvia" at the Dixie
Theatre. Performances are sched-
uled through August 16. Box Of-
fice phone is (850) 653-3200.


Church Needs
Donations For
Yard Sale!

If your home is bulging at the
searits, why not share some
of your used, but still usable,
items with the St. George Is-
land United Methodist
Church, which will hold its
annual gigantic indoor yard
sale on Saturday, August
29th.
Holiday crafts will also be
available at the sale, which
will begin at 8:00 a.m. and
last until 4:00 p.m., in the
cool, air conditioned comfort
of the Church's Fellowship
Hall, located at 201 E. Gulf
Beach Drive on St. George Is-
land.
Proceeds from the sale will
benefit the Church's Building
Fund. Your tax deductible do-
nations will be greatly appre-
ciated! For pick-up of items,
or drop-off or other informa-
tion, please call Shirley
Hartley at 927-3154 or Frank
Latham at 927-2981. Then
mark your calendars to come
a-shopping on August 29th!


E --.- -w- '.


I








Page 4 7 August 199' The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


Battery Park Family Fun Day vf

Raises $5,600+ f


By Tom Campbell


Over 1.000 attended the Battery
Park Family Fun Day in
Apalachicola, July 25. The
fundraiser for the "Apalachicola
Parks Fund" was a big success,
raising a total $5,665.50. All pro-
ceeds go toward new playground
equipment in Battery Park.
Ms. Karen Leigh Cox-Dennis
helped organize the event. Ms.
Dennis said, "I could not be more
pleased with the success of the
event. All the children had fun.
and the music and food donated
by Southern Builders Supply As-
sociation and Big River Industries
were appreciated and added to the
success.
About 3 p.m., Superintendent of
Franklin County Schools Brenda
Galloway welcomed the crowd
and wished everybody a good day
of family fun. She read a short
poem titled, "How Do You Teach
a Child?" She later said, "I hope
this will become an annual event.
because it brings together fami-
lies and friends."
Cajun cooking, games and con-
tests for all ages were featured.
Included were old-fashioned fish-
ing, bobbing and tossing.
Face-painting was a highlight.
The Mullet Toss was a favorite,
along with the hands-on exhibit,


I


~f~

.. i'


8;l~i~Ei~$C~~=r -;=s---r pI
.n, i ih/ :u;o~

F? I
tl
...
;~F;

_t.l
,r-
-. --. r


sponsored by Apalachicola Na-
tional Estuarine Research Re-
serve, Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection. In the
tank available for kids to handle,
were stingrays, horseshoe crabs,
hermit crabs, cow fish, sand dol-
lars, scallops, sea horses, sea ur-
chins, and more.
Any adventurous kids, if they
wanted to, could also touch and
handle a Gray Rat Snake. Two
Gulf Coast Box Turtles, among
other creatures, were on display.
One of the demonstrators, Erik
Lovestrand, explained that it
seemed like about a thousand
kids had been by the exhibit. An
enthusiastic youngster about six
years old proudly said, "I came by
the most times-about 30."
Educational information and col-
oring books were available, in-
cluding "Aquatic Preserves Are
Exceptional" and bumper stickers
proclaiming, "Keep Sea Turtles in
the Dark-Minimize Beach Light-
ing in the Summer."
Among the winners of the Mullet
Toss were: Katie Thomas in the
9-12 year division (63.3 feet);
Micah Rapack in the 12 year di-
vision (105 feet, 10 inches); and
Bradley Vaughn (8 years) who won
his division, but couldn't remem-
ber how far he threw the mullet.
At 7:45 p.m., according to an-


U.S. Coast
Guard
Auxiliary
Offers
Opportunities
By Tom Campbell
One of the exhibits at the Family
Fun Day at Battery Park in
Apalachicola July 25 was theU.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary.
Mr. John R. Champion and
Deborah Myers were in charge of
the exhibit. He is owner of
Champion's Marine and Heavy
Equipment Repair on St. George
Island.
They were enthusiastic, about op-
portunities in the Auxiliary. The
theme of their exhibit was "Be Part
of the Action -- Join the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary."
Ms. Myers said, "The Coast Guard
Auxiliary is a volunteer service
organization. We volunteer time,
talents, boats, radios, and air-
craft. We are given special train-
ing in order to work effectively
with the Coast Guard."
The Coast Guard Auxiliary has
35,000 volunteers nationally.


Franklina



Choncl


Beachfront

Elegance


Southern Cross,
St. George Island


I L fjl mII-II -vs.-" '. A Home by
IlI ,1..I William Solburg






Southern Cross, St. George Island, Florida. Spectacular Gulf front view combined with old world
quality craftsmanship. Custom woodwork made from centuries old cypress. Copper roof, elevator,
distinctive tile work, custom doors, Andersen windows. This new, custom built beach home has
3,200 square feet of heated and cooled spacious living area encompassing four bedrooms and four
baths. Built on a one-acre lot, this William Solburg masterpiece features large decks and a pan-

oramic view of the Gulf. $1,195,000.


S Resort Realty of
Prudential St. George Island


800-974-2666
850-927-2666


123 Gulf Beach Drive West St. George Island, FL 32328
An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.


j1"F. ,
t~ -


They are active on waterways and
in classrooms in over 2,000 cities
and towns nationwide.
Each year, Auxiliarists save "al-
most 500 lives and assist some
25,000 vessels in distress," ac-
cording to Mr. Champion. They
conduct more than 290,000 cour-
tesy examinations on recreational
vessels, and teach over 500,000
students in boating courses.
Ms. Myers said, "Our purpose is
to promote safety and to effect
rescues on navigable waters."
They also foster wider knowledge
of, and compliance with, the laws,
rules, and regulations governing
the operations of motorboats and
yachts.
Mr. Champion said, "We welcome
friends, neighbors and interested
folks to attend one of our flotilla
meetings. our meetings are held
at the Emergency Management
Center located at the Apalachicola
Airport."
The next meeting is scheduled for
August 18 at 7 PM. For more in-
formation, contact Ms. Deborah
Myers or Mr. John Champion at
(850) 927-3552, or Flotilla Com-
mander Royal Scott at (850)
697-4548.










t S
ILand civiocu


8.00%APR*

Fixed Rate For First Six Months


Marine
Fisheries
Commission
STATE OF FLORIDA

Saltwater Fishing
Rules Approved

MFC Schedules
Fort Myers Meeting
& NE Shrimp

Workshop
The Governor and Cabinet has
approved a number of important
saltwater fisheries management
rules and rule amendments pro-
posed by the Marine Fisheries
Commission. In other action, the
Commission has scheduled a
public meeting September 9-11,
1998 at the Sanibel Harbour Re-
sort, 17260 Harbour Pointe Drive,
in Fort Myers (please see the en-
closed meeting agenda). The Com-
mission has also scheduled a
public workshop to receive com-
ment on the management of the
shrimp fishery in northeast
Florida, including live bait
shrimping and closed areas. The
public is encouraged to partici-
pate at this workshop, which will
take place on Friday, August 14,
1998 from 1:00-3:00 p.m. at the
Atlantic Beach City Hall, 800
Seminole Road, in Atlantic Beach.
Information regarding the Gover-
nor and Cabinet rule approvals
and the Commission's upcoming
meeting topics is provided below:

Governor/Cabinet
Action

Shrimp Trawl-By
Catch Reduction
Devices Rules
These rules, which are intended
to reduce the unnecessary killing
and waste of finfish incidentally
harvested as bycatch during
shrimping operations in Florida
waters, require a legal, function-
ing bycatch reduction device
(BRD) to be installed and used in
all otter trawls rigged for fishing,
by food and live bait shrimp pro-
ducers, in all state waters. These
rules also prohibit the rigging or
altering of BRI's installed in
trawls, in a manner that would
Continued on Page 7


FOR QUALTIY SERVICE YOU CAN DEPEND ON...CALL


fflvG VLL
A/C HEATING REFRIGERATION
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
SALES SERVICE* INSTALLATION


Stop by our office at
25 Island Drive in
Eastpoint for informa-
tion on all major
brands of HVAC
equipment, ice
machines and air
purification systems.


1850-670-4890 1-888-578-4890 1


RSES
CERTIFIED
TECHNICIANS


24 HOUR
EMERGENCY
SERVICE


RADIO
,DISPATCHED
VFHIC.I F.S


ENVIRONMENTALLY
SAFE CONTRACTORS
WE RECOVER REFRIGERANT


STATE
LICENSE #
CAC057156


10.00%APR-

Current Standard Variable Rate After Six Months


*For Credit Limits of $30,000 or more


No Origination or Annual Fee

Primary Residence Only

Interest May Be Tax Deductible

Easy as Writing a Check wEDER

Member FDIC. Subject to Credit Approval. Rates are subject to change without notice. Gulf State Community Bank Home Equity
Line of Credit is a variable rate based on Prime Rate as published by the Wall Street Journal. Introductory APR may vary based on
Prime minus .50% for the first six months. After the first 6 months the Standard APR applies and varies based on Prime plus 1.50'%.
Maximum APR 17.75%. Consult your tax advisor regarding the deductibility of interest. Initial and Standard Rates increase to
9.00% and 11.00% on Credit Limits under $30,000.


On Highway 98
StjlOA' 1!051H 2 ; alif R in Eastpoint
Open 24 Hours

tip d(,g 4' 670-4000

-... .-=- ...- Fresh Seafood
Di'- Daily Luncheon
Specials

Thick, juicy, char-grilled western steak
and assorted side items.
Specialty celebrity desserts, delicious: Pecan Pie,
Carrot Cake, German Chocolate Cake.

'8f(AFREfH 'JEAFOO

UR Tt Homemade Gumbo
____ ___ ___ ____ ___ ___Cooking

Escape to Beautiful
Apalachicola East Bay
Just 5 minutes to Historic Apalachicola
and to magnificent St. George Island Reasonable Rates
i Daily*Weekly*Monthly


L odge Motel & Marina Approved
P.O. Box 606 Eastpoint, Fla. 32328
Phone (850) 670-8423 RV Hookups


GULF STATE

Community

BANK


NOW FEATURING

The


Home Equity



Line of Credit


I I b- I I I


nouncer Chuck Spicer, "The
World Championship of Oreo
Cookie Stacking" was witnessed
by over 200 cheering spectators.
The exciting result was a tie be-
tween Megan Platt (5 years old)
and Casey Schuyler (4 years).
They managed to stack a total of
17 Oreo cookies (each) in two min-
utes. Supposedly they were free
to eat them after the stacking, if
they wanted. They were excited to
be the "World Champions." Many
observers were heard saying they
wanted to eat some of the Oreos.
One observer noted that every-
body was having a good time, "just
like an old-fashioned hometown
fair, where the simple games,
imaginative and well-organized,
are fun for everybody."
Apalachicola City Commissioner
Van Johnson said the Family Fun
Day was a big success and "at-
tracted well over 600."
Any person or corporation inter-
ested in making a donation to
"Apalachicola Parks Fund" may
contact Ms. Karen Dennis at (850)
653-2168.
Recently, Ms. Dennis said that the
City of Apalachicola Council had
agreed on a proclamation that the
"third weekend in July will be
Apalachicola Parks Beautification
Day," making the Family Fun Day
an annual event.


S- ,.
I1
~, >m=








Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 7 August 1998 Page 5


Second Circuit

Court Report

The Honorable Judge F.E. Steinmeyer
Assistant State Attorney Rachel Chesnut
Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval
July 20, 1998


All defendants are innocent of the charges listed below until proven otherwise
in a court of law.

ARRAIGNMENTS
Frederick "Scooter" Estes, Jr.: Charged with one count of Dealing in Stolen
Property, the defendant pled Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer con-
tinued the case for case management on August 17. The defendant was ap-
pointed the services of the public defender.
According to the probable cause report, Apalachicola resident Michael Shiver
reported that a VHF radio had been stolen from his truck on May 8 1998. Mr.
Shiver reported that he went to the home of his neighbor. Mike Anderson, to
inquire as to whether he had seen anyone around his vehicle during the time
of the alleged theft.
While at Mr. Anderson's home, Shiver allegedly noticed that his VHF radio
was on the sofa in his neighbor's home. Mr. Anderson allegedly reported that
the defendant sold the radio to him for $45. Another witness. Dennis Waltman,
alleged that the defendant attempted to sell the VHF to him.
Amanda Whiddon: Charged with one count of Grand Theft, the defendant
pled Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case
management on August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Pub-
lic Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant was arrested on June 8
by Officer Joseph Ham of the Carrabelle Police Deoartment for allegedly steal-




',A


QUALITY WOI


GEN. CONTRACTOR
NO: RG005076:
ROOFING CONTRACT
NO: RC0051706


RK JOHN'S REASONABLE RATES
CONSTRUCTION
of Franklin County, Inc.
Remodeling & Custom Homes
Roofing & Repairs
Vinyl Siding
John Hewitt
850-697-2376 OWNER
R LIC.
OR LIC 106 St. James Avenue CARRABELLE
S P.O. Drawer JJ Carrabelle 32322


GARLIC ENVIRONMENTAL
ASSOCIATES, Inc.
.. SERVING FLORIDA'S COASTAL AREA
"ii SPECIALIZING IN ENVIRONMENTAL
6.-' ". s REGULATORY ISSUES INCLUDING:
.. Wetlands regulatory permitting and
development feasibility
assessments;
S Environmental site assessments
and audits;
SMarine construction including
Smarinas, piers anid shoreline
protection
48 AVENUE D P.O. BOX 385
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329-0385
r -.-- (850) 653-8899 FAX (850) 653-9656



For. Sale
Large rock for erosion control, breakwaters
and rock sea walls. Rock delivered and placed.
Call Larry Craft, 403 Woodville Hwy.
Crawfordville, FL 32327
Mobile (850) 545-7863 Home (850) 421-6907




VOTE FOR AND ELECT

ARTHUR "RED" DAVIS, JR.

