Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00084
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: April 3, 1998
Copyright Date: 1998
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00084
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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The Published Every Other Friday






Franklin chronicle
j, C


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Prison May Pump $22.7 Million Into Local
Carrabelle Economy

Gov. and Cabinet O.K.S

Land Purchase for New

Correctional Facility

The Governor and Cabinet, sitting as the Board of Trustees, gave
permission on March 24th, to the Department of Corrections to ac-
quire 349 acres of land for the construction of a new correctional
institution in Franklin County. According to Deputy Administrator
Bob Stanley, the property is to be acquired from the St. Joe Timber-
land Company within the next 100 days.
The land is located about one mile northeast of Carrabelle at Lake
Morality Road in Franklin County.
The money to acquire the property has been available from a previ-
ous legislative budget. The money to build the $43,300,000 facility is
contained in a budget request currently under review by the present
legislature.
This project has been a long time coming. At least 15 sites were re-
viewed by the Department o Corrections but rejected for various rea-
sons, ranging from high costs, environmental concerns, wetland is-
sues, owner refusals, small sites or development issues. Some land
was tied into the P-2000 program conducted by Florida to preserve
environmentally endangered lands. An accompanying map shows
many of these sites, that were previously, reviewed beforp-thei-Dept..of
Corrections discovered the Lake Morality site oin State Road 67.
Under the 100 day time period, the Department of Corrections (DOC)
has until July 2, 1998 to close the land deal, with a projected price of
$238,000 for the 349 acres.
The total capacity of the correctional facility, when completed over a
three year period, will be 1,450 beds. The facility will operate on about
$19.4 million per year, including a $11.2 million annual payroll when
fully operational.
This will be an all custody level institution with all buildings related
to inmates to be located within a secure perimeter surrounded by two
12-foot high fences augmented with razor-wire and perimeter detec-
tions systems. Armed correctional officers in vehicles will constantly
monitor the perimeter.

Potential Prison Sites Reviewed;
in Order Reviewed
1. 'Carrabelle-U.S. 98 Site
2. Carrabelle-Duck Lake Site
3. Carrabelle-Airport Site
4. Lanark Village-U.S. 98
5. Carrabelle-Lake Morality Site on SR-67-
selected site
6. Carrabelle-Radio Tower Site on SR-67
7. County Jail Site-SR-65
8. Apalachicola-Airport Site
9. Division of Forestry Site-SR 65
10. Apalachicola-Airport Site
11. Eastpoint North-West of SR-65
12. Beverly-South of SR-65
13. Eastpoint-Straddles SR-65, just two miles
north of Site #9
14. Lanark Village-adjacent to Site #4 and
located at site of old hospital
15. Several miles west of Apalachicola .

The correctional facility will be built in three phases. Phase I, utiliz-
ing private contractors, includes site work and utilities. The begin-
ning of construction work will depend on funding appropriations from
the current Legislature.
Phase II will include construction of two single cell housing units,
four secure housing units, and support functions such as food ser-
vice, academic, health, classification, central control tower, security,
visitor, administration, and warehouse buildings.
Phase III will be built using inmate labor supervised by Department
of Corrections staff, and includes a laundry, two dormitories, a main-
tenance building, a superintendent's residence, an assistant
superintendent's residence, vocational building, staff training and
other smaller support buildings.
Using inmate labor will reduce the cost of the facility, now budgeted
at $45 million over a three year program. Once operational, inmate
labor will provide the facility with support services such as cooking,
laundry, building maintenance and grounds keeping. The institution
will offer a full range of programs for inmates, including academic
and vocational classes, medical and psychiatric services and programs
in substance abuse prevention.
Through the "multiplier effect", as calculated by the Florida Bureau
of Labor Market Information, for each dollar naid in salaries there
would be about $2.03 for the local econcty. Thus, using the
institution's $11.2 million payroll, there coula be generated for the
Carrabelle area more than $22.7 million annually for local businesses
and individuals.
Several Franklin County residents signed up for correctional officer
training in the past few months in direct anticipation of the Franklin
County facility coming on line, but Bob Stanley, Deputy Administra-
tor, cautions that the completed plant would be at least two years off.


Carrabelle Man
Shot-Suspect at
Large

33 year old Carrabelle resident
Cliff Massey was shot and
critically wounded on March 27
while driving his truck down 7th
Street in Carrabelle. The bullet


that was fired allegedly travelled
through the bed of his truck,
through a toolbox in the truck and
through the back of Mr. Massey.
Assistant State AttorneyRon
Flury stated that a suspect has
been named in the case. He said
that the suspect was currently at
large.


The Honorable Judge Elijah Smiley

The Second Annual Feastivity
Banquet: "Rising-Above the
Ordinary."
"Isn't it strange/ That Princes and Kings/ and clowns that caper/
In sawdust rings,/ And common people/ like you and me/ Are
builders of eternity?/ Each is given a bag of tools,/ A shapeless
mass/ A book of rules;/ And each must make-/ Ere life is flown/
A stumbling block/ Or a stepping stone." E.L. Sharpe, from the
poem, "A Bag of Tools."
Approximately 200 residents made their way to the Second Annual
Feastivity Banquet on March 29 at the Apalachicola High School. The
event, which was sponsored by Franklin County Commissioner
Clarence Williams, raised over $1,100 for the Sylvester A. Williams
Memorial Scholarship for graduating seniors.
Judge Elijah Smiley from Panama City served as the event's keynote
speaker. Judge Smiley urged those young members in attendance to
set short and long term goals for their future and to "rise beyond the
ordinary."
"You need to identify what you want to do," said Smiley, "and choose
what you want to be." He continued, "please remember that wherever
you travel that you are important. And always remember that there
isn't anything too good for you."
Judge Smiley warned youth members to resist those temptations from
the drug culture and other criminal elements. "Please don't give in,"
he said, "please don't give up and please don't give out...rise above
the ordinary. I dare you to work to become a good leader and a
contributing member of the community."
"Never rest til your good is your better," concluded Smiley, "and your
better is your best."
Ms. Pamela Amato provided words of encouragement for the event.
'This is about team work," she said, "and team work goes well beyond
being on a football team or a baseball team." Amato saidthat people
needed to remember team work when it came to family and community.
Ms. Amato pointed towards a banner that had been placed at the
forefront of the event. "It (the banner) says 'Reaching Past the Hill,
Continued on Page 10



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April 3 16, 1998


Twelve Coastal Petroleum

Applications Denied by DEP
Site #1281 (St. George) Not Affected By Order




-N-



Cot l St F bu r ,,0- *\ \/____ .I.000-----
46 1998 0 o owa 4
S 1296
16.000 129
Cop. St Gorge #1 \.000
S1280 iFenhoao-wy #2
16,000 .
Cope St. George #2
Twelve offshore oil and gas drill-
ing permit applications filed by -- --
igrom80 5
Coastal Petroleum in February 0 ld 1
1997 have been denied on March 6
26, 1998. 14.0
nclote Illa d 12
SThe Department of Environmen-
tal Protection (DEP) issued a fi-
nal order holding that Coastal
Petroleum Company, Apalachi- 279 Lgi KY I#I
cola, had insufficient information
to ensure compliancerwith Florida so mI*
Statutes. The drilling applications 1270 .osI10
proposed drilling to depths rang- c ,4 pl. p""" to 12
ing from 8,000 to 23,000 feet us- 1
ing portable offshore drilling plat- f-o. d g ,
forms in state waters in the Gulf ,30
of Mexico, as indicated in the ac- S island 12
companying map. Sites close-in to
the panhandle region included #s
1296 (Cape St. George), #1297
(Cape St. George), #1298 23o000
(Fenholloway) and #1299 t27 p" In
(Fenholloway).
there had not been any official
The DEP decision ended, tempo- agency action taken on the appli-
rarily, year long trek comprised cations. The requested informa-
of letters between Coastal Petro- tion DEP wanted included loca-
leumand the lorida Geological tion plat and coordinates, envi-
Survey, the reviewing agency for ronmental and site assessments,
such applications. The Survey data on the proposed zero dis-
would not accept the Minerals charge rig, applicant's plan to pre-
Trust Fund payment as surety for vent pollutant discharges, drilling
the wells, saying instead that the platforms, hurricane response
Administration Commission (Gov- plaorm geologic data, transporta-
rnor and Cabine would set a tion, test oil and ga plan, a drill-
surety (bond) requirement to pay ing plan and contingency plans.
for accident damage. Throughout All along, Coastal has challenged
the process of application, Coastal the DEP authority to require such
Petroleum has challenged the information.
DEP's authority to require de-
tailed information on their appli- This recent decision by DEP has
cations. As late as December 26, nothing to do with the pending
1997, Coastal Petroleum formally administrative hearing involving
requested an Administrative site #1281, about 9 miles south
Hearing, asserting that all legally of St. George Island. That series
required information to complete of decisions and recommenda-
the applications had already been tions from an administrative law
submitted. In January 1998, DEP judge is expected within the next
dismissed the request for an ad- two or three weeks.
ministrative hearing saying that

1998 Waterfront Festival to Showcase

Riverwalk Pavilion in Carrabelle


By Tom Campbell
As a businesswoman,
Stephenson, Executive D
the Carrabelle Area Cha
Commerce, wears sever
ent hats. Some days sh
more than one at a time
manages the affairs ofth
ber, handling her job as
Kay Consultant, and pre
the Seventh Annual Wa
Festival, scheduled for S
April 18, from 9:00 AM u
p.m., in Carrabelle. "An
even have a hat on, upsid
she laughed.


The Chamber has a new office in
the Carrabelle Mini-Mall on High-
Bonnie way 98 East. 'Tell everybody to
director of come visit," she said, "and let us
imber of show off our beautiful new space."
al differ- It is attractive with displays of
e "wears shells, books, brochures, maps,
" as she and plenty of items to delight
le Cham- tourists and local residents.
Sa Mary The original telephone booth
pares for (circa 1963) is prominently dis-
iterfront played. It became famous, be-
aturday, cause of The Johnny Carson
ntil8:00 Show on TV, as "The World's
.d I may Smallest Police Station." On a
e down,"
Continued on Page 8


Volume 7, Number 7


___








Page 2 3 April 1998 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


Judge Rules

for SGI:

County to

Appeal the

Decision

In a unanimous decision, Frank-
lin County Commissioners agreed
during a March 23 special meet-
ing to appeal a recent ruling from
Judge F.E. Steinmeyer that would
allow Morris Palmer with SGI,
LTD. to construct a nine hole golf
course in Eastpoint.
Judge Steinmeyer ruled in his
March 20 Opinion and Final Or-
der that the Franklin County
Commission had failed to prop-
erly consider a site plan submit-
ted by Morris Palmer for the nine
hole golf course; he further ruled
that the reasons in which the
county denied Palmer's site plan
were not supported by competent
substantial evidence. Steinmeyer
ordered that the county take ac-
tion consistent with his Opinion
and Final Order.
At the special meeting, Chairper-
son Raymond Williams explained
that the county would lose its
bargaining powers with Mr.
Palmer if the commission decided
to appeal Judge Steinmeyer's rul-
ing. "Do we want to appeal this,"
he asked, "and take a chance of
not having any protection?" He
concluded, "In any court action,
you never know what's going to
come out in the end...As Mr. (Al)
Shuler pointed out, there's a high
probability that we will lose this
case."
Mr. Palmer previously assured
commissioners that he would
abide by the restrictions and limi-
tations that the county had im-
posed on August 5, 1997 concern-
ing maintenance and develop-
ment of the golf course. Some of
those conditions included: a limi-
tation of the amount of imperious
surfaces which would be allowed


for the development, water qual-
ity monitoring and a specific use
and appllcatibn program with
limitations on the use of pesti-
cides, fungicides, herbicides and
fertilizers.
Chairperson Williams also stated
that the cost of appealing the case
would also affect the taxpayers in
the county. "There's a possibility
and only a possibility that we may
lose all the way around," he said.
Williams continued, "We're
charged with protecting the bay
and we're also charged with the
responsibility of finances."
Commission Eddie Creamer
countered, "My view of it is that
the seafood workers are taxpay-
ers, too." He stated that he wanted
to return to his original position
on the matter. Chairperson Will-
iams responded, "I'm not sure I
know what that was." Creamer
explained, "To deny the golf
course."
Commissioner Clarence Williams
also acknowledged that the
county could lose its appeal. '"The
seafood workers are taxpayers,"
he said, "and it's their livelihood."
He then made a motion to appeal
the matter. Commissioner
Creamer seconded the motion
and the board voted unanimously
to appeal the matter to the First
District Court of Appeals.
Attorney Patrick Floyd informed
the county in a March 23 letter
that he had been requested by the
Franklin County Seafood Workers
to help protect their interests from
"adverse environmental conse-
quences" to the Apalachicola Bay.
Floyd noted that he had agreed
to be retained by the Seafood
Workers Association and would
assist the county in its legal
defense.
Mr. Palmer originally presented
the site plan for his development
to the Franklin' County Commis-
sion on July 15, 1997. At that
time, Steinmeyer found that "SGI
established and demonstrated by
competent substantial evidence
that it met or exceeded all require-
ments and conditions set forth in
the site plan ordinance."


Melton Receives Citizen

of the Month Award


Becky Melton (L) speaks as Sandra Lee Johnson looks on.


Carrabelle resident Becky Melton
was recognized at the MarCh 26
Juvenile Justice Council meeting
with the Citizen of Month Award.
Juvenile Justice Council
Chairperson Sandra Lee Johnson
explained, "this is a way that we
acknowledge people for being
great volunteers or being out there
moving and shaking and making
a difference in the community."
Ms. Melton informed those in
attendance that she worked as a
VISTA (Volunteers in Service to
America) with the Franklin
County Adult Reading Program.
She said that her responsibilities
were to recruit and work with
adults in order to "help them
improve their reading and their
quality of life."
Ms. Johnson responded, "it's
people like you who keep a

C h a s o n
Delivers Report
to Juvenile
Justice Council


Jada Chason delivered a brief
report to the Juvenile Justice
Council on March 26 concerning
her participation with the
Franklin County Public Library's
WINGS Program in Juvenile
Justice Week.
Jada informed those in atten-
dance that members from the
WINGS Program had created
posters to be displayed in the
Capitol for Juvenile Justice Week.
Juvenile Justice Council Chair-
person Sandra Lee Johnson ex-
plained, "Franklin County had
Juvenile Justice Week represen-
tation at that level at the Capi-
tol."


community going. You take a
vested interest in where you live.
It's important to you and we need
these kinds of people."
Other residents nominated for the
Citizen of the Month Award in-
cluded Chuck Melton, Jackie Gay
and Liz Sisung.


