Title: Franklin chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00071
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: September 19, 1997
Copyright Date: 1997
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00071
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text





BULK RATE
U. S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA, FL
32320
PERMIT #8


25


...page 2


pru Ad%


Published Every Other Friday


franklin chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Proposed well location


Coastal Appeals Bond

Decision

A Report and Commentary by Tom W. Hoffer
On September 9, 1997, Governor Chiles and his Cabinet were sittiner
as the State of Florida Adiinistration Commission. This'n meeting
involving Apalachicola-based Coastal Petroleum Company, was about
the amount of bond that should be required for clean-up costs and
damages to natural resources IF there should be an oil spill from the
drilling rig at site 1281, about nine miles south of Sikes Cut, near St.
George Island.
The Administration Commission set the bond at an unprecedented
figure of $4,249,637,866 for the 1281 project in the Gulf of Mexico.
Coastal Petroleum, in their appeal, has stated that $4 billion is
unreasonable.
According to documentation distributed at the Governor and Cabinet
meeting, the most recent oil exploration well in Florida sovereign waters
was drilled by the now disbanded Getty Oil Company in 1983. After
the Getty well was drilled, the Florida Legislature added several drill-
ing prohibitions to Chapter 377, Part I, Florida Statutes, to further
protect near-shore environments. During the 1989 and 1990 ses-
sions, the Legislature enacted a complete prohibition on structures
for oil drilling in state waters. This prohibition, however, did not ap-
ply to any lease entered into before the date of the legislation, includ-
ing those held by Coastal Petrol.um. In the case of Getty Oil, the
State established a bond reau.'ement of $35 million.
That amount, according to. Coastal Petroleum, is still used by the
U.S. Government for offshore drilling in federal waters.
The Governor and Cabinet are not in favor of any offshore oil drilling,
period. The arguments about the process of arriving at the very high
$4 billion+ estimates of clean-up costs and damage to natural re-
sources were strongly argued by Coastal Petroleum's attorney, Talla-
hassee lawyer Robert Angerer. The $35 million figure was more rea-
sonable to Coastal Petroleum.
The oil rig has not yet been formally permitted although the
Department of Environmental Protection announced an in-
tent to issue a permit on August 16, 1996. When the notice
of intent was published, several parties petitioned for a for-
mal administrative hearing. Those proceedings will continue
on September 29, 1997 in Tallahassee.
Coastal Petroleum, through its own experts, has estimated that the
St. George Island site 1281 could produce 546 million barrels of oil.
Other estimates have been as high as 2 billion barrels of oil. This site
appears to be the company's most promising oil prospect, along the
425 mile long offshore leasehold, stretching south from Apalachi-
cola, down to Naples, Florida, about 9-10 miles offshore. Among the
"ifs" in the years-long scenario of trying to get permission to drill,
Company President Phillip W. Ware has said site 1281 might be "...the
largest U. S. discovery ever made east of the Mississippi." The 1996
annual report of the company indicated repeatedly that Coastal Pe-
troleum never found oil in its various test sites and drillings, going
back to the das they first obtained the leasehold, in the 1940s. At
that time, the State encouraged offshore drilling for oil largely be-
cause of the war effort and the shortage of oil from other producing
areas in the world, particularly the middle east.
While conditions are now considerably different, the domestic U.S.
oil production has fallen considerably in the last 20 years, down to
less than 50% produced from domestic sources.
The Coastal Petroleum appeal brief added:
"...Domestic oil production not only circulates the money in
our economy, but it reduces the nation's trade deficit and
increases national security by decreasing dependence on
foreign oil. The economic benefits from this well, although
substantial, were not even considered by the Administration,
Commission or Department in the setting of the surety
amount. Coastal's experts conservatively estimate that the
prospect will produce 546 million barrels of oil. Florida, un-
der its lease with Coastal would be entitled to a 12.5% roy-
alty or $1,365,000,000 over the 20 year life of the field. Also,
the 8% severence tax would yield another $873,600,000 over
the 20 year life, of which $109,000,000 would go to Franklin
County."
The grounds for the Coastal Petroleum appeal is that the Administra-
tion Commission "...has substantially affected Coastal's rights by at-
tempting to add an unreasonable condition to that permit." Coastal's
brief listed 6 disputed issues of fact concerning clean-up costs, and
an additional 10 disputed issues of fact in regard to actual resource
damages. Clean-up costs and natural resource damages are the two
major components used by the Administration Commission in estab-
lishing a surety bond.
Continued on page 6


School District Proposes

Alternative Opportunity Center


Students who have a hard time adjusting to the regular class setting
may have the opportunity to participate in the school district's newly
proposed Franklin Alternative Opportunity Centers.
The Opportunity Center will serve as a voluntary program for those
students between the grades 7-12 who exhibit academic, behavioral
or other school problems. The program will be able to'serve as many
as 15 students. The Opportunity Center will be located at the Chapman
Elementary School band room. Members from the Franklin County
School District expect that the center will be open by October 1, 1997.
The school district has already identified an instructor for the new
program. Norm Carrin, a Drop-Out Prevention instructor, has been
selected for the position. Carrin previously taught the Alternative
Classroom Education System (ACES) Program at Carrabelle High
School and the Students Targeted for Achievement, Recognition and
Success (STARS) Program at Apalachicola High School.
"He's one of the most qualified people in the area," stated Nan Collins
with the Franklin County School District, "he has a quality about
him. He's adaptable, flexible and has the commitment to do the job."
Ms. Collins serves as the Supervisor of Special Programs. She will
participate in the alternative program as a counselor. "I plan on giv-
ing up my lunch time to see this succeed," said Collins.
Additionally, Eric Lovestiand with the Apalachicola Research Reserve
will participate with the new program. He, Lovestrand, who serves as
the Education Coordinator, said that he still needs to meet with school
district personnel to make more definite plans; he expected that he
could involve the students in a variety of on-going science projects
and field trips.
"I like the idea of involving these kid~n science," said Lovestrand, "to
get them sparked'to science...in a hand- -on manner.
WHO'S ELIGIBLE
In order to qualify for the newly proposed alternative program, a stu-
dent must be identified by the school as a potential candidate. The
student must receive a certain amount of written office referrals dur-
ing the current school year. Those referrals may come from class-
room instructors, bus drivers or other appropriate school officials.
If the student agrees to participate in the program, the alternative
program will then develop a Student Support and Assistant Plan
(SSAP). The plan will document the students' needs, annual goals,
instructional objectives, educational and related services to be pro-
vided, evaluation procedures and schedules for determining annual
or bi-annual progress.
Some of the factors that constitute a student's needs may include
academic achievement, attendance/mobility and attitude. For in-
stance, the plan will identify whether the student has been retained
previously and whether that individual has changed schools more
than two times during the past year. Other documented needs may
be identified by school personnel or other relevant agencies in order
to determine whether the student exhibits low self esteem, a negative
attitude towards school and an expressed intent to drop out of school.
The annual goals of the plan will focus on the student's behavior and
academic record. For instance, a student's goals may be to reduce
the amount of days missed at school and increase his or her grade
point average.
The instructional objectives of the plan will chart the student's be-
havior and attitude. For instance, a student's objective may be to
attend class on time, bring paper and a pencil to class and improve
work and study skills.
An SSAP Committee will chart the students' progress. Some of the
members on that committee will include the Supervisor of Special
Programs, an assigned principal, the Drop-Out Prevention instructor
and a guidance counselor. Although the program will be completely
voluntary to enter, the student will have to work his or her way out of
the opportunity center. A student must stay at the center for one
entire semester after being admitted.
A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THE CURRICULUM
Some of the programs that will be included in the Opportunity Center's
curriculum are the Graduation Options (GO) and Teenage Parent Pro-
gram (TAP). The programs will seek to enhance both academic and
vocational skills for all attending students.
The Graduation Options Program will emphasize an individualized
and self-paced curriculum. The program will be conducted either by
Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) or by traditional methods; it will
combine vocational and work-study programs with academic courses
to encourage students to obtain standard high school diplomas while
also obtaining job skills.
Continued on page 8

Lt. Gov. Visits the County


E1k 9 r


,. ,J
/-
.1
'4


-~ .. Y


September 19 October 2, 1997


.' ..

.4 ^

j^


EEW


Marie Marshall, Dr. Nancy Chorba, and Max Shilling,
appeared at recent Franklin County School Board meeting
on behalf of the new First Step/Teen Parent Program.

New Teen Parenting

Program in Schools

By Sue Riddle Cronkite
A bold program has been approved by the Franklin County School
Board which is designed to keep teenage parents in.school and teach
them how 't6 properly care for a child. It also puts emphasis on edu-
cation, understanding of the process of physical and emotional de-
velopment, and the importance of sexual abstinence during teen years.
Teenage parenting (TAP) efforts in schools are not new. Laws already
set up by the Florida Legislature regarding the health and education
of children were not amended during the 1996 session, but the Gen-
eral Appropriations Act did create a separate cost factor category for
the funding of TAP programs.
As a result, education, transportation, child care, and funding for
dropout prevention programs have been set into motion, with school
districts receiving weighted education funds from the state that cov-
ers the cost of child care, as well as basic health and social services.
The method reports children of teenage parents for weighted full time
equivalency (FTE) funds.
In Franklin County this translates into setting up a child-care area at
Chapman Elementary School where teen parents enrolled in Apalachi-
cola High School are to bring their children while they attend regular
school classes. Education on how to care for children is part of the
package. Plans are to expand to Carrabelle High when needed room
for the program is arranged.
Phyllis Kalife, director of Early Childhood Services for seven counties
including Franklin, Marie Marshall with Early Start, and Max Schilling,
specialist in teenage parenting programs, appeared before the school
board to explain how the program works. Supt. Brenda Galloway and
board members were assured that, in addition to state FET allow-
ances, grant funds are to cover costs of the program, new for Frank-
lin County.
Supt. Galloway, Board Chairman Will Kendrick and board members
Willie Speed, Jimmy Gander, and Connie Roehr, spoke out in favor of
the program. When it came time for a vote, Board Member Katie
McKnight voted against it. She later explained that she was not against
the overall concept, but does not believe it should be implemented on
the school grounds.
McKnight said she talked with parents who felt that teenagers might
get the idea that it's all right to have babies when they are that young,
that they might decide it's 'cool' to become parents. If the daycare
program was set up someplace beside school grounds it might be
more effective overall, she said.

Continued on page 2

PRICE REDUCTIONS ON ST. GEORGE ISLAND
Thirty-four owners lowered the "Asking Price" on their island
real estate by a total of over $500,000 in the last sixty days!!!
(One Example Below: Reduced by $20,500)


"Bay Pines." Beautiful bayfront home has a concrete seawall, screened porch,
decks, and much more. Enjoy the beauty and quiet of the bay. $249,500.

DROP BY OUR OFFICE AND PICKUP YOUR
FREE MAP OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND AND A LIST
OF THE 300 PLUS PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
Call usfor a free 1997 color catalog of our entire rental offerings.
(800) 367-1680 (850) 927-2596
45 First St. East St. George Island, FL 32328

Gulf ast ealt


County Clerk Kendall Wade (L) and Chairperson Raymond
Williams (R) pose with Lt. Governor Buddy McKay in the
county courthouse on September 16.


I~-'

Ay i-


N


Volume 6, Number 19


Gov. and Cabinet Set Surety Bond for
Coastal Petroleum at 4 Billion+


".,"A .A.,,r

.,- .,: : ...', ,

--'" APALACHICOLA
BAY
*,I .';t "', .'.' ST. GEORGE ISLAND
ISLAND
%%c-^


* ....'*
0


ISLAND


Coastal Petroleum Company
Permit Application 1281


It


* 1--


w









Page 2 19 September 1997 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


County Strikes Down Proposed

Golf Course



m .,r" We-


Commissioner Eddie Creamer (L) voices opposition to the pro-
posed golf couse as Developer Morris Palmer (R) responds to the
unanimous vote to deny his project.


Developer Morris Palmer wit-
nessed the future of his proposed
nine hole golf course in Eastpoint
come to a dramatic close on Sep-
tember 16 as county commission-
ers unanimously voted to reject
his project.
Commissioner Eddie Creamer led
the board's opposition to the pro-
posed project. Commissioner
Creamer sited environmental rea-
sons for his rejection of the pro-
posed golf course. "I'm just not
convinced that this project will not
hurt the bay...it's a possibility that
it won't," said Creamer. He con-
tinued, "I've seen these men for


Budget, Nudity
Ordinance and
Buz Stays
By Rene Topping
The Carrabelle City Commission
. approved a proposed millage rate
of 8.026 during a special session
on September 16. The commis-
sioners also passed an amended
Carrabelle Port and Airport Au-
thority budget, noting that it was
not now in deficit.
Commissioners approved a sea-
wall construction bid from
Poloronis Construction to install
a seawall on the Riverwalk
Project. Commissioner Buz Putnal
pointed out, unless a seawall is
installed, it will not be possible to
build access to the almost com-
plete pavilion. The bid was based
on $318 per linear foot to build a
sloping type seawall.
The commissioners then came to
a final reading and adoption of a
16-page anti-nudity ordinance.
Unlike the scene at a recent meet-
ing, where a large group of resi-
dents came to protest three erotic
dancers performing at the River-
side Bar, and at Which' tempers
were short and hostile,-there was
an air of quietness. The ordinance
to ban nudity was passed unani-
mously with little discussion, and
few of the public present.
The ordinance spells out specific


years work hard to keep the bay
clean. They've worked hard out on
the bay all of their lives. And that's
what a lot of people around here
know. They know the bay."
Commissioner Bevin Putnal con-
curred, "I said in the beginning
that I wasn't for it, because I think
it's too close to the bay. It's just
like resort village is too close to
the bay. You're taking a chance
on destroying the bay. It's just in
the wrong place."
Mr. Palmer later allegedly said
that he planned to develop an R-
2 zoned mobile home park on the
site in question.


rules pertaining to "establish-
ments that serve or allow the con-
sumption of alcoholic beverages,"
and in "certain other public
places," the state of undress per-
mitted. The word "nudity" is
spelled out in great detail, and in
graphic, explicit terms.
Included in the ordinance are
rules that will ban thongs, strings,
pasties and other brief styles of
attire. The ordinance spells out
just how much of the breast and
buttocks exposed will be toler-
ated. Copies of the ordinance are
.available at city hall.
With the meeting winding down,
Reverend Don Glenn of the
Friendship Baptist Church and
Reverend Andrew Rutherford of
the Carrabelle Christian Center
presented Buz with sheet after
sheet of a petition filled with
names. These petition were signed
by almost 200 people and Rever-
end Glenn said it was in an effort
to show Buz that he was appreci-
ated for his hard work and the
things he has done to beautify the
city have not gone unnoticed by
many people.
The minister proclaimed "this was
an expression of their desire that
you keep on being their commis-
sioner." Putnal looked down at the
petition and said, "Pray for me,"
as he accepted the paper. He then
spoke in a voice so soft that
Bonnie Kerr, who was sitting in
the front row, asked, "Did you say
you were going to stay?" He an-
swered "Yes, I will."