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT #4


















Red's wife is the former Billie Faye Crum. Their
sons are Dan and Clint Davis, and their daughter
is Kelly Turner.

Red has owned and operated Red's BP since
January 1979. He served in the U.S. military for
38 years and is now retired. Red is a former
school board member and a past President of the
Jaycees.

The "Red" Davis family has been involved in
seafood for 55 years and continuing. He has been
a financial contributor to the Share program and
Franklin County Seafood Workers Association.
He has served in the Franklin County Sheriffs
Department Reserve and Auxiliary (school
dances, football games, graduation, etc.). He has
sponsored the Franklin County School Board
Scholarship Award.
Pd. Pol. Ad reviewed by the campaign account of Arthur
"Red" Davis, (Dem.).


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU












Zirinitp

850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:00 A.M.


ing approximately $400 from Carah Whiddon. The defendant had allegedly
taken the money from Ms. Whiddon's bedroom.
Brian Anderson: The defendant has been charged with one count of Aggra-
vated Battery on a Pregnant Victim. Information has not yet been filed in this
case. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for arraignment on August 17.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly grabbed his
wife (Toni Anderson) by the throat and pushed her while at their residence in
Eastpoint on June 13, 1998. Deputy Tony Sapp of the Franklin County Sheriffs
Department was dispatched to the residence: he interviewed the defendant.
following the alleged incident.
"When I arrived at the address," he reported, "Brian (Anderson) told me that
she (Toni Anderson) would probably tell us that he had hit her or something
to get him in trouble." Deputy Sapp reported that he observed red marks on
the throat of Ms. Anderson. who was reportedly seven months pregnant at the
time; she was later taken to Weems Memorial Hospital by ambulance.
Cynthia Richeaux: Charged with two counts of Uttering.a Forged Check, the
defendant pled No Contest to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the
defendant Guilty and sentenced her to 60 days in the Franklin County Jail
with credit for 37 days of time served. Judge Steinmeyer also sentenced the
defendant to three years of probation and ordered her to pay $275 for court
costs. As a condition of probation, the defendant will be screened, evaluated
and treated for -substance abuse. The restitution amount in the case will be
determined at a later date.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant was arrested at Red's
BP Station in Apalachicola on June 13, 1998 for allegedly stealing checks
from her mother (Ann Sundberg) and cashing them. The defendant allegedly
cashed two checks in the amount of $45 and $55 from the account of Ms.
Sundberg. The defendant also allegedly cashed another stolen check from the
account of Melton Strickland in the amount of $45.,
Rufus Polk: Charged with one count of Battery on a Pregnant Victim, the
defendant pled Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for case management on August 17. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly struck his
girlfriend (Jackie Chastain) on the right check and left eye on June 21. 1998.
Deputy Tony Sapp of the Franklin County Sheriffs Department reported that
the victim had an abrasion on her check: he also reported that her left eye was
bruised and bloodshot. Witnesses Doris Chastain, Sarah Chastian and David
McAnally alleged that the defendant struck the victim, who was reportedly
five months pregnant at the time.
Donald Lilley: Charged with one count of Resisting an Officer with Violence
and DUI Involving Property Damage, the defendant pled Not Guilty to the
offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on Au-
gust 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff
Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant was arrested on June
7, 1998 after colliding with another vehicle. Officer Jonathan Riley with the
Carrabelle Police Department reported that the defendant "insisted that we
arrest him."
Officer Riley further reported that the defendant then resisted arrest by pull-
ing away from officers as they attempted to handcuff him. "We put him on the
ground to cuff him." Riley reported, "and he tried to roll over and take the
cuffs from us with only one (handcuff) attached to his wrist."
Riley alleged that the defendant allegedly drew his hand back in an attempt to
strike at the officers on the scene. "He was then sprayed with O.C. Spray and
detained," Riley reported. "On the way to the jail," he concluded, "the defen-
dant hit his head on the shield of my car and had a knot on his head and a
small cut."
Wade Dixon, Jr.: Charged with one count of Burglary of a Dwelling and Lewd
& Lascivious Act in the Presence of a Child, the defendant pled Not Guilty to
the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on
August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff
Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly broke into a
home and attempted to force a female resident to have sex with him. The
victim ordered the defendant to leave her residence, after the defendant had
allegedly pulled his underwear and shorts down to his ankles and asked her
to have sex with him. According to the report. "He then ran to the front door
and she picked up a broom and hit him with it." The defendant allegedly
informed the victim that she could not hurt him, but that he could hurt her.
The defendant reportedly had blood on his clothing and scrape marks on his
body when he was arrested shortly thereafter.
Michael Richardson: Charged with one count of Possession of Cocaine with
Intent to Sell and Possession of Cannabis with Intent to Sell, the defendant
pled Not Guilty to the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case
management on August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Pub-
lic Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, officers received a search warrant on
June 29, 1998 to search a room at the Best Western Apalach Inn in
Apalachicola, which was registered to the defendant. Officers allegedly dis-
covered $$6.500 in U.S. currency, nine-small bags of cannabis, a plastic bag
with 42 pieces of crack cocaine and two one-fourth ounce bags of cannabis.
The estimated cost of the drugs seized totaled $2,700.
Danny Dillon, Jr.: Charged with one count of Dealing in Stolen Property, the
defendant pled Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for case management on August 17. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly gave a stolen
microwave oven to Ms. Margaret Ward. The defendant allegedly asked that the
price of the microwave be deducted from money he owed Ms. Ward. After
reviewing the numbers on the appliance, it was later determined that the oven
had been stolen from Taylor's Building Supply in Eastpoint.
Michael Campbell: Charged with one count of Battery on a Law Enforcement
Officer, a written plea of Not Guilty was filed on behalf of the defendant by
Assistant Public Defendei Kevin Steiger. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case
for case management on August 17.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly struck Cor-
rectional Officer Randell Cook repeatedly in the side of the head on June 26,
1998: the defendant had been serving time as an inmate at the Franklin
County Jail during the alleged incident. Officer Cook reportedly suffered a
nose bleed, but did not require medical treatment.
Brian Myers: Charged with one count of Sale of Crack Cocaine, the defendant
pled Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case
management on August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Pub-
lic Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly sold a large
rock of crack cocaine to a confidential informant on May 13, 1998 for $50
while in Carrabelle. Prior to the controlled drug purchase, audio surveillance
equipment had been placed in the confidential informant's vehicle by Investi-
gator Jep Smith and Lt. Robert Shiver of the Franklin County Sheriffs
Department.
Andre Rosier: Charged with one count of Sale of Crack Cocaine and Posses-
sion of Cocaine with Intent to Sell, the defendant pled Not Guilty to the of-


Tourists Welcome!
Early Sunday Check-Out Time?
9:30 a.m. Worship Check-In (St. George)
11:00 a.m. Worship Check-In (Eastpoint)
St. George Island United Methodist Church
201 Gulf Beach Drive
Eastpoint First United Methodist Church
Route 65/Patton Drive at David Street
No advance reservations required. Phone: 670-8875.


inantufiiu'rers of
Home Elevators
& Dumbwaiters

0 \0 ; / /


Nationwide
Distributors

Factory
Direct
Prices

For More Information

Call 850 926-6022 or

1-800-832-2004


Handicapped
Accessible

Accomuiodales
State CC#041 Mos Wheelchairs



FOR SALE
ST. GEORGE ISLAND deep water canal front 4BR/2.5BA home, wraparound
porch with views of Gulf and Bay, dock, boat lift, launch. $289,000.
APALACHICOLA- Historic District corner lot, 3BR/2BA, income producing,
1920s home with lots of character. $89,500.
MOTIVATED SELLER-MAGNOLIUA BLUFF- Tarpon Shores 1.65 acres. North
Bayshore Drive. Cleared, high and dry, well. Zoned R-1.$37,500.
APALACHICOLA DOWNTOWN Historic sponge exchange [c. 1836] on two
corner lots overlooking river. 1500 sq. ft. building, prime location. $420,000.
CARRABELLE COMMERCIAL Half city block (5 lots) with house on Hwy. 98
next to IGA. Prime location. $300,000.
APALACHICOLA HISTORIC DISTRICT- Best building site, 7th Street, high
ground overlooking city marina, bay. $79,900.
ST. GEORGE ISLAND 2BR/2-1/2BA, fully furnished, gulf front townhome,
Unit G-3, 300 Ocean Mile. $219,500.
RANEY GUEST COTTAGE Multiple commercial use possibilities. Historic
Apalachicola at its best. $179,500.
ONE ACRE HOMESITES Hammock Shores and Indian Mound Shores
subdivisions, bay front and bay views, protective covenant. From $25,900.
CARRABELLE Frame 2BR/1BA Bungalow, central heat/AC, wood floors,
fenced yard, screen porch, 403 Tallahassee Street. $49,000.
APALACHICOLA Owl Cafe, prime commercial corner with 2 upstairs
apartments. $525,000.
APALACHICOLA- 2 story 4,000 sq. ft. renovated old post office building. 75
Commerce Street. $450,000.
APALACHICOLA BAYFRONT 2 story 2,800 sq. ft. turn-of-the-century home
west of town. Fine living, lovely breezes and views, garare, workshop.
$350,000.





(850) 653-8330
P.O. Box 666 17 1/2 Avenue E Downtown Historic Apalachicola


'-^^/ 0-rL*850-653-3600
Adult Medicine and Family Practice 122 Marke
Do You Suffer from Osteoarthritis of the Knees?

Does Degenerative Joint Disease Cause Your Knees to Ache & Swell?
If you answered yes to either of these questions, We Have The Answer.

A new therapy is now available for these problems and RAMIREZ MEDICAL is the first and only place
in Franklin and Gulf Counties where you can receive this therapy.

Call RAMIREZ MEDICAL at 653-3600 to schedule an appointment and find out if
this new and innovative therapy is right for you.


I -


senses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the'case for case management on August
17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report. Major Ronald Crurn. Major Mike Mock
and Captain Chester Creamer served a search warrant on July 3. 1998 to the
residence of the defendant, which was located in Carrabelle. Officers allegedly
discovered eight large pieces of crack cocaine, digital scales, a box of 9nmn
Winchester cartridges, a H-ugvarana 6-shot revolver and $279 in U.S.
currency.
Michael Hill: Charged with one count of Sale of a Controlled Substance and
Cultivation of Cannabis, the defendant pled Not Guilty to the offenses. Judge
Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on August 17. The de-
fendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly sold $140
worth of cannabis to a confidential informant on June 20. 1998 while in
Carrabelle. Prior to the controlled drug purchase, a hidden audio surveillance
device was placed on the informant's person.
According to another probable cause report, officers with the Franklin County
Sheriffs Department served a search warrant to Dewayne Braswell and the
defendant on July 3. 1998 at their residence in Carrabelle. Officers allegedly
discovered two cannabis plants, plastic bags containing both cannabis seeds
and residue, two cannabis smoking pipes, a Jennings 22 semi-automatic pis-
tol and a special light used to facilitate the growth of cannabis in the
residence.
Travis Hill: Charged with one count of Principal to Sale of Cannabis. Posses-
sion of Cannabis with Intent to Sell. Cultivation of Cannabis. Possession of a
Firearm During the Commission of a Felony. Possession of Less Than 20 Grams
of Cannabis and Possession of Drug (Paraphernalia). the defendant pled Not
Guilty to the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case manage-
ment on August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public De-
fender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly led a confi-
dential informant, who had asked to purchase one ounce of cannabis during
a controlled buy. to the home of Michael Hill on June 20. 1998.
According to another probable cause report, officers from the Franklin County
Sheriffs Department served a search warrant to the defendant on July 3.
1998 at his residence located in Carrabelle. Officers allegedly discovered three
cannabis plants, a baggie containing cannabis. cannabis seeds, drug para-
phernalia and a firearm.
John Burks: Charged with one count of Sale of a Controlled Substance. Pos-
session with Intent to Sell Cannabis, Cultivation of Cannabis and Possession
of Drug Paraphernalia, the defendant pled Not Guilty to the offenses. Judge
Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on August 17. Informa-
tion has not yet been filed in this case. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly sold $40 worth
of cannabis to a confidential informant on June 23. 1998 while in Carrabelle.
Prior to the controlled drug purchase, an audio recording device had been
placed on the informant's person by members of the Franklin County Narcot-
ics Unit. Officers were allegedly able to detect the voice of Cynthia Gray during
the controlled drug purchase operation. According to a probable cause report.
Investigator Jep Smith noted that Ms. Gray also occupied the home of the
defendant.
Continued on Page 6


RESIDENTIAL


ELEVATORS, INc.