The county commission at that
meeting tabled the matter to seek
more public input about environ-
mental concerns. Steinmeyer has
determined that "none of the con-
cerns expressed were based upon
any provision of the Site Plan
County." Steinmeyer pointed out
that the county had an ordinance
which established a Critical
Shoreline District for the protec-
tion of the bay; he further noted
that the proposed development
was not in the Critical Shoreline
District.
On August 5, the county again
failed to approve the site plan
submitted by Mr. Palmer. A mo-
tion was made by Commissioner
Bevin Putnal to deny the request.
His motion received no second.
The board finally voted to approve
a portion of the site plan, which
included a commercial building.
and a driving range.
The county argued in its Motion
to Dismiss and Answer that the
proposed golf course was located
on property zoned R-2 and that
such development projects were
not permitted in that zoning clas-
sification. County Planner Alan
Pierce informed the board on July
15 that the zoning code did not
have a category for a golf course.
Judge Steinmeyer pointed out
that the driving range that was
approved on August 5 was located
on property zoned R-2. "Franklin
County," ruled Steinmeyer, "by
this approval, conceded that a golf
course is a permitted use in the
R-2 zoning."


Panhandle Poets

and Writers to

Sell Anthology
The Panhandle Poets and Writers
announced they will sell their
brand new Anthology of Poems
and Short Stories, a limited col-
lectors' edition, e at the erfront
Festival in Carrabelle on Satur-
day, April 18. The book is spon-
sored by and includes material by
WINGS Program members and
the Franklin County Public
Library:' -
The poets and writers will have a
booth at the Festival and the
books will be available at the
exhibit.
Members who are contributing (in
alphabetical order) are: Tom
Campbell, Nora Collins, Jack Da-
kota, Brian Goercke, Carolyn
Hatcher, Ken Kenniston, Marga-
ret E. Miller, Laurel Newman,
Rene Topping, and Van B. Waulk,
among others.
The group urges the public to at-
tend and support the Seventh
Annual Waterfront Festival on
April 18.


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District

Honors

Teachers of

the Year

The Franklin County School Dis-
trict hosted a recognition event on
March 26 at the district office in
Apalachicola for the four instruc-
tors nominated for District
Teacher of the Year.
Melanie Humble from Carrabelle
High School received the District
Teacher of the Year honors. The
three instructors also nominated
for the award included Martha
Brady from Apalachicola High
School, Bertha Stanley from
Chapman Elementary School and
Donna McCroan from Brown El-
ementary School.
"More often than not," announced
Superintendent Brenda Galloway,
"teachers very rarely get the ac-
colades that they need. And it's
been my mission in life to ensure
that Teachers of the Year are given
the recognition that they need."
She then presented each of the
nominated instructors with a
plaque for their service to the
school district.
Nina Marks then presented the in-
structors with "teacher baskets"
which contained gift certificates
and "lots of little things that
teachers need on their desks." Ms.
Marks informed those in atten-
dance that all the baskets were
different and the certificates were
from different people in the
community."
Ms. Humble provided a brief
statement to those in attendance
as she accepted her award. "Each
one of us represents a lot of years
of teaching," she said, "and each
one of us represents a team of
people with a lot of years of teach-
ing. I think we all appreciate
them, because you can't do it all
by yourself."
The three instructors nominated
for District Teacher of the Year
were then presented with a sav-
ings bond for $100. Ms. Humble
received a check for $500. David
Butler with Gulf State Bank pre-
sented a plaque to the Franklin
County School District recogniz-
ing those District Teachers of the
Year from 1990 to present.
"The need for leadership in school
has never been greater," stated
Butler, "what better way to hold
up a guiding light not only to the
students but to the other teach-
ers. And I know it's a team effort.
Those that are awarded...these
awards are representative of a
bunch of great people out there.
What's most important is that we
recognize the best of the best and
that we have a permanent re-
minder placed in all of our
schools." Mr. Butler said that a
plaque recognizing the Teachers
of the Year from 1990 to present
would be placed in the district
office as well as in all of the
schools.'


"Cuffer ShIipp-" Gets Thumbs

Up From Audience


By Rene Topping
A happy mixture of dramatic ren-
ditions, comedy and some inter-
esting poetry readings, was not
the only thing on the menu at the
Carrabelle High School Drama
Club production of "Coffee
Shoppe," held at the High School
cafeteria on March 20. In addition
the program for the evening also
included coffee or tea served with
delicious desserts.
All in all it was a great evening
out for the audience.
One of the great dramatic mo-
ments came when Valerie Hamp-
ton and Harmony Martin sniped
at one another in a snarling battle
of the tongues, with an excerpt
from "Pride and Prejudice." Valerie
played Lady Elizabeth and Har-
mony took the part of Lady
Catherine.
Then there was the fractured fairy
tale rendition of "Cinderella Finds
Time" with the entire cast getting
applause. Featured in this hilari-
ous piece were Therese Fulsom;
Heather Davis; Katrina Hilton;
Rob Davis : Ashlyn Mitchell;
Christina Lee; Christopher
Massey; Adrienne Pay; and
Camille Fulsom.
Another dramatic excerpt, "The
Cage," was skillfully played with
great passion by Jason Rudd as
Christiano and Valerie Hampton
as Chiara.
Wayne Williams had the crowd
swinging and laughing as he
played a reincarnation of Elvis
singing "Hard Headed Woman."
Noted players in "The Indian Ex-
pert" were Mr. McDaris who usu-
ally plays the school principal in
real life. Also Donna Dasher and
Melanie Humble who are often
featured as teachers on school
days. Also in this funny spoof on
summer camp were Jessica
Marrir; Laura Jackson; Becca
Molton; Fallon Palk; Elizabeth
Beaty and Sharon Stone. All the
players acquitted themselves well.


Among the poems, "Is This Love"
as Donna Dasher was "really, re-
ally," sinitten with love of a boy
as she recited a poem she had
done in 7th grade. "Cinderella
Poetry" was rendered by Elizabeth
Eller and Ashley Thompson.
Teacher Madeline Poole did a
moving tribute to Helen Keller in
a poem entitled "The Awakening"
and later in the program gave the
audience an insight into "A
Mother's World." Donna Dasher
was back in the second act with a
poem entitled "Dummy Lane."
Valerie Hampton presented two of
her poems, 'The Glade" and in a
different vein, who can forget "The
Creature in the Classroom."
Diana Sanders presented 'To Be
or Not To Be" as her special ren-
dition. The production ended as
a dramatic duo, Levi Stanley, who
came in from Apalachicola Drama
Club, to confront the charms of
Valerie Hampton in 'The Princess
Bride." It was a presentation with
Levi playing Wesley and Valerie
Hampton playing Buttercup.
None of this would have been pos-
sible without the work of the
"CREW." Director was Melanie
Humble, Assistant Director
Valerie Hampton, Stage Manger,
Jully Hampton, who also handled
props and set construction along
with Michel Hamilton. Tickets,
Programs and Publicity were done
by Valerie Hampton, Video was
handled by Spencer Harrison.
Photography was done by
Madeleine Poole.
Refreshments were provided by
the Senior Class. Among the
noted people in the audience were
two international visitors Fred
and Alice Webb, who had traveled
all the way from the British Isles
to be present at this show.
In addition to seeing the show
which they proclaimed to be "Very
good," they also came to visit their
granddaughter Melanie Humble.


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Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 3 April 1998 Page 3


EDITORIAL AND COMMENTARY


Misplaced Priorities

For the umpteenth time, an out-of-town newspaper consulted with
the local seafood spokesperson "leadership" on important seafood is-
sues, including the recent decision by the Franklin County Commis-
sion decision to appeal Judge Steinmeyer's holding about the pro-
posed golf course in Eastpoint.
It would appear that LeRoy Hall is a one issue spokesperson in these
matters, especially in the light of other, equally important issues af-
fecting the seafood business and Apalachicola Bay.
Mr. Hall lobbied against the proposals and programs of the aquacul-
ture demonstration project and succeeded in convincing the County
Commission not to approve leasing a small fraction of Apalachicola
Bay for future leaseholds. The project moved to Dixie and Levy coun-
ties where it became a success in terms of economical development
in the local clam and oyster industries.
Months later, the net-ban Amendment was imposed by voters out-
side these districts and created hardship among many in the seafood
business including Franklin County. The avenue to innovation and
progress in seafood was cut off by the rhetoric of those opposed to
aquaculture.
Now, another project must suffer the uncertainties of such specula-
tion, but Judge Steinmeyer concluded that evidence must be pre-
sented to demonstrate that the proposed course would endanger
Apalachicola Bay. This is part of what lawyers and jurists mean when
they espouse "rule of law", and it would appear that the case will
move into another forum, at some cost to Franklin County taxpayers,
without the speculation, and unsupported claims like those made
against aquaculture years ago. The closing arguments on that fateful
day in the courtroom clearly demonstrated the circus atmosphere
that accompanied the county's decision to deny aquaculture leases,
by one vote, as I recall.
This newspaper has supported local seafood industries for a long time.
We have systematically published announcements of the Marine Fish-
eries Commission even though I hold other opinions as ability to handle
those issues fairly. They act without any commercial seafood repre-
sentation on that board. We have systematically published news of
aquaculture in other species to show that the entire world is turning
to farm-raised project, led by the Japanese successes. We have con-
sistently argued that farms and natural harvesting can exist side-by-
side to the economic benefit of all those engaged in seafood.
And, we have raised warning flags on two other issues almost com-
pletely ignored by many, many others locally. One issue has to do
with the flow of freshwater into Apalachicola Bay. The Tri-River project,
involving the division of those waters by the States of Alabama, Geor-
gia and Florida has been meeting and making "progress" for many
years.
Those groups are now reviewing the formula to divide up the
freshwater flow that eventually arrives at Apalachicola Bay.
This mixture of freshwater and saltwater is what makes Apalachicola
Bay so unique in nurturing oysters that are usually disease-free, and
known far and wide as the tastiest oysters, bar none. Yet, the local
leadership in seafood is not well represented at those meetings.
The second issue ignored by local seafood leadership deals with needed
lobbying efforts about the Marine Fisheries Commission and the
Governor's office concerning seafood representation on the Marine
Fisheries Commission. A bill or two is now pending in the Florida
Legislature on that very point.
I would suggest that the concern about the golf course be better bal-
anced with a review of other priorities that, in the long term, will have
far influential impact on seafood business in this area. The current
priorities are misplaced, and should be revised to include fresh water
issues and MFC representation.
Tom W. Hoffer
Publisher
P. S. For whatever it is worth, and to be completely open concerning
the above opinion, the reader should be advised that the Chronicle
owns 2.3 acres adjacent to the proposed Golf course. However; our
corporation does not plan to go into the golfing business, nor build
apartments.



FISHERMAN'S CHOICE
Hwy. 98 Eastpoint FL 32328 (850) 670-8808


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,V t, POST OFFICE BOX 590
i ~ EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
850-927-2186
850-385-4003 (TALLAHASSEE)
oSi Facsimile 850-385-0830
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 7, No. 7


April 3, 1998


Publisher ...... Tom W. Hoffer
Editor and Manager ................. Brian Goercke
697-3657
Contributors Sue Riddle Cronkite
............ Tom Campbell
............ Bonnie Segree
.......... Rene Topping
Sales. Pam Rush
Advertising Design
and Production ...... Diane Beauvais Dyal
............ Jacob Coble
Production Assistant Stacy M. Crowe
Proofreader Tom Campbell
Circulation ............................................... Scott Bozem an
........... Larry Kienzle
Citizen's Advisory Group
George Chapel Apalachicola
Sandra Lee Johnson ...... Apalachicola
Rene Topping Carrabelle
Pam Lycett Carrabelle
Pat Morrison ..... St. George Island
Dominic and Vilma.Baragona ................. St. George Island
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung ........................ Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins................. Eastpoint
Wayne Childers ......... Port St. Joe
A nne Estes ............................................... W akulla
Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example a 10 page issue would
cost $2.00 postpaid. Please write directly to the Chronicle
for price quotes if you seek several different or similar
issues. In-county subscriptions are $16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 1998
Franklin County Chronicle, Inc.


Water Allocation in Tri-River Project Hot
Topic in Upcoming Meetings
Steve Leitman and Georgann Penson of the Northwest Florida Water
Management District have announced the next "stakeholders" meet-
ing on the Tri-River project to take place at the district's offices, Ha-
vana, Florida, on Tuesday, April 7, 1998 at 9:00 a.m. EDT.
Agenda item #2 will concern continued discussion of stakeholder in-
volvement in the allocation formula process, having to do with divid-
ing up the freshwater flowing into the Flint, Q and Apalachicola Riv-
ers. Also, agenda item #3 will deal with activities of the newly created
Apalachicola-Chattachoochi-Flint River Basis Commission, which will
function to govern the flow of freshwater downstream, and eventually
into Apalachicola Bay. Public involvement in the Water Allocation
Formula Committee will also be discussed, a topic of high interest
among the "stakeholders,", the organizers participating in the pro-
cess. The important Water Allocation Formula Committee has sched-
uled meetings in the three states for the next two months, as follows:
April 9 (Alabama)
April 24 (Georgia)
May 7 (Florida)
May 27 (Georgia)
June 29 (Alabama).
For additional information, call 850-539-5999














R.. .
1.
i 'il ., '


























Report on Northwest Florida
Side-bars to the report also convey a veiled caveat to the region. For

















employment numbers down, new jobs created, "...but growth needs
a,. 0..
,. -J. "






1998 "Economic Yearbook"

Report on Northwest Florida

"Luke-Warm"

In a copyrighted article by Matt Moore in the latest issue of Florida
Trend (April 1998), the headline tells much of the story. It reads "...The
region may be on the brink of an economic boom, but some see the
consequences of growth in other parts of Florida and say-not here."
Side-bars to the report also convey a veiled caveat to the region. For
one thing, the experts say, this part of the state can no longer assert
that it is the "forgotten coast." Tourists have discovered many of the
13 counties rounded up in the Florida Ttend economic review. These
include Escambia, Santa Rose, Okaloosa, Walton, Holmes, Washing-
ton, Ja Bay, Calhoun, Gadsden, Liberty, Gulf and Franklin.
Experts were quoted in the published pieces including economist
Henry Fishkind (Orlando) who asserts the region's "saturation point"
won't be reached for 15 years. The signs are there in the statistics
reported in the inagazine, including improved tourism numbers, un-
employment numbers down, new jobs created, "...but growth needs
nurturing." What does that mean? The experts asserted the region
needs a more balanced economy.


'THE FOURTH ESTATE THE ONLY INDEPENDENT WEEKLY JOURNAL OF NEWSPAPERING

Video Surveillance Goes Nationwide in
Professional Newspaper Trade Journal

The March 14, 1998 issue of Editor and Publisher, the national trade
magazine for practicing journalists and their editors devoted an en-
tire page to the news reports concerning the placement of a video
camera in the bathroom of the newspaper and the walk out by the
female employees.

BY DAVID NOACK


Cops Probe Hidden Video

In Fla. Newspaper Bathroom
Sheriff's deputies seize 29 videocassettes; female employees walk out


iff's deputies in Franklin County, Fla., last
week seized a video camera concealed in
the ceiling of tile Apalachlcolu Tihnc' unt-
sex bathroom and 29 videotape cassettes.
John Fred Lee, general manager of the 1,150-
circulation newspaper located on tile state's
northwest Gulf Coast, said the camera was pan of
a larger video surveillance network Installed as all
nani-dheft measure.
Sheriff's Li. Michael Moure said three to four
cameras were positioned inside tile newspaper's
offices all transmitnig to a monitor and
recorder in Lees office. Controls at the monitor
allowed a viewer to switch along tile different
cameras to see various building locations. One of
the cameras was hidden in the bathroom, directly
above the toilet used by male and female employ.
Moore said tile bathroom camentra was'canou.
tlaged inl such a way that it you did not know
what you were looking at, you would not know
what it was.
He said he received a tip about the situation
on Feb. 23. After inspecting the bathroom, Moore
said, he contacted the StateAttorney's office to
request a search warrant.
Shortly after sheriffs officers completed their
search of the newspaper's offices, seized equip.
meant and announced all ongoing investigation of
Lee, five female employees walked off their jobs.
Tlhey included a Tniaes reporter. an ad sales.
woman, the bookkeeper, a receptionist and tihe
production imalager. Somle of tile former employ.
ec arc reported 10 be meeting with all att'o
toa explore a possible civil lawsuit.
It was not known if tlae vi'-
tained images recorded ,
era, Moore said -


two-story Markelt Street building th. Imhoiuss tite
newspaper's offices, said only,'The sheriff's
deparltent haas an invst ignailin .and:is I on 1C.
they complete it, I'm sure we'Ill have commetntc
He declined to take other questions.
The Apalacicnkola Times quoted Lee s diaput.
ing tlhe Lshriffsl dellsuy's accounia o thai tie cam-
eras were opa)eraiional.
"One wsea intallcd ;i[ tile rear of the building
near tie computer server rerand another w;ls ]i)tI
into die ratl pltlatlnned to e a.1 comniainaiiin tinlh-
rooim/darkroom.ll 'Il c .amcnlers re used in
conlicinction will an ;alnirm system, bill never
wlile authorized c.lea pll,'ccs were in tile build-
ing. I illlmcdiatcly Itl tlle l search tenall that we
lhad illree or lfoLir c.alalac-.a including .)n ii n tile
liallrooni.ll tholighii n wa.s nol turned oil. I
offered tiIe ll iii'y iaa'slalie.nc, and even uit tlnIe ai
thle cui le. sal lvllc l aaay i\tt lllalll c ii. ul lI
through lt walL" Le.e qultedi as a'.)in g
Ihe nt'wepapi.er iS iviined a l);ivsd nlod ilhbcrt
Lindsay of S:arjiia lF.I.. who reportedly flew ic n
for a brief visit. They also own tile nalarl
CaI',rabtllte lnis.
Attorney Barhar. Sbanders, whoil represents the
Undsays, said slie is waiting to see tile results of
tile investigation. Slie said the owners werr
aware lltat a video security sysemn I,"'
installed, but she wias unsure if
exact locatilonls al te c:-
Sanders alsai .s,'
employees ""
their


Tourism is a positive aspect, BUT more skilled jobs are needed. Tour-
ist Development Councils, school curricula, and bed taxes are a part
of an unstated formula to evolve into a "balanced economy," accord-
ing to the published articles.
One thing is clear. The numbers of ads in newspapers and shoppers
is hardly a reliable index of economic growth and stability in this
region. The matters are much more complex. Tourism and military
activity are reliable stable elements but a small part of a dynamic and
growing economy. The general "state of economic affairs" is rehearsed
in another observation quoted in the article. "Florida has about 18,000
manufacturing firms and of that, only about 1,200 are in north
Florida."


Proposed House Bill Restricts
Video Cameras from Private


Areas
A committee hearing bill
restricting video cameras from
private areas proposed by
,Representatives Jane Gale Boyd
(D), Sally Heyman (D) and Paula
Dockery (R) was unanimously
approved in the House on March
19 and has been placed on' the
Consent calender.


Buying and selling Franklin County
antiques for 16 years.


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HOME (850) 653-8564


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Telephone: (850) 984-0381
All at tiscoanted prices you can a ffrrd!
Prom Dresses and Formals Now Available
Monday through Thursday 9:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Friday and Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Sunday 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.


The proposed House Bill 3709
provides that "It is unlawful to
observe, photograph, film,
videotape, or record without
consent or reasonable notice, a
person who is in any private place
including a public restroom or
dressing room." The proposed bill
adds, "A private place is any place
where a person has a reasonable
expectation of privacy."
Representative Boyd denied that
the proposed bill was introduced
because of a recent incident at the
Apalachicola Times in which video
cameras were removed from the
building's unisex bathroom.
"A voyeurism bill was already in
process," said Boyd. She did say,
however, that several constituents
from Franklin County had
contacted her about the matter.
"The concern was that the issue
was not in Florida Law," said
Boyd.
A person committing a violation of
the proposed bill will be guilty of
a first degree misdemeanor.

13th Annual
Antique Car Race
The 13th Annual Gold Cup An-
tique Car Race from Panama City
to Apalachicola, hosted by the
Miracle Strip Region, Antique
Automobile Club of Panama City
will end at the Gibson Inn, Sat-
urday, April 4 about 1:30 p.m.
The event will include thirty-seven
cars, the largest number of cars
in the 13-year history of the race.


East Gult Beacn unve, suu ucean Mile, 01. ueorge island.
Unit H-5, 300 Ocean Mile Townhomes. This excellent pool front unit is
in great condition. Features include: 2 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, large mas-
ter suite with walk-in closets and private balcony overlooking the pool
and beaches, open kitchen, living, and dining areas, fireplace, laundry
room, carport parking, large storage area, very well maintained grounds
and much more. $168,500


9 Apalachicola Street, Apalachicola
Great home for growing family situated on over an acre of land in a
quiet Apalachicola neighborhood. Features include: 4 large bedrooms,
2 full baths, large kitchen, formal living area with separate den, fire-
place, approximately 2,400 sq. ft., 30' x 30' shop building, 3 bay boat
shed, fruit trees, near the Apalachicola Airport and much more.
MLS#1745. $158,900


224 Franklin Boulevard Sering St. George Island &
St. George Island, FL 32328 Serving St. George Island
800/241-2021 850/927-2282 The Apalachicola Bay Area Since 1978 I1
SU T R Y www.coldwellbancker.com REALTORp
SUNCOAST REALTY E-mail: cbsuncoast@msn.com An Independentty Owned & Operated Member Of ColdweH Banker Real Estale Corporation.


FLORIDA

STATE

UNIVERSITY


MARINE

LABORATORY

OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, April 18, 1998
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Located on H 1i0way 98
j.st east of the
HLghway 319 cutoff,
approximately seven
miles east of Lanark
Village.

ExhibLts, lectures, an .
demonstrations will be
presented. Short boat
trLps dlsplaying
specimen collecting
techniques will be
available.

Being held in conjunction with:
CARRABELLE
WATERFRONT FESTIVAL

Be sire to vislt both
locations to get a
true taste of tke
scientific, culturaL
anct social mVtliet--
and enjoy thrat
marvelous Florida
seaJood!!


0 'divel an e' Sncat eat

Reidential Cm eril- nesm n Poeris- Prpety angem nt- VaatonRetas







v A6 NgA- .


Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce


Prove otes the




CarrLabelle




Wrte rnt Festival



AprLL 18, 1998-1 CarrabelLe


AJvo


stop




501(


-l^0o I


BUSINESS MEMBERS:
Absolutely Perfect Tile
American General Life & Accident
Anchor Realty
Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic
Apalachicola State Bank
Arbuckle's Sandblasting
Big Bend Ceramics
Billy Rob Signs
Bowman's Gifts & Books
C-Quarters Investments
Cablevision
Captain Randy's Charter Service
Capt. Tim's Shrimp House
Carrabelle Florist'
Carrabelle General Store Inc.
Carrabelle IGA
Carrabelle Marina
Carrabelle Medical Pharmacy, Inc.
Carrabelle Palms RV Park & Store
Carrabelle Realty
Carrabelle Times
J. E. Castoldi Association, Inc.
Cat V Charters
Cindy's of Carrabelle
William Clark (Computer Services)
Coastal Security
Coastline.
Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc.
Cook Ins.
Cool Change Charters
Crooked River Hauling
Dean Witter
Digital Express Internet Services Inc.
Dingier Machine & Welding
Dockside Marina
Shaun S. Donahoe Real Estate
Eveready Gas & Appliance Co.
Eye Savers of Carrabelle
First American Title Insurance Company
Fitness for Life Inc.
Florida Coastal Properties
Florida Power
Folks Realty
Foster Consulting
Franklin Chronicle
Franklin County Glass
Franklin Realty-Carrabelle
GT Com
Georgian Motel
Gilmar
Green Light Studio
Gulf Coast Realty of SGI, Inc.


Gulf State Bank
Gulf Supply Co.
Gulf Waters Motel
Harbour Breeze River Retreats
Harry's Bar & Package Store
Harry's Restaurant
Hawkins Printing and Graphics
HoBo's Ice Cream Parlor
Ho-Hum RV Park
D. L. Hudson Publishing
Island Charters of Carrabelle
Island Cottons
Island View Inn
Jackson's Auto
Jeanni's Journeys, Inc.
Johnnie's Restaurant
Julia Mae's Seafood Restaurant
Kelley Funeral Home
L & J Flea Market
Lamplighter Cafe
Don Lively Construction
Marks Insurance Agency
Marshall Marine Ways
Marxsen Accounting
Mary Kay Beauty Consultant
Bill Miller Realty
Miss Teak Charters
Moore Treasurers
NHC Home Care
Nightingale & Assoc. Inc.
Ochlockonee Bay Realty
Mark E. bwen, Consultant
Parramore Marine Services
Pat's Place
Pelican Inn
Pirates Landing Marina, Inc.
Poloronis Construction, Inc.
Poole's Paradise Publications
Preston's Land Prep
Putnal's Discount & Variety Store
Quality Home Repairs & Builders
Riverside Associates, Inc.
Riverview Medical Center
Robbie's Hair Styles
Rae Roeder Realty
Sanford's Bridge Marine, Inc.
Sea Breeze R.V. Park
Sean's Shanghai Saloon
Seaside Destinations
Shell Point Realty
Sportsman's Lodge
Summerhill Electric


Sun American Securities, Inc.
Survivors Bait & Tackle
The Garden Gallery
The Moorings
The Three Cats
Timber Island Realty
Two Gulls
Walters Yacht Service & Charters
Waste Management
Water Works Real Estate
Law Offices of Ben Watkins
WEXY 1520 AM
WOYS Oyster Radio, Inc.
Yvonne's Hair Fixery

AggOClATIONg/ORGANIZATIONg:
Apalachicola Maritime Museum
Big Bend Hospice, Inc.
Camp Gordon Johnston Association
Carrabelle Christian Center
Franklin County Senior Citizens
Keep Franklin County Beautiful
Lanark Village Association, Inc.
St. James-Lanark VFD
Timber Island Yacht Club, Inc.
Yaupon Garden Club


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS:
David Butler/Gulf State Bank
Ronnie Jackson/Jackson's Auto
David Jackson/Jackson's Auto
Dr. Laura P. Rider/Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic
Jane Robison/Gulf State Bank
Tom Shields/Folks Realty
Larry Smith/Florida Power
Jackie Stone/Marxsen Accounting


INDIVIDUALS:
Rachel Burris
Thomas Campbell
John & Ann Casey
J. Ann Cowles
Mary Fordham
Jackie Gay
Anthony Minichiello
Pat Riley
Barbara Sabas
Helen Schmidt
Mary Swaney
Robert & Rene Topping
Nancy Varner
William M. Wells
Cliff Willis


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Page 4 3 April 1998 The Franklin Chronicle


Published ever other Fridav


visit


P-21a







Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 3 April 1998 Page 5


T 9The





Shed




iill ii&
I .



A ntiq ues Co llectLbles
170 Water Street
Historic Downtown
Apalachkcola, FL
(850) 653-3635

A ltnvie blend of an-
tiques, collectibles, new
tseafulrnltre, art, paper-
backs & collector books,
Sllkflor4al arrangement,
collector steins, baskets,
bottles, kitchen thnlgs
and miany more distlnc-
tive accent pieceS:'
NO RTH

.0n,8 0 .
',, -.
C m" 6t ,*
TheTin ,,-S.
Hours' 70:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Thursdlay-Saturdacy
Lookjbr the bi tLg shed
on Water Street along tke
historic Apalacicola River.
P.O. Box 9
Apalachicola, FL 32329


Shown is the lighting booth in the rear of the balcony, mezzanine, and orchestra
level.


Historic Dixie Theatre

Re-Creation to Serve

Franklin County Area

By Tom Campbell
Mr. Rex Partington knows the space of his Dixie Theatre as well as he
knows the experience of live theatre. He was Artistic Director in Cleve-
land and at the Barter Theatre. At the Guthrie Theatre in Minnesota,
he was Production Manager. In New York City, he was Stage Manager
and Understudy for the original production of David Merrick's highly
successful "The Matchmaker." He also stage managed the legendary
"My Fair Lady."
Apalachicola and the whole Franklin County area can be proud of the
Historic Dixie Theatre Re-Creation in downtown Apalachicola. Own-
ers are The Partington Family. Architecture Plus is handling the ar-
chitectural design. William Barnes Construction, Inc. is General
Contractor.
Originally built about 1912, the re-creation is expected to be com-
pleted in June, 1998.
The theatre is a carefully planned and precisely executed piece of
work, including architecture and construction. An actor standing on
the 30-foot wide stage can feel the discipline of the arts already present.
The proscenium arch opens on a stage twenty-three feet deep and
nineteen feet high.
The painstakingly designed space for the audience contains three
levels, orchestra designed to seat about 200, mezzanine about 50,
and balcony about 100. A good view of the stage is possible from all
over the house, including balcony. It is the perfect space for an inti-
mate theatre, which is the best kind for the maximum living stage
experience.
"The intimacy of the theatre will facilitate the audience's participa-
tion," said Mr. Partington.
He also stated, "Ann and Wesley Chestnut had the foresight to save
the original box office. Their generosity in donating it to the theatre is
exemplary. And Clark Holmes generously donated the reconstruction
work."
The magnificently restored box office adorns the front of the building
like a real gem.
The seating in the orchestra section of the theatre is designed to be
flexible, in order to accommodate dinner theatre, dances, and other
activities.
Producing Artistic Director for the Dixie Theatre is Mr. Partington
himself, as he has years of professional experience on the job. His
responsibility is to hold the productions together and see that they
keep running smoothly. No easy task. As Producing Artistic Director,
he must dream and yet keep his feet on the ground of economics.
According.to Mr. Partington, "The Technical Director of the Dixie will
be carefully chosen," because he will help design and execute special
effects, lighting, sound, and scenery. These all help to create the at-
mosphere and environment where the magic can happen.
In addition to live theatre, Mr. Partington plans to use the space for
showing movies, holding classes, lectures, demonstrations, tours,
concerts, dances, community meetings, and educational projects. He
hopes to keep the new theatre active all year long with community
services, as well as commercial productions.
Mr. Partington said, "This theatre really belongs .to the people. We
want them to feel that.way." The Franklin County area will benefit by
having a center for the arts. Area residents can enjoy the many
opportunities.
Mr. Partington's wife is Cleo Holladay, professional actress, as is
daughter Dixie Partington. Son Tony is a singer/actor and lighting
designer. Among them they probably have about a hundred years of
professional experience in theatre. They also have a love of life, and a
generosity and concern for the well-being of their community.
The historic Dixie Theatre Re-Creation is scheduled to have its Open-
ing Night in mid-June, 1.998. This writer certainly plans to be there
for the excitement. Genuine community-minded people for miles
around will be happy to support this cultural endeavor.


-- .." -. ....


View from the stage showing overhead grid space for lighting instruments,
fly space for scenery, etc. Shown is the proscenium arch, orchestra level for
seating, mezzanine, and balcony. Lighting booth is shown in rear of balcony
area.


THE FRIENDS OF THE
FRANKLIN COUNTY
PUBLIC LIBRARYAND
THE CARRABELLE
AREA CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE
CHALLENGE YOU TO
JOIN OUR BIG
SEAFOOD GUMBO
COOKOFF TO BE'
HELD DURING THE
7TH ANNUAL
CARRABELLE .
WATERFRONT
FESTIVAL ON APRIL
18TH, 1998




NAME:

ADDRESS:



PHONE:

CUT OUTAND MAIL WITH
$5.00 ENTRY FEE TO:
CARRABELLE CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE
P.O. DRAWER DD
CARRABELLE, FL 32322


Shown is the destruction as seen during the summer of 1990; the roof over the
stage had collapsed. All projection equipment was left out in the open and rusted
because of weather. The building was eventually sold, so the re-creation could
be achieved.
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Main entrance to theatre as seen from the stairs leading to the
mezzanine of the theatre.
C- ""'

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Hours: Tuesday thru Saturda\
10:00 a.m. fill 5:00 p.m. '
Highlw\'a 67, Carrabelle, Florida .',
Phone: 697-2063 L i ....: i~I I. ii.
-- 1 .ihc l lllff* t


I I -


1








Page 6 3 April 1998 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


Franklin County Circuit

Court Report

The Honorable F.E. Steinmeyer
Assistant State Attorney Ron Flury
Assistant Pubic Defender Kevin Steiger
March 16, 1998
ARRAIGNMENT
Bruce Folson: Charged with one count of Grand Theft, the defendant pleaded
Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on
April 20. The defendant was appointed the services of the public defender.
Elijah Brown: Charged with one count of Leaving the Scene of an Accidents
involving Serious Injuries, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty to the offense.
Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on April 20. The defendant
was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Raymond Pelt: Charged with one count of Aggravated Assault with a Deadly
Weapon, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for pretrial on May 18. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly threatened
Barbara Estes with a knife on November 1, 1997 while at Charlie's Lounge in
Eastpoint. Ms. Estes alleged that the defendant approached her on the porch
of the lounge, pulled out a knife and verbally threatened her. Witness Greg
Starkey informed Michael Eller with the Franklin County Sheriffs Depart-
ment that he observed the defendant pull out a knife in the presence of Ms.
Estes.
Larry Joseph: The defendant has been charged with one count of Uttering a
Forged Check. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on April 20.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly cashed a check
from the account of Granville Croom at Risa's Pizza in Apalachicola on No-
vember 13, 1997 in the amount of $30. Mr. Croom informed authorities that
-he had not signed the check nor given the defendant permission to cash it.
Chris Buzbee: Charged with one count of Aggravated Battery, the defendant
pleaded Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
pretrial on April 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger.
John Demetrius James: The defendant has been charged with one count of
Aggravated Battery. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on April
20. The defendant was represented by Attorney Gordon Shuler.
Sonny Uptagraft: The defendant had been charged with one count of Bur-
glary of a Dwelling. This charge has been dropped. Assistant State Attorney
Ron Flury explained in his March 11 report of No Information that there was
"probable cause to arrest; however, facts insufficient to prove case beyond a
reasonable doubt." He continued, "further investigation revealed the defen-
dant assisted Diane Yon retrieve property which he was told was Diane Yon's."
The victim requested that charges against Ms. Yon be dropped.
Preston "Buck" Smith: The defendant has been charged with one count of
Possession of a Firearm on School Property. A written plea of Not Guilty was
filed on behalf of the defendant by Attorney William Webster. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for pretrial on April 20.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant was allegedly observed
on the campus of Carrabelle High School on January 29 after previously be-
ing suspended for breaking a window with his fist.
Carrabelle Police Chief Buddy Shiver reported, "I had been told by Dewayne
Coulter earlier on the 29th that there was going to be a fight between 5th and
6th period." When Shiver arrived at the school, he was informed that the
defendant was on the campus.
"I looked up." reported Shiver, "and Buck had already seen me and was leav-
ing. I stopped Buck, asking him what he was doing there, and he gave me an
excuse that he was getting his work he had to make up.
Chief Shiver allegedly observed two guns in the defendant's vehicle, a mini
233 caliber and a 12 gauge shotgun. Both weapons were fully loaded and
within immediate reach ofthe defendant, Shiver reported. He then seized both
guns and advised the defendant to meet him at the Carrabelle City Hall. While


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at City Hall, Shiver informed the defendant that he would probably obtain
warrants for his arrest.
Teresa Martinez: The defendant has been charged with one count of Posses-
sion of Cannabis with Intent to Sell and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. A
written plea of Not Guilty was filed on behalf of the defendant by Attorney
Barbara Sanders. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case fdr pretrial on
April 20.
Daniel Dillon: Charged with one count of Possession of Cannabis with Intent
to Sell and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty
to the offenses; Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on April 20.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defendant Kevin Steiger.
Joey Granger: The defendant has been charged with one count of Possession
of Cannabis with Intent to Sell, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Aggra-
vated Battery with a Deadly Weapon. A written plea of Not Guilty was filed on
behalf of the defendant by Attorney William Webster. Judge Steinmeyer con-
tinued the case for pretrial on April 20.
According to the probable cause report, officers from the Franklin County
Sheriffs Department executed a search warrant to a residence located on
Flowers Street in Eastpoint on February 5. Those present at the residence
included Teresa Martinez. Daniel Dillon,.George Ward, Jr. and the defendant.
Major Ronald Crum arrested the defendant as he allegedly began running out
of the rear door of the residence with a coffee can containing 13 individual
bags of cannabis and a pack of rolling papers. Officers then searched the
residence and discovered drug paraphernalia, a 25 caliber semi-automatic
pistol containing six rounds of ammunition, a set of Triple Beam scales and
plastic bags of cannabis in the living room and bedrooms of the home.
All those present at the residence informed officers that they were either stay-
ing in the master bedroom, guest room or living room. Everyone at the resi-
dence was arrested. The report concluded, "all subjects at the residence had
access to the cannabis found in the trailer."
George Ward, Jr.: The defendant has been charged with one count of Posses-
sion of Cannabis with Intent to Sell and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. A
written plea of Not Guilty was filed on behalf of the defendant by Attorney
Gordon Shuler. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on April 20.
Tammy Stanley: Charged with one count of Possession of Crack Cocaine and
Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty to the
offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on April 20. The
defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant was arrested by Apalachi-
cola Police Officer Jim Wilburn on February 6 on outstanding warrants. Of-
ficer Wilburn reported that he observed the defendant walking down 8th Street
and Avenue H in Apalachicola while he was on patrol.
Officer Wilburn noted that the defendant threw an object out of his patrol car
while he was driving on the Apalachicola causeway in route to the Franklin
County Jail. The defendant allegedly informed Wilburn that she had thrown a
lighter out of the window.
Deputies Carl Whaley and Gary Martina with the Franklin County Sheriffs
Department helped Wilburn search the area where the defendant had thrown
the object. Officers later discovered a "crack pipe." The paraphernalia was



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tested and revealed a positive indication of crack cocaine residue within it.
Officers were unable to find the lighter that the defendant claimed she had
thrown out of the vehicle.
Gary Taunton: Charged with one count of Leaving the Scene of an Accident
involving Injuries and DUI with Serious Injuries, the defendant pleaded Not
Guilty to the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on
April 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin
Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly struck Tiro-
thy Aramu of Niceville with his vehicle on February 12 in Apalachicola. Apalachi-
cola Police Officer Arnold Tolliver reported that he observed the defendant
traveling west on C-30 without his headlights on. Tolliver further reported
that the defendant had swerved into the opposite lane several times. After
being detained, the defendant allegedly refused to take a field sobriety and
intoxilyzer test. Mr. Aramu was taken to Weems Memorial Hospital and then
Bay Medical in Panama City for further observation.
William Boyette: Charged with one count of Grand Theft Auto, the defendant
pleaded Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
pretrial on April 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, officers from the Franklin County
Sheriffs Department were contacted by Ramona Langston on February 7 of
Panacea in concern to a stolen vehicle. Ms. Langston alleged that the defen-
dant had been working on her car. She stated that she had not given him
permission to use the vehicle. Witness Tabatha Hicks informed officers that
she had observed the defendant driving Ms. Langston's vehicle in Crawfordville.
Charles Alexander: Charged with two counts of Third Degree Grand Theft
and one count of Burglary of a Dwelling, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty to
the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on April 20.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly attempted to
sell several decoys to Chad Zingerelli on February 16. Mr. Zingerelli noticed
that the decoys that the defendant was selling were allegedly taken from his
grandfather's shed.
Continued on Page 7




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V I I


I









Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 3 April 1998 Page 7


Court Report, from Page 6
According to another probable cause report, authorities were contacted by
Christine Rhodes on January 22 in concern to a burglary at the old Rhodes
Funeral Home In Apalachicola. Ms. Rhodes informed officers that 1.800 square
feet of carpet valued at $1,500 and a commercial sewing machine valued at
$600 were missing from the funeral home.
Several witnesses allegedly informed officers that they witnessed the defen-
dant and another individual carrying a roll of carpet down 8th Street. O'Sheila
Harris informed officers that the defendant had attempted to sell her some
carpet.
Loretta Harris: The defendant has been charged with one count of Aggra-
vated Battery. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for arraignment on April
20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly struck Delley
Bryant in the face with a hammer on February 28 in Apalachicola. Mr. Bryant
was later taken to Weems Memorial Hospital for treatment.
Michael Champion: Charged with one count of Aggravated Assault with a
Deadly Weapon and Battery, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty to the offenses.
Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on April 20. The defendant
was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, Deputies Larry Litton and David
Duncan were dispatched to Barfield's Gulf Breeze Tavern on Alligator Point
on February 16 in concern to a disturbance. The officers were informed
that the defendant had allegedly been throwing bar stools while in the
establishment.
Mr. Bob Barfield informed officers that the defendant verbally threatened him
and then picked up a barstool and began swinging it at him. Barfield alleged
that he was struck in the leg with the stool when it slipped from the defendant's
grasp. Other witnesses alleged that the defendant then began throwing ash-
trays and other objects while in the bar. The incident allegedly occurred for 20
minutes.

PRETRIAL
Michael Anderson: Charged with one count of Burglary of a Structure. the
defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer withheld ad-
judication and sentenced the defendant to two years of probation.
As a condition of probation, the defendant will have to complete 50 hours of
community service. The defendant will also be screened and evaluated for
substance abuse treatment. Judge Steinmeyer ordered the defendant to pay
$250 for court costs. A restitution amount will be determined at a later date.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Charles Brown: Charged with one count of Possession of a Controlled Sub-
stance with Intent to Sell, Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon. Pos-
session of Cannabis, Possession of Less than 20 Grams of Marijuana and
Violation of Probation, the defendant pleaded No Contest to all charges except
Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon.
Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced him to 30
months in the Department of Corrections with credit for 95 days of time served.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
William Davidson: The defendant has been charged with one count of Aggra-
vated Assault with a Deadly Weapon. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case
for pretrial on April 20.


Thomas Davy: The defendant has been charged with one count of Possession
of a Controlled Substance, Possession of Cannabis and DUI. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for pretrial on April 20. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Charles Dean: The defendant has been charged with one count of Felony
Battery with Bodily Harm and Battery. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case
for pretrial on April 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.
Richard Edgecomb: The defendant has been charged with one count of Lewd
and Lascivious Assault on a Child Under 16. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for trial on May 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.
David Ellis: The defendant has been charged with one count of Delivery of a
Controlled Substance. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on
May 18. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin
Steiger.
Christopher Granger: The defendant has been charged with one count of
Third Degree Grand Theft. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial
on April 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin
Steiger.
William Hammond: Charged with one count of Aggravated Assault with a
Deadly Weapon, the defendant pleaded No Contest to the lesser offense of
Aggravated Assault. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and
sentenced him to two years of probation. As a condition of probation, the
defendant will be screened and counseled for substance abuse. Judge
Steinmeyer also ordered the defendant to pay $255 for court costs. The defen-
dant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Jack Hubbart: The defendant had been charged with one count of Aggravated
Assault with a Deadly Weapon. This charge has been dropped. Assistant State
Attorney Ron Flury explained in his March 12 report of Nolle Prosequi that
upon "further investigation by, this office with respect to the victim's recollec-
tion of events as well as further considerations including the victim's request
to dismiss, the case cannot be proved beyond a reasonable doubt." The defen-
dant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Wordsworth Irving: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sexual
Battery upon a Child Under 12 Years of Age and Lewd and Lascivious Assault
on a Child Under 16 Years of Age. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
trial on May 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender
Kevin Steiger.
Jackie Jones: The defendant has been charged with one count of Possession
of Contraband at a County Detention Facility. Judge Steinmeyer continued
the case for pretrial on April 20. The defendant was represented by Attorney
Doug Gaidry.
Curtis Lake: The defendant has been charged with two counts of Sale of
Crack Cocaine. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on April 20.
The defendant was represented by Attorney Barbara
Sanders.
Robert Lee: The defendant has been charged with one count of Resisting an
,Officer With Violence. The case has been reset for March 23 before Judge Van
Russell. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin
Steiger.
Cliff Massey: The defendant has been charged with one count of Dealing in
Stolen Property. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on April 20.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.


Michelle Massey: The defendant has been charged with one count of Uttering
a Forged Instrument, Grand Theft of a Motor Vehicle and Providing a False
Report to a Law Enforcement Officer. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case
for pretrial on April 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.
Tony Sadler: The defendant has been charged with one count of Possession
of Cannabis with Intent to Sell, Possession of More than 20 Grams of Can-
nabis and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Judge Steinmeyer continued
the case for trial on April 22. The defendant was represented by Attorney
John Edward Eagen.
Charlene Simmons: The defendant had been charged with one count of Pos-
session of Cocaine, Possession of a Controlled Substance and Possession of
Drug Paraphernalia. These charges have been dropped. Assistant State Attor-
ney Ron Flury explained in his March 25 report of No Information that "the
defendant was deemed incompetent to proceed by a court appointed psy-
chologist." He pointed out that the defendant had no prior record. Flury con-
cluded, "further cost to the county for an additional psychological evaluation
is not warranted."
Cecil Strickland: The defendant has been charged with one count of Lewd
and Lascivious Assault on a Child Under 16 Years of Age. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for pretrial on May 18. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Michael Cain: The defendant had been charged with one count of Third De-
gree Criminal Mischief. This charge has been dropped. Assistant State Attor-
ney Ron Flury explained in his March 12 report of Nolle Prosequi that the
defendant agreed to pay restitution in the case, while the victim was in agree-
ment to the disposition. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.
Tilden Fichera: Charged with one count of Resisting Arrest With Violence
and Battery on a Law Enforcement Officer, the defendant pleaded no contest
to the offense of Battery on a Law Enforcement Officer. Judge Steinmeyer
adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced him to eight months in the
Franklin County Jail with credit for 153 days of time served. Judge Steinmeyer
also ordered the defendant to pay $255 for court costs. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Ronald Henderson: The defendant has been charged with one count of Ag-
gravated Fleeing and Eluding, Resisting Arrest Without Violence and Reckless
Driving. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on April 22. The defen-
dant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Andre Rosier: Charged with one count of Possession of Cocaine, the defen-
dant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the
defendant Guilty and sentenced him to 90 days in the Franklin County Jail
with credit for eight days of time served. Judge Steinmeyer also sentenced the
defendant to two years of probation and ordered him to pay $255 for court
costs and $100 to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) for lab
costs. As a condition of probation, the defendant will be screened and coun-
seled for substance abuse. The defendant was represented by Assistant Pub-
lic Defender Kevin Steiger.
Ben Turrell: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sale of Crack
Cocaine. This charge has been dropped. Assistant State Attorney Ron Flury
explained in his March 11 report of Nolle Prosequi that facts were insufficient
to prosecute the case. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.

Continued on Page 10


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Funding for the trail was provided
in part from a grant of $13,000
supplied by the Florida Depart-
ment of State, assisted by the
Bureau of Historic Preservation
Advisory Council.
Laffan's original idea was the con-
cept of offering information to ca-
noeists. kavakers and other shal-


On Saturday, March 22, at 10:30 low draft boat owners about the
a.m. inaugural ceremonies were heritage, both historical and an-
held on the deck at Angelo's Res- thropological.
taurant to honor the founding of
the nation's first archaeological Although Laffan died on August
boat trail. For those gathered to- 5, 1998 after a long illness and so
gether in the crisp spring air, al- was not able to see the culmina-
though the trail is officiallynamed tion of his original idea, the
The Barry Laffan Apalachee Ar- project was taken up by a long
chaeological Boat Trail, it will be term friend and colleague,
forever "Barry's Trail." Many of Madeline Carr. who took up the
these people were members ofThe task of finishing the dream.
Association for the Apalachee Laffan dreamed of a three fold
Culture and Coastal Wilderness aan am a
Area (AACCWA) founded by Barry plan. Number one to enhance
Laffan who was its Charter appreciation of the Ochlockonee
President. Bay's long term cultural heritage
and the importance of conserving



HOMETOWN Pl

Monday-Saturday:
8 a.m.-8 p.m.
Sunday:
8:30 a.m.-7 p.m.I

850-984-5286
Panacea Plaza W
Panacea, Florida QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
Prices in this ad good from April 1st-April 9th
Here is your Value Checklist for this week, clip and
bring with you as you shop "Hometown Proud"
DAIRY:
Sunny Delite Juice-128 oz.............. $1.89
Pillsbury Crescent Rolls-8 oz. ........... $1.79
Pilsbury Danish Rolls "Assorted"-
11 & 13 oz...................................... $1.69
FROZEN:
Patio "Assorted" Burritos-5oz......... 3/99
Tyson's Boneless Chicken Patties, Fillet &
Tenders 9 &10 oz. ........................... $2.49
Tyson's Chicken Stir Fry Kit-28 oz... $4.49
PRODUCE:
SBananas-3 Ibs. ................................... 99
SGreen Cabbage-31bs ............................ 990
Yellow Corn-3 ears.............................. 990
MEATS:
SBoneless Beef Shoulder Roast per lb. $1.59
Boneless Rib-Eye Steaks per Ib ......... $4.59
Fryer Leg Quarters per b. .................... 394
SBoneless Beef Chuck Roast per Ib. .... $1.39
Fresh Ground Chuck per Ib .............. $1.69
SEdkrich Smoked Beef Sausage-16oz. .... 99
SPork Country Style Pork Ribs per lb.. $1.49
SButter Ball Franks-16 oz ...................... 99
Pork Boston Butt Roast per Ib.......... $1.09
SBoneless Chuck Steaks per Ib............ $1.69
London Broil from Top Round per lb. $2.29
GROCERY:
__ Bake Rite Shortening-42 oz. ........... $1.39
Lucky Leaf Apple Juice-46 oz.......... $1.49
Duncan Hines Cake Mix ...................... 790
Folger's Flake Coffee-11 oz. .... 2 for $5.00
IGA Bath Tissue-4 rolls ..................... 89
Shopper Value Bleach-1 gal. .............. 894
Tide Detergent-39 oz. .................... $2.99
Pepsi Cola-12 pack ......................... $3.49


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Property For
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ancient relics. Secondly, to create
a novel non-intrusive attraction
for eco-tourists. Thirdly, he felt he
would accomplish his goals by
constructing a combination of
education, recreation, outdoor
adventure experiences. He felt
that eco-tourism, although
scorned by many, is the wave of
the future for fragile ecosystems
such as the Ochlockonee Bay
area.
Laffan was so entwined in his
project that when he married
Joanna Mauer. They exchanged
their wedding vows on Landing
Number Seven. Kate Brimberry's
property, where today people have
access to see a shell midden 500-
1000 years old. When he died his
ashes were interred on that same
midden and Barry Laffan became
a part of the trail he worked so
hard to build.
There are eleven points of inter-
est along the trail, ranging 7rom
Mounds, Fisheries remnant, of
the Tar Pine industry, Ange.o's
Restaurant, famous as the "wa-
tering hole" for the Florida State
Legislators during Prohibition
Days. In the twenties Wakulla was
a "dry" county and Franklin was
"wet" so the crafty legislators in-
cluded Angelo's into Franklin
County to lessen their mileage to
a drink.


Barry's Trail

Points of

Interest
1. Marsh Island Park
2. Marsh Island Mound
3. Ochlockonee Fisheries
4. Tar Pine
5. Angelo's Restaurant
6. Surf Road
7. Brimberry
8. Nichols
9. Live Oak Landing
10. Shell River
11. Shell Hammock

The trail is interpreted through a
series of large signs and offers a
unique experience if someone
hankers to find out about people
who lived in the area up to 3,000
years ago. There are additional
attractions for the nature lovers.
Wild flowers and all manner of
wildlife. Visigoth will be treated to
flights of the Monarch Butterflies,
hawks, bald eagles, alligators, all
manner of wading birds, gopher
tortoises, and quiet places to con-
template. Laffan always felt that
water was so essential in early
man's life for survival and now is
used for food and recreation.
The Ochlockonee is readily acces-
sible from ramps at the west end
of the bridge in Franklin County
and at Ochlockonee River State
Park, Mashes Island Park, and
Angelo's in Wakulla County.

Continued on Page 8


Four long-term water front rentals available.
Private,prestigiousSt. Georgelsland'sPlantation
offering 24-hour security, boardwalk beach
accesses, cool pool and tennis courts. These two
choice acres are available today: Indian Bay Village
lot 12: A perfect comer lot with bay view, many
lovely trees only $49,000. Indian Bay Village lot
14: Superbuildingacre with Bayview, nicelytreed
and ready for your home. $67,500.
Call us todayfor these orother choice properties.


Location! Island Home with Great Gulf
View.Just steps to the Beach, Shopping or
Restaurants. This 3 bedroom, 2 bath with
spacious open family living area and split
bedroom plan is your perfect Island
getaway. Completely furnished. $179,000.


MAKE PLANS NOW FOR THE SEVENTH ANNUAL


SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1998


ART 5HOW
MARKET
featuring all kinds of o
art products and crafts
We've had our share ol
ity merchandise Uhat y
enjoy seeing... and ma
buying. If you have YO
OWN unique or creative
or crafts items why not
on exhibiting and sellir
them in our ANT S5OW
MARKET?


CHILDREN'5


EVENTS
This year we are continuing
to include more entertain.
ment. games and other
things for the kids. This
includes fun rides on an
1090 steam train replica.




EDUCATIONAL
EXHIBITS
Learn more about the won-
derful environment that is
franhlln County and the
Canabelle Area by way of
sme specialty exhibits that
are being planned right now.


^I{


& SEAFOOD
GUMBO
original COOKOFF
Squal- has grown Into a major part
oull of our festival. The coosoff Is
ybe sponsored by The Gulf St.te
UR Bank who invites all of you
e arts cooks AMD seafood lovers to
plan be part of the fun and prizes.
ig Last year's winner, Jackie
and Gay went on to win The
Newman's Own national
Recipe Contest Enter YOUR
recipe or just bring your
taste buds.For entry forms or
more information please call
Bonnie
Stephenson
at 697-2585




FOOD


BOOTHS


FUN & BOAT MARITIME


AUCTIONS5
Individuals and businesses
contribute a wide assort-
ment of merchandise and
services to the FUM AUC-
TlOrl. Bidders get great
deals and EVERYOIE has a
lot of FUrI. Wade and Paula
Clark and of Wade Clark
Auctions are the pros who
run the FUnt AUCTION as well
as THE BOAT AUCTIO11. Sell
your boat or buy one for a
"deal". CALL 904-229-9282
for further Information.
(License numbers A81239/
AU1757)

^^^^WV,


CRAFTS
Carrabelle's entire history
centers around the seas.
Countless skills were neces-
sary in order to live and
work In the seafood and
fishing Industries. Many of
these skills are changing or
dying out but we plan to
have some of them on dis-
play to entertain and edu-
cate our visitors. If YOU
have one of these
skills or have
access to tools or -
'props that may
be shown or dis-
played.
please let
us know.


Call the Chamber at
.. 697.2585


ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE
Waterfront Festival April 18, 1998


9:re a gradpa00 Open ary Lou Bowman
trivaland ours sf noAefcep- 9:30 Mayor Charles MIlllender
tlon. Besides the popular 9:45 Chamber President Tomm
Seafood Gumbo Cookoff we 10:00 Church of God Eastpoint
have more local food ven- 11:00 Pattle and Lennle Mlnlstrle
dots than ever to show off 11:50 David Richards
and sell there own spedalty 12:00 Carrabelle Christian Center
foods and recipes. And well 1:00 Evelyn McAnally
have all those other trd-. 1:30 Wayne Williams
Uonal food favorites that 2:00 Music by Twilight.
festival-goers expect. 4:00 Fun Auction
Eating Is as good a reason 5:00 Run Foot
as any to com on down oo c
and erjoy The Eighth Annual 5:30 $500.00 Cash Drawing
Carrabelle Waterfront 6:00 Music by "Twilight"
Festival... and Blues Brothers Set
spend plenty of 8:00 End
time In the food (Tentatve and subject to change)
Court Area.
Take a Sailboat Ride with Captain Jack as he te
his new ape: "Tales of the land and Sea

The Carrablle Area Chamber of Commerce
P.O. Drawer DD, CarrabiU Llorida 32322 |
850/697-2585 a-


y Loftin
Singers
sn
r Singers


lls stores from
I)aL


Sales and
Long Term
Rentals


Barry's Trai--

First in the

:NatiOn ... .........


By Rene Topping


"RIVER RUN"
FOOT RACE
This will mark the second
year for yet another exciting
Waterfront Festval tradition
- our River Run foot race
competition scheduled at
5:00PM. If you are Interest-
ed In participating In this
event and would like to
know more Information
please call the Chamber
office between 10:00AM
S and 2:00 PM at
697-2585


See where Carrabelle's
going, see where
Carrabelle's been... but
most of all, see where
Carrabelle Is right now!
enjoy the flavors and fun
of the Coast along the
picturesque Carrabelle
Harbor where the
Intracoastal Waterway
meets the Gulf of
Mexico. This festival Is
for and by the communi-
ty, who Invites all of you
readers of the Coast
Line to come Join us,
APRIL 18th, 1998.


I -









Page 8 3 April 1998 The Franklin Chronicle


Victims Bill of Rights

Introduction by Jeannie Taylor
The constitution guarantees Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happi-
ness; yet, in homes plagued by domestic violence, the very person
who has vowed to Love, Honor and Respect is the very person who
violates these rights...not privileges, but Human Rights.
Children also have these rights; however, when raised in a violent
environment, they will not only spend their youth suffering such
abuse...they will most likely spend their adulthood as an abuser. Sta-
tistics indicate that violence begets violence.
Like the proverbial pebble thrown into the lake, this learned violent
behavior is rippling into our schools and communities at a frighten-
ing rate. If our citizenry will commit to reaching out to the families in
distress, the benefits of this outward show of concern will also have
the same rippling effect into our schools and communities.
Think about it. Hopefully, you'll decide to STAND with Refuge House
by volunteering, making donations or offering ideas. Let us know your
thoughts. Send all correspondence to P.O. Box 614, Carrabelle, FL
32322 or call 697-3983.
Crimes That Meet the Legal Definition of
Domestic Violence Trigger Special Rights,
Responsibilities, Powers, and Immunity
When a crime meets the legal definition of "domestic violence", there
are special:

1. RIGHTS:
The victim has a right to:
* call law enforcement for protection;
* have a report written on the alleged incident;
* have a thorough investigation conducted (including interviews
with witnesses/collaterals, evidence collected, photographs taken,
etc.;
" not be arrested for acts of self-defense;
* be offered and receive necessary medical care;
* be advised of legal rights & services available (at each contact
site);
* have the perpetrator arrested or assistance provided to obtain a
warrant and/or protective order for acts of actual or threatened
abuse;
* be advised prior to an abuser's release from incarceration. If prior
notification is not successful, to be notified within 4 hours following
the release;
* request restitution.

2. RESPONSIBILITIES:
The law enforcement officer is required to:
* make a written police report;
* assist the victim in getting any necessary medical assistance;
* inform the victim about the domestic violence center where s/he
may receive services and provide the telephone number for the
center;
* tell the victim that domestic violence is a crime and that the sole
responsibility for decisions about whether charges are filed is with
the state and not the victim;
* provide a Legal Rights and Remedies card;
* provide information about how to obtain an injunction against
domestic violence;
* ask the victim if s/he wants to be notified when the abuser is
released from jail;
* request the victim to complete a "Notification Card" containing the
name,, address, phone number of victim, appropriate next of kin or
designated contact person;
* give the victim the offense report number;
* prepare and forward the paperwork necessary to charge and
prosecute a suspect;
* hold the defendant in custody until brought before the court at
first appearance to consider bail and setting pretrial release condi-
tions;
* conduct a thorough investigation;
The notification card gives the jail the information needed to notify
the victim within 4 hours after the abuser is released on bail and at
least 4 hours before the abuser is released from incarceration. This
notification is required by 760.001(1)F.S. it also provides the pros-
ecutor with a contact number should the victim need to go in hiding.
The prosecutor is required to:
* perform and provide the court with a "thorough investigation of the
defendant's history, including, but not limited to prior arrests for
domestic violence, prior arrests for non-domestic charges, prior in-
junctions for protection against domestic and repeat violence where
the defendant is the respondent, and noting history of other victims,
and prior walk-in complaints filed against the defendant."
The court is required to:
* "consider the safety of the victim, the victim's children, and any other
person who may be in danger if the defendant is released, and exer-
cise caution in releasing defendants and setting pretrial release condi-
tions" at first appearance and may consider setting conditions on
pretrial release from jail that:
prohibit the abuser from contacting the victim,
prohibit contact or limits visitation with children
require alcohol and drug screening,
Require alcohol/drug testing at regular intervals,
require weapon forfeiture,
mandate counseling/psychological evaluation.
* order the abuser to a minimum term of 1 year's probation where the
abuser is found guilty, has adjudication withheld or pled no contest
to a crime of domestic violence
* order the abuser to attend a batterers' intervention program as a
condition of probation where the abuser is found guilty, has adjudi-
cation withheld or pled no contest to a crime of domestic violence,
and may;
prohibit the abuser from contacting the victim,
prohibit contact or limits visitation with children,
require alcohol and drug screening,
require alcohol/drug testing at regular intervals,
require weapon forfeiture,
mandate counseling/psychological evaluation.
Conditions of pretrial release or sentencing must be reasonably
related to the domestic violence.

3. POWERS:
Legal authority allows the law enforcement officer to make a warrant-
less arrest, with good faith and probable cause for:
stalking (misdemeanor and felony offenses)(784.08(5)
crimes of "domestic violence" (741)
violation of an order of protection against repeat or domestic
violence issued by Florida or any other state (901.15)
violation of court imposed pretrial release conditions for prior
arrest for domestic violence (741.29)
misdemeanor animal cruelty

4. IMMUNITY:
A LEO who acts in good faith and exercises good care in making an
arrest for domestic violence or violation of injunction is immune from
civil liability that otherwise might result.(901.15(7) and 741.29(5)


The prosecutor and court are virtually immune from civil liability.


Wakulla





Lumber & Truss, INC.
4379 Crawfordville Highway P.O. Box 640
Crawfordville, FL 32326
(850) 926-8919
Residential Commercial


Galloway again reiterated that
such incidents were quite serious
and would not be tolerated.


Carports-Trailers
Kennels-Screened Rooms

Wakulla

Portable Buildings
319 South


Published every other Friday


m -


Marine
Fisheries
Commission
STATE OF FLORIDA

Net Fishing Rule

Amendments

Approved

Reef Fish Public
Workshops Scheduled
The Governor and Cabinet on
March 24th approved Marine
Fisheries Commission proposed
rule amendments that clearly de-
fine legal saltwater fishing nets
and specify how these nets may
be legally fished in Florida waters.
This action conforms Commission
fishing gear rules with provisions
of the constitutional amendment
approved by Florida voters in
1994 that limits net fishing, and
with recent legislation. The rule
amendments prohibit the use of
any seine with a mesh size larger
than 2 inches stretched mesh,
delete obsolete net gear provi-
sions, and establish certain con-
stitutional and statutory conform-
ing provisions. These rule amend-
ments take effect April 27, 1998.

REEF FISH PUBLIC
WORKSHOPS
The Marine Fisheries Commission
has scheduled a series of public
workshops to receive comment on
proposed changes to the manage-
ment of various reef fish. These
proposals, intended primarily to
track federal reef fish manage-
ment plans, would:
- reduce the minimum size limit
for red snapper harvested from
Gulf of Mexico waters from 16 to
15 inches total length
- provide an automatic closure of.
state waters to Gulf recreational
red snapper harvest when federal
waters close to such harvest (af-
ter 6 weeks prior notification of
the projected closure)-a fixed clo-

sure period instead is also being
considered
- prohibit retention of the recre-
ational bag limit of Gulf red snap-
per by captain/crew on for-hire
vessels
- prohibit the sale of red snapper
harvested from state waters
- require both "South Atlantic
snapper-grouper" and "Gulf red
snapper" commercial licenses in
Commission rules
- establish a 2 fish daily recre-
ational bag limit (within the 5 fish
daily aggregate limit for all grou-
pers) for black and gag grouper,
increase the minimum size limit
on black and gag grouper from 20
to 24 inches total length, and pro-
hibit the harvest, possession, pur-
chase and sale of black and gag
grouper during March and April
all of these provisions would ap-
ply statewide)
- increase the minimum size limit
on black sea bass from 8 to 10
inches total length statewide, and
establish a 20 fish daily recre-
ational aggregate bag limit on all
sea bass species statewide
- establish a statewide 12 inches
total length minimum size limit
for white grunts, and establish a
20 fish statewide aggregate daily
bag limit and apply it to either all
grunts or to just white grunts

Small Fire at AHS
Under Investigation

A small fire set on the evening of
March 31 at Apalachicola High
School is still under investigation.
Investigator Thomas Bosco with
the State Fire Marshall's Office
reported that a couple of trash
cans had been set on fire at the
school. He said that minor
damage to the pillars and ceiling
of the school resulted from the
fire.
Currently, Bosco said that he still
needs to interview some of the
students at AHS as a part of the
investigation.
Superintendent Brenda Galloway
commented on the seriousness of
the incident. "Kids need to know
that this is a serious offense," said
Galloway, "it's a violation of the
code of conduct and a class four
offense." A student guilty of such
an offense may receive a 10 day
suspension from school and.
possible expulsion.
On March 24, Superintendent
Galloway noted that pepper spray
had been sprayed in the vent of
an air conditioner at Apalachicola
High School. She said that
students were released from
school following that event.


Barry's Trail, front


Waterfront Festival, from Page 1


good day, twenty or more tourists
stop to take a photo of the cur-
rent phone booth on Highway 98
in Carrabelle.
Speaking of the 1998 Waterfront
Festival, Ms. Stephenson said,
"We need to get the participation
of the local area residents and
businesses, attending the day's
events and enjoying all the food,
fun and exhibits. Many busi-
nesses are helping with the Fun
Auction. There are already over 45
items for auction. For example,
Carrabelle Florist has donated a
lovely Spring Wreath, valued at
nearly fifty dollars."
Other items donated include: Gift
Certificate for $50 from Putnall's
Variety which sells clothing; a
Framed Mirror valued at $200
from Franklin County Glass; two
nights for one valued at $38 do-
nated by Gulf Waters Motel;
Walters Yacht Service donated a
Grouper Pole valued at $100; Eve
Saver donated an Eye Exam and
Glasses valued at almost $100;
Harry's Restaurant donated Sea-
food Dinner for Two at about $25;
Cindy's of Carrabelle and Julia
Mae Restaurant each donated Gift
Certificates of $25; Sharon's Place
donated Dinner for Two at $25;
Bowman's Gifts and Books, Gift
Certificate $25; Fitness for Life,
One Month Membership at
$26.50; and many others.
For young people there are nu-
merous activities, including
games and educational demon-
strations. Some of these are Moon
Walk, Spin Art, games from
"Friends of the Franklin County
Library," Face Painting, and an
exhibit by the Bureau of Seafood
and Aquaculture. Captain Put-
Put is a boat for tours for "kids of
all ages," Ms. Stephenson said.
"Maritime exhibits will be near the
Pavilion."


There will be Train Rides and Sail-
n Page 7 boat Rides by the Sea Explorers.
A Forestry Trailer, among
others, will provide exhibits and
i" ''" demonstrations.


., mP r .,. r"
Barry Laffan
Speakers at the dedication wer
Madeline Carr; Wakulla County
Commission Chairman, Wyati
Pope; Florida State University Pro
fessor, Anthony J. Parades; Gler
Doran, Florida Department of His-
toric Preservation; Fred Gaske
Florida Tourism Industry Market-
ing Director, Frank Nocera; U.S
Forest Service Representative
Larry Kolk; Wakulla Chamber of
Commerce President, Bob Routa
Gulf Marine Specimen Laboratory
Co-President, Ann Rudloe; and
Joanna Mauer widow of the late
Barry Laffan.
Ms. Mauer said later that she fell
it was a fitting and beautiful dedi-
cation and that she was grateful
to all who had helped to bring 11
to completion. She said that she
is seeking an individual or an or-
ganization to take over the reins
and keep the AACCWA on the
track it was started on by her late
husband-that of promoting sus-
tainable development and growth
while promoting proper resource
utilization. The AACCWA is sup-
ported by private donations.
Maps of the trail are available
right now at the Wakulla Cham-
ber of Commerce and will soon be
available at the Carrabelle Area
Chamber of Commerce.


HanndilHouses o


&,ciPWWi


Crawfordville, Fla 32327
850-926-8215 850-697-2638
Jerry Mathis or Barbara Snell
NO DOWN PAYMENT
IN A VARIETY OF STYLES, METALS, SIZES & COLORS.


Phase One of the Master Plan of
Carrabelle Riverwalk Park will be
partially completed. The City is
doing this ambitious project and
has received "grant money for it,"
Ms. Stephenson said. In the de-
sign shown, the Riverwalk Park
Stretches along the Carrabelle
River and Marine Street.
The 20-foot by 40-foot Pavilion
and Observation Deck is now
complete and will be featured as
part of the 1998 Waterfront Fes-
tival. "The City is doing a terrific
job with this Riverwalk Park," said
Ms. Stephenson.
Mary Lou Bowman, Entertain-
ment Director for the Festival, will
officially Open the Festival on the
Riverwalk Pavilion at 9:00 AM,
followed by Mayor Charles
Millender and Chamber President
Tommy Loftin.
e Entertainment will be provided by
y Church of God Eastpoint Sing-
t ers, Boat Auction-Gulf State
Bank, Evelyn McAnally on stage,
1 Wayne Williams, Music by "Twi-
-light," including Blues Brothers
set.
'There will be all kinds of good
food to eat," said Ms. Stephenson,
f obviously looking forward to en-
joying that. Jackie Gay's Famous
SSeafood Gumbo, last year's win-
ner of the Seafood Gumbo
Cookoff. will be on sale all day,


- establish a 14 inches total length
minimum size limit and a 5 fish
daily recreational bag limit for red
porgies in Atlantic Ocean state
waters, and prohibit the harvest
and sale in excess of the bag limit
and all sale of red porgies in
March and April in Atlantic state
waters (other possible manage-
ment options for Gulf red porgy
are also being considered)
- require that all reef fish species
included in Commission rules be
landed in a whole condition, and
designate all reef fish species as
"restricted species"
- standardize commercial closure
language in Commission reef fish
rules
- raise the minimum size limit for
hogfish
- prohibit all possession of under-
size Nassau grouper
- specify that the 1 fish daily rec-
reational bag limits for speckled
hind and Warsaw grouper are
within the 5 fish aggregate daily
grouper bag limit
The Commission encourages all
interested persons to participate
in the workshops, which will take
place from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. as
follows:
Wednesday, April 15,1998
Steinhatchee Community Center
1013 Riverside Drive, S.E.
STEINHATCHEE
Thursday, April 16, 1998
Madeira Beach City Hall
300 Municipal Drive
MADEIRA BEACH
Thursday, May 7, 1998
Department of Environmental
Protection
Twin Towers Office Building
2600 Blair Stone Road
Room 609'
TALLAHASSEE


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as long as the supply lasts.
The 1998 Seafood Gumbo Cookoff
is open to all cooks who would like
to enter. Gulf State Bank and The
Chamber of Commerce invite all
to participate for lots of fun, food
and prizes.
The top three contestants win
cash prizes from $75 to $200, and
there will be other prizes for 4th
through 10th Place. All proceeds
from the sale of the Gumbo will
go to the Library and The Wings
Program.
All Gumbo Entries are to be
signed up no later than 10:30 AM
at The Festival Site for Placement.
"You must have the Gumbo in a
Crockpot Container," the Rules
state. "Please bring a stirring
spoon and an extension cord.
Judging will take place at 11:00
a.m. Bring no glass lids; tin lids
will be provided on site. Do not
bring rice pots. The Chamber will
provide cooked rice."
For more information, you may
phone Bonnie Stephenson at 697-
2585, or David Butler at 697-
3183, or Barbara Sabas at 697-
2787. There is an Entry Fee of
$5.00 per pot and the recipe must
contain Florida Seafood.
Ms. Stephenson states that "all
kinds of delicious food" will be
available, including Cassie and
her Funnel Cakes, Sno Cones,
Shrimp Fritters, Boiled Shrimp,
Slinky Fries, Hamburgers, Fried
Mullet Dinners, Cajun Food,
Grilled Chicken, Hot Dogs, Home-
made Ice Cream, Barbecue
Chicken, Nachos, Polish Sausage,
Chicken Wings, Cherry Clams,
Blooming Onions, Lemonade,
"and of course, our own Jackie
Gay's Famous Winning Gumbo."
According to Ms. Stephenson, one
of the major events is the 5K Road
Race, sponsored by the Tate's Hell
Track Club.
Dr. Hobson Fulmer and Mason
Beam are in charge of this event.
Start of the race is scheduled for
5:00 PM at Cat-5 Charters on
Marine Street. The course will run
along the old highway (Gulf Av-
enue) along the shore in
Carrabelle. To enter the race, any-
one may register up until 4:30
p.m. at the Starting Line at Cat-5
Charters.
Throughout the day at The Wa-
terfront Festival, both local Radio
Stations will broadcast live. WOYS
Oyster Radio, 100.5 FM, and
WXGJ Country Music 105.5 FM
will be broadcasting, "probably
near The Riverwalk Pavilion," said
Ms. Stephenson, "or wherever
there is a newsworthy event."
'The Master Plan of Carrabelle
Riverwalk Park, Phase One," she
stated, "is wonderful for the City,
as well as the Festival. The Pavil-
ion Area will be complete in time
for the Festival, and we are de-
lighted."



[eTom;


t

t

r








Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 3 April 1998 Page 9


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DEBT CONSOLIDA.TION ,,Mipimum,$3500,.& up.a,.
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HOME LOANS, PURCHASES & Refinances only-Good,
Bad or No Credit.-Pay debts, judgements, collections-No
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HOMEOWNERS call CommonPoint Mortgage today and
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(800)968-2221.


HOMEOWNERS! DEBT CONSOLIDATION! Borrow
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REFINANCE&SAVE$100sEACHMONTH. WithToday's
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FOR SALE


FACTORY DIRECT POOL HEATERS. Heatpump, Solar,
or Gas. Majorbrands. New/Used. Doityourselforinstalled.
Free Phone Quotes. (800)333-WARM (9276)
www.solardirect.com Members BBB. Lic. #CWC029795.

PRESSURE'CLEANERS: FACTORY DIRECT SALE!!!
2800 PSI $599; 3500 PSI $799, 4000 PSI, $889, 4500 PSI
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HEALTH AND FITNESS


LOSE UP TO 30 POUNDS in 30 days! Brand New Herbal
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days...Guaranteed! Call now for FREE information. (800)606-
1259.

MEDICAL SUPPLIES. MEDICARE recipients are you
using a Nebulizer machine? Stop paying full price for
Albuterol, Atrovent etc. Solutions. Medicare will pay for
them. We bill Medicare for you and ship directly to your
door. MED-A-SAVE (800)538-9849.


HELP WANTED


$$1,000$$ SIGN-ON BONUS, miles, hometime, paid vaca-
tion, respect! For Company Drivers with Class A CDL, 1 yr.
OTR Call PFT Roberson, Premier Flatbed Hauler. (800)305-
6050.

1000 Envelopes=$4000...Receive $4 forever envelope you
stuff with oursales materials. Guaranteed! For free info, call
24 hr, recording 3.0-851.-3360, askofpr Dept R6... ,,

DRIVER OTR COVENANT TRANSPORT- West Coast
Runs. $1,000 Sign-onbonus for Experienced Drivers. Health/
Life Insurance Available First Day On Truck. Experienced
Drivers, Owner Operators and Teams Call (800)441-4394.
Graduate Students Call (800)338-6428.

DRIVERS. TUITION FREETRAINING. North American
Van Lines has tractor trailer driver openings for owner
operators in all divisions. Tractor purchase program, no up
front money required. Call (800)348-2147 Dept. FLS.

EARN MONEY READING BOOKS! $30,000/yr income
potential. Details. (800) 513-4343. Ext. Y-1616.


5 Aa^UcdeI, ~LeI/.J (


.A Wedding Consulting and Tuxedos
S Art of the Area
We Deliver To The Greater Apalachicola Area
"Please visit Sea Oats Gallery on St. George Island!
(850) 670-8931
1-800-929-8931
Hwy 98, Eastpoint Just Across The Bridge


U


PAT'S PLACE
CarrabeHe 850-697-4567

PAT'S Tasty and Wholesome Food at
PLACE Very Reasonable Prices
BURDAS X APW S |
BR I Il Pizza, Soups, Steaks, Subs,
S N Sloppy Joes
Eat Inside or on the Patio
HWY 98 Just off Highway 98, 2 doors down from Burda's Drugstore



Harbor Breeze


Assisted Living Facility in Carrabelle for the elderly and those with
memory loss. We offer 24 hour care by qualified, caring staff- meals,
laundry, housekeeping, supervision of medication and much more in
a loving, attractive and secure environment.
Many have found Harbor Breeze to be a most attractive alternative to
nursing home confinement-at a fraction of the cost!
Please call or visit any time!
Phone: (850) 697-2886
3rd Street West & Avenue D
SPEO. Box 645, Carrabelle, FL 32322
B


HONEST INCOME $300 TO $1000 Weekly/Potential!
Process FHA mortgage refunds. No experience. Own hours.
Part-time/Full-time. Start Now!! (305)460-3259 OR
(800)645-7802 Dept. 92.

JIM PALMERTRUCKING. Teams &%-Team Up With The
#1 Team in Trucking Today. We Are The Good Looking
Fleet. Call (800)755-9458.

POSTAL JOBS. Starting $14.68 +/ hr. + Benefits. Clerks,
Carriers, Sorters, Computer Operators. For Exam and Appli-
cation Info. Call (800)955-9195 ext. 413 8AM-9PM 7 days.

TRUCK DRIVERS WANTED! Regional Runs Available!
Training Available! Great Pay/ Benefits, Consistent Miles,
Job Stability, Home More Often, Tuition Reimbursement.
SwiftTransportation. (800)644-2257. (eoe-m/f)

LAND FOR SALE

VOLUSIA COUNTY FLORIDA LAND BARGAIN
50+Acres $49,900. 600 ft./paved road. Near beaches, river,
National Forest, Orlando 50 minutes. Financing Available.
Atlantic Land Consultants. (888)635-5263.
www.atlanticland.com


Per sqareard
intle wih a


LEGAL SERVICES


DIVORCE $150* Covers children, property division, name
change, military, missing spouse, etc. One signature required.
*Excludes govt. fees, uncontested. Paperwork done for you.
(800)462-2000. Budget Divorce.

MISC

CARS FOR KIDS. Donate your Car, Boat, Truck, R.V. and
receive maximum tax deduction. Need not be running.
registered, smogged. For immediate pickup call (800)910-
3663.

JACKSONVILLE INTERNATIONALBOATSHOW-Northl
Florida's largest in water boat show, April 2-5, Metro Park
Marina-across from Alltel Stadium, admission $6, Thur-Fri,
11 to 7, Sat-Sun. 9 to 7. For exhibitor info (800)742-7219.

SCOTT ANTIQUE MARKET. Two Mammoth Facilities.
2400 booths-April 10-12. 2nd Weekend of Every Month.
Atlanta Expo Centers Atlanta, Georgia. 1-285 at Jonesboro
Road (614)569-4112.


REAL ESTATE


GOVERNMENT FORECLOSED HOMES, pennies on the
$1. Repo's, VA, HUD, Sheriff sales.. No money down
Sgoveyrnment loans available now. Local listings. Toll free
(800)669-2292 ext. H-4000.

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS.Cool
mountain air, views &streams! FREEbrochure of Mountain
Properties/Vacation Rentals (800)642-5333 Realty of
Murphy, 517 Peachtree St., Murphy, NC 28906.

TANNING
WOLFFTANNING BEDS.Tan at home. Buy DIRECT and
SAVE! Commercial/Home Units from$199.00. Low Monthly
Payments. FREEColorCatalog. CallToday (800)842-1310.

VACATIONS/RESORTS
FREEGUIDETO 38 approved fun-packed ranch vacations.
Riding, fishing, rafting, more. Colorado Dude & Guest
Ranch Assn. Box 300S, Tabernash CO 80478. (970)887-
9248 ext. 12. www.coloradoranch.com/s/


Escape to Beautiful
Apalachicola East Bay
Just 5 minutes to Historic Apalachicola
and to magnificent St. George Island Reasonable Rates
-Daily*Weekly*Monthly


Sportsman's
Lodge Motel & Marina Approved
P.O. Box 606 Eastpoint, Fla. 32328
Phone (850) 670-8423 RV Hookups


FRANKLIN COUNTY GLASS, INC.

Commercial & Residential
Plate, Tempered & Laminated Glass
Turtle Glass (Greylite 31 & 14)
Insulated Units, Storefront & Shower Enclosures
We are have Reynolds, BetterBilt and Peachtree
Windows and Doors (in Vinyl and Aluminum)
Carrabelle, Florida (850) 697-8007
email: fcglass@ix.netcom.com



wxS0

PURE

COUNTRY





1055
THE GULF COAST'S
HOT NEW COUNTRY
24 HOURS A DAY!
Freddy Willis, General Manager
Lee McKnight, Sales
54 Market Street, Suite D, Apalachicola, FL 32328
P.O. Box 388, Eastpoint, FL 32320
Business Office: 850-653-3648 Fax: 850-653-3649


Register Number 019990


61 Avenue E
P.O. Box 129
Apalachicola, Florida 32329
mmmmmmmmmmmmmw


Demitris

James
Sales Agent

Business (850) 653-8851
Toll Free (800) 586-1408
Fax (850) 653-8946
Residence (850) 653-8797


Eastpoint Barber Shop


Cosmetologist and Manicurist
needed. Point Mall, 670-4860."
Monday thru Friday
9:00 a.m. till 5:00 p.m.
Closed Saturday and Sunday.


FOR SALE
ST. GEORGE ISLAND deep water canal front 4BR/2.5BA home,
wraparound porch with views of Gulf and Bay, dock, boat lift, launch.
$289,000.
APALACHICOLA Historic district comer lot, 3BR/2BA, income
producing, 1920s home with lots of character. $98,000.
EASTPOINT Lot 11, Hammock Shores, 1.65 acres, 582' frontage on C. C.
Land Road. Zoned R-l, seller financing. $19,000.
MAGNOLIA BLUFF Tarpon Shores 1.65 acres. North Bayshore Drive.
Cleared, high and dry, well. Zoned R-l. $42,000.
CARRABELLE Three city blocks across street from new health
department. Tremendous investment potential. Priced to sell.
APALACHICOLA DOWNTOWN Historic sponge exchange (c. 1836) on
two comer lots overlooking river. 1500 sq. ft. building, prime location.
$420,000.
APALACHICOLA Bay view, breezes from back porch of this cozy 2BR/
1BA hideaway. All new inside 232 Center St. $85,000.
APALACHICOLA Historic district, turn of the century 2BR/1BA charmer,
heart pine, extra large corer lot, 15th Street at Avenue G. $79,900.
ST. GEORGE ISLAND East end bay front, high ground, one acre
homesite. Beautiful property. $129,900.
CARRABELLE COMMERCIAL Half city block (5 lots) with house on
Hwy. 98 next to IGA. Prime location. $300,000.
APALACHICOLA HISTORIC DISTRICT Best building site, 7th Street,
high ground overlooking city marina, bay. $79,900.
ST. GEORGE ISLAND 2BR/2-1/2BA, fully furnished, gulf front
townhome, Unit G-3, 300 Ocean Mile. $219,500.

Shaun S. Donahoe
Licensed Real Estate Broker

(850) 653-8330
P.O. Box 666 171/2 Avenue E Downtown Historic Apalachicola



APALACHEE
CENTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES, INC.

Counselor III #1887-Apalachicola. Requires a
minimum of a Bachelor's Degree in Social or
Rehabilitative Science and two years of related
professional experience. Starting salary:
negotiable.

***EXCELLENT BENEFITS ***
***PAID TRAINING***
k*S SLIPPORTIVE/TEAM ATMOSPHERE***

To receive an application by mail call (850) 487-
0217 or apply in person, Human Resource
Office, 625 E. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, FL.

EOE/DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
J


--- 1


L GkntuN
Marks R
ealty


Ml


A










Pag 10 pi 98*TeFaki hoil OALYONDNWPPRPbihdeeyohrFia


Court Report, from Page 7
Julian Van: Charged with one count of Sale of Crack Cocaine and Possession
of a Controlled Substance, the defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense.
Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced him to 15
months in the Department of Corrections. All outstanding court costs were
reduced to a civil judgment. The defendant was represented by Assistant Pub-
lic Defender Kevin Steiger.
VIOLATION OF PROBATION (VOP)
Vickie Carnes: Charged with VOP, the defendant entered a denial to the of-
fense. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for a hearing on April 20. The
defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Ronnie Gene Crum: Charged with VOP, the defendant entered an admission
to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sen-
tenced him to 90 days in the Franklin County Jail with credit for 37 days of
time served. The defendant will also be screened, evaluated and counseled for
substance abuse. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender
Kevin Steiger.
Kevin Harless: The defendant has been charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for a hearing on April 20. The defendant was represented
by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
William Danford: The defendant has been charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for a hearing on April 20. The defendant was represented
by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Eric Evans: Charged with VOP, the defendant entered an admission to the
offense. Judge Steinmeyer sentenced the.defendant to a new six month period
of probation. As a condition of probation, the defendant will be required to
complete an Anger Management Counseling Program. The defendant was rep-
resented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Vickie Flores: Charged with VOP, the defendant entered an admission to the
offense. Judge Steinmeyer sentenced the defendant to nine months in the
Franklin County Jail with credit for 103 days of time served. All court costs
were reduced to a civil judgment. The defendant was represented by Assistant
Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Brenton Freeman: The defendant has been charged with VOP. Judge
Steinmeyer continued the case for a hearing on April 20. The defendant was


represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
James Jackson: Charged with VOP, the defendant entered an admission to
the offense. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to 30 months in the Department of Corrections. All outstanding court
costs were reduced to a civil judgment. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Sean Madison: Charged with VOP, the defendant entered an admission to the
offense. Judge Steinmeyer sentenced the defendant to a three year term of
probation. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin
Steiger.
Clarence Stillings: Charged with VOP, the defendant entered an admission
to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer sentenced the defendant to 30 months in the
Department of Corrections. All outstanding court costs were reduced to a civil
judgment. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin
Steiger.
Charles Stringer: Charged with VOP, the defendant entered an admission to
the offense. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to a new six month period of probation. The defendant was represented
by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Evelyn Williams: The defendant has been charged with VOP. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for a hearing on May 18. The defendant was represented
by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
James Yon: Charged with VOP, the defendant entered an admission to the
offense. Judge Steinmeyer sentenced the defendant to 30 months in the De-
partment of Corrections with credit for 288 days of time served. The defen-
dant was represented by Attorney Gordon Shuler.
Donnie Thompson: Charged with VOP, the defendant entered an admission
to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sen-
tenced him to 25 months in the Department of Corrections. All court costs
were reduced to a civil judgment. The defendant was represented by Assistant
Public Defender Kevin Steiger.


Feastivity, from Page 1
Towards the Mountain.' They're saying that it doesn't matter whether
you live on the Hill or on the Island or in Carrabelle. What is being
said is that we're moving from a physical location to a destination."
Juvenile Justice Council Chairperson Sandra Lee Johnson provided
words of inspiration for the event. Ms. Johnson spoke about developing
human relationships. This means how we get along with one another,"
explained Johnson, "This particular topic is multi-faceted."
Ms. Johnson stated that it was important for mankind to look on one
another in the way that God that looked on mankind. "God sees people
through love," she said, "this then would eliminate all racial prejudices
and many other social and economic problems that we face each day."
People must also take risks to develop relationships with one another
said Johnson. 'The reason why people hesitate in taking risks and
getting to know one another are fear of rejection, fear of being hurt,
fear of being disappointed and fear that their secrets will be
discovered."
Ms. Johnson said that it was important, finally, to extend
unconditional acceptance and positive regard to all those that you
meet on a day-to-day basis.
Other speakers at the event included Ms. Rosa Tolliver, Mayor Bobby
Howell, Reverend Johnny Curry, Commissioner Clarence Williams,
Mrs. Evelyn Williams, Ms. Elinor Mount-Simmons, Dr. Shirley White
and Gulf County Commissioner Nathan Peters.
Musical performances were provided by The Apalachicola Christian
Community Band, Dr. Daniel White and Mrs. Annie Hand, Mrs.
Maxine Kellogg and Mrs. Theresa McClendon.


the Chronicle Bookshop


Mail Order Service *

2309 Old Bainbridge Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303





AL -


(198) Lethal Medicine: The Epidemic of Medical Mal-
practice in America by Harvey F. Wachsman M.D., J.D.,
with Steven Alschuler. In the midst of a health-care sys-
tem in upheaval, and government officials focused on
the cost and quality of vital health services, a hidden
epidemic, Medical'Malpractice, destroys hundreds of
thousands of lives each year, ignored by the medical es-
tablishment, according to author Wachsman. The author
is a neurosurgeon and leading attorney in the malprac-
tice field. The book reviews the latest court rulings and
malpractice policies. New, Hardcover, 220 pp, published
by Henry Holt and Co., 1993. Sold nationally for $23.50.
Bookshop price = $15.95.


(194) Legacy: The Story of
Talula Gilbert Bottoms
and Her Quilts by Nancilu
B. Burkick. New, Hard-
cover, 176 pp, published by
Rutledge Hill Press, Nash-
ville, 1998. With color
plates. Legacy is the story
of master quilter Talula Gil-
bert Bottoms, born in 1862
in Fayette County, Georgia.
She made beautiful quilts
and her output was as-
tounding. She is known to
have made between 200
and 300 quilts, many of
which are still extant. Her
quiltmaking enabled her to
triumph over her own frag-
ile health and over the
losses and tragedies in her
life. The Text selects words
from Talula's autobiogra-
phy written in her eighties
and hidden away in the bot-
tom of a chest. The books
is organized and written by
her granddaughter, Ms.
Burdick. An unforgettable
personal history. Sold na-
tionally for $22.95.
Bookshop price = $15.95.


(192) Vivian Sherlock's bi-
ography of John Gorrie,
The Fever Man, is available
once again after being
out-of-print for more than
a decade. This is the story
of John Gorrie, young phy-
sician who invented an "ice
machine" that many argue
was a forerunner to air con-
ditioning dozens of years
later. His cooling device was
developed to provide relief
to his suffering yellow fever
patients. A museum in
Apalachicola to this day
marks the work of John
Gorrie just across from his
last resting place in Gorrie
Square, down from Trinity
Church. This book tells
what is now known about
Dr. Gorrie, his work and his
ice machine. Paperback,
New, 151 pp. Bookshop
price = $10.00

THE FEVER MAN
A Biography of Dr. John Carrie


(193) The End of Aging,
How Medical Science is
Changing Our Concept of
Old Age by Carol Orlock.
New, Hardcover, 1995, 247
pp. Published by Birch
Lane Press. We are experi-
encing a sequence of break-
throughs that will redefine
old age. While many agree
that the human life span
has an upper limit of about
120 years, it now looks like
we may be able to grow
older as our bodies are kept
artificially young. This
books looks into the labo-
ratory research on immune
system enhancement and
other methods that offer the
promise of arresting, per-
haps reversing, the biologi-
cal process of aging. Sold
nationally for $19.95.
Bookshop price = $13.95.


lli ill I ll' ll ilaif 11
GCORIGE WALLACE, THE ORIGINS OF THE NEW
CONSERVATISM. AND THE
'T".'F.iSr irW O. A.EI-ICT. POLITICS
-= I] I I o11 A houn1>! =


(195) The Politics of Rage:
George Wallace, the Ori-
gins of the New Conserva-
tism and the Transforma-
tion of American Politics.
Written by Dan T. Carter,
winner of the Bancroft Prize
in History. Wallace was a
four-time Alabama Gover-
nor, and a four-time presi-
dential candidate that
helped launch a conserva-
tive political movement that
put Ronald Reagan in the
White House, and gave
Newt Gingrich and the Re-
publicans control of the
Congress in 1994. Using
newly available research
materials on Kennedy,
Johnson and Nixon admin-
istrations, historian Dan T.
Carter explains in sharp
detail Wallace's pivotal role
in shaping national politics
from 1963 to the present.
Author Carter is the Kenan
Professor of History at
Emory University, Presi-
dent of the Southern His-
torical Association. New,
Hardcover, 572 pp, pub-
lished by Simon and
Schuster. Sold nationally
for $30.00. Bookshop price
= $16.95.


(196) Events Leading Up
To My Death by Howard K.
Smith. The Life of a Twen-
tieth-Century Reporter.
New, 419 pp, Hardcover,
published by St. Martin's
Press, 1996. He was the last
reporter to escape wartime
Berlin and the first one
back in. Joining the
Murrow reporting team on
CBS radio, and after World
War II, he moved to ABC
television. His is a deeply
personal book, looking back
over a lifetime of reporting
and commentary, tracing
the threads that tie this
century together. Sold na-
tionally for $24.95.
Bookshop price = $16.95.



11 I1i I 1111


(197) David Brinkley: A
Memoir. New, Hardcover,
273 pp, published by Alfred
A. Knopf, 1995. The promo-
tional literature for this
book seems to accurately
describe David Brinkley in
one respect: "...his distinc-
tive ability to cut through
cant and pretension. We
know that when he delivers
the news it will be cogent,
trustworthy and stamped
with this trademark sar-
donic wit. ...He is deeply
appreciated for being a pro-
fessional talker who doesn't
believe in talking too
much." Rich in anecdote
and humor, David Brink-
ley's story overlaps with
great events and great per-
sonages of our era. There
are priceless moments,
public and private, and he
takes aim at some chronic
American bugbears such as
taxes and political conven-
tions. Sold nationally for
$25.00. Bookshop price =
$16.95.


r-----------------------
I Order Form
I Mail Order Dept., Chronicle Bookshop
S(Please Print)
Your Name
Address
ITown State ZIP
ITelephone( )
IBook
Number Brief Title Cost










Total book cost
Shipping & handling
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2-3 books .... $3.50
4-5books.... $4.00 Shippingand
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3 April 1998 Total
SAmount enclosed by check or money order $
Please do not send cash. Thanks.
All book orders must be ordered on this form. When
completed, please mail this form and your check or
money order to: Franklin Chronicle, 2309 Old
Bainbridge Road, Tallahassee FL 32303. Be sure to I
Iadd sales tax and shipping charges. Incomplete orders
Will be returned.
L-------- --------------____________J


(199) Gathering Storm: America's Militia Threat. By
Morris Dees with James Corcoran. New, Hardcover, 254
pp, published by Harper Collins, 1996. Pulitzer Prize win-
ning historian Arthur Schlessinger, Jr., has written: 'This
startline book casts a bright light on the dark underside
of American life-a fireball in the night for all Americans."
That quote is only the surface warning. Author Dees
traces Oklahoma City bombing suspect Timothy McVeigh
to the shadowy fringes of the militia movement. He makes
the case that the bombing was influenced by key leaders
in the "militia movement." These are the militia armies
operating across the United States. This book goes be-
hind the scenes to explore secret paramilitary cells train-
ing deep in back country, manned by some fanatics who
see themselves in a life-and-death struggle to reclaim the
United States. Dees writes that these militias do not op-
erate in a vacuum but are close cousins to the religious
right and ultraconservative politicians, fueled by the ban
on assault weapons, radio talk show hosts and those
who preach hatred of the U. S. federal government. Pub-
lished nationally for $24.00. Bookshop price = $12.95.


Please Note
Books from the mall service of the Chronicle Book Shop are new and
used, and are so-designated in each item description. Some titles
may be temporarily out of stock, in which case a second .-1,i r'' Il
wil be made, normally in 14 days. Books arc shipped in "- "i .iiu
normally. Some of our books are publishers' closcouts. overstocks.
remainders or current titles at special prices. Most are in limited supply
and at these prices may sell out last, If any book is sold out your
money will be refunded by bank check. To ulTfr thel lowest possible
prices all orders must be prepaid. We do no hilling and do not accept
credit cards.



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