City Sets Millage Rate


Apalachicola City Commissioners
unanimously agreed to set the
city's tentative millage rate at
8.2914 during a September 15
budget hearing. The proposed rate
will generate $506,044 for the
upcoming budget year.
Board members also voted 4-1 on
a pay increase proposal for most
city employees. Commissioner
Jack Frye voted against the ma-
jority.
City police officers have tradition-
ally received step increases of
$541 annually; all other employ-
ees have received a $272 step in-
crease. Those increased were
abolished and most employees
will now receive pay increases
ranging from $1,134 to $2,084.
Secretaries, supervisors and part-
time employees will not receive
raises in the upcoming budget
year.
"We do need to give the employ-
ees a good raise this year," said
Commissioner Wallace Hill,
"they're dedicated and they've
helped us through this year.
They've helped us come further
ahead this year with their
dedication."


At the request of Attorney Ben
Watkins, the board also agreed to
allocate $2, 250 to the Franklin
County Humane Society. Attorney
Watkins informed the board that
the local humane society was
short $4,200 in needed funding.
He said that he knew of an orga-
nization who would match the
city's allocated amount.
"We've raised nearly half of our
budget through donations," said
Watkins. He said that the
organization's annual budget was
$38,375. "We take care of home-
less, sick and abandoned dogs
and cats," he said, "and we also
handle animal control."

Attorney Watkins informed board
members that 605 animals were
picked up by the animal control
rom October of 1996 to August
of 1997. During that time, he also
said that 260 animals were
dropped off at the animal shelter.
Over 29 percent (148 dogs and
101 cats) of those animals picked
up in the county by the Animal
Control Authority, said Watkins,
were in the City of Apalachicola.


Residents Raise

Stink over

Proposed

Treatment Plant
Residents throughout the county
joined forces on September 15 to
voice their disapproval of a pro-
posed wastewater treatment plant.
in the City of Apalachicola. Rep-
resentatives with the Department
of Environmental Protection con-
ducted the September 15 work-
shop to review the county's sen-
timents to the proposed 7.4 mil-
lion dollar plant.
Residents complained that the
proposed treatment plant would
discharge effluent directly into
Huckleberry Swamp. The con-
tents of the effluent, they argued,
would then penetrate Huckleberry
Creek and eventually permeate
the Apalachicola Bay.
James Waddell, Engineer with
Baskerville-Donovan, informed
audience members that the pro-
posed plant would discharge ef-
fluent into Huckleberry Swamp.
"Huckleberry Swamp in and of it-
self is the headwaters to Huckle-
berry Creek," said Waddell. He
estimated that the spray field sys-
tem would cost one millions dol-
lars extra to construct.
Mr. Waddell said that the plant
would be updated in order to pro-
vide an advanced level of treat-
ment in adherence to department
standards. Mr. Waddell helped to
prepared the permit application
for the proposed treatment plant.
Apalachicola resident Lee
McKnight warned of the dangers
presented by discharging effluent
into a body of water. "A wetland
is a balanced community," said
McKnight, "the plants over there
are there for a reason. They in
balance with the amount of nu-
trients coming in. If you dump
more phosphorus and nitrogen
into those systems, then there's
a shift in the community and the
plant levels." Mr. McKnight urged
that the proposed wastewater
plant utilize a spray field system.
Mark Sowell with the Department
of Environmental Protection
stated that substantial work
would be done to the proposed
treatment plant; he said that the
treatment plant's collection sys-
tem would be repaired. Mr
Waddell stated that half of the
treatment plant project was de-
voted to the rehabilitation of the
collection system. "A lot of the
problems associated with the
treatment plant will go away with
the collection system," he said.
Rebecca Jetton with the Depart-
ment of Community Affairs asked
whether the site was evaluated for
land application. "Apalachicola
and Franklin County were desig-
nated as areas of critical state
concern back in the 1980's," said
Jetton, "Apalachicola is the only
area within Franklin County
which remains designated. The
department is concerned that the
water of Apalachicola Bay contin-
ues to be protected and not de-
graded."
Carrabelle resident John
McKnight stated that the City of
Carrabelle and Lanark Village
both opted to utilize a spray field
for their treatment plants. "What's
wrong with Apalachicola City
Commissioners," he asked.
McKnight continued, "I'm from
Carrabelle but I make my living
on the water. I've worked on the
water for about 40 years."
Apalachicola resident Eric Teat
repeatedly asked whether the
Department of Environmental
Protection could guarantee
whether the proposed treatment
plant would not pollute Huckle-
berry Creek or Apalachicola.
Mr. Sowell informed the audience
that the permit applicant was re-
quired to illustrate a "reasonable
assurance" that they would not


J.E. CASTOLDI ASSOCIATES, INC.
Real Estate and Management Consultants
Old Beach Road, Post Office Box 5, Carrahelle, FL 32322-0005
Telephone .s i.,-, :,"2'-:C, Ft. I51.i-9"-11 ) 1


Location, Location, Location!!!
The Eagle's Nest Bakery and Pastry Shop, overlooking Carrabelle Harbor. Center of downtown
Carrahelle Over ,Onn00 q ft divided in half for private dining or deli shop. Ideal for full restau-
rj ,it-l .tim il r ., ,nnre ,,:u l hu. jn .:v,, Bj.4 .:P, h ,., r tl, c. Ij i n d-e.l rJ .. in .J nJ r
car bc t ,rr..c ri ,J i l i. 1 rig q inJrer, ...r .,l hi ii rn I .,.l, ui'i.e ,c All [tI I' ,..r ,.ir ]', I, ii l' .:.dl
Bill C -i. ,J .i r _'hirle i i....Iji. Br.,ker .i[ 850-69'-28-1'.


Johnson

Takes Seat 3

in City's Run-

Off Election

.^s, -


Newly elected Apalachicola
City Commissioner Van
Johnson is congratulated by
a loyal campaign supporter,
Mary Bennett.
Candidate Van Johnson gathered
enough votes during the City of
Apalachicola's run-off election on
September 16 to defeat fellow
Candidate George Patrenos.
Johnson received 487 votes, while
Patrenos gathered 401 votes.
For Van Johnson, the victory
came after a heartbreaking defeat
to Commissioner Wallace Hill in
1994 by a paper-thin margin of
14 votes. In his second attempt
at public office, Johnson would
not be denied. Although he ap-
peared nervous as the votes were
being tallied, he seemed almost
stunned when the results were
announced. "I was overwhelmed,"
said Johnson, "I guess it was like
I was in another world."
Mr. Johnson said that one of his
campaign goals was to provide
more youth recreation in the com-
munity. He envisioned that a rec-
reation complex such as a
Y.M.C.A. center may well be
possible.
In the end, Van Johnson said that
he was mainly grateful to the
many people who believed in his
candidacy. "I want to thank the
people who supported me and put
the children first," said Johnson.
44 percent of the eligible voters
in the City of Apalachicola made
their way to the polls on Septem-
ber 16. Supervisor of Elections
Doris Shiver Gibbs had predicted
a 42 percent voter turnout. "I
think this was a good turnout,"
said Gibbs, "usually in the sec-
ond election you don't get the
turnout that you do in the first."


destroy the water quality. "Can
anyone guarantee," asked Sowell,
"no sir. We cannot guarantee."
"Why take a chance with the
Apalachicola Bay," asked Mr.
Teat, "why not put in a spray sys-
tem? If you can put the people out
of work for good, you ought to be
able to give them a guarantee that
you won't screw It up. We've heard
this bullcrap before. They said
you can drink the water coming
out of it (the treatment plant). I
live out there and I'll bring you
some water and see if you'll drink
it. Everyone of y'all, I'll bring you
some (water)."
Ms. Wanda Teat complained that
her family was never notified by
the Department of Environmen-
tal Protection about the condition
of the creek. "We're highly upset
because we now find out that DEP
let two families live out on that
creek for two years," she said.
Teat continued, "never were we
approached and told that there
were toxic levels of things coming
into our waterway. We were never
approached about having our well
water tested...where's the state's
responsibility here? When are you
gonna take charge? We should not
have to stand up and tell you
this."
Mr. Sowell informed audience
members that a permit could not
be denied to an applicant with-
out a good reason. "It's not
enough to say, 'I just don't want
a spray field because I don't like
spray fields.'" said Sowell. He said
that the DEP would accept com-
ments on the matter until Sep-
tember 26.


Teen Parenting Continued from Page 1

The program, as described by Marshall, leans heavily toward educa-
tion on what being a parent means in time and effort. "The real chore
of tending a baby, which might cry all night, is not something teenag-
ers are likely to enjoy." she said. The Early Start program, under
Marshall, would provide daycare for the teenage parents, and also
teach the importance of sexual abstinence. Marshall mentioned one
tool to discourage teenage parents is a doll the size of a baby which
cries every hour. The doll is sent home with teenagers so that they
can see first-hand how much care is demanded by a baby.
Teenage parenting programs were Degun in an effort to stem the tide
of children bearing children which has reached epidemic proportions
over the country. By helping adolescents learn that they are neither
emotionally mature enough nor financially able to provide for a child
it is hoped that the cycle of children bearing children can be stopped.
Developmental problems of teenage parents are passed on to their
children. The adolescent's efforts toward establishing a lifetime iden-
tity and learning to control behavior in anticipation of consequence is
compromised by the abrupt and traumatic entrance into parenthood.
In addition to helping teen parents learn how to care for their chil-
dren in the daycare unit, the program aims to help them carry into
adulthood more mature life-skill attitudes.
All TAP participants are given the opportunity to be enrolled in an
academic course of study which advances their progress toward a
high school diploma, according to the resource manual for Teenage
Parent programs. "They must receive pregnancy-and parentirig-re-
lated instruction in the topics of prenatal and postnatal health care,
parenting skills, the benefits of sexual abstinence, and the conse-
quences of subsequent pregnancies," states the manual.
, Also, all TAP program participants and their children "must be of-
fered the ancillary services of child care, transportation, health ser-
vices and social services," according to the Florida Administrative
Code. All current TAP program participants must be reported for full
time equivalency funding credit, which is reflected in enrollment part-
time which can be one period per day, two periods per day, or three
periods per week, or full-time TAP enrollment at 25 hours per week.
Among classroom practices are suggested teaching strategies in the
seven areas of intelligence which gather and process information,
including verbal/linguistic, logical/mathematical, visual/spatial,
bodily/kinesthetic, musical/rhythmic, interpersonal, and
intrapersonal. Authentic assessment is defined as "the construction
by the teacher, of meaningful tasks which require students to syn-
thesize information, apply what they have learned, and perform or
demonstrate their understanding of the material," which reflect "the
necessary skills for lifelong learning." Instruction is outcome-driven,
according to the.manual.
Cooperative learning is suggested as the solution to "astonishing ar-
ray of educational problems," states the manual. "Social skills such
as compromising, accepting responsibility, processing emotions, and
risk taking should be purposefully infused into existing curriculum
in every class each day ... as an enhancement to learning," accord-
ing to the manual. Also included is computer-assisted instruction,
flexible or block scheduling, and GED exit option. The school
system is required to make an annual report is to the Florida Depart-
ment of Education on the extent to which the TAP. program has met
its objectives.


Run-Off Results
City ofApalachicola Seats 3 City Commissioners
September 16, 1997
Candidates Absentee Vote Precinct Vote Total Votes %
Van Johnson, Sr. 38 449 487 54.84
George Petrenos, Jr. 49 352 401 45.16


P"44


519 Grace Avenue Panama City
Phone: 785-6622 Fax: 785-7078
"Tell them Dale sent you!"


I Construction Service



NOW SHOWING


South Bayshore Drive, Magnolia Bluff. This newly constructed
Florida Home is. situated on a gorgeous 1 acre lot overlooking
Apalachicola's East Bay. Features include: 3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, large living area with vaulted ceilings, top line appliances
including Jenn Air stove with grill, wrap-around porches, metal
roof, and much more. $179,900
Gulf Front, Indian Pass. We are currently offering four (4) exclusive
Gulf Front homesites in Camp Palm Subdivision. $115,000 ea.
Gulf Front, Sweet Water Shores. New Gulf Front Subdivision
located at Money Bayou, Indian Pass. Gulf Front home sites. from
$85,900 ea.

MAKING REAL ESTATE REAL EASY.


224 Franklin Boulevard
St. George Island, FL 32328
904/927-2282
800/341-2021
FAX: 904/927-2230
E mail: cbsuncoast@msn.com


SUNCOAST REALTY

An Independently Owned and Operated Member
of Coldwell Banker Real Estate Corporation


a T THE WATER'S EDGE




A Pictorial and Narrative History of

Apalachicola and Franklin County


A Great Christmas Gift Idea!:
Don't Miss Your Opportunity To Own This Personally Signed Limited Edition Collector's Book!
"At The Water's Edge" is now available at all branches of Apalachicola State Bank for $3 )95
plus tax. Also available through the following Apalachicola merchants who support this charity
project: Market Street Emporium, Hooked On Books and the Gorrie Museum.




SB APMLACHI.$LN
ESTATE BANK*I 1897FDic
Man urfifi- 22 Avenue Apalacrncosa FL 850,653-8805 FAX 850/653-2232
Carratelie 850 69--14500 E.aslpoint 850/670-8501 St. George Island. 850/927-2561


- C -


I _


a


--1~










Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 19 September 1997 Page 3


SHORN!

Secure Homeowners Rights Now!
September 1, 1997 20565 NE 6th Court Miami, FL 33179
Web site: http://www.florida-homeowners.com/shornfla
Comment: The Chronicle received this letter around September
1, 1997. SHORN! seeks new members. Homeowner associations
are growing in Florida along with their abuses. The letter is self-
explanatory.
We will use the money to lobby the legislature on your behalf and to
help other frustrated homeowners. We need to buy stamps and office
supplies. If we can afford it, one of us will go to Tallahassee this
winter to testify on HOA bills at legislative committee hearings. We
would like to send a full busload of sign-waving, angry homeowners
to the state capital.