Page 6 7 August 1998 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


Second Circuit Report Continued from Page 5
According to another probable cause report, officers with the Franklin County
Sheriffs Department served a search warrant to the defendant at his resi-
dence in Carrabelle on July 3. 1998. Officers allegedly discovered a bag con-
taining cannabis stalks, cannabis seeds & residue, a pair of scales and $725
in U.S. currency.
Cynthia Gray: Charged with one count of Principal to Sale of Cannabis. Pos-
session with Intent to Sell Cannabis. Cultivation of Cannabis and Possession
of Drug Paraphernalia, the defendant pled Not Guilty to the offenses. Judge
Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on August 17. Informa-
tion has not yet been filed in this case. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Richard Sutcliffe: Charged with one count of Sale of a Controlled Substance.
the defendant pled Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for case management on August 17. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly sold $40 worth
of cannabis to a confidential informant on June 25. 1998 while in Carrabelle.
Prior to the controlled drug purchase, an audio surveillance device was placed
on the informant's person by members of the Franklin County Narcotics Unit.
Everette Barrack: Charged with one count of Sale of a Controlled Substance.
Possession of Crack Cocaine with Intent to Sell, Possession of Less than 20
Grams of Cannabis and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. the defendant pled
Not Guilty to the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case man-
agement on August 17. Information has not yet been filed in the case. The
defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly sold $40 worth
of cannabis to a confidential informant on June 26, 1998 while in Carrabelle.
Prior to the controlled drug purchase, an audio surveillance device was placed
on the informant's person by members of the Franklin County Narcotics Unit.
According to another probable cause report, officers from the Gulf and Franklin
County Sheriffs Departments served a search warrant to the defendant on
July 3. 1998 at his residence in Carrabelle. Officers discovered several bags
containing cannabis and cannabis plant stems.
Thomas Wright: Charged with one count of Sale of a Controlled Substance,
the defendant pled Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for case management on August 17. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly sold $40 worth
of cannabis to a confidential informant on June 26. 1998 while in Carrabelle.
Prior to the controlled drug purchase, an audio surveillance device had been
placed on the informant's person by members of the Franklin County Narcot-
ics Unit. The voice of Christie Sloan was allegedly heard on the audio tape
during the controlled drug purchase operation.
Christie Sloan: Charged with one count of Principal to Sale of Cannabis, the
defendant pled Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for case management on August 17. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.


Register Number 019990




aFOSmR CONSULINGt
Computer Ilardware & Software
SOffice Supplies
Authorized 360 Cellular Dealer -
Pagers 8 Accessories

Gift items Gift Bags Art & Craft Supplies
Original Swiss Army Knives Electronics
Toys Reading Glasses School Supplies

31 Avenue E Apalachicola 653-9800
-. .--------.---------


Judy's Fashion Corner, Etc.
Name Brand Apparel at Discount Prices
The Latest Styles


Dewayne Braswell: The defendant has been charged with one count of Pos-
session of Crack Cocaine and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Information
has yet to be filed in this case. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for ar-
raignment on August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Jeff Duval.
James Gordon: Charged with one count of Burglary of a Conveyance, the
defendant pled Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for case management on August 17. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly entered a
boat owned by George Rakel known as the Boston Whaler on July 3 1998 with
the intent to commit the offense of theft or some offense therein.
Anthony Croom: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sexual
Battery by one in the Family or Custodial Authority. Information has not yet
been filed in this case. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for arraignment
on August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender
Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly fondled and
had intercourse with a 14 year old family member at his residence on June 3.
1998. The defendant allegedly threatened to kill the victim and members of
her family if she told anybody about the occurrence. The victim claimed that
this activity has continued for approximately three years.
Henry Martin: Charged with one count of Attempted Burglary of a Dwelling.
Battery on a Law Enforcement Officer and Violation of Domestic Violence In-
junction, the defendant pled Not Guilty to the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for case management on August 17. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly attempted to
break into the residence of Teresa Martin on July 6. 1998. Officers at the
scene noted that the windows of the home had allegedly been broken and that
the telephone wires leading to the residence had been torn out.
The defendant allegedly kicked out the window of a patrol vehicle while being
taken to the Franklin County Jail. The defendant also allegedly kicked officers
as they attempted to further restrain him.

PRE-TRIALS
James Amison: The defendant has been charged with one count of Uttering a
Forged Instrument and Aggravated Battery. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for case management on August 17. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Willie Baucham: The defendant has been charged with one count of Resisting
Arrest with Violence and Petit Theft. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
case management of August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant
Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Ricky Anderson: The defendant has been charged with one count of Burglary
of a Structure. The defendant pled No Contest to the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer
adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced him to 120 days in the Franklin
County Jail with credit for 72 days of time served.
Judge Steinmeyer also sentenced the defendant to two years of probation and
ordered him to pay $275 for court costs. As a condition of probation, the
defendant will be evaluated, screened and counseled for substance abuse.
Judge Steinmeyer further ordered that the restitution amount, which will be
paidto Dennis Jones, be made a condition of the defendant's probation. The
actual restitution amount will be determined at a later date. The defendant
was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Michael Slade: The defendant has been charged with one count of Grand
Theft. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on August
17. The .defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Gerald Brannen: The defendant has been charged with one count of Battery
on a Law Enforcement Officer and Battery. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for pretrial on August 17. The defendant was represented by Attorney
Alfred Shuler.
Fred Brown: The defendant -has been charged with one count of Sale of a
Controlled Substance. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case man-
agement on August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Jeff Duval.
William Cargill: The defendant has been charged with one count of Attempted
Sexual Battery and False Imprisonment. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case
for trial on September 16. The defendant was represented by Attorney Howard
Schumacher.
Billy Dalton: The defendant has been charged with one count of Grand Theft
of a Motor Vehicle. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case manage-
ment on August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public De-
fender Jeff Duval.
Daniel Davis: The defendant has been charged with one count of Diverting or
Misappropriating Funds and Uttering a Forged Instrument. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for trial on September 16. The defendant was represented
by Attorney Michael Shuler.
O.C. Davis: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sale of Crack
Cocaine and Grand Theft. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case man-
agement on August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Jeff Duval.
Robert Dean: The defendant has been charged with two counts of Burglary of
a Dwelling and one count of Grand Theft. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for case management on August 17. The defendant was represented by
Attorney Barbara Sanders.
George Fletcher: The defendant has been charged with one count of Battery
on a Law Enforcement Officer and Resisting Arrest with Violence. The defen-
dant pled No Contest to the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer withheld adjudication
and sentenced the defendant to two years of probation. As a condition of pro-
bation, the defendant will be evaluated, screened and treated if necessary for
substance abuse. Judge Steinmeyer also ordered the defendant to pay $200
for court costs. A restitution amount will be determined at a later date. The
defendant was represented by Attorney Lee Meadows.
James Golden: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sale of
Cannabis. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on
August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff
Duval.
Noah Goodson: The defendant has been charged with one count of Cultiva-
tion of Cannabis. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case management
on August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender
Jeff Duval.
Jason Harrell: The defendant has been charged with one count of Felony
Battery involving Great Bodily Harm and Resisting Arrest without Violence.


Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on August 17.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
William Johnson: The defendant has been charged with one count of Second
Degree Murder. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case management
on September 14. The defendant was represented by Attorney Lynn
Thompson.
Katina Joseph: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sexual
Act with a Child Under 16 Years of Age. A written plea of Not Guilty has been
filed on behalf of the defendant by Attorney Barbara Sanders. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for case management on August 17.
Alma Marks: The defendant has been charged with one count of Cultivation
of Cannabis and Possession of more than 20 Grams of Cannabis. Judge
Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on August 17. The de-
fendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Alvin Marks: The defendant has been charged with one count of Cultivation
of Cannabis and Possession of more than 20 Grams of Cannabis. Judge
Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on August 17. The de-
fendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Cliff Massey: The defendant had been charged with one count of Dealing in
Stolen Property. This case has been dropped by the State of Florida. A report
of Nolle Prosequi. which was filed on July 16. noted that the case could not be
proven beyond a reasonable doubt. The defendant was represented by Attor-
ney Gordon Shuler.
Kim Miller: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sale of Can-
nabis. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on August
17. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
John Nowling: The defendant has been charged with one count of Resisting
an Officer with Violence. The defendant failed to appear for his court appoint-
ment. Judge Steinmeyer issued a capias for the defendant's arrest for failing
to appear.
Patricia Nowling: The defendant has been charged with one count of Battery
on a Person 65 Years of Age or Older. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
case management on August 17. The defendant was represented by Assistant
Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Mark Rhodes: The defendant has been charged with one count of Aggravated
Battery involving Great Bodily Harm. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case
for trial on August 18. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Jeff Duval.
Kenneth Rucker: The defendant has been charged with one count of Retali-
ating Against a Witness. Third Degree Criminal Mischief and Violation of an
Injunction for Protection. The defendant was found Guilty by jury trial on July
22. Thejury deliberated for 35 minutes before bringing in a verdict of guilty as
charged. The defendant will be sentenced on August 17. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Jimmy Shiver: The defendant has been charged with one count of Posses-
sion of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon and Discharging a Firearm in Public.
Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case management on August 17.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Timothy Stewart: The defendant has been charged with one count of DUI.
Driving with a Suspended License and Violation of Probation. The defendant
pled No Contest to the offense of Felony Driving while License Suspended or
Revoked. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to 15 months in the Department of Corrections with credit for 214 days
served. Judge Steinmeyer reduced all outstanding court costs to a civil judg-
ment. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Troy Wood, Jr.: The defendant has been charged with one count of Grand
Theft of a Motor Vehicle and Petit Theft. The defendant pled No Contest to the
offenses. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to two years of probation. As a condition of probation, the defendant will
be evaluated, screened and treated for substance abuse. Judge Steinmeyer
also ordered the defendant to pay $275 for court costs. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Mitchell Yander: The defendant has been charged with one count of Aggra-
vated Assault. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for August 17. The de-
fendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Gerarld Kent, Sr.: The defendant has been charged with one count of Aggra-
vated Assault on a Law Enforcement Officer. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for case management on August 17. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.

VIOLATIONS OF PROBATION (VOP)
Jessetta Dalton: The defendant has been charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer
Continued on Page 7


...no matter where you are-
ours is a service you can trust.

KELLEY FUNERAL HOME

KELLEY-RILEY FUNERAL HOME
serving all of Franklin County
653-2208 697-3366


"1

MARKS


INSURANCE


AGENCY, INC.





I Insiipann




WRITING:
Home, Auto, Life, Business, Marine,
Bonds and Other Lines of Insurance


Writing All Lines of Insurance Since 1930

"Insure To Be Sure"


See us for your insurance needs at:
61 Avenue E
Apalachicola, Florida 32320
850-653-2161 800-586-1415

II


~P0
IT 0








S
The WISTL STO
isnwbaki


CHARLIE'S LOUNGE & PACKAGE
Open until 12:00 p.m. Sunday Thursday Open until 2:00 a.m. Friday & Saturday
Drive Thru Package
Tuesday: 8 Ball Tournament ... 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday: Line Dancing...... 7:00 p.m.
Thursday: 9 Ball Tournament .. 8:00 p.m.

Happy Hour
Monday Thursday 5:00 7:00 p.m.
Dancing-D.J. L
Friday & Sat. 9:00 p.m. 2:00 a.m.

NO COVER CHARGE
Highway 98 e Eastpoint, FL 670-8207


Re-Elect Will S. Kendrick for School Board, District 2

"Let's Keep Proven Leadership Working For Us"

Over 20 Years of Banking/Finance
* School Board Member 12 Years Experience
Apalachicola State Bank Vice-Presi-
* School Board Chairman 6 Years dent
* Immediate Past President of Board of Directors, Franklin County
Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce ,Senior Citizens Council, Inc.

* Member of Carrabelle Methodist 1978 Graduate of Carrabelle High
School
Church 1981 Florida Supervisor Academy,
* Member of Carrabelle Lions Club University of South Florida
SMember of Masonic Curfew 1990 Florida School of Banking,
* Member of Masonic Curfew
University of Florida
Lodge #73
Lodge #73 Age 38, married (Connie), two children
(Sterling, age 13; Jonathan, age 9),
both attending Carrabelle Schools
Pd. Pol. Ad-Paid for and approved by the campaign account of Will S. Kendrick, (Democrat)


Y Y









Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


* 7 August 1998 Page 7


MFC Continued from Page 4
render the BRD nonfunctioning or
ineffective. BRDs that currently
meet the legal specifications of
these rules include the Florida
Finfish Excluder and the Large
Mesh Extended Funnel BRDs.
The rules also include language
expressing the Commission's in-
tent that a process of expedited
rulemaking (as provided in the
Administrative Procedure Act)
shall be employed to allow the use
of new BRDs that are approved
and certified for use by the Na-
tional Marine Fisheries Service.
These rules were approved by the
Governor and Cabinet on June
24, 1998, reaffirmed on July 14,
1998, and will take effect on Au-
gust 17, 1998.

Red Snapper Rule
Amendments
These rule amendments, which
are consistent with federal provi-
sions:
- reduce the recreational bag limit
for red snapper from 5 fish per
day. to 4 fish per day (including
captain and crew, on for-hire ves-
sels)
- modify the federal commercial
license requirement in the reef
fish rule, to correctly reference
new Gulf red snapper commercial
limited entry permits
These rule amendments were ap--
proved by the Governor and Cabi-
net today and take effect on Au-
gust 17, 1998.

Black Drum Rule
This rule, which allows shore fish-
ermen who possess a valid salt-
water products license with a re-
stricted species endorsement to
harvest the commercial limit for
black drum, was approved by the
Governor and Cabinet today and
takes effect on August 31, 1998.

Sale Prohibition of
Undersize Fish Rules
These rules, which prohibit the
sale of undersize cobia, bluefish,
flounder, sheepshead, and triple-
tail, were approved by the Gover-
nor and Cabinet today and take
effect on August 31, 1998.


Fort Myers
Commission Meeting


Snook Rule-Final
Public Hearing
The Commission will hold a final
public hearing on proposed
amendments to the snook man-
agement rule. These amendments
would establish a statewide mini-
mum/maximum size limit of
26-34 inches for snook, eliminate
the allowance of 1 fish over the
maximum size limit, and prohibit
the captain and crew on for-hire
vessels, from retaining the snook
bag limit.

Reef Fish Rules-Final
Public Hearing
The Commission will hold a final
public hearing on proposed reef
fish rule amendments that would:
- provide an automatic closure of
state waters to Gulf recreational
red snapper harvest when federal
waters close to such harvest (af-
ter 6 weeks prior notification of
the projected closure)
- modify black and gag grouper
management in Atlantic state
waters only, by establishing a 2
fish daily recreational bag limit
(within the 5 fish daily aggregate
limit for all groupers), increasing
the minimum size limit from 20
to 24 inches total length, and pro-
hibiting the harvest and posses-
sion in excess of the recreational
bag limit as well as purchase and
sale of black and gag grouper dur-
ing March and April'
- increase the minimum size limit
on black sea bass from 8 to 10
inches total length statewide, es-
tablish a 20 fish daily recreational
aggregate bag limit on black sea
bass in Atlantic state waters only,
and require escape vents on sea
bass pots statewide
- establish a 10 inches total length
minimum size limit for white
grunts statewide
- establish a 14 inches total length
minimum size limit and a 5 fish
daily recreational bag limit for red
porgies, and prohibit the harvest
and sale in excess of the bag limit
and all sale of red porgies in
March and April (these provisions
would apply in Atlantic state wa-
ters only)
- require that all reef fish species
(including all snappers, groupers,
sea basses, wrasses, grunts, por-
gies, triggerfishes, and amber-
jacks) be landed in a whole con-


edition, and designate all these
species as "restricted species"
- standardize commercial closure
language in Commission reef fish
rules- prohibit all possession of
Nassau grouper
- specify that the I fish daily rec-
reational bag limits for speckled
hind and Warsaw grouper are
within the 5 fish aggregate daily
grouper bag limit

Southwest Florida
Seasonal Shrimp Trawl
Closure Rule-Final
Public Hearing
The Commission.will hold a final
public hearing on a proposed rule
that would extend a federal sea-
sonal shrimp closure off south-
west Florida, into adjacent state
waters in the region.

Mullet Rules-Final
Public Hearing (if
requested)
The Commission will hold a final
public hearing, if requested, on;.
proposed mullet rule amend-
ments that would designate mul-
let as a restricted species state-
wide and prohibit the possession
and sale of mullet taken in illegal
gill or entangling nets.

Tarpon Tag Rule-
Final Public Hearing (if
requested)
The Commission will hold a final
public hearing, if requested, on a;
proposed rule that would set the
total number of tarpon tags al-
lowed to be sold during the July
1 June 30 license year at 2,500
(with 1,250 tags reserved for fish-.
ing guides).

Mullet/Gear
The Commission will receive a
stock assessment of the mullet
fishery and a report on mullet/.
gear public workshops recently
conducted. The Commission will
also receive scientific and public
comment and consider manage-,
ment options regarding various
gear and mullet fishing issues,
including cast net/entangling net
possession, mullet trip limits,
seine bunching, vessel lengths,
and the use of bridge gaffs.

Continued on Page 9


0 m e *








Apalachicola State Bank is a proud contributor to
the Gulf Coast Community College Honors Plaza
Endowment Campaign because we believe in the
value of higher education.


We believe in looking at the big picture.


SAs a major corporate partner to the new Franklin/
Gulf County GCCC campus; we're committed to
supporting higher education and the promise it
holds for our children and our community.


Apalachicola State Bank.
Service, commitment and the rest is history...






APALACHIC. LR
STATE BAN K* 1897

Man Office 22 Avenue E. Apalachicola FL 850 653-8805 FAX 850 653-2232
Carrabclle 850 697-4500 Easlpoinl 8.O 670-850 1 ,
,-.-i SI George Is.land 850 927.2561 FDIC "


Workshop Explores Illegal Dump Sites

in the County


.Wods and fnite illegal dumed at te Apalac la A rt ea.
White goods and furniture illegally dumped at the Apalachicola Airport area.


Members of the Keep Franklin
County Beautiful Committee
(KFCB) conducted a workshop on
July 22 to explore various av-
enues in resolving the problem of
illegal dumping in the county.
Representatives of several agen-
cies including the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protec-
tion, the Florida Department of
Transportation, The Florida Ma-
rine Patrol and the Franklin
County Sheriffs Department at-
tended the meeting.
Four illegal dump sites have been
targeted for clean-up by commit-
tee members of KFCB. Those sites
include:
S1. Twin Lakes in Eastpoint
2. Eastpoint Waterway
S3. Apalachicola Airport
4. Camp Gordon Johnston Parade
Grounds in Lanark Village.
At the workshop, those in atten-
'dance identified the various litter
scattered on the four sites.
Members determined that some
of the litter in the Twin Lakes area
included white goods, tires, aban-
doned vehicles, boats, motors,
plastic buckets and house trash.
Some of the trash identified at the
Eastpoint Waterway included
abandoned boats, trailers, mo-
tors, petroleum products and con-
tract materials.
Atthe Apalachicola Airport, it was
determined that white goods,
tires, car batteries and abandoned
vehicles were the main items of
trash at the area. Those items
identified at the Camp Gordon
Johnston Parade Grounds in
Lanark Village included white
goods, tires, boats, motors and
car batteries.
Frank Feliciano with the Florida
Department of Environmental
,Protection' stated that he hoped
*to attract members of the commu-
nity to help clean up the illegal
dump sites and maintain their
cleanliness.
"At DEP," explained Feliciano, "we
have an organized approach to
these large problems. It's called
environmental problem solving.
'And what we do is get members
from the community and mem-
bers from other agencies to get
involved and come up with ideas
to resolve the problem." He ad-
vised, "cleaning up the dump sites
and maybe arresting a few people
is not going to be the answer."
Members at the workshop then
identified a number of problems
that have contributed to the con-
tinuation of illegal dumping; those
problems included:
1. A tradition of illegal dumping
on unauthorized sites.
2. A lack of deterrence from en-
forcement agencies prohibiting il-
legal dumping.
3. A failure to monitor the reoc-
currence of dumping on sites that
have been cleaned up.
4. A lack of public knowledge on
dumping laws and consequences.
5. A lack of accessibility to legal
diump sites.
6. A lac k of concern for illegal
dumping.,
7. A failure of land-owners to help
prohibit dumping on their sites.
Some of the solutions proposed to
the noted problems included:


1. Monitoring the number of new
dump sites.
2. Monitoring law enforcement
inquiries regarding dump sites.
3. Monitoring the number of ar-
rests for illegal dumping.
4. Generating local initiatives to
promote education on the matter.
5. Collaborating with civic groups,
churches and governmental agen-
cies on the matter.
6. Constructing fences and post-
ing signs to deter littering.
7. Patrolling dump sites more fre-
quently.
Mr. Feliciano stressed that the
effort to clean up the four sites
would need to be meticulously
planned. "This is not a problem
that's going to be taken care of
overnight," he said, "right
now...we're identifying what the
problem is."


Numerous agencies and organi-
zations have already agreed to
donate equipment, personnel and
money in order to clean the four
sites. The St. George Island Civic
Club has indicated that 20-25
volunteers from its group have
agreed to participate in the clean
up efforts. The group has pledged
$100 for refreshments and also
offered the use of two pick-up
trucks, one van and one flatbed
trailer to help with the proposed
effort. Other agencies including
the FDEP & Department of Cor-
rections have offered to provide
both equipment and personnel in
the matter.
KFCB Director Guy Hogan will
tour the four dump sites with Eric
Johnson of the Florida. Marine
Patrol in the next week. Another
workshop will be scheduled fol-
lowing the completion of that tour.
The actual date of the clean-up
efforts has yet to be determined.


Trash piles up at the Twin Lakes area in Eastpoint.


Furniture dumped illegally at the Camp Gordon Johnston
parade grounds in Lanark Village.

Notes From Carrabelle August 3rd


Regular Meeting
By Rene Topping
* Good news for residents waiting for
the water extensions to River Road.
Bayou Harbor, McKissack Reach and
north of the city was related by Phil
Devon of Baskerville and Donovan. He
said the advertisements are out for
bids on the work.
'* The Commissioners agreed to hire a
new city policeman with 27 years of
experience in police work, Victor Mar-
tin (Marty) Schutt.
* Commissioners disapproved a zon-
ing change on a request by Donnie
Fitzgerald. who wanted to do me-
chanic work at his home. The adver-
tisement was for incorrect lots. When
the commissioners saw the correct
lots they were in a residential area.
* Bill McCartney of Baskerville and
Donovan said that they have drafted
a proposal to the Department of Cor-
rections to supply the new prison
with water and possibly waste water
treatment.
* Approved payment to retiring city
clerk Charles Lee Daniels. of 25 per-
cent of his unused sick and annual
leave time.


* Approved city accepting liability aris-
ing from, or based on. the closing of a
portion of U.S. 98 for the annual Fall
Festival sponsored by the Senior Citi-
zen Board.
* Appointed Pam Lycett for a two year
term as city representative on the
Animal Adjudication board.
* Approved application from Ben
Watkins to clear the street right of
ways around his property at lots 71.
72 and 63. Pickett's addition. Fourth
Street East from east Meridian Avenue
to Avenue B North.
* Approved a special exception for
Robert and Charlotte Rosier to place
a second mobile home on lots 18 and
19 Block 19 (14) Kelleys Plat.
* Commissioners approved a rip rap
sea wall for Greg Christ-offerson
Block C. lots 3 and 4 Three Rivers
subdivision.
* Commissioners also approved an
extension on an existing dock for Theo
Proctor. Jr.. on lots 47.48 and 49. U.S.
98. on the harbor.
* Approve staff to begin getting bids
and quotes on a new computer for city
Shall.


Second Circuit Report Continued from Page 6

continued the case for a hearing on August 17. The defendant was repre-
sented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Robert Lattimore: The defendant ha- been charged with VOP. Judge'
Steinmeyer continued the case for a hearing on August 17. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
George Lowery: The defendant has been charged with VOP. Judge Steininever
continued the case for a hearing on August 17. The defendant was reprle-
sented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Holly Stripling: The defendant has been charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for a hearing on August 17. The defendant was repre-
sented by Assistant Public Defender Jeff Duval.
Danny Wallace: The defendant has been charged with VOP. The defendant I
failed to appear for his court appointment. Judge Steinmeyer issued a capias
for the defendant's arrest for failing to appear.


Dedicated ..
QualiRed



RE- SELECT


Experienced


.





SWILLIAMS






Proven Leadership
Reviewed by & paid political advertisement, campaign account of Raymond Williams, Dem.


1 I -


r I


~


:: -~;~;9e~~11;T~1~~









Page 8 7 August 1998 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


WIZARD 12.5 H.P.
38 IN. LAWN TRACTOR
REG. $974.99-SALE $933.99
S28.4 cu. in. single cylinder I/C quiet
engine for quiet, lasting power
SHeavy-duty in-line automotive type
transaxle
S4-speed forward, 1 reverse with at
hand controls. 93-7124-6


301015BE LAWN
TRACTOR
REG. 1,599.99-SALE 01,519.99
S1 0 HP Briggs & Stratton engine with
electric start and back-up recoil
S30" single-blade deck suited for
rough cutting or fine
manicuring
SAnti-scalp wheels
SAutomatic blade stop for safety and
convenience
SConverts from side discharge to
mulching or bagging


WIZARD 19.0 H.P.
42 IN. LAWN TRACTOR
REG. 0 1,499.99-SALE $ 1,359.99
S45.6 cu. in. twin cylinder Briggs &
Stratton engine with cast iron cylin-
der sleeve
Electric start key ignition
SHeavy-duty 11 gauge steel frame.
93-9191-3


331415BVE LAWN
TRACTOR
PEG. ,1,999.99-SALE $1,899.99
14 HP OHV I/C Briggs & Stratton
quiet engine with electric start and
back-up recoil
S33" single-blade Hi-Vac deck for
superior bagging capacity
SAnti-scalp wheels
SAutomatic blade stop for safety and
convenience
SConverts from side discharge to
mulching or bagging
SCompanion model 33141 5KVE with
14 HP OHV Kohler Command Engine
and spin-on oil filter available


City Begins Work on 1998/99 Budget


By Rene Topping


A. A. A







MD OF





SSUMMI R






Y Ly


r T T '


Before starting work on the 1998/
1999 budget at a special meeting held
July 30, Carrabelle City Commission-
ers reappointed Barry Woods to the
Carrabelle Port and Airport (CPAA) for
an additional four year term. Commis-
sioner Pam Lycett made an effort to
have commissioners discuss the mat-
ter and she suggested that they
should advertise the position. Imme-
diately after the suggestion, Jim
Phillips made the motion to reappoint
Woods. It was seconded by Donald
Wood and the vote was 3-1.
The budget item turned out to take
up only a small part of the over two
hour meeting. The commission
quickly approved a tentative millage
rate of 10 mills, on a budget of
249,580. Mayor Buz Putnal hurriedly
said, "Please don't go home and. tell
everybody we are approving the 10
mills." In fact each year at the budget
time, the commissioners always ap-
prove up to 10 mills which gives them
a chance to work on a lower village
rate.
It was decided to hold a workshop at
6 p.m. prior to the regular August 3
meeting, which begins at 7 p.m. They
then set dates for the two public hear-
ings on the budget for 6 p.m. on Sep-
tember 8 and September 21. Assis-
tant City Clerk Mary Lou Mathes ex-
plained that the budget they were
looking at was 12.5 percent higher
that the previous year. She said there
had been more allotted for attorney
fees, which this year are $10.000-
up from $5,000. Also she stated that
insurance is higher. The commission-
ers decided to talk about raises for
city employees at the next workshop
meeting.


Budget Talks Continue


By Rene Topping
The Carrabelle City budget for the year
1998/99 came one step closer to re-
ality as commissioners continued to
fine tune numbers at the workshop
meeting, held at 6 p.m. Monday Au-
gust 3. Police Commissioner Pam
Lycett was first to step forward and
ask for a raise for the four police of-
ficers that comprise the Carr-abelle
police force. She asked for 4,000 more
to be added to her budget, to permit a
$1,000 a year raise for the officers.
This will mean that the pay for the
policemen will be $18,800 per year.
Any new employee will start at
$17,800 and will get a raise at the end
of his or her year probation.
Water and Sewer Commissioner Jim
Phillips remarked that he was for an
across the board pay raise for all em-
ployees, should all get a raise of
$15.00 per week, except the police
department. The commissioners then
voted for that and the raise for the
police officers.
Audrey Messer asked to speak on
behalf of Edmund Chipman who has
been with the city for 17 years and
earns $291 per week, while another
.employee who has been on the job
earns $285 a week. She said, That
is not right. It's not fair." Don Woods
said that he would have to excuse
himself from any voting on Chipman's
salary, as his stepdaughter is
Chipman's wife.
Ms. Messer continued to talk on be-
half of the worker. Phillips moved that
the commissioners set Chipman's sal-
ary up to $310 and still give him the
across the board raise. Phillips also
made a motion that the commission-
ers raise all employees by $15.00 per
week. Mary Lou Mathes said that
there was $45,000 in the budget. The
water and sewer employees are paid
out of their separate budget.
Putnal told Donald Wood who is the
new Parks and Roads Commissioner,
that the County Commissioners have
always given $7,500 to that budget.
He also said there was a balance in
the account.
The only expense questioned was that
of the Animal Control. Keith Mock
noted there was $2,250 in the budget
for animal control. He asked them to
request or demand that the city have
an animal control officer work one day
a week in Carrabelle, to pick up the
dogs. "Is there any way we can do
that?" he asked. Then he went on to
say that the dogs, were all over his
neighborhood. Putnal said, "On
Thursday night, I had to stop and shoo
the dogs off the intersection at 98, to


get by." He also added that he felt that
for the money the city is putting in,
Carrabelle should get one-fifth of the
man's time." Mock said that he would
call them, [the animal control] except,
"I don't want to become unpopular,
that's what I want to do." He had com-
plained before, at other meetings, say-
ing that there was a real problem with
the dogs on his street. This time he
said, "All I want is to have the dogs
caught. That's all I want."
The commissioners voted to have one
of their number request that the ani-
mal control officer be in Carrabelle one
day of each week. Pam Lycett was
chosen to be the commissioner who
would be on the adjudication commit-
tee, who decide the fate of a dog who
has become a "biter," and has bitten
several times. They are the "court of
last resort" and their decision is final.
Ms. Lycett said she did not choose to
be on the committee but accepted the
post, after all of the other commission-
ers refused.
On the budget, Jenni Sanborn moved
that Carrabelle would be given one day
a week when the animal control o-
ficer would work only Carrabelle or
they would withdraw the funds. The
motion was seconded by Pam Lycett
and passed unanimously.
Assistant City Clerk Mary Lou Mathes
said that the budget was within the
6.50 millage, even with the changes
made at the meeting and the raises.
A motion was made by Jenni Sanborn
and seconded by Pam Lycett that the
commissioners tentatively accept the
millage rate of 8.50 and it passed
unanimously. At present, the budget
amount is $860,250.00. Public hear-
ings on the budget were set for Sep-
tember 8 and 21, at 6 p.m. The meet-
ing was adjourned at 6:45 p.m.


New Land Use from Page 2


A couple of residents objected to the
proposed ordinance when board mem-
bers considered two applications for
the Residential Estate Category. A re-
quest from Ron Bloodworth to have
378 acres of property north of Twin
Lakes Road in Eastpoint changed from
Agricultural to Residential Estate.
zoning received no objections.
However, a request from Alice Collins
to have 132 acres of property near
Yent's Bayou changed from Rural
Residential to Residential Estates did
receive a couple of objections from ad-
jacent land owners.
Residents George Heitman and Joe


Ethics

Complaints

Against Marine
Fisheries

Commission
Dismissed


I


Roach complained that the proposed
zoning category, would decrease the
value of their adjoining properties.
"When I bought this property." said
Heitman, "I was assured by both the
seller and the planning board that this
parcel would not be subdivided. And
now it comes to pass that it's now
being subdivided." Heitman alleged
that the proposed zoning change was
equivalent to "spot zoning" and could
incur legal opposition.
Ms. Collins claimed that the requested
zoning change would not have any
negative affects on the values or uses
of the properties owned by Heitman
and Roach.


421615BVE LAWN
TRACTOR

REG. $2,699.99-SALE $2,564.99

S16 HP OHV V-Twin Briggs & Stratton
Vanguard engine with electric start
and back-up recoil
S42" twin-blade deck suited for mani-
curing or heavy cutting
SAnti-scalp wheels
SAutomatic blade stop for safety and
convenience
SConverts from side discharge to
mulching or bagging
SComfort cushioned flip-up seat for a
smooth, comfortable ride


While Supplies Last-

No Rain Checks


281015BE LAWN
TRACTOR
REG. 1,549.99-SALE 11,472.99
S10 HP Briggs & Stratton engine with
electric start and back-up recoil
S28" single-blade Hi-Vac deck for
clear cutting
SAnti-scalp wheels
SAutomatic blade stop for safety and
convenience
SConverts from side discharge to
mulching or bagging
SErgonomically designed seat for
mowing comfort


Taylor's Building Supply, Inc.

Highway 98 Eastpoint, Florida (850) 670-8529

Serving Frankin County For Over Thirty Years


Chevron JR. FOOD MART TM

SimplySmarter TACO BELL
Located in the center of town.
Apalachicola
Open 6:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight 7 days a week. Breakfast served daily. Chevron
gasoline, ATM machine, fish bait, free bag of ice with 12 pack beer purchase.

Telephone: 653-3444


SSelling the Pearl of the Panhandle
My Specialty area is Carrabelle Lanark -
SCarrabelle Beach St. Teresa St. James Eastpoint
S .. Let me be your guide to finding your
S. "perfect pearl" of a property.
.;- = -' """ Please call Rene for all your real estate needs, buying or selling.
TA-


Rene
Topping
Associate
CARRABELLE REALTY
(the name says it all)

Office: (850) 697-2181
Home: (850) 697-2616
FAX: (850) 697-3870


LOOK AT Tils GREAT HOIISEAND MAKE AN
OFFER-OWNER IS ANXIOUS TO SELL.
This is your opportunity to buy a well built
house with 3 bedrooms, 2 haths, another
needs only hooking up. Huge living and din-
ing rooms. Space to spare in the enormous
kitchen. 2 car enclosed garage. On 2 full
acres. Corner of Putnal Street and U.S. 98.
Look and buy this one.
HERE Is A SUPER IMMACULATE home on one
full acre. Split bedroom each with own hath.
Custom kitchen. View of the lighthouse. Has
open deck and screened porch$93,500.00
3 BR, 2 BATris ON MH WIrH FRAME addition
on 100 x 150 foot lot with great trees. Outside
laundry and big carport. This one is a must
see for value. Would rent easily$38,000.00
ASK FOR RENE


HERE IS AN IN-TowN HIDEAWAY. Reasonably
priced at $29,500 for a fishing place. Fenced
all around for your boat's security. Has three
bedrooms and two baths. Large shed.
2 ACRES IN LIi(HTOUSE RiDGE on cul-de-sac.
Priced well at $10,500.
1 BEDROOM wrlnH F(ORIDA RooM. All the nice
furniture goes with this one. Has a $1,000
Golf Club Bond that will be transferred to
new owner. This is a must see.$22,000.00
WANr To OwN THE UI.TIMATE? 162 feet of
water front. Landscaped grounds. Great
room with two large bedrooms upstairs.
Plenty of room downstairs to use as a family
room or more sleeping quarters. Has cool
porch on the river side. Greenhouse, two
storage sheds. Fence in front. Two septic
tanks $185,000.00


Call or E-Mail at TOPPR@AOL.COM for complete brochure and other information.


While Supplies Last-
No Rain Checks


I


The majority of the meeting was taken
ip with a contract for use of five acres
of the airport by George and Pat Maier.
The couple have been working with
both the CPAA and the City to lease
the land and establish a fueling facil-
ity. a possible training facility and
T-hangars. They are putting in
$65,000 of their own money and had
received approval on the lease at the
last CPAA special meeting held July
23. Woods told the commissioners
that the members of the CPAA had
approved it saying, the city could
make comments and additions or de-
letions to the lease.
Then followed, a paragraph by para-
graph reading of the lease with pointed
questions from Woods, who at one
point said he would prefer that the
Maiers went back to the original lease.
In the end, after several alterations to
the wording were made by Maier's at-
torney and City Attorney Douglas
Gaidrey who acted together to com-
pose sentences to change or add to
-the contract. At one point together, the
Maier's attorney said after composing
a new paragraph along with Gaidrey,
"We'll just pop that in here." Phillips
joked, "Is that attorney talk."
There was no vote on the document.
which will now be rewritten to con-
form with all changes which were
made in the meeting and will be pre-
sented again to both CPAA and the
City Commission for approval.
The commission took up Item 3 which
was to approve or disapprove action
of the city to obtain the acreage adja-
cent to the marine patrol office, pro-
posed for a public boat ramp and
parking. Ms. Lycett said, "Don't you
think we should wait until we have
an answer from the State as to what
they are going to do with the request
to dissolve the CPAA." No action was
taken on the matter.


I


Then Chairman Robert Q. Marston.
Marine Fisheries Commission (MFC)
and Vice-Chair Barbara Barsh (MFC)
were accused by two Wakulla County
fishermen of ethics violations, on May
8. 1998, in that they caused "the un-
necessary killing and waste of
Florida's marine animals." Ronald F.
Crum and and James Taylor. Jr ac-
cused Marston and Barsh with caus-
ing "the deaths of billions of juvenile
fish."
The accused administrators of the
MFC allegedly violated the code of eth-
ics for public officers, by voting for and
supporting an administrative rule
which required fishermen to use seine
nets with 1 square inch mesh size,
only viable to catch juvenile game and
food fish. "This rule is in direct viola-
tion of Article 10, Sections (16(a) of
the Florida Constitution." their com-
plaints read.
The accusers relied on a Second Ju-
dicial Circuit decision signed by Judge
Charles D. McClure, that held a
Pringle-Crum net was legal to use, and
that two seine nets could be used so
long as "...the nets do not exceed 500
square feet and each net contains a
15-foot panel built with 2" stretched
mesh and a wing (or wings) that com-
prises the remaining 485 square feet
built with 3" stretched mesh." The
decision was dated 13 April 1998.
In responding to the ethics complaint,
Robert Q. Marston. M. D. called the
complaint "absurd." Barbara Barsh
responded in similar fashion, request-
ing that all records in the matter be
made public. She added: "I am ap-
palled at this action by the complain-
ant, who chose not to participate in
any part of the long and arduous rule
making process conducted by the Ma-
rine Fisheries Commission, and now
chooses to, in my opinion, wastefully
distract public offices to suit his mis-
guided agenda."
The Ethics Commissioners examined
the complaints and concluded, the
sections of the Florida Constitution
cited by Crum and Taylor did not, by
themselves, "...establish any stan-
'dards of ethical conduct, disclosure
requirements, or prohibitions appli-
cable to public officers or employees,
in order to avoid conflicts between
public duties and private interests
within the jurisdiction of the Commis-
sion on- Ethics." There might have
been a provision to the Code of Ethics
applied to the allegations under an-
other section of Florida law. However,
to allege a violation of the provision
contained in Section 112.313(6) of
Florida Statutes, "...the complaints
must indicate that the Respondent
used his position, as a member of the
Marine Fisheries Commission, or re-
sources within his trust, with wrong-
ful intent to benefit himself or another,
in a manner inconsistent with his
public duties." The Commission con-
cluded that in Crum and Taylor's
"claimed speculative effect" (i. e. the
death of small fish), there was "...in-
sufficient factual specificity to indicate
that the Respondent (Marston or
Barsh) used his position to secure a
special privilege, benefit, or exemption
for himself or another person, or that
he had any motive to..."
In sum, "...Respondent's voting on the
rule was entirely consistent with the
proper performance of his public du-
ties. Consequently, the allegations are
legally insufficient to indicate that
Respondent violated Section
112.313(6), Florida Statutes." Bonnie
Williams then recommended that the
complaint be found "legally insuffi-
cient and be dismissed without inves-
tigation," dated July 8, 1998.










Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 7 August 1998 Page 9


AUTOMOBILES

AUTOS/SEIZED CARS from $150. Jaguar, Corvette,
Mercedes, BMW, Porsche, Honda, 4x4's, trucks & more.
Local sales listings. Toll free(800)669-2292 ext. A-4000.
CARS FOR $1.00? LET CRIME pay youl Police/IRS
Seized Cars, Boats, Truck, Office Equipment, Auctioned to
Highest Bidder! Call forAuction List, (800)972-5213 Ext.
470

BUILDINGS FORSALE

STEEL BUILDING BLOWOUT! Save Thousands, Fac-
toryDirect. BothArch andStraightwall Designs. Example:
20x24=$2980.00. 25x30=$3650.00. 40x60=$7980.00.
Other Sizes Available. Call: (800)813-1358.

BUILDING MATERIALS

REFINISHED HARDWOOD FLOORING. Must sell,
will sacrificeS2.29 Sq. Ft. unfinished available. (800)914-
0488.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

ASSEMBLE ARTS, CRAFTS, toys, jewelry, wood items,
typing, sewing,computerwork inyoursparetime. Greatpay.
Free Details(800)632-8007,24 hrs.(fee)

HUGE CASH INCOME! Earn $2,000.00/weekl DOUBLE
within 180 days! Not MLM. 100 times more powerful.
Achievesuccessand freedom. CallNowl(800)320-9895ext.
5370. Min. inv. $1250.00.

LOCALCANDY ROUTE, 30 Vending Machines. Earn apx.
$800/day. All for $9,995.Call (800)998-VEND.
EARN AMAZINGPROFIT inyourspare time. Advertise
in thousands ofpublications. Call(888)849-2788 24hour
hotlineto receive FREEreportnow! http://thejunction.com
(min. inv. $20.00)

IMAGINE COMPUTING, cable, the internet, email, real-
time video tele-conferencing, and more overyourtelevision.
Interested in joining Teddy Turner's hi-tech team? Call
(800)935-5171 ext. 6220. (min. inv. 95.+)

LEARN THE SECRETS OF THE WEALTHY! Retire
with dignity. International Banking Program generates
incredible wealth. Eam 300+%//year. Agents needed. For
detailscall:(716)720-6477(24 hourrecording)

SERIOUS INCOME! 1 Need Help!Work EthicsWanted.
Earn $2K-$10 K+ monthly potential. Training and Full
Support Provided. No Sellingl Not MLM. Call (800)322-
6169,ext. 5273.
FINANCIAL

"CASH" Immediate $$$ for structured settlements and
deferred insuranceclaims. J.G. Wentworth (888)231-5375.

A DEBT-FREE LIFE! Free confidential help. Cut monthly
payments. Reduce interest. Stop collection calls. Avoid
bankruptcy. Nation's largest nonpmfit:Genus CreditMan
agement.(800)295-7415.
AUTO LOANS. ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED. No Appli-
cation Fee. I-Hour Approval. 24-Hour Service. World
Funding Group. (800)984-4408, ext. 501

BEHIND ON HOUSE PAYMENTS? Need help fast? Seven
programs to get you current. No application fee. Capital
Resources, Inc. (800)452-9572. BBB Member. Web Site
www cap-resources.com
MORTGAGE RATES ARETHE LOWEST IN YEARS
Refinance even without perfect credit. Use your home's
equitytoconsolidatedebt&loweryourrate. Orpaycollege
tuition, home improvements,medical bills. Wespecialize
in self-employed, bankruptcy, 125% lending.'No applica-
tion fees, rapid approval &closings. FAIRBANK MORT-
GAGE(888)496-0667. Lic. ML9700547


FINANCIALPROBLEMS? Stoptheharrasmentll Onelow
monthly payment. Noupfrontfees. Discharged bankruptcy
welcome. Call the professionals(800)411-8781. "National
Financial ConsultingServices."

HOMEOWNERS! DEBT CONSOLIDATION! Borrow
$25,000-$100,000. Too Many Bills? 'Home Improve-
ments. Apply By Phone/24-HourApproval. NO EQUTY
REQUIRED. PLATINUM CAPITAL: (800)523-5363/Open
7 Days. www.platinumcapital.com

NO DOWN PAYMENT? ProblemCredit? Ownthehome
you need now, without a big downpayment. Complete
financing ifqualified. DeGeorgeHomeAlliance(800)343-
2884.

READTHIS! Repairyourowncredit. Payoffmonthlydebl
Featured in moneymagazine. Homeowners, increasesavings
and quality oflife. Renters, buydream home, next to nothing
down. More! No purchase necessary. (800)896-0974.

REFINANCE & SAVE $100s EACH MONTH. Consoli-
date debt, improve your home or get needed cash. Custom
programs tbrevery need: Good&problemcredit, no-income
verification, self-employed & bankruptcy. 24-hour pre-
approvals,quick closings,competitiverates. WeBendOver
Backwards To Approve Your Loan. FAIRBANK MORT-
GAGE(888)577-8671 ext. 552 FL Lie. ML9700547.
$$WE BUY$$ SellerFinanced Notes*Insurance Settle-
ments* Land Note Portfolios. Colonial Financial (800)969-
1200 Ext. 50.

REFINANCE FAST. EASY & over-the-phone. Need a
second chance? Credit problems?-OK. Foreclosures?-OK.
Starting under 7%-APR. 8.973. Call Platinum Capital.
(800)699-LEND. Nationwide Lender.
www.platinumcapital.com

FORSALE

$444 POOLS POOLS $444. Completely installed new
20'x32' family pool with deck, fence, filter, motor, liner.
100% Financing. Free Cover. Nationwide Builders.
(888)414-6500.

BEAT CANCER AND OTHERchronic ailments without
drugsorsurgery. Bookrevealshow. Includes testimonials.
For more information, call or write: Consumer's Edge
MarketingGroup, 2227 U.S. Highway 1,Suite 300, Dept.
FPA,NorthBrunswick,N.J. 08902,(732)422-3800 Ext. 3.

FOR A FEW PENNIES MORE, get the latest technology
in liquid wormers. HAPPY JACK LIQUI-VICT delivers
active ingredients better than older formulas. Farm, feed &
hardwarestores.www.happyjackinc.com

MILLIONDOLLARBILLI Receiveareplicaofa$1,000,000
bill,FREEI Impressyourfriendsl Send$2.s/hto:SLI, 19S
700E, American Fork, UT 84003.

HEALTH AND FITNESS


IMPOTENCY? Milagro(tm)- A natural male potency pill!
Lowsexdrive? Imaginefeelingtwentyagainl Safe-effective-
economical. Sexual functionandsatisfaction. Noprescrip-
tion required. To order call (800)254-9447. Distributors
needed.
HELPWANTED

AIRFORCETRAINING, experienceand education can help
youreachyourgoals. Find outmore. For free information
packagecall (800)423-USAF.


AVON PRODUCTS-Startyourown business.Work flexible
hours. Enjoy unlimited earnings. CallToll Free(888)561-
2866.


DRIVER OTR BONUS, BENEFITS, miles, equipment,
pay. Covenant Transport has it alll *Teams start 35c-37c
*$1,000 Sign-On Bonus forexp. co. drivers. (800)441-4394.
Experienced drivers and owneroperators(800)338-6428 for
GrduateStudents.

DRIVER.. SWIFT TRANSPORTATION Now Hiring
TractorTrailerDrivers! CDLTraining Availablel Excellent
Pay&FullBenefits,RiderPrograms, ConsistentMiles,Job
Stability. (800)644-2257. (eoe-m/f)

DRIVERS-$2500 Sign-onBonus FFEishiringexperienced
& inexperienced drivers. FREE CDL school for qualified
applicants. Call Scott(800)569-9265. M-F8a-6p. Owner/
Operators enjoy Free Base Plates, $1,000 Sign-on Bonus,
Avg. 91 c epm.

EARN MONEY READING BOOKS $30,000/yr income
potential. Details. (800)513-4343. Ext. Y-1616.

FRIENDLY TOYS & GIFTS has openings for party dem-
onstrators & managers! Home decor, gifts, toys, Christmas.
Earn cash, trips, recognition. Free catalog, information.
(800)488-4875.


CONTRACTOR/FLEET OWNERS...80c/mi. loaded.
75c/mi. empty. Permits provided Avg. 3,000 mi./wkl
Homeevery7-10days. 100%lumperreimburs. lyr.OTR
Exp. req'd. ASHLEY TRANSPORT (800)346-5264
Contractor Drivers Welcomel


Forest Fire In

Bald Point Area

By Tom Campbell
"Butch" Baker, Director of Fran-
klin County Emergency Manage-
ment, said Monday that a two-day
fire in the forest of Bald Point
area, northeast of Pine Street on
Alligator Point, had been con-
tained.
He said that around 4 pm on
Thursday, July 30, the Division
of Forestry, fought a forest fire,
working through the night Thurs-
day and Friday. It was Saturday,
August 1, before the fire was con-
tained.
The Red Cross serviced the area,
providing food for the firefighters.
Director Baker said that about 75
acres were effected in the fire,
which was still smoldering Satur-
day, but had been contained.


No structures were reported
burned and no persons were in-
jured.
Crisis in School Budget
Continued from Page 1
She added, "It's a hard road, but
not a political agenda. We have to
think of what is best for our stu-
dents.
I invite the public to attend the
public hearings and all meetings,
and to call for information. The
public should be informed. It is
that serious."
The next School Board Budget
Workshop is scheduled for
September 10 at Carrabelle
School at 6 pm.
The public is invited to attend.

MFC Continued from Page 7

The Commission will receive a
report regarding a public work-
shop recently conducted, regard-
ing the management of certain


DRIVER OTR COVENANT TRANSPORT The one
perk everyone deserves. Coast toCoast runs. Teamsstart
35c-37c $1,000 Sign-on bonus for exp. Co. Drivers
(800)441-4394. Experienced DriversandOwnerOperators
(800)338-6428 Graduate Students.

A


DRIVER/COMPANY... Exp'd drivers start at 27c/mi.
(w/raisesevery6 mos.) Upto 32c/milel Avg. 3,000 miles/
wkl Home every 7-10 days. Safety bonus, assigned
equip..100%LumperReimburs. I yr.OTRExp. ASHLEY
TRANSPORTATION (800)346-5264.
IMMEDIATEOPPORTUNITIES IFyou're 16-24,start
acarreerin business/clerical occupations orculinary arts.
JobCorps has limited trainingslotsopen immediately. No
tuition. GED/high school diploma program available.
Relocation may be required to a Job Corp campus.
Housing, meals, medical care, paycheck,job placement
assistance provided. U.S. Dept of Labor Program. Call
(800)733-JOBS.

OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE FOR FEMALES.
Train foran excitingcareer in health occupations, building/
apartmentmaintenance, plumbingorbusiness/clerical. No
tuition, no cost. GED/high school diploma program
available. Housing, meals, medical care and paycheck
provided. Helpwithjob placement at completion. Ages
16-24. Job Corps-U.S. Dept. of Labor program. Call
(800)733-JOBS,

OWNER-OPERATORS. Immediate Openings in our
Regional Van Fleet RunS.C., home regular, paid weekly,
steadydrybox loads, top percentage, paid permits, no up-
frontcost. Mustlive in Central or North Florida. SUNCO
CARRIERS, INC. (800)237-8288. Tony in Lakeland.

TELEMARKETER/ASST. CLASSIFIED MGR. The
Orlando's #1 weekly shopper. Salary & commission &
benefits. Call Dot (407)275-9300.


SALES HELP WANTED. Awesome income opportunies!
National Co. needs reps. to negotiate the purchase of bad
checks from local merchants. Training provided and free sales
kit. Call (713)896-1044.

SALES-35% COMMISSION LOCALLY. Business Sales
Conslt Avg. Eamings$150K. FormerBus.Owners. Strong
closer. Travel. No cold calls. Leads Supplied. Fax
Resume:(800)847-6747. Worldwide Business Services.

T/L CARRIER-Reg. Drivers: Home every other week.
Dedicated truck. 90% no-touch freight. Rider program.
Benefits/6 mos. OTR. Females welcome. Students
welcome. (800)365-1337.

TRUCKDRIVERTRAINEESNEEDED! CovenantTrans-
porthasimmediateopeningsforentrylevel drivers. Eam37K-
42K. No experience needed. Training provided.with TDI
(800)435-5593.

TYPIST/PC USERS. Steady work. Full-time/Part-lime.
$45,000peryearearnings potential. Calltoll free (800)883-
0819 ext. T-400.
LEGALSERVICES

DIVORCE$150* Covers children, propertydivision,name
change, military, missing spouse, etc. One signature
required. *Excludes govt. fees, uncontested. Paperwork
done foryou. (800)462-2000. Budget Divorce.

NOTICES

FOR A FEW PENNIES more, get latest technology in
liquid workers. HAPPY JACK LIQUI-VICT delivers
active ingredients betterthanolderformulas. AtGOLDKIST
www.happyjackinc.com

GUARANTEED LOW COST ADVERTISING! on the
Internet. Get your business or products) on line. Reach
80,000,000+potential customers. Call or Visit (800)860-
4586. www.ndiyp.com


tropical ornamental marine life
species, and on marine life lim-
ited entry issues. The Commis-
sion will also receive scientific and
public comment on marine life
limited entry, and on manage-
ment options for "turbo" snails,
blue legged hermit crabs, Cuban
and Spanish hogfish, small
coastal sharks, Condylactus
anemones, and grunts.

Northwest Florida
Shrimp

The Commission will receive a
report on recently conducted pub-
lic workshops regarding
shrimping in the Northwest Re-
gion. The Commission will also
receive public comment and con-
sider shrimp management op-
tions for this region.

Other Meeting Action

The Commission will receive a
report, public comment and rec-


SCOTT ANTIQUE MARKET. Two Mammoth Facili-
ties. 2400 booths-Aug. 7-9. 2ndWeekendofEvery Month.
AtlantaExpoCenters-Atlanta,Georgia.1-285 atIJonesboro
Road(614)569-4112.
REALESTATE

AFFORDABLE LAND 5 AC $27,900 N. FL meadowland
between two state parks. Icy springs/cool rivers Owner
financing. (800)294-2313,ext. 1536. Licensed Reaul Estate
Co.

ALACHUA COUNTY Min. to Gainesville. 10 Acres
$32,900.Beautiful Rolling Land. Georgeous buildable
homesites. Oaks& Pines.Privacy. Financing. CALLNOW!
Won't Lastll Atlantic Land Consultants (888)635-5263.

GOVERNMENT FORECLOSED HOMES, pennies on the
$1. Repo's, VA, HUD, Sheriff sales. No money down
government loans available now. Local listings. Tollfree
(800)669-2292 ext. H-4000.
PRIME WATERFRONT LOT-Only $50,000 Picture
perfect lakefrontloton 30,000 acre lake in cool Smoky Mtns
ofTennessee. Gently rolling, Mature hardwoods, dock ok!
Privatecommunity, paved rds, utilities. Ideal for vacation/
retirement home. Local bankhas appraised &will finance.
Call now (800)861-5253 ext. 8371.


WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA mountains. FREE
BROCHURE of properties and homes. (800)438-8159.
Raper Realty, Inc., Selling property for 20+ years. PO Box
619, Murphy, NC 28906.,
QUIET. COUNTRYLIVING 5Acres$19,900. Yesterday's
valueswith today conveniences inNorth Florida. Owner
financing. Call (800)294-2313 ext. 1436. ABarSales, nc.
A Licensed Real Estate Co.

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS.Cool
mountain air, views & streams FREE brochure of
Mountain PropertiesCall(800)642-5333 RealtyofMurphy,
517 Peachtree St., Murphy, NC 28906.
MOUNTAIN LAND. WESTERN NC & North Georgia.
FREE BROCHURE of listings of Homes, Cottages,
Acreage,Lake&WaterProperties,lnvestments. (800)438-
7715. Ralph Crisp Realty Co., Murphy NC


STEELBUILDINGS


FACTORY CANCELLATIONS STEEL buildings!
30'x50',40'x48',45'x70',55'x120',60'x225'and80'x260'.
Willsell forbalanceowed. Deliveryand financingavailable.
(800)490-8592, ext.791.
STEELBUILDINGBLOWOUT! SaveThousands, Factory
Direct. Both Arch and Straightwall Designs. Example:
20x24=$2980.00. 25x30=$3650.00. 40x60=$7980.00.
OtherSizesAvailable. Call: (800)813-1358.


TANNING


WOLFFTANNINGBEDS.Tanathome. BuyDIRECTand
SAVE! Commercial/Home Units from $199.00. Low
Monthly Payments. FREE Color Catalog. Call Today
(800)842-1310.

VACATIONRENTALS

HILTONHIEADdiscountrentals. 1-6BROcean Villas and
homes on Hilton Head Island. All with pools at prices to
please any budget. Free Brochure (800)445-8664.


ommendanons regarding blue
crab trap degradable panel mate-
rials, and a. report on blue crab
limited entry issues. The Commis-
sion will also receive a report and
public comment on stone crab
limited entry issues, receive an
overview of the southwest Florida
shrimp fishery and a report on the
northeast Florida shrimp work-
shop, and receive a status report
on the baitfish tarp seine pilot
program. In addition, the Com-
mission will receive public com-
ment and review calico scallop
management options, consider
budget and research recommen-
dations, and discuss various fed-
eral fisheries management issues.


Florida Classified


Advertising Network


Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience

of 1.7 million subscribers through 111 Florida newspapers!


The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper

with the FLORIDA REACH at 850-385-4003, fax: 850-385-0830.


FISHERMAN'S CHOICE

Hwy. 98 Eastpoint FL 32328 (850) 670-8808


* Crickets
* Shiners
* Squid
* Live Shrimp
* Licences
*Ice *Feed


Minnows
Worms
Cigar Minnows
Tackle
Chum
Specializing in Live Shrimp
CHARLES PENNYCUFF-OWNER


I


Wakulla






Lumber & Truss, INC.
4379 Crawfordville Highway e P.O. Box 640
Crawfordville, FL 32326
(850) 926-8919
Residential Commercial
^^^^*^^-^*^^^^i^ ----^^^P


S WXGJ


PURE


L COUNTRY






105.5

THE GULF COAST'S
HOT NEW COUNTRY
24. HOURS A DAY!
Freddy Willis, General Manager
Lee McKnight, Sales


54 Market Street, Suite D, Apalachicola, FL 32328
P.O. Box 388, Eastpoint, FL 32320
Business Office: 850-653-3648 Fax: 850-653-3649


Carrabelle Cafe
PIZZA SUBS
Hot Philly Steak Subs Open 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. -

Hot Wings & More 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Daily
Sunday 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Bloomin' Onions: $3.95 Next to the Georgian Motel

EAT IN-TAKE OUT

CALL 697-8484


Johnson Steps Down from
Page 1
been real supportive of the coun-
cil."
Ms. Johnson spoke enthusiasti-
cally about the possibility of
Pamela Amato becoming the
council's next chairperson. "I
think she will be a dynamite per-
son to carry on," said Johnson,
"she seems to have a lot of energy
and excitement for making a dif-
ference; and she's certainly in-
volved in a lot of organizations
within the community working on
behalf of the kids." She expected
that the council would elect
Amato as their new chairperson
in September.
Ms. Amato tipped her hat to the
out-going council chairperson. "I
don't know where she gets her
energy," said Amato, "if it wasn't
for her, I think the Juvenile Jus-
tice Council would have fallen
apart by now. I think that she's
really built it up quite a bit."
Amato continued, "she's
(Johnson) recognized people in
our community that have made a
contribution, especially for the
young people. This has been an
ongoing thing. The Juvenile Jus-
tice Council is a place where you
can voice your concerns about the
young people. And it's a place
where young people can express
their concerns, also."
The prospect of becoming the
council's next chairperson is ex-
citing to Ms. Amato. She spoke of
personal abilities- that will help
keep the council moving on a
steady pace for county's youth.
"I'm very good at organizing, del-
egating and following through"
said Amato, "I think I'm good at
inspiring people to do things." She
hopes to attract volunteers from
the community to help her accom-
plish her many ambitious projects
with the council.
One of those projects include the
establishment of a sub-council for
young people. Ms. Amato is al-
ready working with many of the
community's young people as co-
ordinator of the WINGS Program
in Eastpoint. "I'd like to get the
young people more involved," said
Amato.
Ms. Amato also hopes to estab-
lish a teen court for the county's
youth. The experience, she feels,
will help to provide young indi-
viduals with a better sense of re-
sponsibility for their actions. "It
will be good for the young people
to work on a peer system to get a
better understanding of the jus-
tice system," said Amato.


Fire Caused by
Lightning
Strikes North of

Eastpoint

By Tom Campbell
Two separate fires were caused by
two separate lightning strikes in
the woods about half a mile north
of Brown Elementary School in
Eastpoint July 28. A School Board
Workshop, which had been sched-
uled at that school, was moved as
a precautionary measure, shortly
before the scheduled hour.
The workshop was moved
to Chapman Elementary in
Apalachicola.
Heavy smoke clouded portions of
Highway 98 and the bridge from
Eastpoint, and some sections of
the town. Some of the area homes
were evacuated as precautionary
measures.
Director of Franklin County
Emergency Management "Butch"
Baker said, "There were two sepa-
rate fires, started by two separate
lightning strikes. One fire involved
two to five acres, and the other
fire involved about 160 acres."
The lightning strikes occurred
about 12 noon, during a storm.
Members of the Franklin County
Sheriffs Department were the
first to report the fires shortly af-
ter that.
A Department of Forestry helicop-
ter was used to help fight the
blaze. Fire crews from Eastpoint,
St. George Island, Apalachicola,
and the Counties of Leon, Wakulla
and Gulf were involved, bringing
the total of personnel to about a
hundred. These and members of
the Franklin County Sheriffs De-
partment were still working to
contain the larger fire at about 8
pm Tuesday evening. At that
hour, Director Baker said about
75 percent of the fire was under
control. By dark, the fire was con-
tained.
Some structures were threatened
by the forest fires, but the crews
cut breaks to protect homes and
contain the blaze. No structure
was burned, but fire came within
seventy yards of about a dozen
homes.
Wednesday morning, crews were
checking to make sure all the
blaze was contained. They discov-
ered the fire had started up again,
jumping trees. An additional
eighty acres burned, bringing the
two-day total to about 240 acres.
By 5 PM Wednesday, the fire had
been contained.









Page 10 7 August 1998 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


Approximately 90 young adults
from Franklin, Holmes and Jack-
son Counties made their way to
Camp Timpoochee near Niceville
from June 8-12, to participate in
a variety of camp activities spon-
sored by the 4-H Program.
The young campers"had an op-
portunity to participate in such
recreational activities as canoe-
ing, archery and volleyball. In
addition, some of the environmen-
tal science activities offered the
youth an entertaining way to
learn more about their ecosystem.
The environmental science activi-
ties included lessons on such top-
ics as the poisonous and non-poi-
sonous snakes located in the
State of Florida. The campers also
received lessons on how to set up
an aquarium and how to monitor
water quality in a fish tank.
Franklin County Extension Direc-.
tor Bill Mahan attended the event
and helped to supervise the ac-
tivities, as a local agent. An agent
from both Holmes and Jackson
Counties also attended the event.
While at Camp Timpoochee, the
youth members were lodged at the
eight cabins located on the site.
They were also treated to the regu-
lar campsite chow of hot-dogs and
hamburgers at the camp cafete-
ria during their visit.

#o4fce Cdiet



Art of the Area
Art Supplies
Gifts and Collectibles
Custom Frame Shop
Flowers for All Occarsions
Complete \teddinsg
Services & Euent Planniiing

S 1-800-929-8931
Hours: 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Now serving soft serve frozen
yogurt at Sea Oats Gallery on
St. George Island
Highway 98 P.O. Box 585
Eastpoint, FL 32328
Office: (850) 670-8931
Res.: (850) 670-8323
h omo l .o m /.ain i [


Requirements
Florida Education Commissioner
Frank T. Brogan wants the par-
ents and guardians of all incom-
ing kindergartners and seventh
graders to become aware of and
comply with new school immuni-
zation rules.
Before they will be admitted to
school on the first day of fall
classes, an estimated 177,000
incoming kindergartners must
have begun the hepatitis B vac-
cine series. This new school im-
munization requirement is in ad-
dition to the currently required
immunizations for diphtheria,
tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles,
mumps, and rubella.
All incoming 183,000 seventh
graders must have begun the
hepatitis B vaccine series, as well
as received a second dose of the
measles vaccine and a
tetanus-diphtheria vaccine prior
to attending school.
The Commissioner of Education
has sent a memorandum to
school district superintendents
and principals stating that stu-
dents cannot be admitted to
school on the first day without
proof of having initiated the new
immunization requirement. It also
reinforced that compliance with
the new requirement, which is


Those local youth members at-
tending the 4-H Camp included:
Jessica Williams, Hope Critton,
Wesley Sullivan, Michael Sullivan,
Michael Vroegop, Deannna
Simmons and Serena Rhew.


Tf The







Shed J



e-m-r


A ntiq 4es C Collectib les
170 Wcater Street
H historic Dow town
Ap [achco la, FL
(850) 653-3635


A n ln e bllen c of
antic uqes,
collectibles, new &
usec fvniltt4re,
art, andt many
more distinctive
accent p pieces
specLllizing I I
ncutdcal Items.

Lookfor the big, tin
shed on Water Street
alo'v the kLstoric
Apalachicola River.

P.O. Box 9
Apalacklicola, FL 32329


Now is the time to
subscribe to the

FRANKLIN

CHRONICLE
The Chronicle is published every other Friday.
Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County
are $16.96 including taxes for one year, or 26
issues. The out-of county rate is $22.26 in-
cluding taxes. All issues mailed in protective
Kraft envelopes.

Subscriber
Address
City State
Zip
Telephone

Basic Subscription, 26 issues.
i Out of County
J In County

Franklin Chronicle
Please send this form to: Post Office Box 590
Eastpoint, Florida 32328
850-927-2186 or 850-385-4003


the Chronicle Bookshop

Mail Order Service *

2309 Old Bainbridge Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303


Th Aale Indias


enforced by the Florida Depart-
ment of Health, cannot be waived
until after school attendance has
been officially counted, which
usually occurs in October.
The requirement is intended to
fully immunize children in all
grades by 2004-2005. Parents are
urged to contact their private phy-
sician to schedule an appoint-
ment for their children affected by
the new school immunization re-
quirements, and to use the visit
to check the status of the child's
medical history to determine if
other immunizations are needed.
Required immunizations are cov-
ered under most health insurance
policies.
Florida's Immunization Program
implemented the Vaccines for
Children program two years ago.
The VFC program provides vac-
cines free of charge to private
health care providers for use in
immunizing children whose par-
ents cannot afford to pay for vac-
cines.
Children eligible for free vaccines
are those without health insur-
ance, with insurance but lacking
coverage for immunizations, Na-
tive Americans, Alaskan Natives,
and children receiving Medicaid.


.---. -i
'40



(218) The Apalachee Indi-
ans and Mission San Luis
by John H. Hann and
Bonnie G. McEwan. Paper-
back, 193 pp, University of
Florida Press, 1998. Now,
the story of Mission San
Luis is brought forward
through' the new Florida
Heritage series of books for
the first time. During the
first two centuries of Florida
history, the European
colony was under Spanish
rule. The Spanish Crown
and the Catholic Church
brought European ways of
life to Florida through a sys-
tem of mission settlements.
San Luis was the principal
mission town of Apalachee
Province in the Florida pan-
handle serving as adminis-
trative and religious capital
of a chain of missions
stretching from St. Augus-
tine. Mission San Luis sites
were acquired by the State
of Florida in 1983, and un-
der the ground were the
archeological remains of
this important 17th Cen-
tury town so important to
Florida's history. The park
is now open to the public
in Tallahassee, and this
book, based on the archeo-
logical digs and documents
from Spanish archives, tells
the story of the town and
the native American and
Spanish peoples who lived
together for two centuries.
Sold regionally for $19.95.
Bookshop discount price =
$14.95. Lavishly illustrated
in color.

....- -.
-., .

.. -I. .. ..
..... ........ ........
i'" ', :- -.-


(217) Rose Cottage Chron-
icles. The civil war letters
of the Bryant-Stephens
Families of North Florida.
Edited by Arch Frederic
Blakey, Ann Smith Lain-
hard and Winston Bryant
Stephens, Jr. These letters
and the narrative are as
fresh and poignant today as
the time they were written,
capturing the heart of ev-
eryday life during the Civil
War. The letters were writ-
ten from 1858 to the
mid1865 by two genera-
tions of the Bryant and
Stephens, ordinary Confed-
erate folk whose members
includes successionists,
moderates, and a few
Unionists. Despite the war,
the letters also tell a love
story in the courtship of
Winston Stephens and Tivie
Bryant. Their married life at
Rose Cottage was nearly
perfect-and brief. Virtually
all of the letters, more than
one thousand exchanged
between 12 correspondents
survive in this family saga,
a riveting family chronicle
set in the Civil War. Sold
nationally for $34.95.
Bookshop price discounted
to $28.95. 389pp, Univer-
sity of Florida Press, 1998,
Hardcover.


A ~

~h

a


New School Immunization


(212) No Ordinary Time.
Here is a compelling
chronicle of America and its
leaders during the period
when modern America was
created. Doris Kearns
Goodwin has written a nar-
rative of how the United
States, in 1940, then an
isolated nation divided
along class lines, suffering
the ravages of a depression
and woefully unprepared
for war, was unified by a
common threat and also by
the extraordinary leader-
ship of Franklin Roosevelt
to become the preeminent
economic and military
power in the world five
years later. At the center of
this transformation was the
complex partnership of
Eleanor and Franklin
Roosevelt. You have not
read this history before.
Using diaries, interviews
and White House Records,
Goodwin paints a detailed,
intimate portrait on the
daily conduct of the Presi-
dency and the Roosevelts
themselves. Here is the pro-
found story, of the
Roosevelt's leadership that
led the nation to military
victory and the changing
fabric of American society.
Sold nationally for $30.00
Bookshop price for this
Pulitzer Prize book, $18.00.
Hardcover, 760 pp., Simon
and Schuster, 1994.



NO

ORDINARY

TIME




Franklin ad EleanorRoosevelt:
The Home Front in World MarII

DORISKEARNS
GOODWIN
Auleor ut Tne fil:gerak s iand tlhe K,'rennts

(220) Landscaping for
Florida's Wildlife. Recreat-
ing Native Ecosystems in
Your Yard. By Joe Schaefer
and George Tanner. Paper-
back, 92 pp, University of
Florida, 1998. In a
step-by-step format, this
book tells how to create a
wildlife-friendly-landscape
that takes into account
both people and nature.
Which ecosystem is appro-
priate to a particular piece
of property and how to de-
termine which species to
use on the property. It tells
how to install, maintain and
evaluate the new yard. Sold
regionally for $12.95.
Bookshop discount to
$9.95.


...... v1,LE --CE OP COlClT



Hernando de Soto
and the
Indians of Florida


-.S.
'-'I~ \~* 111


(192) Vivian Sherlock's bi-
ography of John Gorrie,
The Fever Man, is available
once again after being
out-of-print for more than
a decade. This is the story
of John Gorrie, young phy-
sician who invented an "ice
machine" that many argue
was a forerunner to air con-
ditioning dozens of years
later. His cooling device was
developed to provide relief
to his suffering yellow fever
patients. A museum in
Apalachicola to this day
marks the work of John
Gorrie just across from his
last resting place in Gorrie
Square, down from Trinity
Church. This book tells
what is now known about
Dr. Gorrie, his work and his
ice machine. Paperback,
New, 151 pp. Bookshop
price = $10.00


F----------------------------------------
Order Form
Mail Order Dept., Chronicle Bookshop
(Please Print)
Your Name
Address
Town State ZIP
Telephone ( )
Book
Number Brief Title Cost









Total book cost
Shipping & handling in F.
1 book ....... 2.50
2-3 books .... 53.50
4-5 books .... S4.00 Shipping ard
6-10 books ... 5.00 handling +
Bookshop List of Total
Total
7 August 1998
Amount enclosed by check or money order S ____
Please do not send cash. Thanks.


~~1


All book orders must be ordered on this form. When
completed, please mail this form and your check or
money order to: Franklin Chronicle, 2309 Old
IBainbridge Road. Tallahassee FL 32303. Be sure to
add sales tax and shipping charges. Incomplete orders
will be returned.
L-------------------- -


(187) Hernando de Soto
and the Indians of Florida
by Jerald T. Milanich and
Charles Hudson. "A persua-
sive and perhaps definitive
reconstruction of the
Florida portion (of the de
Soto expedition).. .Highly
recommended." Library
Journal. Hardcover, 1993,
307 pp. Photos, maps, in-
dex. Sold nationally for
$39.95. Bookshop price =
$29.95.


(180) Atlas of Maritime
Florida. Paperback, 1997,
56 pp. Generously illus-
trated, this volume surveys
13,000 years of Florida
maritime history and
georgraphy in a style acces-
sible even for your students
of Florida history. Includes:
bathymetry and shoreline,
winds, currents; growth of
Florida's maritime indus-
tries; ship types; overview of
thousands of shipwreck
sites in Florida. Sold na-
tionally for $9.95. Book-
shop price = $7.95.


Please Note
Books from the mail service of the Chronicle Book Shop are new and
used, and are so-designated in each item description. Some titles
may be temporarily out of stock, in which case a second shipment
will be made, normally in 14 days. Books are shipped in 48 hours.
normally. Some of our books are publishers' closeouts. overstocks.
remainders or current titles at special prices. Most are in limited supply
and at these prices may sell out fast. If any book is sold out your
money will be refunded by bank check. To offer the lowest possible
prices all orders must be prepaid. We do no billing and do not accept
credit cards.



More Savings
A $35+ purchase order in books will earn you a
bonus one-year subscription to the Franklin
Chronicle at no additional charge!
(Please complete the form below)
I have enclosed my purchase order for $35+ in
books and now request the bonus subscription to
the Chronicle. My address and other data are as
follows:
Name
(Please write legibly.)
Address
State Zip code + 4
Subscriptions will begin within a 3-week period.
Telephone Number: (
area
You may renew your subscription to the Chronicle
under this plan. Please indicate a renewal by
checking the block below and placing your mail-
ing label to this form.
Renewal Mailing Label
placed here
0


I I


(188) A Narrative of the
Early Days and Remem-
berances of Oceola Nikk-
anochee. Prince of Econ-
chatti, a Young Seminole
Indian... by Andrew G.
Welch. From the Florida
Bicentennial Floridian Fac-
simile Series, this is the
story of Oceola as told to
Andrew Welch, who at-
tended the Elorida histori-
cal figure at Oceola's death-
bed. Other stories of this
historical period are in-
cluded. 1977 reprint of an
1847 work. Hardcover, 305
pp. Chronicle Bookshop
price = $20.95.


(203) The Florida Hand-
book: 1997-1998. The
26th Biennial Edition com-
piled by Allen Morris and
Joan Perry Morris. Hard-
cover, Pennisular Publish-
ing Co, Tallahassee, 1997,
751 pp. Here is the indis-
pensable guide to Florida,
from the Executive, Legis-
lative and Judiciary,
through various historical
categories and subjects in-
cluding the counties,
Florida literature, exotic
species, climate, sports, cit-
rus, state parks, minerals,
wildlife, marine resources,
farming, highways,
economy, employment
power, elections, the state
constitutions and dozens of
additional topics, all in-
dexed. Updated every two
years; this is the most re-
cent edition. Sold nationally
for $36.95. Bookshop price
= $30.00 Shipping fees for
this work, due to length, is
$3.00.

THE FEVER MAN
A Biography of Dr. John Corrie


Youth Members from Three

Counties attend 4-H Camp
By Brian Goercke


V -- I I


I


i




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs