Title: Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00027
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: December 22, 1995
Copyright Date: 1995
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089928
Volume ID: VID00027
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text































The Published Every Other Friday





Franklin Chronicle



Volume 4, Number 26 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER 29 December 11 January 1996


Reward Offered for Theft of
Chronicles
This issue reprinted to foil work of thieves
The criminal behaviour of two suspects who have stolen newspa-
pers from dozens of Chronicle vending machines in Apalachico-
la, Eastpoint, and Carrabelle has ended in failure.
In addition to reprinting the 29 December 1995 issue, mail satu-
ration will be instituted to ensure that citizens have access to
the stories and advertising in this last issue. The systematic
nature of this newspaper theft and tampering clearly indicates
that stealing papers from vending machines was not an idle,
spontaneous act, but rather a calculated scheme to keep the news
away from Franklin County citizens. That effort has failed.


To attempt to control the Chronicle's circulation with such
bizarre e tactics is futile given the Chronicle's distribution by
mail, second tier and vending network which extends across a
100+ miles zone -- from Tallahassee to Port St. Joe.
A reward of $2,000 is offered by the Chronicle for information
leading to the arrest, conviction and imprisonment of the crimi-
nals responsible for these actions. "The Chronicle will seek crimi-
nal prosecution and civil litigation against these persons," said
publisher Tom W. Hoffer.


County Comm1isioners

Meet with City Officials

to Discuss Waste

Disposal Conflict


Members from the Franklin
County Commission attended a
special meeting with the Apalachi-
cola City Commission on Decem-
ber 18 at the Apalachicola City
SHall to discuss the city's decision
to dispose of its solid waste out of
county.
County Attorney Al Shuler in-
formed city commissioners that
the county could not enforce an
ordinance that was in conflict
with a municipal ordinance.
Thus, the county ordinance that
requires all local entities to bring
their solid waste to the Franklin
County Landfill would not actu-
ally be a requirement of munici-
palities who have a conflicting
S ordinance. Attorney Shuler stated
: that he was not aware of an ordi-
nance within the City of Apalachi-
cola that conflicted with the
county ordinance. "I just hope we
can put our heads together to-
night and come up with a mutu-
ally agreeable and beneficial so-
lution to this problem for all con-
cerned."
Mayor Bobby Howell informed
county representatives that the
City of Apalachicola was presently
in a five year contract with Waste
Management of Bay County. He
noted that the contract with Argus
Services had already expired. "I
know of no way that we can force
Waste Management into doing
anything other than what's in the
contract, just as we couldn't force
Argus to do anything that was not
in their contract. We can't get out
of our contract without getting
into a lawsuit with waste manage-
ment."
Howell said that the board de-
cided to change their waste dis-
posal provider because of con-
tinuous dissatisfaction with the
performance of Argus. He noted
that the board had spoken to
Argus publicly on several occa-
sions about their grievances, be-
fore finally changing their waste
disposal' provider to Waste Man-
agement of Bay County. "I was
shocked that when we (the City
of Apalachicola) made our move,
you (Franklin County) didn't
make a move, too, When I said (to
Argus representatives) that we
were going to get a new contract,
that fella looked like he was in
Alice in Wonderland. It was like
he just woke up and said, Ya'll
mean you're gonna' let us go?"
Mayor Howell told county repre-
sentatives that the City of Apala-
chicola did not have a contract
with Franklin County requiring
that solid waste be brought to the
county landfill. "Now, if ya'll have
one, I haven't seen."
Franklin County Commissioner
Dink Braxton said that he did nol


feel that the county could direct
a municipality to bring its solid
waste to a particular site. "We
don't have anything to do with
you. That's why you have city
commissioners. I don't know why
we're here other than if we're
gonna' negotiate a contract with
waste management and run
Argus out. I think we need to do
that at our board meeting and not
yours."
Representatives from Waste Man-
agement of Bay County informed
county commissioners that their
charge to the City of Apalachicola
was $23.52 per ton. Chairperson
Jimmy Mosconis expressed an
interest in Waste Management's
rates and invited them to attend
the December 19 Franklin County
Commission meeting.
"I have a feeling that when Argus
hears about this meeting," said
Commissioner Dink Braxton,
'Their tipping fees are liable to go
down."
Apalachicola City Commissioner
Jack Frye did scold county com-
missioners for a comment made
at a public meeting concerning
the City ofApalachicola. "I do have
a little heartburn with one thing
that was in the paper... that one
of the commissioners said that
they'd put the City of Apalachico-
la into a lawsuit and maybe that
would get our attention. That's
not how to get our attention. We're
all serving the public in Franklin
County. That (comment) should
have been something worked out
through the county attorney or
the clerk of the court with our city
clerk...to talk and find out if we
can have a round table meeting
instead of putting something like
that in the paper. I do have a little
heartburn with that. We're all
men and we can work at this in a
way other than stating that maybe
that (a lawsuit) will get our atten-
tion."
Mayor Howell stated that he was
willing to work with county rep-
resentatives as much as possible,
though he was not willing to have
the rates in the city's contract in-
crease. "Every citizen pays county
taxes, but every county tax payer
don't pay city taxes. We get caught
twice here. We get Apalachicola's
problems and the city's prob-
lems." He also admonished
county officials, "When the county
went up $25 a ton (at the land-
fill), they never asked, the city's
permission to do so, nor did they
have to. They went up in the
middle of a budget year and put
us in a very precarious position.
SThe city provides 58% of the solid
waste to the landfill. I think if I
r Continued on page 6 1


Chronicle Begins

- Fourth Year


.1 __-~ _


WILLSPRINGS

HOME HEALTH CAREIC.


697-2007-L


U. S. Trustee Seeks

Liquidation of Wellsprings

The most recent filing in the Wellsprings bankruptcy case being
handled in the U. S. Bankruptcy Court, Northern District of Florida
(Tallahassee) has been the intervention by the U. S. Trustee seeking
liquidation of the home health care business based in Carrabelle.
Wellsprings's attorney, Brian Neuman (Tallahassee) said such a mo-
tion for converting the case to a Chapter 7 matter, or liquidation of
the business to pay all debts, wtvac .-al in such proceedings "...to
keep the proceedings moving aJurg. Neuman said that his irm is
planning to file a reorganization plan pursuant to a Chapter 11 pro-
ceeding, not for liquidation.
Wellsprings had entered into voluntary bankruptcy on October 4,
1995. The business served over 300 patients in Franklin, Gulf,
Gadsden, Liberty, Leon, Madison, and Jefferson counties. The fixed,
liquidated secured debt is $344,648.18 and unsecured debt,
$409,889.39 with assets of $2,177,426.05. The owners are Maxie G.
Carroll and Brenda Molsbee.
The motion calling for liquidation instead of reorganization was signed
by Jim L. Bennett, Attorney-Advisor for Donald F. Walter, Acting U. S.
Trustee, on December 18, 1995. In his motion, two developments
were generally described as reasons to seek such a resolution of the
debt. The first development was the termination of the provider agree-
ment Medicare had with Wellsprings, which provided the home health
care business with a substantial amount of its operating capital. The
second development, following Medicare's termination of their pro-
vider agreement, was an audit conducted by Aetna, which precluded
Wellsprings' reinstatement.
...An audit conducted by Aetna, subsequent to Medicare's deci-
sion to terminate Wellsprings' provider agreement, has precluded
Wellsprings' reinstatement and further substantiated Medicare's
decision to terminate the provider's agreement...
The motion claimed that Wellsprings had an inability to effectuate a
plan of reorganization, and the absence of a reasonable likelihood of
rehabilitation justified the conversion of this case to Chapter 7 that
there may be a orderly liquidation of the debtor's assets.
Just a few days earlier, Bankruptcy Judge Lewis M. Killian, Jr. ruled
for Wellsprings by dismissing an objection made by the Internal Rev-
enue Service (IRS). Wellsprings wanted to incur debt other than that
incurred in the ordinary course of business. The IRS argued in their
brief that this was not justified. The IRS motion continued,
...The debtor is owned and controlled by two individuals, Brenda
Molsbee and Maxie Carroll. The debtor has had as many as
210 employees now reduced and has had substantial payroll.
These two individuals acquired Wellsprings in 1993. Since that
time the debtors have not timely made their employment tax de-
posits, nor paid their payroll taxes timely, despite the fact that
unds paid the debtor by Medicare include funds to pay employ-
ment taxes. The debtor has not made its payroll tax deposits nor
paid its payroll taxes since filing bankruptcy. The proof of claim
of the Service [IRS] shows payroll taxes due by Wellsprings of
$332,711.50 in addition to the amounts levied on...
...Despite being delinquent in paying their employment taxes,
Ms. Molsbee and Ms. Carroll have paid themselves excessive sala-
ries of approximately $250,000.00 and $300,000.00, respectively,
for the years 1993 and 1994. The payroll taxes of the debtor should
have been paid by the operating income of the debtor. The own-
ers of the debtor responsible for their tax delinquencies should
not be entitled to an administrative priority over the Internal Rev-
enue Service for lending money to the debtor when the funds
possessed by them to be used for this purpose in all likelihood
were the very funds which should have been used to pay their tax
liability in the first place and which in fact came from the United
States through Medicare.
The IRS motion continued to argue that the owners should stand
in the same shoes as the creditors of debtor.
The IRS concluded,
...The Service [IRS] submits that the likelihood of the debtor be-
ing able to reorganize is bleak since 95% of the debtor's operat-
ing funds come from Medicare, and Medicare has terminated the
provider agreement of Wellsprings under which it was receiving
Medicare funds. Additionally, it has been determined by Aetna,
the fiscal intermediary of Medicare, that the debtor was overpaid
by Medicare in the amount of approximately $1,170,000.00
for 1994, which amount must be repaid.
Judge Kimball DENIED the IRS motion described above but specifi-
cally indicated that the loans to the Wellsprings corporation by Molsbee
and Carroll for $60,000 would be subordinate to payroll tax liability
including any interest and penalties. Killian signed his order on 22 De-
cember 1995.


Now istrbutd,:i Frakli, Waul0
~r~ mi~ i nrr 5u l T -C uin Tfl


PR/FJKLIN CHIROMCICE

%. IL

I- -



A third birthday cake commerating the Chronicle's Third
Year was cut at a staff and guest party in the Plantation in
early December. In the picture above,. Angel McLain, (far
left) sales, George Chapel (advisor), Will Morris (columnist),
Tom W. Hoffer (publisher) and Rene Topping (contributing
reporter) were among several dozen celebrating the
milestone. The photo was taken by Editor Brian Goercke.
The Chronicle's first issue appeared in August 1992, and
regular, twice monthly publication resumed on
10 November 1992. The paper appears every other Friday,
26 times a year. Production occurs in Tallahassee with
printing by the Post Searchlight in Balnbridge, Georgia.
The Franklin Chronicle is now distributed in three counties
(Gulf, Wakulla and Franklin) across a 100-mile zone.


Grant Presentation Draws

Protest from Board Member


Apalachicola grant writer
Willoughby Marshall presented
his Florida Community Trust
Grant application to the board of
Apalachicola City Commissioners,
despite adamant protest from
Commissioner Wallace Hill at a
December 18, 1995 special meet-
ing.
"You can either take the grant or
leave it as far as I'm concerned,"
said Mr. Marshall to the protest-
ing commissioner, "If I am asked
to do something by the mayor, I
do it. And if there's something you
don't like about that, you'll have
to take that up with the mayor
and the city commission, but not
with me."
Commissioner Hill stressed that
he was not necessarily against the
grant proposal, but that he was
opposed to the method in which
the grant was being filed and pre-
sented to the Apalachicola City
Commission. "I don't buy this
business of individuals going up
to the state requesting to buy
properties on behalf of the City of
Apalachicola and not coming be-
fore this board first. I'm of the
democratic process, but don't
come here after the fact. We (Ap-
alachicola City Commissioners)
represent the people of our com-
munity and they need to be here
to give us their input and their
guiding light."
Mayor Howell then requested and
received a motion to have Mr.
Marshall give his presentation.
After the motion received a sec-
ond, Howell asked for a vote on
the matter without calling for dis-
cussion as is required in Robert's
Rules of Order. "So, I don't get my
discussion?" inquired Hill. Mayor
Howell returned, "You've been dis-
cussing this for the last 15 min-
utes. When Commissioner Hill
informed the mayor that he was
violating his office, Howell re-
sponded, "Oh yeah, well have me
impeached." Hill noted, "I like
your ethics. I really do." Howell
responded, "Well, I wish you had
some." The motion passed 4-1
(Commissioner Hill voting Nay).


Willoughby Marshall
Mr. Muar-ill began his presenta-
tion by informing the board that
the Florida Community Trust
Grant did not pay for restoration
or constructions costs. He stated
that those said expenses were tra-
ditionally paid through a Commu-
nity Development Block Grant.
The Florida Community Trust
Grant, said Marshall, involved
four parcels of land. Those par-
cels include: property on the end
of Avenue G, property between
Avenue D and E on Water Street,
property near the Franklin
County Courthouse and property
on Bay Avenue. The grant appli-
cation, said Marshall, has been
ranked in the upper 20% of all
Florida Community Trust Grants
submitted.
According to Mr. Marshall, it is
important for grants to fulfill a city
comprehensive plan; this plan
includes: using the end of streets
and avenues as open space for
public access to the water, using
additional open space for active
and passive recreation sites and
preserving historic architecture
and historic natural resources.
"You're supposed to try to pre-
serve the unique qualities of a city
and this city has been called by
many as a unique place."
Continued on page 6










PDo. 7 Q0 nreomhPr 19950 The Franklin Chronicle


.1 k - 7- x- A.----


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


*The board introduced J. Patrick
Howard, who is the new Execu-
tive Director of the Apalachicola
Chamber of Commerce.

Franklin

Briefs

Notes from the
19 December 1995
Franklin County
Commission Meeting -.


* Superintendent of Public Works
Prentice Crum announced that a
boat ramp might be constructed
. on Highway 65 in Eastpoint on
Department of Transportation's
right-of-way.
***
The board agreed to invite rep-
resentatives from a bass tourna-
ment organization to discuss the
possibility of holding annual tour-
naments in the county. Commis-
sioner Bevin Putnal stated, "The
Department of Commerce in-
formed me that they were willing
to have an annual bass tourna-
ment in the area and they want
to build a facility and hire fifty
people."
**#
The board directed Superinten-
dent of Public Works to obtain an
estimate to "armor coat" the Es-
cape Road in Eastpoint. Chair-
man Jimmy Mosconis described
the term armor coat as covering
a road with oil and then covering
the oil with sand. Mosconis felt
that, if the Escape Road were
treated accordingly, the road
would be stabilized for a couple
of years.

The board agreed to sign a soft-
ware support agreement with the
Carolina Software Company to
provide software maintenance for
the newly installed Landfill/Waste
Management computer system.
Solid Waste Director Van Johnson
stated that the new system com-
prised four computers linked via
modem. He said.that the new sys-
tem allowed the finance depart-
ment to upload daily information
and download accounting infor-
mation simultaneously. Johnson
also noted that the system allowed
him to produce management re-
ports from his office. The software
support agreement will cost the
County $250 per quarter.
***
Representatives from Argus Ser-
vices agreed to meet with Solid
Waste Director Van Johnson to
discuss possible remedies to the
county's failure to meet a 5000
tonage waste requirement to the
county's transfer station. Argus'
representatives informed the'
board that they had a five year
contract with Franklin County to
provide waste disposal services.
"We're willing to sit down an talk
and look at anything that's rea-
sonable for both parties," noted
representatives from Argus, "One
of the things that you need to
bring to a head is where the Apa-
lachicola solid waste is going."
Argus representatives said that
their contract with the county
expires in February of 1997. Solid
Waste Director Van Johnson
stated that the county lacked ap-
proximately 500 tons of waste
needed to comply with contrac-
tual obligations to Argus.. He pre-
viously stated that, because the
City of Apalachicola had changed
their waste disposal provider from
Argus Services to Waste Manage-
ment of Bay County, Franklin
County was unable to meet their
contractual agreement with
Argus. Johnson stated that the
county would have to pay Argus
seven dollars per ton or an over-
all $35,000 to meet their annual
agreement. He said that the
county's tipping fees would have
to be raised. if Franklin County
could not meet its tonage require-
ment.
Mr. Johnson said that, according
to a Supreme Court decision, the
county could not require an in-
corporated city to take its waste
through a particular transfer sta-
tion. Argus representatives felt
that the Supreme Court ruling
was not applicable to the situa-
tion between Franklin County and
the City of Apalachicola and urged
the board to challenge the City of
Apalachicola's decision to allow
Waste Management of Bay County
to haul their waste outside of
Franklin County. Attorney Al
Shuler cited the Florida Consti-
tution which provided, "A county
ordinance will govern except
where there is a specific conflict
with a municipal- ordinance."

Shuler noted, "All the city would
have to do is to pass an ordinance
within the municipality and over-
ride the county ordinance." Attor-
ney Shuler said that he would
continue to research the matter.
Chairperson Mosconis noted,
"We've got to figure out what to
do, cause you can spend your
money on legal fees or spend your
money on tipping fees or maybe
not spend any money on either."
S **


r

/ *. ',,' ' "

J. Patrick Howard


County Extension Agent Bill
Mahan informed the board that
phase two (harrowing) of the air-
port tree replanting project had
been completed.

County Extension Agent Bill
Mahan informed the board that
the Food & Drug Administration
(FDA) would implement a HACCP
(Hazard Analysis Critical Control
Point)rule by the end of 1996. The
rule would provide that each lo-
cal seafood processor would be
responsible for identifying the
hazards within their processing
that would likely affect the safety
of their products and maintain a
log of such findings. According to
Mahan, the HACCP inspections
will prevent 20,000 to 60,000 sea-
food poisonings per year. If at least
one such hazard can be identified,
the processor will be required to
adopt and implement an appro-
priate HACCP plan.
***
The board voted to abandon
North County Road 370 (Bald
Point Road) to the Mader Corpo-
ration. The board previously
agreed to provide county labor
and equipment to design the road,
to cut the new right ofway and to
clear and place the appropriate
amount of fill necessary for the
limerock road base for the Mader
Corporation (a private corpora-
tion) in exchange for 45 acres of
land. The board plans to exchange
the 45 acres of land from the
Mader Corporation to the Port St.
Joe Paper Company for land
needed for the proposed spray
field site in Eastpoint. The board
has agreed, however, to return the
45 acres of land to the Mader Cor-
poration if the Port St. Joe Paper
Company refuses to trade land.
None of the commissioners could
give assurance that the Port St.
Joe Paper Company would defi-
nitely trade land. Commissioner
Bevin Putnal suggested that the
county refrain from providing
county labor on Bald Point Road
until the board was certain that
the Port St. Joe Paper Company
would trade land. Chairperson
Jimmy Mosconis, however, urged
fellow commissioners to act im-
mediately on the board's proposed
plans. "The old adage that time is
money is the big deal here. We
don't want to hold those folks up."
***
The board agreed to have
County Engineer Joe Hamilton
observe Third and Seventh Streets
on Gorrie Drive and decide
whether stop signs would be
needed. The St. George Island
Civic Club had requested that
stop signs be placed at the said
locations. "I liked to get run over
there," noted Commissioner Dink
Braxton. "They like to run over
county commissioners," said
Commissioner Edward Tolliver.

Commissioner Bevin Putnal re-
quested that all media sources
report that emergency 911 call-
ers seeking information on resi-
dential addresses dial 670-8500
and ask for 911 Coordinator Pat
McQueeny.


* County Planner Alan Pierce an-
nounced that Eastpoint Water &
Sewer Administrator would be
submitting a grant application to
the board worth $529,000 for
water and sewer improvements.

* County Planner Alan Pierce
stated that there were two vacan-
cies on the Board of Adjustments
and Franklin County Planning
Board that needed to be filled. He
said that Assistant Public De-
fender Kevin Steiger had volun-
teered to fill a position on the
Board of Adjustments. Pierce said
that Commissioner Dink Braxton
needed to replace Roy Bateman
and Commissioner Raymond Wil-
liams needed to replace Jeanette
Pedder on the Franklin County
Planning and Zoning Board.
***
* The board turned down devel-
oper Jim Sullivan's request for a
variance to make room for mini-
warehouses. Alan Pierce -noted
that Mr. Sullivan had not met with
the 25 foot setback needed for a
variance. "We're here to help you
use your property reasonably,"
said Pierce, "But you're trying to
maximize the use of it." Mr.
Sullivan argued that no one else
would mind if he put his mini-
warehouses next to the property
line. Chairperson Jimmy Mosco-
nis instructed Sullivan that the
county had an ordinance that
needed to be adhered to; he stated
that, if the board granted him
such a variance, other individu-
als could hold the county liable if
their variance requests-,were de-
nied. "If you can come show us a
real hard economic siti-ation, we
might could give you a variance."
**
* The board unanimously ap-
proved the Resolution for the Or-
dinance Providing For The De-
struction Of Dangerous Dogs And
Vicious Animals (see page 3 for
ordinance). Resident Richard
Brannan protested, "I think this
thing'shouldn't happen. The
government's too big already."


Richard Brannan

* County Planner Alan Pierce iP-
formed the board that constr"l
tion for the newly proposed prison
site in Eastpoint will not begin
until the spring. He stated that
The delay in construction was
necessary to prevent getting too
far ahead of construction for the
Eastpoint Water & Sewer Plant.
The water & sewer plant will re-
quire approximately 25 acres of
land. Pierce also said that the
county may not have to purchase
land for staff housing for the
prison site in Eastpoint. He stated
that land east of the site may be
leased from the Division of For-
estry, instead. Mr. Pierce said that
the Department of Corrections
might want as many as 40 mo-:
bile home sites for on-site staff
housing. "If that works out," said
Pierce, "All we'll need is 45 acres-
for our spray fields and our rec-
reation complex on Highway 65."
Pierce said that, if the said land
could not be leased, the board
would have to seed more land
from the Port St. Joe Paper Com-
pany for staff housing.

* County Planner Alan Pierce an-
nounced that the county received
state grant money from the Com-
munity Trust program money to
purchase Porter's Bar.
***


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* County Planner Alan Pierce pre-
sented the board with a job de-
scription of the County Manager's
position, which he referred to as
the Director of Administrative
Services. He stated that the posi-
tion would require collaboration
with the County Clerk's office and
the County Attorney. The position
would also require planning, di-
recting, coordinating and com-
pleting tasks assigned by the
board of Franklin County Com-
missioners. The position would
also require working in conjunc-
tion with the county clerk and
preparing & submitting an annual
operating budget. Other duties
would include establishing sched-
ules and procedures for all county
departments to follow in relation
to the department's budget, pre-
paring board meeting agendas,
reviewing the expenditures within
the budget, monitoring the effec-
tiveness program services and
providing the board with result-
ing recommendations.

Commissioner Dink Braxton wor-
ried that, if Pierce was given the
position, it would create too much
work for the county planner. At-
torney Al Shuler suggested that
the position not be given a title in
order to bypass advertisement of
the job for bids. He said that the
board could assign the said du-
ties to Mr. Pierce and compensate
him for the extra work that the
County Manager position entails.
"I just don't think that Alan
[Pierce] can be county planner
and do these duties all at one
time. It's gonna require someone
who's gonna be full time." Mr.
Pierce said that the position may
evolve into a full time job. Chair-
person Jimmy Mosconis said that
Pierce could delegate many of the
county planning duties to Assis-
tant Planer Mark Curenton.
"You've got the resources already
at your fingertips," said Mosconis.
Pierce noted that there was no
money budgeted for a new posi-
tion. "You're (Pierce) already do-
ing these things," said Mosconis,
"Maybe we can make this [title]
county planner, a.k.a. [also
known as] Director of Administra-
tive Services. We could just leave
this as [the title of] county plan-
ner. We all know what he's [Mr.
Pierce] doing. I think it's worth a
try. We've got to do something."
Pierce said that the position
should probably pay $7,000 per
year. The board decided to table
the issue until their next meeting
in January.
#**
County Attorney Al Shuler an-
nounced that the county's lawsuit
against the Nature Conservancy
on behalf of the Dog Island Con-
servation District has been for-
warded to federal court. Shuler
said that the move to federal court
was compelled by a "diversity of
citizenship" because the Nature
Conservancy is an out of state
corporation. He said that the suit
was expected to be sent back to
state court based on the alleged
fact that the jurisdictional
amount in the suit is $25,000. Mr.
Shuler informed the board that a
motion has been filed by the Na-
ture Conservancy to join the con-
servation district as a party or
plaintiff. The county is seeking to
claim a main road on Dog Island
and then turn the road over.to the
Dog Island Conservation District
if they are successful in their suit.
***
* County Attorney Al Shuler re-
ported that, according to the De-
partment of Revenue, the state
will add a two cents tax on every
three cents that is taxed by a lo-


cal option gas tax. He said that
seven percent of money earned
from the county's proposed gas
tax would be sent to the state's
general revenue fund. Shuler also
said that a two percent adminis-
trative fee would be assessed by
the time the county could enact a
local option gas tax.


Now is the time to
subscribe to the
Franklin County
Chronicle


Promoting New Ideas in

Development


Murray Sharkey, President of Deziners & Builders of Our Umbrella
Home, took his home developing ideas on the road a brought a little
music and beauty along for the promotional tour. Musician Hoot
Gibson strummed his guitar and sang while model Kathleen Hedges
greeted curious visitors from the back of a pick-up truck in the park-
ing lot of the Eastpoint branch of the Gulf State Bank.
Mr. Sharkey is promoting the Umbrella Home, which he says can
withstand winds of 175 miles per hour. The home is six sided, con-
tains a 50 year metal roof, an exterior Styrofoam insulated wall, and
a steel "backbone" which the company notes will guard against high
winds. The home can be erected in 30 days or less after the required
building permit is received. For more information, contact Mr. Sharkey
at 222-2323.


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Charming Motel Reasonable Rentals Available
Rates Daily Weekly Monthly


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Phone (904) 670-8423 Approved


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Realty


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HCR Box 126

St. George Island, FL 32328-9703

Office: (904) 927-2821

Fax: (904) 927-2314


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Please Open Your Heart and Give United Wa
OF THE BIG BEND
(904) 681-9281


i









Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 29 December 1995 Page 3


Editorialand Commentary


Miscellaneous Notes

From the Publisher 1-l


Views from Left Field

1996-We've Got All Year
By Will Morris
As 1996 rolls around, each on us may now pause to look back on this
last year, in order to pinpoint something we can resolve to do differ-
ently in the coming year.
Perhaps you were fired from the Post Office-then went back and
shot several of your former co-workers. An obvious resolution for 1996
would be to better control your temper. Another one might be to keep
an eye on people who get fired, and who appear to be openly resent-
ful.
Most new year's resolutions are fairly obvious and generic. A few ex-
amples: quit urinating on toilet seats; quit driving at a uniform rate
of 14 m.p.h. from Lanark to Apalachicola; quit marking store items
up 350% just prior to "50% off' sales; quit using the slogan "No job
too big, no job too small-our name says it all;" quit depositing empty
beer cans in the driveway of Will Morris (full ones still accepted); quit
looking obnoxiously smug while putting low-fat yogurt in your shop-
ping cart (or while throwing empty beer cans in the driveway of Will
Morris); quit hoping more of your neighbors will be arrested so that
you can get a good job at the new prison; quit leaving those revolting
tobacco wads at supermarket entrances; quit parking across the lines
in parallel parking areas; quit wearing tee shirts with offensive mes-
sages, such as "Our name says it all"; quit thinking that driving with-
out proper insurance is a worse crime than assault and battery; quit
driving around with "Seminole" or "Gator" flags on your car in the
middle of the week; quit designing traffic systems where the next
light turns red as the one you just went through turns green; quit
reading the newspaper and get back to work!
Now-if those persons who need to make the above resolutions would
do so, and stick to them, then the rest of us might not be forced to
consider resolutions to obtain concealed weapons permits.
A few simple rules concerning resolutions might be in order here.
Keep them:
(1) Realistic Resolutions to vanquish evil from the face of the earth
strike me as overly ambitious for most individuals.
(2) Challenging A resolution to refrain from frequent episodes of
mass murder may well be highly commended, and a safe bet as far as
keeping it. But it is hardly challenging.
(3) Positive A resolution to smile at, compliment, and assist those
who please you is better than a resolution to glare at, berate, and
cause to be arrested, those who displease you.
Perhaps the best resolution (and the one I have chosen) is to wait and
see. And after waiting and seeing, then we'll be able to make more
intelligent resolutions. No sense in rushing these things. After all,
we've got all year.


Tommy Bevis, owner and operator of a boat-building facility on
Timber Island, has been the subject of continuing concern at the
Carrabelle Port and Airport Authority with regard to the terms of
his lease and whether his agreement with the Authority has been
fulfilled. Earlier this year, members of the Dept. of Community
Affairs, indicated that their department would be more flexible
in allowing the Authority and Carrabelle community to reorient
the functions of Timber Island, once envisioned as a seafood
industry park. In 1995, that concept was abandoned, but new
plans have been slow in coming. Last week, Authority attorney,
Ben Watkins, had filed a lawsuit in 2nd Circuit (Franklin County)
seeking a declaratory judgment on the question of the Bevis lease
-and its fulfillment.


LIvr JI POST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
904-927-2186
O 904-385-4003 (TALLAHASSEE)
o r, Facsimile 904-385-0830
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.
Vol. 4, No. 26 29 December 1995


Publisher ..................................... Tom W. Hoffer
Editor and Manager ................. Brian Goercke
697-2675
Contributors ..................................... ...... Paul Jones
............ Bonnie L. Dietz
........... Rene Topping
............ W ayne Childers
............ W ill M orris
............. Tom Markin
Survey Research Unit .............................. Eric Steinkuehler
Computer Systems,
Advertising Design,
and Production................................. Christian Liljestrand
............ Audra Perry
............ Jacob Coble
Layout ............................ ................... Garvey Scott
Production Assistant ................................ Cindy Nipper
Circulation ........................................ Lee Belcher
........... Bonnie Dietz
Citizen's Advisory Group
George Chapel .......... ...................... Apalachicola
Sandra Lee Johnson............................ Apalachicola
Grace and Carlton Wathen ...................... Carrabelle
Rene Topping .................. .. Carrabelle
Pat M orrison ............................................ St. George Island
Tom and Janyce Louthridge .................... St. George Island
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung......................... Eastpoint
Bedford and Eugenia Watkins ................. Eastpoint
W ayne Childers ..................................... Port St. Joe

Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are available
free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for postage and handling.
For example an 8 page issue would cost $1.75 postpaid. To others
back issues are priced at 350 each plus postage and handling. Please
write directly to the Chronicle for price quotes if you seek several
different or similar issues. If a single issue, merely add 350 to the
price quote above. In-county subscriptions are $16.96 including tax.
Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26 including tax.
All contents Copyright 1995
Franklin County Chronicle, Inc.


We promised some additional information and perspective on Ben-
jamin Franklin, the county's namesake, with his birthday fast ap-
proaching on 17 January 1996. This is the 290th one, but we failed
you in that regard. Other than printing Mr. Franklin's picture in the
banner, we have not done much to honor the man. We resolve to do
better in 1996.
Last issue, the story about the St. George Homeowner's association
was a bit messy. We failed to identify the quoted letter as one from
attorney Barbara Sanders, and some other paragraphs were missing
which would have made the transitions clearer. We are sorry we messed
up.
As our panhandle region moves into 1996, I find the same problems
involving many areas of Franklin, Gulf and Wakulla counties con-
tinue including the impact of the net-ban, education, politics, devel-
opment and the seafood industries. Changing the years does little to
change the issues. In this issue, we pause a bit for a tentative review
on some of the major events, and others, not-so-major.
In the new year, I hope this newspaper will continue to be responsive
to your needs. The Chronicle appears to be the only paper in Franklin
county that offers editorial opinion and commentary on a regular
basis. We think this is vital to any democratic lifestyle in the midst of
the growing influence of government and quasi-governmental enti-
ties, such as homeowner associations.
I think there is more to this process than just "the squeaky wheel
getting some grease." We also need to hear more from you, our dear
readers, whether you agree or disagree on any public issues. The
First Amendment is of value only when we use it. When it falls into
disuse, and a few good men (or women) remain silent, the forces of
authoritarianism start their march.
1996 is an election of considerable importance to everyone in this
region and the nation. Elections at the city, county, state and federal
level will deal with complex problems. We hope the candidates are
"up" for the issues, especially at the local level. The Chronicle expects
to provide a forum for the definition and discussion of those issues
facing the county and its communities as we did in 1995 and 1994.
In the last year, we discovered anew that lots of folks like to read
about Franklin county events and personalities partly because they
visit and revisit this area, shop in her stores, eat in her restaurants,
stay in her motel and rental properties, and buy merchandise in her
retail shops. We want to do our part by stimulating travel to the county
to enhance business, and more jobs, for all, including ourselves-we
admit.
While we are expounding our hopes for 1996, I also want to pause to
THANK YOU for your past support, financial (advertising and sub-
scriptions) and editorially. I am gratified by the many unsolicited,
sometimes spontaneous comments by our readers in their confidence
and support for this newspaper. I think there is lots of room for im-
provement, but I hope our readers will continue their involvement
with the paper. Happy New Year!

Tom W. Hoffer
Publisher






Emerald Coast Hospital Embroiled with Complaints
1995 began with pointed charges by Drs. Tom and Elizabeth Curry
about the financial priorities of Franklin County's Emerald Coast Hos-
pital located in Apalachicola, in hJie wake of'state authorized money
for rural Florida hospitals under the so-called 'Trammel funds".
Later, a physician's assistant and former employee of Gulf-Pines Hos-
pital in Port St. Joe complained about some internal practices there
and at Emerald Coast, some relating to finances. Some employees
had not been paid on time.
The long awaited, independent audit, requested by county attorney
Al Shuler, never materialized but a 13 September 1995 article in
The Wall Street Journal reported that Emerald Coast Hospital in Ap-
alachicola had a 1994 operating profit (as a percent of revenue) of
14.9% with operating revenue of $3,711,694. The table shows how
Marquis (owner) compares with the most profitable hospital chain in
Florida, Columbia. The point of the piece published in the Journal
was to profile the profitability of privately-owned hospitals contrasted
with publicly owned hospitals. The profitability among privately-owned
hospitals is still high despite the fact that Florida has a 58% bed
occupancy rate contrasted with 66% at the national level. The article
concluded, in nart:


...The chains also keep things lean and mean, while public and
not-for-profit hospitals, which tend to be the biggest, bear the
burden of providing high-cost services such as burn center,
trauma centers and neonatal intensive care facilities. Of the
30 hospitals that spend the least per patient last year (1994),
15 belonged to Columbia.

A Dominant Chain
Columbia owns 15 of Florida's 20 mosr-prolil3ble hospflals, Dased on proilt margins'
OPERA PROFIT
OPERATING ASPCT. OF
HOSPITAL : CITY REVENUE REVENUE OWNER


Fisherman's H.spital
Gull Coast Hospital
Largo Medical Center
North Florida Regional
West Florida Regional
Bayonet Point Med. Center
Palms West Hospital
L.W. Blake Memorial
New Port Richey Hospital
North Ridge Med. Center
South Bay Hospital
Raulerson Hospital
Highlands Regional
Aventura Hospital
Oak Hill Hospital
Putnam Community Hospital
University Hospital
Tallahassee Community
Emerald Coast Hospital
University General


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'Dos t noi Inlude spewcoly or loolgirm UspiuIs
Sod,/,S FijoiodAg rc'y arrtoann C.9re CAJ,,,i,.101 .,i oI'1994 Am.Tuq a, 1 t l, Il"n o c'ls j .









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Curmudgeon's Corner

Intervention In Bosnia
By Tom Markin
Frequently as I write these columns I find myself very much out of
the mainstream of the conventional thinking of most Americans. So
it is a bit of a new experience when I find some 80 percent of the
populace agreeing with me.
I'm speaking of our Bosnian debacle, where our draft-dodging presi-
dent is in the process of sending some 20,000 American troops. These
young people will be risking their lives in order to appease Clinton's
liberal entourage, many ofwhom are in the media. The goal is to
ensure "peace" in that benighted land, an area that has been wracked
by warfare and violence for thousands of years.
Our leftist friends say it is our "moral" duty to stop the killing, mis-
ery, and destruction that has been going on for some three years.
Their other main argument for going is that the mission is vital to the
long-term security of the United States, Europe, and the Balkans.
They fear the Russians may give overt support to the Serbs, which
could bring in other countries to support the Croats and the Mus-
lims, and presto!, you have World War III.
The final reason Clinton and company give for the trip is NATO. They
say the future of NATO is at stake, and that without this organization
the U. S. might find itself standing alone in the world crises of the
future.
To me all these arguments are specious at best. The idea of bringing
peace to this area is nothing less than ludicrous, as these people's
hatred of each other goes into their very bones. They dearly love the
sport of killing their enemies, a pursuit they find even more pleasur-
able than we do watching football. They're not going to change, and it
is stupid altruism to go into Bosnia in the hope of bringing peace.
In regard to our national interests, I can't think of a single one that is
important. Certainly there's nothing of a material nature that could
affect us. No significant oil, gas, or essential minerals are present in
that beleaguered land. As for this area eventually involving us in a
European war, we first have to assume the Europeans will be stupid
enough to start a general war, and that certainly is not a given. I
believe even the Russians will be so busy trying to patch together
their ramshackle, suffering society they will not be able to indulge in
military adventures outside of their borders.
Even in the highly unlikely event the Europeans do decide to fight,
why do we have to stick our battered nose in their mess? It would
seem since they are a highly developed people, they surely can man-
age their own affairs, including wars. Along this line of thought, I'm
totally convinced we should get out of NATO, and let the Europeans
maintain the organization if they are so inclined.
I also feel it is idiocy for us to try to be policeman for the world,
spending countless billions of dollars maintaining super expensive
troops, planes, and ships all over the planet. More and more, I'm
ready to be an isolationist as far as becoming involved in other coun-
tries' political or internal affairs is concerned. Let's dominate world
trade with better products and prices, and practice and preach free
trade as a vehicle for so doing.
Question. Didn't we learn the futility and dreadful cost of interven-
tion in such places as Vietnam, Beirut, Somalia, and the Gulf war?
(Saddam is stronger then ever.) We're watching Haiti imploding right
back into anarchy, violence, and crime after we spent billions of dol-
lars on that disaster of a "country". Will we never learn?
If we feel we must borrow and spend billions of dollars to prevent
violence, killing, and destruction, why not spend it sending troops to
our own festering third-world cities? At.least the lines of supplies
would be closer and cheaper.
In the meantime, all we can do is hope a spasm of intelligence and
sanity will get through to our leaders, and they will bring the kids
home. Sure. And maybe we'll get a visit from some flying pigs.


An Ordinance Providing for

the Destruction of Dangerous

Dogs and Vicious Animals

WHEREAS, the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners recognizes
that Dangerous dogs and vicious animals are a threat to the health, safety
and welfare of the people of Franklin County, Florida and


WHEREAS, in order to control this threat, it is necessary to provide for the
destruction of dangerous dogs and vicious animals and to establish an ani-
mal adjudicatory Board.
NOW THEREFORE, Be It Ordained By the Franklin County Board of County
Commissioners that:

Section 1: Vicious dogs or dangerous animals
Any animal that is a dangerous dog as defined in Section 767.11, Florida Stat-
utes, or a vicious animal as provided in Franklin County Ordinance 88-4,
shall be immediately confined by the animal control officer, placed in quaran-
tine, if necessary, for the proper length of time, or held for 10 business days
after the owner is given written notice pursuant to Section 707.13. Florida
Statutes, and thereafter destroyed in an expeditious manner.

Section 2: Animal Adjudicatory Board
There is hereby created the Franklin County Animal Adjudicatory Board. The
board shall consist of three members who shall serve two year terms from the
date of their'appointment, and thereafter until the members successor takes
office. One member shall be appointed by the Apalachicola City Commission,
one member shall be appointed by the Carrabelle City Commission, and one
member shall be appointed by the Franklin County Board of County Commis-
sioners.

Section 3: Appeals
Appeals filed pursuant to Section 767.13, Florida Statutes, or otherwise as to
destruction of dogs or other animals, shall be to the Franklin County Animal
Adjudicatory Board. Meetings of the Franklin County Animal Adjudicatory
Board shall be public and that board may adopt rules for the conduct of its
meetings.


SEAFOOD
RESTAURANT





WATERFRONT DINING

"THE SOUTH'S FINEST"
* Local Seafood
* Delicious Steaks
* Daily Lunch Special
Choice of 10 different vegetables

OPEN 7 DAYS
11 A.M. 9 P.M.
OPEN FRI. AND SAT. TILL 10 P.M.

US Hwy. 98 West
Carrabelle, FL 32322
904-697-3791


LUBERTO'S J
Hwy 98
Eastpolnt, Fl. 32328
(904) 670-8143

FREE
DRIVEWAy
ESTIMATES
I ew initallalionu of rcp.lr,

Suppliers of:
TOPSOIL
MUSHROOM COMPOST
LIMEROCK STONE
BUILDER'S SAND
PINE CYPRESS MULCH .
SHELLS
AND MO.RER


WILLY aPAULA LUBERTO
I. -M.-4.-M -4/1


-JrObd (U&bdt-- YVv
Ha(c(:p (M(--Pnm A(t)(t)ma
IL(ow Atltp,






Page 4 29 December 1995 The Franklin Chronicle


0


.: Q
00. *d
urn


St. James Lanark Village Vol. Fire Dept.
AUXILIARY
"BINGO STAFF" Wishes
All of Our Friends and Patrons
A HAPPY NEW YEAR



On Behalf of Franklin
County School District,
Superintendent C. T. Ponder,
faculty, and staff wish you a
VERY PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR


,Aace a Sale and P4aipesaut VeAew ea!/
S9op a.id dee 4as i" Jallahataee.
Mitchell Hicks

SALES SERVICE RENTALS
Typewriters 612 N. Bronough St.
Computers/Printers Tallahassee, FL 32301
Fax Machines 904-681-9528




Happy New Year!
from

Red's B. P.

653-2455 Apalachicola



Happy New Year

River City BP
Bi i and Wi Z Zene
We appreciate your patronage
this past year!
Apalachicola 653-9848



TAYLOR'S BUILDING SUPPLY, INC
P.O. Box.605 Eastpoint, Florida 32328
Phone 670-8529 Fax 670-8561

Happy New Year!
Family and Staff



GLORY TO GOD IN THE HIGHEST
AND ON EARTH, PEACE GOODWILL TOWARD MEN
LUKE 2:14
Wishing you a Happy 1996!
LAW OFFICES
J. PATRICK FLOYD, P. A.
PORT ST. JOE (904) 227-7413 APALACHICOLA (904) 653-8056

Literacy Volunteers of America, Franklin County
wish you a very

Happy New Year
Help others to improve their skills and their lives
in the new year--become a literacy tutor.
Call 670-8151
for more information.


Happy New Year from
Bro, Maggie, Gator,
Foggy, & Puss! A


Hooked on Books, your only new
and used bookstore in
Apalachicola, wishes you and
yours a Safe and Happy New Year!
R 653-2420




Officers & Members of
St. James Lanark Vol. Fire Dept.
Wish Our Friends and Neighbors a

Happy New Year


I


HAPPY NEW YEAR
FROM ALL OF US AT
CARRABELLE IGA

OPEN 7AM 10PM DAILY

Martin Security Wishes All of Their Customers and
Franklin County a Happy New Year!
MARTIN SECURITY AGENCY, INC.
"TO PROTECT AND SERVE"
LEONARD D. OR SHELA W. MARTIN
P.O. BOX 383, 401 24TH AVENUE, APT. 1E
APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA 32329
904/653-2866
We're here for all of your security needs in 1996.


Loving


/ ,,
r ^! { i /

^/


S :


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o*


I'


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/ , -' "


Paradise Thank youfor a
6,ardens great year.
Stop byfor our
Holiday Bargains
S.IO..now on sale.
.' 927-3535

The People at
GULF STATE BANK
wish you a
YHappy & Prosperous

New year!



Hiappn ew Jemr
Law Offices of Barbara Sanders, P.A.
Barbara Sanders, Attorney
Rachl Chestnut, Attorney
80 Market Street P.O. Box 157 Apalachicola, FL 32329
Tel (904) 653-8976 FAX (904) 653-8743


Season's Greetings


ALFRED 0. SHULER
J. GORDON SHULER
THOMAS M. SHULER
Attorneys and Counselors at Law
OFFICE
(904) 653-9226 APAI


BOX 850
34 4TH STREET
LACHICOLA, FL 3232


The Staff of
& Learning Day Care


wish you and yours a
Safe and Happy
New Year.


The Staff of
Nightingale & Assoicates
wish you and yours a
IHIIEAILTIHIY AND HIAIPIPY
NIEW:YIEAkIR



SHARE LOVE THROUGHOUT
THE YEAR!
HIAIPPY NIEW YEAR!
Pat & Randy Morrison



The Staff of Pied Piper
wish you and yours a


Happy New


Yeai.


The Staff of
Senior Care Properties
wish you and yours a
Happy New Year.


THE NEW BOARD OF GOVERNORS
OF THE LANARK VILLAGE ASSOCIATION
Wish You a
Prosperous New Year

NEW MEMBERS WELCOME


#Iag


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*


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*


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The Chronicle Staff and
Contributors wish you a
Happy lew year!!
385-4003


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


o
o


m --







Pu lsh d ev r o h rFrd y OC L Y W E N W PA E T e Fr n ln h once 9 e e be 99 P n


Writing All Lines of Insurance Since 1930
P.O. Box 129
61 Avenue E
Apalachicola, FL 32320 Bus. (904) 653-2161

awe a S & appA flVew /ea4!


R & R Electronics
RADIO SHACK
Located on Highway 98
P.O. Box 966*Eastpoint, Florida 32328
Bus. Phone 670-8568
Happy New Year!
Thank you for your patronage in 1995.
Wishing you prosperity in 1996.

SHAR ION'S PAi E C
ktestaumrint &'Saf/od 'larke
Jltu. 98/. R. w- 47(
4 lpoi,,, Jf 3232,%.,
904-670-8646 .
aoui d' Co, &S ., av,.S/,/u
restaurant 11Am. -10 'Pm. "f' ,wn, Operat,
Wishes you a Happy flew year!


SGulf Coast Flooring
We are ready to help you
meet your 1996 certification
with our U.S.D.A. approved
Seamless Epoxy Flooring.
927-3329



GARLIC ENVIRONMENTAL
ASSOCIATES, INC.
wishes you a
Happy New Year!


(904) 653-8899


APALACHICOLA FAX(904) 653-9656


fe e5ntf ree

Happy and Prosperoms New Jear
to yom.from the Chestmnt Tree
STORE (904) 653-2084 HOME (904) 653-8564 APALACHICOLA


J^a f2/Z9 NAew- /e0

The Mane Salon
eauie, fa^uice and Pcada
653-8714

926-7530 For food orders
-,;. 926-7079 For cake orders
E' i MYRA JEAN'S CAKES &
RESTAURANT
serving family style food 7 days a week,
cake decorating & wedding supplies, gifts
WEDDING & ALL OCCASION CAKES,
BURGERS, HOT DOGS, PIZZA,
SHOT & COLD SANDWICHES, SALADS,
ICE CREAM
WISHING A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL


3*0


SLi


As


Happy New Year!
50% off on selected items
The Camouflage Shop
75 Market Street, Apalachicola


Happy New Year!
From all the Employees of
St. Joseph Telecommunications
54 Avenue E
Apalachicola
and
502 Fifth Street
Port St. Joe


Peace and blessings

to: all

from the Staff
at Hoij 'aii ily

Gnfu &
Marks Realty
61 Avenue E./P.O. Box 129
Apalachicola, Florida 32320
Fax (904) 653-8851
Business (904) 653-8851, (800) 586-1408
Best wishes for a prosperous New Year!


*0


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0 *


Happy New Year
from
Papa's Seafood Restaurant
serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner,
also has a hot bar buffet Sun-Fri, 1 lam-2pm,
all you can eat for $5.95



Coa stq Ceo & CPaging
Your Sprint Cellular dealer in
Carrabelle wishes you a very
Happy New Year!
Located Downtown in Carrabelle Realty Bldg.
697-8032


Wishing you a
Happy New Year
50% off on ALL Christmas
Decorations
Bayside Art Gallery & Florist
Hwy. 98- Eastpoint, FL



Your local Post Offices in
Apalachicola, Eastpoint,
Carrabelle and Lanark Village


FIRST


wish you a
CLASS NEW
in 1996.


YEAR


-i: .4


Best Wishes


and


Good


Will


Throughout the Year!

Cook Insurance Agency
653.9310


Happy New year
from your local party dress
and tux specialist.
Expertly fitted and guaranteed to fit.
7sabe1's Corner
653-9416

Wishing youa
osperous e& appy New year,
We Look Forwnuard to Serving you
in1996.
Seahorse Gift and Florist
653-8745


Everyone at
FOSTER CONSULTING
wishes you a
SAFE & HAPPY NEW YEAR
APALACHICOLA


0s
'7
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mcO


Thanks for Your Patronage
and Best Wishes for a
Very Propsperous
New Year!

LONG'S VIDEO




Dr. Ed Saunders and staff
wish you and your family
A JOYOUS NIEW YEAR
653-2225



4f*larp' z3feelurp
Thanks for your patronage!
Wishing you a
Joyous and Prosperous
New Year!
(904) 653 -8882 palacbicola


Wishinq The besT FOP The New Yeax,
may all youth Fpshinq lies
becomee TRuThs.
The Pitts Family,
Fisherman's Headquarters


mc
S


N\


II


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


The Franklin Chronicle 29 December 1995 Pao,,,- .


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Pane 6 29 December 1995 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


Highlights From 1995


Hurricanes made news in the panhandle region in 1995, but Opal,
the last one with impact, brought greater attention on the state
of the escape road cutting through the north portion of Eastpoint.
Because highway 98 was washed out in at least 26 places between
Eastpoint and Carrabelle, a detour was made using this old road-
currently unpaved, and a potential dust bowl. Related to these
concerns, discussed at the level of the Franklin County
Commission, were proposals for imposing a gas tax to help pay
for resurfacing the escape road.

m 7A


Hurricane Allison brought more media attention than damage to
the panhandle region, with much of it confined to Alligator Point
and the new road construction on state road 370. A revetment
was installed earlier, which held against the storm, but the new
roadbed had to be rebuilt. Despite many inconveniences including
re-routing traffic through the RV camp at Alligator Point, the
road was repaired and landscaped in a handsome context. As to
the media coverage all those satellite trucks suggest, it was
minimal and coverage for the other storms was diminished.


,-. '-:;
* -' .. ', .
(' -


For about 18 months, the bridge to St. George Island was under
extensive repair for pilings. Some of the prestressed concrete
columns had cracked with water entering into the rebar iron,
rusting out, requiring replacement. By mid-summer most of the
repair work had been done.


Waste Disposal
continued from page 1

were running a business and one
of my customers had 58% of the
business, I would talk to them a
little."
The special meeting ended ami-
cably with both county represen-
tatives inviting the city board to
their next meeting and the city
commission inviting the county
board back to their next regular
meeting. "I had never been to a
city meeting before," said Braxton.
Howell returned, "The night I took
office was my first one (meeting)."


Long Dream Gallery
"Upstairs"

Fine Art Jewelry
Small Sculpture
Hand-made by Contemporary Artists

32 Avenue D, Suite 201
In the Historic Butterflcld Building
Downtown Apalachlcola
(BHOUM V. o3 e nt
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WHEN WAS
THE LAST TIME
YOU Itsitu

YOUR SMOKE
DtI:tCIORS?

Last month? Last year?
Can't remember? If you're
not sure your smoke detec-
tors are working, then how
can you be sure you'll be
protected if a fire breaks
out?

Don't gamble with your life
and assume your smoke
detectors are working. Test
each one, every month, so
you'll know they'll be ready
to protect you and your
family if there's a fire.
Test your detector for life.



+ NFPA
American National Fire
Red Cross Protection Association


The unpopular "net-ban"
Amendment to the Florida
Constitution had gone into
effect by mid-year. Several
litigations in Gulf, Wakulla and
other counties had sought
temporary injunctions arguing
constitutional issues and an
exception allowing use of nets
"for governmental purposes"
but these efforts failed, and the
cases are still pending by year's
end. A new net configuration
was approved by lower level
courts, and the issue was
certified to the State Supreme
Court for "immediate
resolution," but after several
months, that case is still
pending. The Organized
Fishermen of Florida sued
several TV station for
broadcasting alleged deceptive
ads and that case is still
pending. Even after the ban
went into effect, and net buy-
back programs were started,
litigation ensued against the
Dept. of Labor and Employment
Security and others concerning
the purchase of those used nets.
The transition from net fishing
to other occupations has been
a continuing problem for many
in the seafood industry, as this
story continues into 1996.


Grant Presentation
: continued from page 1
Historic buildings (including the
old Grady Building) as old as 1835
between Avenue D and E could
be purchased with the Florida
Community Trust Grant and pos-
sibly restored with funding from
a Community Development Block
Grant. Those open spaces near
the historic sites, said Marshall,
could be developed into parks.
Marshall suggested that the prop-
erty on Water Street be used as
public access to the water. 'To
date, there is no place for larger
boats. This could accommodate
that and the property could be
used to make a dock." Mr.
Marshall felt that those larger
boats could be used to aid indi-
I viduals wishing to view the Apa-
lachicola River. "The history and
beauty of the river is only avail-
able to those of us who have
Boatss" said Marshall, "And most
of us don't have boats." Marshall
suggested that the property lo-
. cated beyond the county court-
I house could be used for active and
passive recreation sites. He also
pointed out that the property lo-
cated on Bay Avenue could be
used to protect the shoreline and
ecology of the bay and be used to
- grant public access to the water.
Commissioner Hill voiced skepti-
cism to the grant presentation.
"The chance of this property be-
Scoming revenue producing is
Practically nil. We don't have the
lucrative jobs that other cities
have. We'llbe raising the tax base
to the point where you can't af-
ford to live in this district. It seems
that, before you ever dream' of
anything like this, we would have
Sto expand the tax base and those
people who you plan to
dislocate...you should try to have
them located."
Hill continued, "Instead of bring-
ing in tourists, we first need to
help support our local business-
men. There seems to be some de-
ceit here and the whole truth is
not coming out." Commissioner
Hill urged the board to study the
percentage of job loss and ad va-
lorem tax loss that may result
'from the land acquisition. "This
is a realtor's dream. This is noth-
ing for the local people."
Mayor Howell stated that the
property would be first developed
and then turned back over to the
public. "Mr. Hill, I've been elected
to public office nine times, which
is 36 years and I'm used to ob-
noxious comments from various
people." He Concluded, "This is an
opportunity to have this property
developed, put back on the tax
role and make 50 or 100 times
more in revenue."
Commissioner Hill stated that he
was only looking out for the in-
terests of the public in his final
term as a city commissioner. "I've
got two more years and that's it.
I'll be off the city commission. I'll
make that statement publicly. I
krow there's a lot of people who
will be happy, but there's one
thing about it. I'm gonna stay
here. I have other plans. I'm mov-
ing on to another section in my
life. The younger folks will be tak-
ing over. That's who we're trying
to protect this property and town
for."


AUTHORIZED ORVISB FULL DEALER
Fishing Tackle Gifts Sportswear 0 Wildlife Art
Guide Service 32 Avenue D
904 653 9669 Apalachicola, FL 32320



Serving Wakulla and Franklin Counties

SBusiness Cards Letterheads Envelopes
Rubber Stamps Carbonless Forms Newsletters
Booklets Church Bulletins Menus
Much More

PRINTING SOLUTIONS

3053 Crawfordville Hwy.
(across from the courthouse)

926-1005
1-800-984-2707 (FL Toll-Free)
Member of:
Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce
Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce



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ours is a service you can trust.
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serving all of Franklin County
653-2208 697-3366


KEYSTONE REALTY & APPRAISAL, INC.
Located at the Post Office Customes House
in Historic Downtown Apalachicola
Christon T. Gallio, SRA

A Full Service Appraisal Firm
First Mortage, Refinance & Equity Appraisals
New Construction Appraisals & Construction Inspections
Estate, Litigation & Insurance Appraisals
Vacant Land & Lot Appraisals

20 Avenue D #201, PO Box 96
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"Board-Certified Specialists"
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Announce the opening of


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By Appointment only: 1-904-785-1530 1-800-376-2246


CI


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Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 29 December 1995 Page 7


Real Estate J, ~Fi~P


Collins Relty, Inc.

61)E.Gui'leah r. S. Gore slndFl 332
ii I el


BEACHFRONT
Perfect house for those familygatherings with the spacious living/dining/kitchen area, stone
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Great rental potential. $385,000.00
HOMESITES
BAYFRONT one acre home site in St. George Plantation with sandy beach and panoramic
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ST. GEORGE PLANTATION interior one acre building site with nice vegetation. $49,500.00
BAYVIEW home site located on corner in quiet area with vegetation. $33,900.00
GULFVIEW one acre building site in St. George Plantation offering terrific view, close to
beach club, and direct access to boardwalk. $225,000.00
INTERIOR home site in peaceful area and just a short distance to bay. $29,500.00









CHRONICLE VIDEO RECORDING
SERVICES


Trinity Christmas Concert

and Yule Log Ceremony
Sunday, 10 December 1995

About one hour on SP mode VHS videotape.

$17.00, Including postage, handling and
taxes.

A portion of the sales will be contributed to the lse
Newell Fund.

One videocassette in SP mode. Please complete the order form
below and mail to: Franklin Chronicle
Post Office Box 590
Eastpoint, Florida 32328
--am enclosing a check for $17 includingg postage, handling and taxes)
for one videocassette of the Trinity Christmas Concert to be sent to I
this address:
Name Phone
Address
City State Zip
L------------------


B. L. Cosey


The cast of characters in St.
George Island Plantation
politics is enlarging, perhaps
into more litigation over Dr.
Ben Johnson's proposed
commercial development called
Resort Village. The complaints
about the development,
projected into the middle of the
Plantation, began with
concerns about the proposed
multi-family dwellings Dr.
Johnson wanted to install and
anticipated changes in security.
The sign "private" held by
former Plantation resident Nick
LaSlavic reflects the strongly
held opinion that a commercial
development in the middle of
the one-acre residential
development is incompatible
with the security element at the
main gate, often pitched to new
lot buyers as a major amenity.


Cnriston rallno
In 1995, opposition continued
to build, with challenges made
by an independent resident
organization, Concerned
Property Owners, to Dr.
Johnson's wastewater
treatment proposals for Phase
One of his development. With a
change in the majority voting
on the Homeowners Association
Board of Directors, dismissal of
manager Wayne Gleasman, the
resignation of long-time
attorney to the Board (Barbara
Sanders) the future of
negotiations with Dr. Johnson
are uncertain. The level of
rhetoric at recent Board
meetings, including a warning
by George Mahr of possible
litigation against the Board for
failing to follow a fiduciary duty
in their administration have
been countered with member
Lennie Davis' rejoinder that he


Susan Gunn
would sue George Mahr. The
Concerned Property Owners
legal expenses have continued
to rise in the meantime.
Complicating the matter is the
uncertain status of an
agreement between Dr. Johnson
and the Association which, if
valid, would invoke continued
responsibilities on behalf of the
Association to support Dr.
Johnson's -plans. The
development, over a ten year
period, would have large'
implications for the economy in
Franklin County, especially
given other economic changes
at Inner Harbor, rising
unemployment county-wide,.
and the delayed status of a
proposed prison facility to be
located in Eastpoint. The sole
remaining administrator who
can provide continuity for the
Board is Mrs. Susan Gunn.


ii
Apalachicola resident Wanda
Teat petitions Franklin County
Commission to get involved in
preventing the pollution of
Huckleberry Creek at an
October 17 meeting.
pw



-GARLICK ENVIRONMENTAL
ASSOCIATES, INC.
STATE AND FEDERAL REGULATORY PERMITTING
WETLANDS JURISDICTIONAL DELINEATIONS
SUBMERGED LAND LEASES
ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENTS
PROJECT SUPERVISION AND MANAGEMENT
,DAN GARLIC
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S . .. "''.. P.O. BOX 385
(904) 653-8899
FAX (904) 653-9656






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PHONE # 697-3334
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR ER-00 03441
HEATING & A/C CONTRACTOR RA-00 51447
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Roofing & Repairs
Vinyl Siding

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Repairs -Roofing
Vinyl Siding Painting
Pressure Washing


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and rock sea walls. Rock delivered and placed.
Call Larry Craft, 403 Woodville Hwy.
Crawfordville, FL 32327
Mobile (904) 545-7863 Home (904) 421-6907


Local Government In Effect

An assortment of mostly unpublished photos illustrate scenes from the
city elections, county commission meetings, and town meetings.


Voter exits election booth on
September 5 during the
Apalachicola city election.


'U


Senator Thomas visits Julia
Mae's Restaurant in Carrabelle
on June 22 for a town meeting.


ATM-ATM ATM-ATM-ATM-ATM~ATM ATM-ATM ATM-ATM ATM ATM ATM


I Gulf State

EQUAL HOUSING
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IF YOU HAVEN'T TESTEVI YO4l I GULF
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Mayor Bobby Howell waits
outside of the Apalachicola fire
house