We've been active for 3 years now, winning political recognition and
surviving, on donations from a few anonymous contributors. We are
the only homeowners rights group in Florida that has succeeded in
obtaining positive changes in the HOA law. Some of our members
have even won big lawsuits against their incorrigible associations.
But this year we suffered some setbacks. Increased fines, secret meet-
ings of certain board committees, restrictions on the right to vote-all
are parts of a bad law that quietly passed this year. Only two legisla-
tors stood by us all the way: Senator Ron Klein and Rep. Suzanne
Jacobs. Appearing before a room full of homeowners at our June
rally, Rep. Jacobs said she has heard from many frustrated voters in
her district and she vows to do something next year to combat ram-
pant homeowner abuse in Florida.
Please send a generous contribution. If you came to our June rally
and gave $10, you are already a Regular Member. For only $20 more,
you can join the exclusive club of Fighting Mad Homeowners.
Sincerely,
Michael Van Dyk


Michael Van Dyk
President
(305) 653-1679


Ted Cedro
Vice President
(954) 475-2681


Connie Baio
Treasurer
(954) 720-6408


Bob Young
Secretary/Webmaster
(954) 450-8149


Audrey Jackson Bill Jakobi Amor Ruso Florene Dietz
Director Director Director Mary Ann Smania
Broward South Dade South Dade SHORN!
(305) 225-0,161 (305) 225-0161 (305) 225-0161 (305) 653-4924
NEW MEMBER APPLICATION
Make check payable to SHORN and send to
20565 NE 6th Ct., Miami, FL 33179
Name Phone ( ) Wk/Home
Address City Zip__
HOA name M Mgmt.Co.
Check if it's OK to give your phone number to selected newspaper and TV reporters.
SCheck if you can volunteer some time to help us out
MEMBERSHIP CLASSES

$ 10 Regular Member Help us change the law! Stay on our mailing list and get our
bulletins. Library documents and news clippings available.

SS30 Fighting Mad Make a big difference! Unlimited access to case library and
Homeowner clippings. Attorney referral service. Tips, election strategies,
flyers & bumper stickers. Support from other Fighting Mad
Homeowners.

S. 00 Life Member Attend all future meetings and rallies free. Above privileges
plus guaranteed admission to special place in heaven reserved
for long-suffering homeowners.
MEMBER SURVEY If you don't know the
names of your state
S legislators, look on your
Florida State Senator Dist- __# yellow Voter Registration
Card to get your district
Fl. State Representative Dist # numbers and send them.
My biggest complaints about my HOA board or property manager.
D disregards law, documents O fraudulent elections / closed meetings / hiding records
0 harassment D board members or property mgr. is ignorant / stupid/ corrupt / dishonest
J uneven / unfair covenant & rules enforcement 0 unnecessary regulations


%lVE to POST OFFICE BOX 590
S EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
904-927-2186
So 904-385-4003 (TALLAHASSEE)
o oFacsimile 904-385-0830
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.


Vol. 6, No. 19


September 19, 1997


Publisher ................................................ Tom W Hoffer
Editor and Manager .............. Brian Goercke
697-3657
Contributors ............................................ Sue Riddle Cronkite
........... Tom Loughridge
........... Bonnie Segree
........... Rene Topping
......... Carol Vandegrift
Advertising Design-
and Production........................................Diane Beauvais Dyal
............ Jacob Coble
Proofreader ............................................. Richard Bist
Production Assistant ................................ Richard Bist
Circulation ........................ ..................... Scott Bozem an
........... Larry Kienzle

Citizen's Advisory Group

George Chapel ........................................ Apalachicola
Sandra Lee Johnson ................................. Apalachicola
Rene Topping .......................................... Carrabelle
Pat M orrison .......................................... St. George Island
Dominic and Vilma Baragona ................. St. George Island
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung ........................ Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins................. Eastpoint
W ayne Childers ....................................... Port St. Joe
A nne Estes .................... ................. ...... W akulla
Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are
available free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for
postage and handling. For example an 8 page issue would
cost $1.75 postpaid. To others backissues are priced at 350
each plus postage and handling. Please write directly to the
Chronicle for price quotes if you seek several different or
similar issues. If a single issue, merely add 350 to the price
quote above. Irf-county subscriptions are $16.96 including
tax. Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.

Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to the
Chronicle in writing.
All contents Copyright 1997
Franklin County Chronicle, Inc.


Around and

About

Eastpoint

By Bonnie Segree
Let's see what kind of news we
have to offer this week. Some
good, some not so good, and some
bad. So, I will start with the bad
news first. As you know, we have
a new ball park in our commu-
nity, something that has been
needed for a long time. This com-
plex is used by quite a few people,
and is really appreciated. It gives
the children and adults a place
to go and enjoy. Well, recently, the
ball park was vandalized by four-
wheelers cutting donuts on the
field and other things. Shame,
shame, and double shame to the
ones who tried to destroy what
has taken so long to obtain.
People want things to happen,
and when we finally get something
to be proud of, someone tries to
tear it up. Maybe the guilty par-
ties will read this and not do it
again.
Pam Rush recently hosted a birth-
day party to honor her grand-
mother, Mrs. Mary Creamer, who
celebrated her 83rd birthday.
Friends and relatives attended the
affair. May you have many more
birthdays, Mary.
We will soon be hearing wedding
bells again .at the Eastpoint
Church of God when our own Ms.
Stephanie Boatwright becomes
the bride of Mr. Steven Cook of
Carrabelle. These two young
people will be saying their vows
on October 11th. I wish them
many, many years of marital bliss.
After the wedding, they will be
moving away for a period of time
while they will both be attending
college.
A big seafood party was held on
September 12th, at the home of
Willie and Ethel Creamer in cel-
ebration of their 50th wedding
anniversary. About 40 people at-
tended this joyous occasion. II
hope to see them celebrate their
75th anniversary.
If you happen to see this tall,
beautiful girl jogging around
Eastpoint early in the morning (as
I did), it is not Cindy Crawford you
see, but it is Kristi Crum, daugh-
ter of Ronald and Shirley Crum.
Kristi has moved back home for a
while, until she moves on to St.
Augustine, where she will be at-
tending college.


EDITORIAL


RN & HHA OPENINGS!
Interim HealthCare of Tallahassee has the following
openings in Franklin County:

* Registered Nurse
For coverage of PRN Medicare and Private visits. I.V.
experience required. 1 year of verifiable work experience
required.

* Home Health Aide
Variety of assignments available to cover visits. 1 year of
verifiable work experience required.
For more information, please call Alison at (800) 747-7828.
EEO/MVFH


,<"^Whe you're #1---- ,----you H
v. ca do thing others a n t.


THE "C" HOUSE
Very well maintained 2 bedroom, 2 bath interior home, fully furnished,
screen porch, sun deck, widow's walk with great views of the gulf and bay,
workshop and extra 12 x 18 enclosed bedroom downstairs. $157,700.00
HOMESITES
TWO ADJOINING interior lots nicely vegetated in quiet area. $35,000.00
each
GULFVIEW Beautiful homesite loaded with oak trees and great views.
REDUCED!! $52,500.00
ST. GEORGE PLANTATION one acre homesite in prestigious Nick's Hole
across from beach $189,900.00
OWNER FINANCING interior homesite in St. George Plantation with easy
walk to beach club. $42,900.00
CANAL VIEW residential building site in quiet area with nice vegetation.
$49,900.00




~S S S S **


Franklin County

Second Circuit Court

The Honorable Judge F.E. Steinmeyer
Assistant State Attorney Ron Flury
Assistant Public Defendant Kevin Steiger
September 15, 1997

ARRAIGNMENTS


/ r/


SHORN!
SECURE
HOMEOWNERS
RIGHTS NOW!
(305)653-1679


To receive an application by mail call (850) 487-0217 or apply
in person at the Human Resource Office, 625 E. Tennessee St.,
Tallahassee, FL
EOE/DRUG FREE WORKPLACE


AND


COMMENTARY


Faye and Orlis Burton are back
and forth between home and
Langston, Alabama, where they
recently bought this old Victorian
home that they plan to restore as
a retreat. Faye is really enjoying
her retirement according to her
daughter, Pam. I hope they have
lots of fun painting, scraping, and
fixing up.
I was talking with Beth Mosley the
other day, and she said the First
Baptist Church on St. George Is-
land has started a youth choir for
children 4 years and up. Her
daughter is quite excited about
this. They plan to be ready by
Christmas with a wonderful pro-
gram. Good Luck!
Speaking of Youth Choirs, the
Eastpoint Church of God has a
Junior Youth Choir, and a Senior
Youth Choir, under the direction
of Mrs. Charlotte Polous. Both of
these choirs perform beautifully
quite often at the church. The
church also has a wonderful
Adult Choir. Since I am a mem-
ber of the Eastpoint Church of
God, and am quite prejudiced, I
think we have some of the best
singers anywhere. God has richly
blessed this church with multiple
talents. Many times these singers
are called upon to help benefits
for different people. They gladly
go and sing for the Glory of the
Lord, when called upon.
Speaking of benefits, a benefit
dinner was held Saturday for Sh-
annon Lolley who was struck by
lightning a few weeks ago, and is
now recuperating from the near
fatal accident. I cannot speak for
other communities, but I can
speak for Eastpoint, and this is a
very caring, giving community in
time of problems. I would also like
to say there are lots of people who
always help over and over again
during these benefits. But there
are three people that I have no-
ticed that always seem to be there
to help out with the cooking and
serving, or cleaning, or whatever
needs doing. Those people that I
have noticed are Brenda Coulter,
and Kendall and Ruth Wade. It
seems like they are always will-
ing to help out with these fund-
raisers. I for one appreciate them
for their efforts. It makes me
ashamed that I don't do more.
After all, we should be helping one
another.
Congratulations to our co-worker,
Ms. Jackie Gay, for her winnings
in the Paul Newman cooking con-
test. Hope you have lots of fun in
New York, Jackie, and come back
the grand prize winner!!!!
Our thoughts and prayers go out
to the Flowers family and the
Brown family for their loss of loved
ones this week. May God bless
you all.
The Literacy Volunteers of
America (LVA) will be having their
annual fund-raising event on Sat-
urday, September 27th at the
Eastpoint Fire Station. This West-
ern Round-up event will be lots
of fun for all. There will be lots of
good Bar-B-Que, cooked by Mr.
Red Hilton, lots of music, comedy,
and fun for all. Hope to see you
There. Please support this worth-
while cause.
Good-bye, good luck and may God
bless you all until next time.


John Blake: The defendant has been charged with one count of Pos-
session of a Controlled Substance. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for pre-trial on October 20. The defendant was appointed the
services of Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, Officer Steve James and Earl
Whitfield with the Apalachicola Police Department allegedly observed
the defendant toss a crack pipe from his vehicle on August 17 while
at the corner of Avenue J and 7th Street in the City of Apalachicola.
The officers allegedly stopped the defendant and discovered a small
bag containing crack cocaine residue on the defendant's person.
Calvin Burns: Charged with three counts of Sale of a Controlled Sub-
stance, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty to the offense. Judge
Steinmeyer continued the case for pre-trial on October 20. The defen-
dant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly sold
$40 worth of crack cocaine to Sgt. James Watkins and a confidential
informant on May 13 during an undercover operation near the Mag-
nolia Club in the City of Carrabelle.
Michael Cain: Charged with one count of Third Degree Criminal Mis-
chief, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty to the offense. Judge
Steinmeyer continued the case for pre-trial on October 20. The defen-
dant informed the court that he would hire his own attorney.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly
smashed the windows of a vehicle that was parked on Water St. by
the Apalachicola City Pier on August 17. Witness Andrew Graham
informed Apalachicola Police Officer Jim Wilburn that the defendant
smashed the windows with a baseball bat at approximately 2:00 a.m.
and then left the scene of the incident.
Keith Castor: The defendant has been charged with one count of
Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of a Firearm during
the Commission of a Crime, Cultivation of Cannabis and Possession
of more than 20 grams of Cannabis. Attorney Steve Glazer filed a
written plea of Not Guilty on behalf of the defendant. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for pre-trial on October 20. The defendant was
represented by Attorney Steve Glazer.
According to the probable cause report, members from the Franklin
County Sheriffs Department executed a search warrant to the
defendant's residence on Holland Avenue in Lanark Village on
August 4.
During the search, officers allegedly discovered four cannabis plants,
several small plastic bags containing cannabis residue, ash trays con-
taining cannabis residue, drug paraphernalia, several pictures which
showed the defendant posing with cannabis plants, a videotape which
showed the defendant in the woods tending to cannabis plants, a
notebook evidencing various drug transactions, buyers and locations
of other cannabis plants and a firearm.
Russell Cooper: Charged with one count of Resisting an Officer with
Violence, Battery of a Law Enforcenpent Officer and Battery, the de-
fendant pleaded Not Guilty to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer contin-
ued the case for pre-trial on October 20. The defendant was repre-
sented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly struck
Apalachicola Police Officer Arnold Tolliver on August 10. The defen-
dant was eventually placed under arrest by Officers Tolliver and Earl
Whitfield.
Frederick Cummings: Charged with one count of Uttering a Worth-
less Check over $149, Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger filed a
written plea of Not Guilty on behalf of the defendant. Judge Steinmever
continued the case for pre-trial on October 20. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defendr, Kevin Steiger.
Kenneth Stanton Dykes: Charged "wth7 one count of Resisting or
Obstructing without Violence, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and
Possession of less than 20 Grams of Marijuana, the defendant pleaded
No Contest to the offense of Possession of Less than 20 Grams of
Marijuana. The defendant was represented by Attorney Doug Gaidry.
Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to one year of probation. As a condition of probation, the defen-
dant will be receive counseling for drug abuse if needed. Judge
Steinmeyer also ordered the defendant to pay $115 for court costs.
According to the probable cause report, members from the Franklin
County Sheriffs Department executed a search warrant at the
defendant's residence located on St. George Island on August 9. The
officers allegedly discovered several small, plastic bags containing
residue and drug paraphernalia which included rolling papers, metal
hemostats, Alligator clips and metal pipes.
According to the report, the defendant allegedly informed the officers
that his name was Justin B. Dykes. However, officers later discov-
ered the defendant's correct identity by examining various letters at
the defendant's residence
Gregory Farmer: Charged with one count of Burglary of a Dwelling,
Trespassing on a Structure or Conveyance, Criminal Mischief, Re-
sisting Arrest with Violence and Escape, the defendant pleaded No
Contest to the offenses of Trespassing on an Occupied Structure and
Continued on page 4



THE BIG LIE

The Soviet Propaganda Industry:
1917- 1991

Kevin Begos will lecture on a series of trips made to
Russia in 1993, 1994, and 1995, investigating and in-
terviewing former Soviet propaganda workers. The
graphic arts, textile, public works, and literary sec-
tions of the State Propaganda Industry will be dis-
cussed. Actual examples of propaganda from 1917
to the 1980s will be on display. Aslide show will ac-
company the lecture.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th, 7:00 p.m.
The Raney House Market Street Apalachicola

Sponsored by the Apalachicola Area Historical Society
(For more information, please contact Barbara
Singer at 1-850-653-9133)




APALACHEE
CENTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES, INC.
Staff Assistant #1255. Requires a minimum of a high school
diploma or it's equivalent and three years of secretarial or of-
fice clerical experience. Must possess a typing score of at least
55 cwpm. Starting salary: $7.65 per hour.
Secretary OPS #2060. Requires a minimum of a high school
diploma or it's equivalent and one year of secretarial or office
clerical experience. Must possess a typing score of at least 35
cwpm. Starting salary: $6.43 per hour.


17










Page 4 19 September 1997 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


Second Circuit Court from Page 3
Resisting Arrest without Violence. The defendant was represented by
Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to one year of probation. Judge Steinmeyer also ordered the de-
fendant to pay $110 for court costs.
According to the probable cause report, Apalachicola Police Officer
Gerald Proctor was dispatched to the residence of Pauline Jones on
December 3, 1996. Ms. Jones requested that the defendant be re-
moved from her home.
Officer Proctor allegedly discovered the defendant in the bedroom of
Ms. Jones. According to the report, the defendant allegedly became
emotional when Officer Proctor attempted advised him that he was
under arrest. The defendant allegedly dove through a closed window
as Officer Proctor attempted to place him under arrest.
Officer Proctor claimed that he grabbed the defendant and was also
pulled through the window; he further claimed that he received a
puncture wound to his left forearm as a result of the incident.
Milan Hicks: The defendant was charged with one count of Resisting
Arrest with Violence and DUI; the charges were reduced to Resisting
Arrest without Violence and DUI and the defendant's case was trans-
ferred to county court.
According to the probable cause report, officers with the Apalachi-
cola Police Department noticed a vehicle at the intersection of Avenue
J and 8th Street moving in a reckless manner on August 9. The ve-
hicle, it was noted; was allegedly spinning its wheels and driving off
the road.
When Apalachicola Police Officers eventually stopped the vehicle on
7th Street arid Avenue J, the passenger fled from the vehicle. When
officers attempted to arrest the driver of the vehicle, he allegedly re-
sisted arrest. According to the report, the defendant resisted officers
by allegedly attempting to kick them. The defendant eventually agreed
to an intoxilyzer test. His highest test sample was .190.
William, Hilderbrandt, III: Charged with one count of Tampering
with Physical Evidence and DUI, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty to
the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pre-trial on
October 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant was allegedly
stopped on State Road 300 in Eastpoint for driving 51 MPH in a 35
MPH speed zone on August 23. The defendant allegedly smelt of alco-
hol. According to thereport, the defendant's "...face was flushed, his
eyes were red, his speech was slurred when he spoke." The defendant
allegedly agreed to a series of field sobriety tests, though he failed the
majority of them.
According to the report, the defendant also agreed to an intoxilyzer
test. His highest test sample was .090. The defendant allegedly grabbed
two copies of the intoxilyzer printout, ran to the restroom and flushed
the copy down the toilet. "I seen him pick up the two copies and read
them," the report noted, "Mr. Hildebrandt then ran towards the toilet.
I screamed to stop but he already flushed them."
Authur Joe Hutchinson: Charged with one count of Sale of a Con-
trolled Substance, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty to the offense.
Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pre-trial on October 20. The
defendant was appointed the services of a conflict attorney.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant was allegedly
present during a controlled buy from Sgt. James Watkins & a confi-
dential informant during an undercover operation at a graveyard lo-
cated near Carrabelle High School on July ,19.
Sgt. Michael Moore and Deputy Jep Smith also served as back-up
during the undercover operation. A physical description of the defen-
dant was rioted. Sgt. Watkins reported that he knew the defendant
only by his nickname, Trigger.
According to the report, Major Mike Mock with the Franklin County
Sheriffs Department advised Sgt. Moore that the defendant was the
only known suspect in the City of Carrabelle who drove a blue col-
ored Ford Fairmount and was referred to a 'Trigger."
Daniel Johnson: Charged with Third Degree Grand Theft, the defen-
dant pleaded Not.Guiltyto the offense. Judge Steinmeyer continued
the case for pre-trial on October 20. The defendant was represented
by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
William Lee Johnson: Charged with one count of Cultivation of Can-
nabis and Possession of More than 20 Grams of Marijuana, the de-
fendant pleaded Not Guilty to the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer contin-
ued the case for pre-trial on October 20. The defendant was appointed
the services of Assistant Public Defendei Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, officers with the Bay and
Franklin County Sheriffs Department as well as the Florida Fresh-
water Game and Fish Department were conducting a Marijuana Eradi-
cation operation in Franklin County on June 19.
Officer Greg Morris with the Florida Freshwater Game and Fish De-
partment allegedly spotted several marijuana plants in the backyard
of a residence located by Highway 67. Officers later arrested the de-
fendant at his residence. A total of 15 marijuana plants were alleg-
edly discovered in the backyard of the defendant's residence.
Johnny Lee Jones, Jr.: Charged with one count of Sale of a Con-
trolled Substance, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty to the offense.
Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on November 19. The
defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly sold
$25 worth of crack cocaine to a confidential informant on May 13
near an area known as the Magnolia Club located in the City of
Carrabelle.
Corlinda Lattimore: Charged with one count of Sale of a Controlled
Substance, the defendant pleaded Not Guilty to the offense. Judge
Steinmeyer continued the'case for pretrial on October 20. The defen-
dant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly sold
$25 worth of crack cocaine to a confidential informant on July 17
near an area known as the Magnolia Club located on 7th Street and
Avenue C in the City of Carrabelle. The defendant was allegedly iden-
tified later that evening by Deputy Jep Smith with the Franklin County
Sheriffs Department.
Sandra Massey: Charged with one count of Uttering a Forged Check
and Third Degree Grand Theft, the defendant pleaded No Contest to
the offenses.


No
Recommendation

for Expulsion

Superintendent Brenda Galloway
with the Franklin County School
District informed the Franklin
Chronicle on September 8 that no
recommendation had been sub-
mitted by Carrabelle High School
Principal Bob McDaris for the ex-
pulsion of an Exceptional Educa-
tion student who was involved in
a confrontation at the school on
August 26 & 27. The student al-
legedly was in possession of a
floundering gig. Possession of a
weapon constitutes a Class 4
Major Offense, according to the
district's Code of Conduct; a vio-
lation of this code may result in a
student's expulsion.



Motel Rooms
With Private Beach
$100 Weekly

LORENZO'S
Highway 98
Call 681-3622 (Tallahassee)
697-3222 (Carrabelle)


Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
her to 120 days in the county jail with credit for 39 days of time
served. Judge Steinmeyer also ordered the defendant to serve 36
months of probation and pay $255 in court costs; he also ordered the
defendant to pay $735 in restitution to Mack Harbuck and $100 to
Ard's Fina Station. The defendant was represented by Assistant Pub-
lic Defender Kevin Steiger.
Estia McGugin: Charged with one count of Third Degree Grand Theft,
the defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer
adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced her to 90 days in the
county jail with credit for 18 days of time served. He also ordered the
defendant to serve two years of probation and pay $255 for court
costs. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender
Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly at-
tempted to sell a Panasonic Omni VHS Camera to the Carrabelle Pawn
Shop located on Highway 98 on July 28. The defendant allegedly in-
formed Carrabelle Police Officer Fred Jetton that he purchased the
video recorder at a flee market located on Highway 98.
According to the report, the owner of that flee market allegedly iden-
tified the noted video recorder and claimed that it belonged to her.
The market's owner allegedly reported that the video recorder had
been previously stolen.
Willie Lee Melton: Charged with three counts of Sale of a Controlled
Substance and Violation of Probation, Attorney J. Gordon Shuler filed
a written plea of Not Guilty on behalf of the defendant. Judge
Steinmeyer continued the case for pre-trial on October 20. The defen-
dant was represented by Attorney J. Gordon Shuler.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant was allegedly
present during a controlled buy with Sgt. James Watkins and a con-
fidential informant during an undercover operation on July 19 at a
graveyard located on Grays Avenue near Carrabelle High School.
According to the report, the defendant was allegedly present at the
controlled buy with two individuals, Calvin Burns and Arthur "Trig-
ger" Hutchinson. Sgt. Watkins allegedly observed Mr. Hutchinson
standing in the yard of a residence located east of Avenue C prior to
the controlled buy. Hutchinson then allegedly requested that Watkins
and the confidential informant meet him at the noted cemetery.
At the cemetery, Watkins and the confidential informant were met by
three individuals who arrived in a blue colored Ford Fairmount. The
defendant allegedly approached Watkins and asked how much crack
cocaine he wanted. Watkins responded that he wanted $25 worth of
crack cocaine. The defendant allegedly collected the money from
Watkins, gave it to Mr. Burns in exchange for a piece of crack cocaine
and returned the noted substance to Watkins.
Lorenzo O'Neal: Charged with three counts of Sale of a Controlled
Substance, Attorney Barbara Sanders filed a written plea of Not Guilty
on behalf of the defendant. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
pre-trial on October 20. The defendant was represented by Attorney
Barbara Sanders.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly sold
$40 worth of crack cocaine to Sgt. James Watkins and a confidential
informant on July 23 during an undercover operation on Avenue A
between 3rd and 5th Street in the City of Carrabelle.
Lisa Polous: The defendant has been charged with one count of Ag-
gravated Battery with a Deadly Weapon; the case against the defen-
dant still remains under investigation. Judge Steinmeyer continued
the case for arraignment on October 20. The defendant was repre-
sented by Attorney J. Gordon Shuler.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly shot
her boyfriend, Revell Dean, following a domestic disturbance at her
residence located on Hickory Dip Road in Eastpoint on August 8.
According to the report, Mr. Dean visited the defendant at her resi-
dence on August 8; the two engaged in a verbal argument which led
to a physical confrontation. The defendant allegedly ordered Mr. Dean
to leave the residence and later shot him in the leg.
"The witnesses all stated they didn't feel that Polous meant to shoot
Dean," the report noted, "she was pointing the firearm at the floor
when it discharged." According to the report, the defendant was ar-
rested because she allegedly did not retreat from the altercation and
escalated the use of deadly force prematurely. The report noted that
Mr. Dean appeared to be under theinfluence of alcohol.'
Chris Richards: Charged with one count of Possession of a Firearm
by a Convicted Felon, Aggravated Battery with a Deadly Weapon, Third
Degree Grand Theft and Criminal Mischief, the defendant pleaded,
Not Guilty to the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
pre-trial on October 20. The defendant was represented by Attorney
A. Waylon Graham.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly shot
resident Chad Fish at a St. Geroge Island residence located on Wing
Street on August 9. Mr. Fish was shot through the upper torso with
a .357 revolver. Following the shooting, the defendant allegedly fled
the scene of the incident.
Several witnesses allegedly informed Major Ron Crum with the Fran-
klin County Sheriffs Department that the defendant had indicated
that he was planning to shoot Mr. Fish. According to the report, other
witnesses to the event claimed that the defendant received a wound
to his hand following the shooting.
The defendant was allegedly apprehended approximately four blocks
away from the scene of the shooting. The defendant had a wound to
the web area of his left hand between his thumb and index finger. The
defendant allegedly informed authorities that he was "so messed up"
on drugs and alcohol that he did not realize what he had done. Ac-
cording to the report, the defendant allegedly claimed that Mr. Fish
and he were talking privately at the Wing St. residence when the gun
went off.
Darnell Robinson: Charged with one count of Sale of a Controlled
Substance and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, the defendant
pleaded No Contest to the offense of Possession of Drug Parapherna-
lia. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to one year of probation. Judge Steinmeyer also ordered the de-
fendant to pay $115 for court costs. The defendant was represented
by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.


According to the probable cause report, members of the Franklin
County Sheriffs Department executed a search warrant at the
defendant's residence located on 7th Street in the City of Apalachi-
cola on August 4. The officers allegedly discovered a crack cocaine
pipe on the defendant's person.
Kenneth Rucker: Charged with one count of Possession of a Con-
trolled Substance and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, the defen-
dant pleaded Not Guilty to the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued
the case for pre-trial on October 20. The defendant was represented
by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Gregory Starkey: Charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance,
the defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer
adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced him to 60 days in
the county jail with credit for 50 days of time served. Judge Steinmeyer
also ordered the defendant to serve two years of probation and pay
$255 for court costs. As a condition of probation, the defendant will
receive counseling for substance abuse if needed. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
According to the probable cause report, Apalachicola Police Officer
stopped the defendant on July 24 for driving through a stop sign
located at 12th Street and Avenue L. Upon stopping the defendant,
Whitfield noted that he discovered a cola can that was bent in the
fashion of a crack cocaine pipe on the console between the bucket
seats of the vehicle.
Larry Taz Stevens: Charged with Sale of a Controlled Substance,
Attorney Barbara Sanders filed a written plea of Not Guilty on behalf
Sof the defendant. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pre-trial
on October 20. The defendant was represented by Attorney Barbara
Sanders.
According to the probable cause report, the defendant allegedly sold
$25 worth of crack cocaine to Sgt. James Watkins and a confidential
informant on July 23 during an undercover operation on the west
end of Avenue C in the City of Carrabelle. The transaction allegedly
occurred near the Magnolia Club.
Michael Vann: Charged with one count of Possession of Drug Para-
phernalia, Possession of a Controlled Substance and two counts of
Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor, the defendant pleaded
No Contest to the offense of Possession of Cocaine.
Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to 90 days in the county jail with credit for 58 days of time served.
Judge Steinmeyer also ordered the defendant to serve two years of
probation and pay $255 for court costs and $100 to the Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement. As a condition of probation, the defen-

Continued on page 5















SAIL.



SThe Governor Stone
Historic 1877 GulfCoast Schooner

SUNSET SAIL
6:00 8:00 p.m., Tuesday Saturday




Group Charters, Weddings, Reunions & Special Occasions
Apalachicola Maritime Museum, Inc.
268 Water Street Apalachicola, Florida



Joel K. Shugar, MD, PA

Nationally Published Specialist
In Disease and Surgery of the Eye

Specializing in Cataract, Refractive & Laser Surgery

+ "No Stitch, No Patch, No Shot" Cataract Surgery
+ RK & Laser Refractive Surgery
+ Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology
+ Fellow, American College of Eye Surgeons
+ Pioneer in State-of-the-Art Acrylic Lenses_


11-800-870-6


1211 N. Center St. Perry, FL
Most Insurance Accepted


Ochlocknee River Home

-. ij 4-
t A 11


0/f
At w-Z~


ji.- 1I I. I '.a I i .. t
Simply gorgeous home on the Ochlocknee River on "White Squirrel Road." The 3BR/3BA main house
has over 3,500 sq. ft. under heat & air. Two fireplaces, an elevator, hardwood floors, New Orleans slate
tile and a gourmet kitchen are just a few of the features. There is a separate one bedroom guest house
with almost 1,000 sq. ft. and a 3 car garage. Deep water dock with boat hoist completes the picture. All
this only 45 minutes from Tallahassee by car and 15 minutes from the Gulf by boat. The enjoyment of the
famous colony of white squirrels is included in the price. The owner will entertain offers in the Value
Range of $370,000 to $450,000.
Ask for "Capt. Jack" Prophater 800-974-2666, Ext. 113 (Office) 850-927-2973 (Residence)


ThePrudentalResort Realty of
The Prudential .. St. George Island

123 West Gulf Beach Drive St. George Island, FL 32328
An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.


...no matter where you are-
ours is a service you can trust.
KELLEY FUNERAL HOME
KELLEY-RILEY FUNERAL HOME
serving all of Franklin County
653-2208 697-3366









Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 19 September 1997 Page 5


Antiques


Collectibles


TheWISTLESTO asepa
Coastl Min-Mal
Panaea 94-98-317 Carabe- e 90.697353


Xancuho Inn
Apalachicola Your Host: Mike
Apaacicoa .,, ,-,,:. .,,


Large Clean Rooms All Major Credit
Air Conditioned/Heated Cards Accepted
In Room Coffee (850) 653-9435
Reasonable Rates
Free HBO Cable TV (850 653-9451
Phone in Room FAX (850) 653-9180


FOR SALE
ST. GEORGE ISLAND East end bay front, high ground, one
acre homesite. Beautiful property. $129,900.
ST. GEORGE ISLAND Super building site, street to street
across from beach 3/4 mile west of bridge. $140,000.
APALACHICOLA COMMERCIAL 7.25+/- acres zoned C-4
behind IGA. Enterprise zone, convenient location, city water.
$225,000.
CARRABELLE COMMERCIAL Half city block (5 lots) with
house on Hwy. 98 next to IGA. Prime location. $279,500.
APALACHICOLA HISTORIC DISTRICT Best building site,
7th Street, high ground overlooking city marina, bay. $85,000.
ST. GEORGE ISLAND Beachfront villa 2BR/2BA, two story,
never rented, quality upgrades. $205,000.
APALACHICOLA Turn of century charmer, 3BR/1BA, three
lots, zoned office/residential. $139,900.
CARRABELLE COMMERCIAL Marine Street, overlooking
river. Location, location, location! $59,900.
APALACHICOLA.- Rental income producer near Lafayette Park.
Two lots, two apartments. $240,000.
CARRABELLE RIVER Deep water, high ground, open Gulf
access. 104'x530'. Lots of trees, privacy, great building site. River
Road. Motivated seller. $79,900.
ST. GEORGE COMMERCIAL 300 ft. highway frontage on
Franklin Boulevard, cause way to bridge. One of a kind, highest
visibility on St. George Island. $559,000.
SST. JOSEPH PENINSULA Secluded bayfront retreat on 4+/-
acres. Quality construction, separate guest cottage. Spectacular
views. $329,000.
SHAUN S. DONAHOE
License Real EsTaTe BRoken
(850) 653-8330
P.O. Box 666 171/2 Avenue E Downtown Historic Apalachicola


ft


Franklin
Chronicle
Now distributed in
Franklin, Wakulla.,
unties
and Gulf Co 1


A Celebration Of GoodTaste,


Unique Design, Excellence and Quafity!


- ~~",o 'CnT~


Look Closer. f

It's travel discounts, secirirt [
benefits and total convenience, n
rolled into one simple chiccking
account. Look at these f-jieu re


* No-Cost Personalized Checks Emergency Cash Advance Service
* 15 Checks at No Charge Savers ClubsM Discount Book
* $10,000 Accidental Death Insurance Key Ring Registration
* Credit Card Protection Sojourns Magazine


All yours for just $8.75 per month.*
Account can be opened with as little as
$100 with no minimal balance required
to maintain. Come by today. Take a
close look at the checking account that
gives you more than just a checkbook.


Gulf State


BANKFI


fourteenth Anniversary Sale


UP TO 50% OFF Henredon Furniture ,Including Special Orders.

5 0 % 40% OFF Lane Upholstery, Including Special Orders.
OFF Up to 50% OFF All In-Stock Furniture.
Store Wide 25% OFF All Accessories.



Any Armstrong and Verna Burke, owners of THE INSIDE STORY INTERIORS,
are now offering Substantial price reductions! Visit our 11,000 sq. foot showroom
in Panama City Beach, or shop at our newest location on Hwy. 30-A in Seagrove Beach.
Join the celebration ...treat yourself to affordable elegance! Sale ends
Sunday, October, 12th 1997 Financing available.


*25 cents per debit fee is incurred on more than 15 items when daily balance of $299 is not maintained.

,SIMPLY THE BEST CHECKING


INTERIORS
7829 FRONT BEACH ROAD, PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL. (850)234-7868,
LAKEWOOD TOWN CENTER, HWY. 30-A, SEAGROVE BEACH, FL. (850)231-0363


Second Circuit Court from Page 4
dant will receive counseling for substance abuse if needed.
According to the probable cause report, members of the Franklin
County Sheriffs Department executed a search warrant at the
defendant's residence located on 7th Street in the City of Apalachi-
cola on August 4. The officers allegedly discovered crack cocaine as
well as drug paraphernalia at the residence. According to the report,
there were allegedly two juveniles at the residence during the search
warrant operation. The juveniles were later interviewed by the De-
pacrtment of Family and Children Services. The defendant was repre-
sented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Benjamin Whitaker: The defendant has been charged with one count
of DUI Involving Serious Bodily Injuries, Leaving the Scene of an Ac-
cident, Aggravated Fleeing and Eluding, Resisting Arrest without Vio-
lence and Willful and Wanton Reckless Driving. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for pre-trial on October 20. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Anthony Williams: Charged with. one count of Third Degree Grand
Theft, Uttering a Forged Check, Possession of a Short Barreled Fire-
arm, Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon, Aggravated As-
sault with a Deadly Weapon and two counts of Battery, the defendant
was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
PRETRIAL
James Amison: Charged with one count.of Uttering a Forged Instru-
ment, the defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge
Steinmeyer withheld adjudication and sentenced the defendant to 18
months of probation. As a condition of probation, the defendant will
receive counseling for substance abuse if needed. Judge Steinmeyer
also ordered the defendant to pay $255 for court costs and $75 in
restitution to the Apalachicola State Bank. The defendant was repre-
sented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Michael Champion: The defendant has been charged with one count
of Aggravated Battery. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pre-
trial on October 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.
Willie Clark: Charged with one count of Carrying a Concealed Fire-
arm, the defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge
Steinmeyer withheld adjudication and sentenced the defendant to
two years of probation. As a condition of probation, the defendant
will receive counseling for substance abuse if needed. Judge
Steinmeyer also ordered the defendant to pay $255 for court costs.
The defendant was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin
Steiger.
Jeremy Collins: Charged with two counts of Uttering a Forged In-
strument and Third Degree Grand Theft, the defendant pleaded Not
Guilty to the offenses. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pre-
trial on October 20. The defendant was represented by Attorney Ronald
Mowery.
George Davis: The defendant.has been charged with one count of
Second Degree Robbery without, a Weapon, Possession of Cocaine
with Intent to Sell, Possession of a Controlled Substance with Intent
to Sell and Battery. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on
October 22. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger.
O.C. Davis: Charged with one count of Resisting Arrest without Vio-
lence and two counts of Possession of a Controlled Substance with
Intent to Sell, Attorney Dennis E. Boothe filed a written plea of Not
Guilty on behalf of the defendant. Judge Steinmeyer continued the
case for pre-trial on October 20. The defendant was represented by
Attorney Dennis E. Boothe.
Robert Dillon: The defendant has been charged with one count of
Burglary of a Dwelling. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial
on October 22. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.
Ruben Gallegos: The defendant has been charged with one count of
Sexual Battery. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on
October 22. The defendantwas represented byAttorney Barbara Sand-
ers.
Linda Goggins: The defendant hasbeen charged with one count of
Hit and Run with Serious Bodily triuries and two counts of DUI with
Serious Injuries, Leaving the Scene 'of an Accident and Violation of
Probation. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pre-trial on Oc-
tober 20. Judge Steinmeyer also denied a motion for pre-trial release
or reasonable bail on behalf of the defendant. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.


Charles Gray: Charged with one count of Sale of Cocaine, Attorney J.
Gordon Shuler filed a plea of Not Guilty on behalf of the defendant.
Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pretrial on October 20. The
defendant was represented by Attorney J. Gordon Shuler.
James Jackson: Charged with one count of Possession of a Con-
trolled Substance with Intent to Sell and Possession of a Controlled
Substance, the defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense of Pos-
session of Cocaine.
Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to six months in the Franklin County Jail with credit for 102
days of time served. Judge Steinmeyer also ordered the defendant to
serve one year of community control followed by one year of proba-
tion. As a condition of probation, the defendant will receive counsel-
ing for substance abuse if needed. Judge Steinmeyer also ordered the
defendant to pay $215 for court costs and $100 to the Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement. The defendant was represented by
Attorney J. Gordon Shuler.
David John Johnson: The defendant has been charged with one count
of Third Degree Grand Theft. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case
for trial on October 22. The defendant was represented by Assistant
Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Clifford Jones: Charged with one count of Battery on a Law Enforce-
ment Officer, Aggravated Fleeing and Eluding, Driving with a Sus-
pended or Revoked License and Sale of a Controlled Substance, At-
torney John Edward Eagen filed a written plea of Not Guilty on behalf
of the defendant. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for case man-
agement on October 20. The defendant was represented by Attorney
John Edward Eagen.
George Lowery: The defendant has been charged with one count of
Sale of Cocaine. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for trial on
October 22. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger.
Brian Miller: Charged with one count of Third Degree Grand Theft
and Burglar of a Conveyance, Attorney Barbara Sanders filed a writ-
ten plea of Not Guilty on behalf of the defendant. Judge Steinmeyer
continued the case for pretrial on October 20. The defendant was
represented by Attorney Barbara Sanders.
George Moss: Charged with one count of Sale of a Controlled Sub-
stance, Attorney Barbara Sanders filed a written plea of Not Guilty on
behalf of the defendant. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
pretrial on October 20. The defendant was represented by Attorney
Barbara Sanders.
Tina Nichols: Charged with one count of Uttering a Forged Instru-
ment, the defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense. Judge
Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced her to
18 months of probation. Judge Steinmeyer also ordered the defen-
dant to pay $255 for court costs and $440 in restitution to the
Carrabelle IGA. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.
Jessica Poole: Charged with one count of Third Degree Grand Theft,
all charges against the defendant were dropped. Assistant State At-
torney Ron Flury filed No Information on the case on September 15.
The case was dropped when co-defendant Sandra Massey pleaded No
Contest to the charges in the matter. The defendant has been repre-
sented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Fred Reynolds: Charged with one count of Dealing in Stolen Prop-
erty and Uttering a Forged Check, the defendant pleaded No Contest
to the offenses on August 7. The defendant was adjudicated Guilty
and sentenced to one year in the Franklin County Jail with credit for
50 days of time served. The defendant was also ordered to serve two
years of probation and pay $255 for court fines; additionally, the
defendant was ordered to pay $60 in restitution to the Carrabelle IGA
and $50 to Jay Hall. The defendant was represented by Assistant
Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Timmie Richardson: Charged with one count of Sale of a Controlled
Substance, Attorney J. Gordon Shuler filed a written plea of Not Guilty
on behalf of the defendant. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for
pretrial on October 20. The defendant was represented by Attorney J.
Gordon Shuler.
Dell Schneider: Charged with one count of Sexual Battery and Sexual
Act with a Child Under 16 Years of Age, the defendant pleaded No
Contest to one count of committing a Sexual Act with'a Child Under
16.
Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced
him to 11 months and 29 days in the Franklin County Jail. Judge
Steinmeyer also ordered the defendant to serve seven years of proba-
tion and pay $255 for court costs; the defendant must also pay all
costs for the victims' counseling. The defendant must first appear
before the U.S. District Court in South Carolina for a pending federal
charge before he serves his local prison sentence. The defendant was
represented by Attorney Jan Hevier and Clyde Taylor.

Continued on page 7


I


~p"B~:l
L'
~1
-Q


HOTE ELS'










Pa2e 6 19 September 1997 The Franklin Chronicle A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER Published every other Friday


Developments at the St. Joe Corporation

Joint Real Estate Venture for

Central Florida Marks Opening

Shot for St. Joe Corp Growth


Peter S. Rummell, Chair and Chief
Executive Officer of the Jackson-
ville based St. Joe Corporation, in
early September, announced that
St. Joe Corporation is beginning
a period of growth ".'..and is fo-
cusing on potential acquisitions
and strategic alliances..." begin-
ning with a joint venture involv-
ing St. Joe and CNL, Inc. CNL is
one of the largest privately held
real estate investment, finance
and development companies in
the United States. The St. Joe
Corporation, former owner of the
St. Joe paper mill in Port St. Joe,
is still the largest private land-
owner in Florida. The St. Joe Cor-
poration still owns thousands of
acres in Franklin and Gulf coun-
ties, and has been the subject of
many rumors concerning future
exploitation of those holdings.
With the announcement of the
joint venture involving CNL, Inc.,
it is now apparent that the St. Joe
Colsporation will begin exploita-
tion of their assets in the popu-
lated areas of Florida. The two
companies will invest in and de-
velop office and industrial prop-
erties throughout a 17-county
corridor from Volusia County
southwest to Sarasota County,
along with single-tenant facilities
throughout the United States.
When approved by the City of
Orlando, a 15-story office project
will be constructed, eventually
serving at the CNL national head-
quarters. The second urban
project will be the development of
Gran Park at Southpark in south
Orlando.
One day following the joint ven-
ture announcement, Peter


Rummell announced the hiring oi
David D. Fitch, who will become
senior vice-president and general
manager for commercial and in-
dustrial development for the St.
Joe Corporation. Rummell said,
"Fitch's flair for commercial acqui-
sition and development and his
proven managerial abilities will
enhance St. Joe's ability to move
quickly and aggressively on a va-
riety of projects." He added,
"David Fitch exemplifies the sort
of proven, action-oriented leader
St. Joe needs to help us unlock
our assets and growth poten-
tial..." Fitch is 43, a native of
Houston, Texas in the real estate
business.
St. Joe, a publicly held company
based in Jacksonville, has inter-
ests in real estate, timber, rail-
roads and sugar. Although the
real estate holdings present sig-
nificant development opportuni-
ties, Rummell also said that the
company's vision extends "well
beyond conventional real estate to
commercial, industrial, residen-
tial, resort and recreational op-
portunities for the next century."
In mid-August, the St. Joe Cor-
poration announced that the net
income for the second quarter of
1997 was down to $.37 per share
contrasted to $2.89 per share for
the same quarter in 1996. In
1996, the corporation's income
was up due in part to the sale of
land to the State of Florida and
income from discontinued opera-
tions, including the Port St. Joe
paper company, now owned by
Florida Coastal Paper.


Literacy Volunteers Go

Western


..' P L


By Liz Sisung
The Literacy Volunteers of Fran-
klin County (LVA) will hold their
annual fund raising dinner Sat-
urday, September 27 at the Fire
House in Eastpoint. Meals will be
served beginning at 5 p.m.
This year's theme is a Western
Round-up which dictates that the
chicken and ribs on the menu be
barbecued. LVA will provide the
meat and Eastpoint's own Red
Hilton will put on his cowboy hat
and boots to give his cooking the
"authentic" western touch.
A tradition of the dinner is the
food contest. This year the catego-
ries to be judged are the dishes
that "round-up" the meal: beans/
side dish, slaw/salad and des-
serts. Anyone who has a favorite
recipe or wants to create a west-
ern recipe of their own is encour-
aged to enter the contest.


Continuous entertainment is a
new feature this year. Cloggers,
line dancers and "home grown"
comedy will round out the meal.
Ticket prices are $5 for adults and
$3 for children under 12. Tickets
may be obtained at the Eastpoint
or Carrabelle branches of the li-
brary or through any Literacy Vol-
unteer.
Literacy Volunteers are proud of
the success of their program. They
have worked with 122 adult stu-
dents this past year. Some of their
success stories include: two stu-
dents enrolled in the Gulf Coast
nursing program, one has gone on
to Haney Vo-Tech, one received
his Captain's license through the
study help program, three have
received their CDL licenses, sev-
eral women have received office
skills and computer training, and
six students received their GED's.
Literacy Volunteers proudly say
"We have a program that works!"


Board Recognizes Retiring Member


Carrabelle Port and Airport Authority Chairperson Gary
Reakes (L) acknowledged retiring board member Carole
Adams (R) during the regular September 10 monthly
meeting. Reakes thanked Ms. Adams for her devoted service
to the Port Authority. "I speak for the whole board," Reakes
said, "when I say thank you very much for your
participation," Adams' response prompted much laughter
from the board. "I'm delighted to move on," she announced.
Port Authority member Barry Woods asked, "don't you want
to re-up for another six years?" She simply responded, "no
sir."


Lighthouse Sales and
ealyI Long Term
Realty / Rentals
Of St. George Island, Inc.
Beautifully oak tree studded island properties
available in Unit 5 for $45,500 and $47,500.
61 West Gulf Beach Dr.Near Carraibelle, high and dry acre with beach
Suite C access, wonderful gulf view. Only $25,000.
St. George Island, FL Bayfront long term rental in Apalachicola-
32328 charming and convenient!
(904) 927-2821 PrivateprestigiousSt. Georgelsland'sPlantation
offering 24-hour security, boardwalk beach
m accesses, cool pool and tennis courts. These two
S gLS choice acres are available today:Indian Bay Village
lot 12: A perfect comer lot with bay view, many
lovely trees only $49,000. Indian Bay Village lot
Property For 23: Superbuildingacrewithwatermeterin place.
Every Budget Bay view, nicely treed and ready for your home.
$63,350.


Coastal Appeals Bond Decision from Page 1

The Dept. of Environmental Protection
(DEP) Review of the 1281 Application
Application No. 1281 was reviewed and critiqued by Department
staff with input from numerous agencies and groups. In addition
to the normal technical information required of all oil drilling
applications the Department required an oil spill response plan
and a professional ecological and biological survey and report.
An assessment of the potential impacts on coastal habitats, off-
shore habitats and communities, water quality, air quality, en-
dangered and threatened species, marine mammals, birds, the
fishing industry, recreational activities, and archaeological re-
sources, was also required.
As part of the review process for application No. 1281, the De-
partment requested comments from the U.S. Army Corps of En-
gineers; U.S. Coast Guard; Environmental Protection Agency; U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service; Tyndall Air Force Base; the Offices of
the Governor and Attorney General; the Florida Departments of
Community Affairs, (the former) Environmental Regulation, and
Transportation; the Department's Divisions of Beaches and
Shores, State Lands, Law Enforcement, Office of Coastal Protec-
tion, Recreation and Parks, Historical Resources, Marine Re-
sources; the Marine Research Institute; Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission; Marine Fisheries Commission; Audubon Soci-
ety; Big Bend Sierra Club; Northwest Florida Water Management
District; Apalachee Regional Planning Council; West Florida Re-
gional Planning Council; Florida Association of Counties, and Gulf,
Bay, and Franklin counties. Eighteen responses were received.
Seven respondents had no objection to the issuance of this per-
mit. The remaining eleven respondents objected to the issuance
of the permit primarily due to potential adverse impact to the
coastal and marine resources.
The application has been deemed by Department staff to be
technically adequate to approve with the information sub-
mitted and the agreed upon conditions to be placed on the
permit. The only remaining insufficiency is the required
surety.
Department staff have reviewed the potential liability of a maxi-
mum oil spill with adverse dispersal conditions transporting oil
Into environmentally sensitive areas, and the potential cleanup
costs as required by the law. Data compiled includes: the worst
case exploratory well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico, historical
cleanup costs from prior oil spills in the Gulf Coast area, poten-
tial economic impact to the state from the loss of natural resources
and or various habitats, recreational and commercial uses (lost
use damages). The geographic area of potential impact from the
operations submitted by the applicant is considered reasonable
by staff. The applicant's data lists offshore areas potentially im-
pacted stretching from off of Escambia County on the west to
Pasco County on the east. Staff believes it is reasonable to use
about half of this distance as an area potentially impacted due to
the likelihood that a spill will be unidirectional following the pre-
vailing winds and currents. As a result separate calculations were
prepared for a spill impacting the area to the west and the east.
The primary impact area as described by the applicant as the
coasts off of Gulf, Franklin, and Wakulla counties was used as
the starting point for both east and west calculations.
For a spill going west from the drill site the following calculations
of damages for a worst case was compiled. Clean-up costs were
estimated from recent costs associated with the Tampa Bay oil
spill where similar sandy beaches prevail. Staff estimates
$462,500,000.00 or about $2,500,000.00 per mile for 185 miles.
Estimates for.natural resources damages are based on the value
formula found in Chapter 376.121 Florida Statutes. Using the
offshore areas of Wakulla, Franklin, Gulf, Bay, Walton, Okaloosa,
Santa Rosa, and Escambia counties, areas for habitat/bottom
types (including: sand bottom, beach, salt marsh, seagrass, tidal
marsh, and oyster reef) were compiled by the Florida Marine Re-
search Institute. The formula produces a natural resource dam-
age estimate of $1,710,000,000.00. The sum of these two (cleanup,
and natural resource damages) for a western spill is
$2.172.500,000.00.
Using similar assumptions and procedures for a spill to the east
(Gulf, Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson, Taylor, Dixie, Levy, Citrus,
and Hernando counties), produces estimates of $557,000,000.00
cleanupnup); and $3,696,000,000.00 (natural resource damages).
The sum of these two for an eastern spill is $4,253,000.000.00.
The Department recommends the higher value be used in com-
pliance with the Law directive to use the "maximum" spill into
"environmentally sensitive areas" as the basis for a surety rec-
ommendation. Therefore a surety of $4,253.000,000.00 is rec-.
ommended as a required security for this drilling application.
RECOMMEND APPROVAL
In its appeal brief, Coastal Petroleum has attacked the DEP estimates
on the basis of "flawed assumptions" in the calculations for cleanup
and natural resources damages. Coastal also attacked the assump-
tions for the calculation of damages to natural resources. In this cat-
egory, the assumptions by DEP regarding the volume of oil spilled
was based upon the worst spillage from Mexican oil well Ixtoc I, off of
the Yucatan Peninsula in the late 1970s. The volume from that spill
asserted Coastal Petroleum was "purely a guess." Coastal asserted:
"...Even if the volume of the spill from the Ixtoc I well were
known, that volume is not applicable to a well drilled a thou-
sand miles away into a different producing formation, using
different technology, under stringent drilling laws and rules,
and using the most modern environmental safeguards, in-
cluding oil response equipment on standby at the location."
Continuing, the Coastal brief said:
"...The sophisticated drilling practices required by regulation
and law in the United States Gulf waters precludes such prob-
lems. As the record shows of the more than 30,000 wells
drilled in the United States Gulf waters there has never been
a spill even approaching orders of magnitude of the Ixtoc I
spill."
Coastal Petroleum also argued in their appeal brief that "...It is very
rare to encounter any environmental effect from offshore drilling.
Actually the fisheries effects are positive." Coastal plans to use a "zero
discharge" rig, which does NOT put any drilling mud, waste water or
other effluents into the waters.


County Approves
Proposed Millage
Rate

Franklin County Commissioners
set their proposed village rate at
7.754 mils during a September 9
budget meeting. The rate will
generate $14,664,394 for the
upcoming budget year.
The previous year's rate, which
was 8.75 mils, generated
$12,809,675. The currently
proposed budget represents an
increase of 16 percent over the
past year.


Enjoy relaxed beach living at an
affordable price. Best priced family home
on St. George Island. $115,000. You also
get a fantastic yard and convenient
location.


:s:
: ALETOO

00.00000* 0*000


-- $12992 k

Beautiful 100% Olefin Loop Pile

Berber I M-


Call now for Free Estimate


The Supply Dock
Bayside Floorcovering

927-2674


139B West Gorrie St. George Island


-


FISH EKMAN'S CHOICE
Hwy. 98 Eastpoint FL 32328 (904) 670-8808


* Crickets
* Shiners
* Squid Shrimp
* Licences
*Ice *Feed


* Minnows
* Worms
* Cigar Minnows
* Tackle
* Chum


CHARLES PENNYCUFF-OWNER

r*




.,. Featuring: Joyce Estes' Original Art & Gifts
Art of the Area
r We Deliver To The Greater Apalachicola Area
-Please visit Sea Oats Gallery on St. George Island!
-. (904) 670-8931
S1-800-929-8931
Hwy 98, Eastpoint Just Across The Bridge


PAT'S PLACE
Carrabelle 904-697-4567

PAT'S Tasty and Wholesome Food at
PLACE Very Reasonable Prices
BURDA'S| [ X-]M
B' I IC I Pizza, Soups, Steaks, Subs,
E) N Sloppy Joes
Eat Inside or on the Patio
HWY 98 Just off Highway 98, 2 doors down from Burda's Drugstore

Escape to Beautiful
Apalachicola East Bay
Charming Motel*Reasonable Rentals Available
Rates lDaily*Weekly*Monthly


Sportsman s
Lodge Motel & Marina Ap e
P.O.-Box 606 Eastpoit, Fla. 32328 P
Phone (904) 670-8423 RV Hookups




Restaurant & Lounge St. George Island
927-2639
*
Monday Thursday: 11:30 a.m. 10:00 p.m.
Friday Sunday: 7:30 a.m. 11:00 p.m.

Happy Hour Specials in the Lounge
4:00 6:00 p.m. Nightly


I. nterActive Designs and

1 ^ Mitsuba Computers
L -- InterActive Designs..,is your local PC Computer Source
I-1 serving Franklin and Wakulla Counties.

Computer Sales System Consulting Webpages Internet
Buying a PC?
As you shop magazines, discount stores and electronic shops, remember personal computers are
made of a collection of components (modem, video, sound, memory, storage, etc.) To get lower
prices, some of these components are integrated into the motherboard. This does not allow you to
change these parts later! Ask before you buy about the upgradability of the system.
Why Mitsuba Computers?
Our systems are Intel based and feature upgradeable components. As technology advances, you
will not be left behind. This flexibility also allows you to customize PC systems to individual needs.
We also include a 2-year on-site warranty.
Only $1,199.00!**
This introductory price includes a Pentium 150 Intel Processor, 16 megs of RAM, 1.6 gig Hard
Drive, 2 meg Video Card, 33.6 Modem, 16X CD, 14'" Monitor (.28 dpi) 1.44 Floppy Drive, Mouse,
Keyboard, 2-Year On-Site Warranty, and Windows 95.
Other Options:
Multimedia Upgrade, add $65.00 for soundcard, speakers and CD titles. Upgrade to a 15" Monitor,
add $90.00. Memory Upgrade to a total of 32 meg EDO RAM, add $65.00. Upgrade Hard Drive to
2.5 gig, add $50.00.
For more information, call (850) 386-3379, e-mail steve@metzke.com, or mobile (850) 566-4141.
Visit our website at www.metzke.com
Listen to the Computer Help Desk ever Saturday at 10:00 a.m. on 105.7 FM Talk Radio.
**Does not include tax. Yes, we accept Visa and MasterCard!


Binstalled


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


Page 6 19 September 1997 The Franklin Chronicle


I*


;%lib


94664









Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 19 September 1997 Page 7


U- -- a Tr. 1 E .I111 U


student, runs bnortian


Baker is New EM Director
County Planner Alan Pierce has announced that Carrabelle resident
Butch Baker was hired as the county's new Emergency Management
Director on September 16.
Mr. Pierce informed the Franklin Chronicle on September 15 that he
had narrowed down his choice for the position to three applicants: Al
Mirabella, Carl "Pap" Duncan and Butch Baker. All three candidates,
he said, had a military background. "That's important for this posi-
tion," said Pierce.
"When I was in the air force," Baker said, "we had Disaster Prepared-
ness, which is the same as Emergency Management." Baker said that
he had served as Disaster Preparedness Chief while in the military.
"I think it's really, really important that we set up a plan (for emer-
gencies) and practice those plans," said Baker. He continued, The
goal is to be ready and able to respond -to whatever natural disaster
comes along without anyone being seriously hurt."
Mr. Baker impressed the planning office for several reasons, Pierce
said. "I thought he had well-rounded experience outside of the
military...and I liked his mannerism and approach to the job."

Wakulla





Lumber & Truss, INC.
4379 Crawfordville Highway P.O. Box 640
Crawfordville, FL 32326
(904) 926-8919
Residential Commercial



LUBERTO'S
SAND & STONE INC.

SITE PREP CONTRACTOR
MATERIALS SUPPLIER 1


LAND CLEARING BUSH HOGGING
CUSTOM PONDS & DRIVEWAYS
FILL DIRT LIMEROCK BUILDERS SAND
COMPOST TOPSOIL CYPRESS MULCH
PALM TREES ASST STONE & GRAVEL
RIVER ROCK CRUSHED GRANITE ETC.

CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
850- 670 8143
153 HWY 98* EASTPOINT FL


Not Solved

By Sue Riddle Cronkite
The drop in number of students
and resulting loss of state and fed-
eral funds for the Franklin County
School System is a problem that
hasn't been solved, yet. To make
it through the past school term
money was transferred into the
general fund from funds accumu-
lated after payoff of several bond
issues. At the beginning of this
school term the system was forced
to lay off a number of teachers,
some of which have been called
back.
"We're working it out, slowly but
surely," said Supt. Brenda Gallo-
way at the Sept. 9 special meet-
ing of the school board at Brown
Elementary School. A final bud-
get amendment for 1996-97 and
the annual financial report for
1996-97 were adopted.
John Reiman, school system fi-
nance officer, said $252,835 re-
mained as a fund balance on June
30, with $184,884 unreserved
and $67,951 reserved.
"After subtracting the reserved
funds, there was roughly
$185,000 in the general fund
available for the board to use,
said Reiman. "As expected, the
unreserved fund balance of
$184,884.29 is considerably be-
low the $389,987 at the end of last
year. The unreserved balance is
available for spending in 1997-98,
where other portions of the fund
balance must be reserved for pay-
ing 1996-97 encumbrances arind
for unexpended categorical
funds."
In Reiman's report the general
fund beginning balance on July
1, 1996, was $389,987 in unre-
served funds and $356,933 in re-
served funds, for a total of
$746,920. Comparing last year's
account balance with this year's
June 30 balance there is a differ-
ence of $494,085.
Immediately after Supt. Galloway
took office proration was avoided
by switching the bond issue ac-
cumulation into the general fund
when it was discovered that in-
come from state and federal funds
had been cut considerably due to
the loss of a number of students.
The money used to avert a disas-
ter is explained in Reiman's re-
port as "The major change to debt
service compared to 1995-96 was
the transfer-out of $513,000 to
the general fund, This was an ac-
cumulated fund balance which
primarily occurred in connection
with the return of funds from the
fiscal agent after completion of
payoff of several bond issues." '-


The loss of students also bit into
the school food service. That ac-
count owes $48,000 to other
school board fund accounts, and
at some point must be repaid,
according to Reiman's report. "In
the past funds have been bor-
rowed from other accounts, and
have been repaid in most cases.
Even if there were to be major
changes to school food service
operations, this probably cannot
be done and will require further
transfers from the general fund.
Food service revenue for 1996-97
was almost $40,000 less than
1995-96, while total expenses
were about $11,000 higher,
most of which were salaries and
benefits.
"In 1996-97 the 'traditional'
grants, including Titles I, II, and
VI, along with IDEA, Adult Edu-
cation, etc., were about $72,000
less than for 1995-96," reported
Reiman. "'New' grants for flood
relief, School-to-Work, etc.; in-
creased the total of federal grants
to $62,000 more than last year."
After Reiman gave his report
Board Member Jimmy Gander
asked him to alert the board be-
fore problems come up. "Sortie-
times things on lists and forms
slip by me. If you could see; like
last year for instance, that we
were losing students and food ser-
vice was going down, and let us
know."
After Reimar's explanation of the
financial report, Doug Creamer
asked, "What about the deficit?"
'The state won't allow a deficit,"
said Reiman.
"I'm confused," said Creamrer. "I
thought there was a deficit
reported."
"You're talking about the funding
shortfall, the end funding from
last year," said Supt. Galloway.
SReiman explained the figures he
had reported for the end of the
school year of 1996-97 and money
left after the bond-issue money
had been transferred into the gen-
eral fund.
"Didn't ypu give raises?" asked
Creamer.
"Somewhere around $100,000,"
said Gander.
"Probably $150,000," said
Reiman.
"About $185,000 was carried over
this year and you're not running
a deficit?" asked Creamer.
"Yes," said Reiman.
"Why?" asked Creamer.
"You want to know why there is a
net remaining," said School Board
Chairman Will Kendrick.


Second Circuit Court from rage a


UNITED STATES

CELLULAR.


We're Now in Port St. Joe

Check us out before you decide,
stop by and shop us at 528 Fifth
Street (Piggly Wiggly Shopping
Center), next to Newberry Eye
SClinic!

FREE ACTIVATION
FREE PHONE
FIRST 2 MONTHS ACCESS FREE*
FREE DESK TOP CHARGER F


Call BJ or Jerry at
The Cellular Connection

899-0527


Monthly Service
Starting at Only
$9.95


1 year service agreement, credit approval required, restrictions may apply.
*$24.95 plans and higher.

"I understand the schools lost 100
students," said Creamer.


"Yes," said Reiman.
"You want to know why they
went.to private schools?" asked
Gander.
"Why?" said Creamer. "I sent mine
to private school because of lack
of discipline in Carrabelle."
S-"A lotof people have moved away,"
said Board Member Connie Roehr.
.If;you want to know why the
nuftber of students dropped
you'll have to go back to the par-
ents and ask them, not the
board."
"Have you done that?" asked
Creamer.
"I wouldn't have an answer," said
Roehr. "Go ask the parents
themselves."
"That's ,a lot of money for the
schools to lose," said Creamer.
. Kendrick called for a vote and the
199'6-97 financial report was
adopted.
SIn other business the board ap-
proved by a four to one vote a First
Step/Teen Parent program at
Apalachicola, with daycare facili-
ties to be located at Chapman El-
ementary. Board Member Katie
McKnight voted against the pro-
gram. She later explained that she
didn't think the teen parenting
program should be located in a
school, that impressionable
young people might think the
school system was condoning
teen-age narenthnnod


VIOLATIONS OF PROBATION


Students Sent,
Home Follow-
ing Small Fire
at CHS
Students from Carrabelle High
School were sent home following
a fire that occurred on Septem-
ber 15 in a small storage room of
the school.
According to CHS Principal Bob
McDaris, the fire was discovered
at approximately '12:25 p.m. in
the school's storage room. The
fire, he said, was put out with the
help of a couple of fire extinguish-
ers located on campus.
Principal McDaris said that the
cause of the fire was currently
under investigation by the State
Fire Marshall's Office. The fire, he
said, caused approximately
$4000 worth of damage. McDaris
said that the noted storage room
contained mainly books and fur-
niture.
The students were sent home af-
ter school personnel determined
that the high school building was
uninhabitable. Mr. McDaris noted
that a certain amount of plastic
burned during the fire and emit-
ted a noxious smell. He
complimented both students and
faculty members for their prompt
response to the small fire.


QUALITY WORK JOHN'S REASONABLE RATES
CONSTRUCTION
of Franklin County, Inc.


GEN. CONTRACTOR LIC.
NO: RG0050763
ROOFING CONTRACTOR LIC.
NO: RC0051706


Remodeling & Custom Homes
Roofing & Repairs
Vinyl Siding
John Hewitt
697-2376 OWNER
104 WEST HWY. 98 CARRABELLE
P.O. Drawer JJ Carrabelle 32322


J MOSELEY
SINCE.
FILL SAND, DRIVEWAYS, LAND CLEARING,
LIMEROCK, GRADING


FOR ALL YOUR TRACTORWORK NEEDS
CALL
-- 670-8246 -


KII KY MVOSELEY
RG 0048406


rP.. BOXA LOO
EASTPOINT, FL 32328


GARLIC ENVIRONMENTAL
ASSOCIATES, Inc.
..-; SERVING FLORIDA'S COASTAL AREA
....' ^SPECIALIZING IN:
S Natural Resource and Environmental
Regulatory Issues.
CALL DAN GARLICK-PROFESSIONAL WETLAND

Civil Engineering Environmental Audits.
CALL STEVE PALMER-PROFESSIONAL
ENGINEER
Contracting in Shoreline Stabilization,
Marinas and Piers. CALL DAN GARLICK-
RC 95-0026
/^' 48 AVENUE D P.O. BOX 385
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329-0385
.- j -z- (850) 653-8899 FAX (850) 653-9656



For Sale
Large rock for erosion control, break waters
and rock sea walls. Rock delivered and placed.
Call Larry Craft, 403 Woodville Hwy.
Crawfordville, FL 32327
Mobile (904) 545-7863 Home (904) 421-6907


Randall Sounders: The defendant was been charged with one count
of Third Degree Grand Theft. Judge Steinmeyer continued thec -ase George Branc Charged with one count of violating community con-
'for trial on September 17. The defendant was represented by Attor- trol, the defendant entered a denial to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer
ney Barbara Sanders. continued the case for a hearing on October 20. The defendant was
represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiaer.


Keturah Washington: Charged with one count of Possession of a
Controlled Substance and Possession of a Controlled Substance with
Intent to Sell, all charges against the defendant were dropped. Assis-
tant .State Attorney Ron Flury filed No Information in the matter on
September 8. According to the report filed by Mr. Flury, the case was
dropped due to insufficient proof of actual possession beyond a rea-
sonable doubt. The defendant was represented by Attorney William
Webster.
Kathy Wiggins: Charged with one count of Third Degree Grand Theft
and Burglary of a Structure, the defendant pleaded No Contest to the
offense. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sen-
.tenced him to 24 months of probation. As a condition of probation,
the defendant must testify truthfully against a co-defendant. Judge
Steinmeyer also ordered the defendant to pay $255 for court costs. A
restitution amount will be determined at a later date. The defendant
was represented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Evelyn Williams: Charged with one count of Aggravated Battery with
a Deadly Weapon, the defendant pleaded No Contest to the offense of.
Battery. Judge Steinmeyer adjudicated the defendant Guilty and'sen-
tenced her to one year of probation. He also ordered the defendant to
pay $255 in court costs and $479 in restitution to Dorothy Agyel. Ms.
Agyei was allegedly unsatisfied with the restitution amount and plans
to seek additional restitution for medical treatment through civil court
proceedings. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger.
Maurice Williams: Charged with three counts of Possession of a Con-
trolled Substance, Attorney J. Gordon-Shuler filed a written plea of
Not Guilty on the defendant's behalf. Judge Steinmeyer continued
the case for pretrial on October 20. The defendant was represented
by Attorney J. Gordon Shuler.
Tracy Wilson: The defendant has been Charged with one count of
Cultivation of Cannabis, Possession of Cannabis and Possession of
Drug Paraphernalia. Judge Steinmeyer continued the case for pre-
trial on October 20. The defendant was represented by Assistant Public
Defender Kevin Steiger.
Glenn Yon: The defendant has been charged with one count of Sexual
Battery and Sexual Battery by Some Force. Judge Steinmeyer contin-
ued the case for pretrial on November 17. The defendant was repre-
sented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.


RESIDENTIAL


ELEVATORS,I me.


manufacturers of
Home Elevators
& Dumbwaiters


b~nMM 'I_~


Nationwide
Distributors

Factory
Direct
Prices

For More Information
Call 850 926-6022 or

1-800-832-2004-


State CC#041


Handicapped
Accessible

Im
Accomm0*I
Most WhOtc IiS


Limous Humose: Charged with one count of violating probation, the
defendant entered a denial to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer contin-
ued the case for a hearing on October 20. The defendant was ap-
poiftted the services of the public defender.

Latira Jean Robblee: Charged with one count of violating probation,
the defendant enter an admission to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer
adjudicated the defendant Guilty and sentenced her to one year in
the Franklin County Jail. The defendant will receive rehabilitative
assistance during her prison term. Judge Steinmeyer reduced all court
costs to a civil judgment. The defendant was represented by Assis-
tant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Andre Rosier: Charged with one count of violating probation, the
defendant entered a denial to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer contin-
ued the case for a hearing on October 20. The defendant was repre-
serted by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.
Michael Scott: Charged with one count of violating probation, the
defendant entered a denial to the offense. Judge Steinmeyer contin-
ued the case for a hearing on October 20. The defendant was repre-
sented by Assistant Public Defender Kevin Steiger.

MOTION
eorge Cargill: Judge Steinmeyer denied a motion from the defen-
dant for Post Conviction Relief. The defendant claimed that his former
attorney, Harold S. Richmond, did not provide adequate counsel.

SENTENCING
Bill Miller, IV: Convicted of one count of Third Degree Grand Theft,
*.Judge Van Russell sentenced the defendant to 10 months in the Fran-
klin County Jail. Judge Russell also ordered the defendant to serve
two years of probation and pay a maximum of $1,525 in restitution
to the American Legion Post #82. The defendant was represented by
Attorney J. Gordon Shuler.



ADOPTION
Loving families are looking to adopt. You may
select the family and they will pay your reason-
able medical and living expenses. Counseling is
available and foster care is not required. Please
call attorney Madonna Elliott at 800-325-4114
for more information. Florida Bar #0746990.


Carports-Trailers
Kennels-Screened Rooms

_Wakulla
Portable Buildings
319 South
Crawfordville, Fla 32327
904-926-8215
Jerry Mathis or Barbara Snell
NO DOWN PAYMENT


HWanI-Houses
rmmArwE


-N A VARIETY OF STYLES, METALS, SIZES & COLORS.


U-UILIIA
A- T%- -


Dr'VV A J


Dr'NV OAD








Page 8 19 September 1997 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


Court Fees

Still

Unchanged

County court fines did not in-
crease as expected for local defen-
dants during the September 15
Second Circuit Court proceedings
at the Franklin County Court-
house.
Although Judge F.E. Steinmeyer
imposed the traditional fine of
$255 to most defendants during
the noted proceedings, he ex-
pected that fees would eventually
be increased for the local court
system. "I thought it might be
done by now," he noted.
Judge Steinmeyer informed the
Franklin Chronicle on September
15 that the new fee schedule was
still in the process of being imple-
mented. "Judge (N Sanders) Sauls
is still fine-tuning it," said
Steinmeyer, "he's speaking with
the different counties and trying
to get everyone on board."
Chief Judge N Sanders Sauls has
proposed that the six counties in
his jurisdiction implement a uni-
form fee schedule. The model fee
schedule will be based on that of
Leon County's. For.Franklin
County, that will mean an in-
crease for many defendants who
appear before the county or sec-
ond circuit court.
Judge Steinmeyer informed the
Franklin Chronicle that County
Judge Van Russell and he were
-expected to soon meet with Judge
Sauls to further discuss the mat-
ter. Steinmeyer expressed enthu-
siasm for the proposed fee sched-
ule. "It strikes me as a pretty good
arrangement," he exclaimed.
Judge Steinmeyer said that the
proposed fee schedule would gen-
erate more revenue for the
county's fine & forfeiture fund.
The proposed schedule has also
received some criticism from the
local public defender's office. As-
sistant Public Defender Kevin
Steiger previously stated that the
proposed schedule would be too
expensive for most defendants to
pay; he predicted that the fee in-
crease would result in a higher
rate of probation violations in the
county.

Nursing Home
Update Available
The Florida Agency for Health
Care Administration has available
free of charge the ninth edition of
its nursing home guide and up-
dating brochure. The north
Florida edition of this guide pro-
vides concise information about
.197 of the 691 statewide nursing
homes, skilled nursing facilities,
hospital skilled nursing facilities
and continuing care retirement
communities. The July 1997 up-
dating guide contains additional
information on facilities cited for
deficiencies as determined on
annual inspections by the Agency
for Health Care Administration.
Write: Information Office, Agency
for Health Care Administration,
Building 3, 2727 Mahan Drive,
Tallahassee, FL 32308-5403.


Rene
Topping
Associate
CARRABELLE REALTY
(the name says it all)


ents ior conferencing during eacn grading penrou.
DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR
Students may be dismissed or suspended from the program if they
exhibit disruptive behavior at the alternative center. The program will
group the disruptive behavior in three separate categories: major,
intermediate and minor offense.
The following disruptive behavior will be categorized as Major Offenses:
Possession of Weapons, Possession, Use or Sale of Drugs, Sealing,
Extortion, Larceny, Igniting Fireworks, Indecent Exposure and Vio-
lence against Person or Property. Such behavior will result in an au-
tomatic dismissal from the alternative center. These students will also
receive recommendations for Adult School enrollment.
The following disruptive behavior will be categorized as Intermediate
,Offenses: Illegal Use, Possession or Sale of Tobacco, Cheating, Leav-
ing Class without Permission, Forming Secret Societies/Gangs and
Profanity:


The first such offense by a student will result in a written referral and
a mandatory suspension until a parent conference has been com-
pleted. Parents and students will be provided a written notification of
the consequences for repeat offenses. Further counseling may be pro-
vided to the students and parents. Students who repeat the same
offense will be automatically dismissed from the center and receive a
recommendation for Adult School enrollment.
The following disruptive behavior will be categorized as Minor Of-
fenses: Wearing Headgear, Hats or Caps, Truancy, Failure to Accept
Disciplinary Action, Inappropriate Displays of Affection, Non-Confor-
mity to the Dress Code, Being Unprepared for Classroom Work, Loi-
tering on Campus Before or After School, Misconduct at the School
Bus, Forging Signatures, Notes or Excuses and Possession of Elec-
tronic Telephone Pagers, Cellular Phones or Amplified Devices.
The first such offense by a student will result in a "time-out" session
in which the student will be required to write an essay describing his
or her day up to the time in which the offense had been committed.
The student will also receive counseling. During the counseling ses-
sion, the student will be asked to sign a behavior modification con-
tract. The contract will serve as an agreement between the student
and instructor; it will outline a plan for the student to prevent similar
behavior and detail the consequences of such repeat behavior.
A student will receive a written referral if he or she repeats the same
offense. That students' parents will also be contacted. Additionally,
detention will be scheduled for the student. If a student commits the
same offense for a third time, the student will be suspended until a
parent conference has been completed. The student will also receive
a referral. Those who dare to commit a fourth identical offense will be
automatically dismissed from the center and receive a recommenda-
tion for Adult School enrollment.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Ms. Nan Collins stated that the proposed alternative center is part of
the Drop-Out Prevention Program. "It really will be the beginning of a
Second Chance School," said Collins. She predicted that a Second
Chance School would be opened by January 1, 1998.
An alternative education program can accept those categorized as
either Disruptive Students or Juvenile Offenders. The alternative cen-
ter will currently only accept those who are characterized as Disrup-
tive Students. Ms. Collins did not rule out the possibility of creating a
Juvenile Offenders Program in the future. "We'll take this one step at
a time," said Collins, "that's how you have to do it in education."
Collins stated that most parents she has spoken with about the mat-
ter have voiced enthusiasm for the proposed program. She said that
schools are currently identifying possible students for the program.
In the next week, Collins said that parents would be contacted and
students would be officially chosen to participate in the program.
Franklin County Superintendent of Schools Brenda Galloway com-
mended the work rendered by Ms. Collins and others in the effort to
create an alternative education program. "I'm real excited about this,"
said Galloway. She continued, "some students have problems with
the regular classroom setting. This will give the children with those
problems a second chance." Galloway concluded, "it will benefit the
whole community...not just one school."


LOOKING FOR A GET-AWAY for fish-
ing, beach combing, or just plain
laying about? See this 2BR Florida
Room on 2 lots. Fenced all around,
opposite the city park $29,900.00
LOOK AT ALL THIS ROOM! 3BR/3BA 2
story on River Road. Unique Plan
on one acre, 1710 sq. ft.$97,000.00


Fiber-Classic Raised Panel Fiber-Classic Embossed


WANT AN IMMACULATE 2 BEDROOM
on pilings near the Crooked
River Lighthouse? This home is
on 1 acre and has 2 large bed-
rooms, 2 baths, huge kitchen,
open deck and screened porch.
$93,500.00


Fiber-Classic Doorlites


----=wmI~~-I~- ~ f ~-ea melli-
Take a closer look at Therma-Tru door systems. They function as beautifully as they look.

TaloI Bu ild S p in I id &: C. IB idin

Hwy.198:&Fp.1:S.7Ct iN
Eastoint Fl.TallhasseFLTallhasseF


Serving the Big Bend area for over 30 years.



the CHRONICLE BOOKSHOP

MAIL ORDER SERVICE *
2309 Old Bainbridge Road Tallahassee, FL 32303


Alternative Opportunity Center Continued from Page 1'
In the GO Program, students will receive credits upon demonstrating
a mastery of performance standards. Students will learn at their own
pace. The three main goals of the program will be to modify student
behavior, improve attitudes and increase academic performance. The
main objective of the GO Program is to keep at-risk students in school.
The Teenage Parent Program will seek to decrease the amount of re-
peat teenage pregnancies. The program will also empower teenage
parents to earn high school diplomas. Teenage parents will be
provided a supportive environment to enable them to continue their
education.
The students will receive grades every six weeks. Student behavior
will be monitored and evaluated. The program will make referrals to
support agencies when needed. The program will also contact par-


Name


(Please write legibly.)


Address
State Zip code + 4
Subscriptions will begin within a


Telephone Number:


3-week period.


area


You may renew your subscription to the Chronicle
under this plan. Please indicate a renewal by
checking the block below and placing your mail-
ing labelto this form.
Renewal Mailing Label
placed here


4-5 books .... S
6-10 books... S
Bookshop List
19 September 1!
SAmount enclosed
Please do not se


All book ord
Completed,
money ord
Bainbridge
Iadd sales ta
Will be return
L -


Now is the time to
subscribe to the

FRANKLIN

CHRONICLE
The Chronicle is published every other Friday.
Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County
are $16.96 including taxes for one year, or 26
issues. The out-of county rate is $22.26 in-
cluding taxes. All issues mailed in protective
Kraft envelopes.


Subscriber
Address
City State
Zip
Telephone
L Renewal*
Basic Subscription, 26 issues.
Q Out of County
U In County
*If renewal, please include mailing label
Franklin Chronicle
Please send this form to: post office Box 590
Eastpoint, Florida 32328
904-927-2186 or 904-385-4003


(53) New. Picture History,
American Painting 1770-
1930. Edited by William
Ayres. Rizzoli, New York in
association with Fraunces
Tavern Museum, New York.
In twelve profusely illus-
trated chapters, scholars re-
view the masterpieces of
American history painting to
show how public opinion,
governmental patronage
and imaginative artistry
combined to record events
and shape how we interpret
history. Sold nationally for
more than $40. Chronicle
Bookshop price = $29.00.
256pp. Large format (9.75 x
12.50 inches). Hardcover.

(62) New. The Creek War of
1813 and 1814 by H. S.
Halbert and T. S. Ball; Ed-
ited by Frank L. Owsley, Jr.
University of Alabama Press.
This standard account of
one of the most controver-
sial wars in which Ameri-
cans have fought is again
available with introductory
material and bibliography
revised. This facsimile re-
production of the 1895 origi-
nal provides a full and sym-
pathetic account of the In-
dians' ,point of view. Sold
nationally for $29.95.
Bookshop price = $22.95.
370 pp. Paperback.

(115) Home Fires: An
Intimate Portrait of
One Middle-Class
Family in Postwar
America. By Donald Katz.
Aaron Asher Books, a divi-
sion of Harper-Collins,
1992. Hardcover. 619 pp.
A power saga of the Gordon
Family- real people,
names changed. Their story
has the scope, depth,
wealth of incident, and
emotional intensity of a
great novel, illuminating
the interplay between pri-
vate life and profoundcul-
tural changes. Natibnally
sold for $25.00. Bookshop
price = $15.95



More Saving
A $35+ purchase order in books
bonus one-year subscription t
Chronicle at no additional charge
(Please complete the form below)
I have enclosed my purchase or
books and now request the bonus
the Chronicle. My address and o1
follows:


(22) New. University Of Ala-
bama Press. Fair To
Middlin':The Antebellium
Cotton Trade Of The Apa-
lachicola-Chattahooche
River Valley. Sold nation-
ally at $26.95. Available
through the Chronicle
Bookshop at $21.00. Hard-
cover.


(72) New. Don't Fence Me
In, an anecdotal biogra-
phy of Lewis Grizzard by
those who knew him best.
One of America's most
widely read humorists, in a
biographical account by
-close friends and associ-
ates. For the first time,
since Grizzard's death on
March 20, 1994, a dozen
friends and celebrities pro-
vide insights into this celeb-
rity. Sold nationally for
$20.00. 289 pp. Bookshop
price $12.95. Hardcover.

(79) New "Dr. Bullie's"
Notes: Reminiscences of
Early Georgia and of
Philadelphia and New Ha-
ven in the 1800s. By
James Holmes. Edited by
Delma E. Presley. The
Reminiscences of a pre-
Civil War Southern aristo-
crat. A book to be read with
leisurely pleasure, to be
shared with others, and to
be savored again by return-
ing to the Good Doctor's
graceful prose.247 pp. Sold
regionally for $10.00
Bookshop price $4.95.


r-------
S Mail Orde
i(Please Print)
I Your Name
Address
I Town
Telephone (
Book
Number Br
's
will earn you a
:o the Franklin
I

der for $35+ in
s subscription to
other data are as



SShipping & handlil
1 book....... S
2-3 books.... $


OP I


State ZIP


iefTitle Cost









Total book cost
ng0 Sales tax (6% in Fla.) +
S2.50
S3.50
4.00 Shipping and
*5.00 handling +
of
S Total
997
by check or money order
end cash. Thanks.


lers must be ordered on this form. When
please mail this form and your check or
er to: Franklin Chronicle, 2309 Old
Road, Tallahassee FL 32303. Be sure to
x and shipping charges. Incomplete orders
xned.


Please Note
Books from the mall service of the
Chronicle Book Shop are new and
used, and are so-designated in
each item description. Some titles
may be temporarily out of stock.
in which case a second shipment
will be made, normally in 14 days.
Books are shipped in 48 hours.
normally. Some of our books are
publishers' closeouts, overstocks.
remainders or current titles at
special prices. Most are in limited
supply and at these prices may
sell out fast. If any book is sold
out your money will be refunded
by bank check. To offer the low-
est possible prices all orders must
be prepaid. We do no billing and
do not accept credit cards,


SEAFOOD
RESTAURANT





WATERFRONT DINING

"THE SOUTH'S FINEST"
* Local Seafood
* Delicious Steaks
* Daily Specials

OPEN 7 DAYS
11 A.M. 10 P.M.

US Hwy. 98 West
Carrabelle, FL 32322

904-697-3791


SSelling the Pearl of the Panhandle
My Specialty area is Carrabelle Lanark -
Carrabelle Beach St. Teresa St. James Eastpoint
'.. ,, Let me be your guide to finding your
Si'i "perfect pearl" of a property.


Office: (850) 697-2181 Home: (850) 697-2616 FAX: (850) 697-3870






A Doo Frt Evey Hoe


THERMA-TRIv
The Door System You Can Believe In


"


(135) New. Alan Shepard
and Deke Slayton. Moon
Shot: The Inside Story of
America's Race to the
Moon. Hardcover, 383 pp.
Alan Shepard and Deke
Slayton were part, of
America's effort to reach the
moon from the very begin-
ning. No one could be as
qualified to tell this fascinat-
ing and thrilling tale of the
courage, dedication and
teamwork that made the
journey to the moon pos-
sible. This is the book for the
present and future genera-
tions of American families
by two of the men who lived
the adventure. Sold nation-
ally for $21.95. Bookshop
price = $14.95.

(126) Shipwreck and Ad-
ventures of Monsieur
Pierre Viaud From 1768,
the sensational story of a
shipwreck near Dog Island,
and the adventures of Pierre
Viaud and his search for
survival. Published by the
University of Florida Press,
139 pp. Hardcover. Sold
nationally for $24.95.
Bookshop price = $20.95.

(21) New. University Of
Florida Press. William
Roger's History, Outposts
On The Gulf: St. George Is-
land And Apalachicola
From Early Exploration To
World War II. Sold region-
ally for $30 or more. Avail-
able from the Chronicle
Bookshop for $25.00. Hard-
cover.

(133) Hardcover, 254 pp.
Take This Book to the Hos-
pital with You. By Charles
B. Inlander and Ed Weiner.
A consumer's Guide to sur-
viving your hospital stay. A
People's Medical Society
Book. Bookshop price
$10.95.


Order Form
er Dept., Chronicle Bookshe




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs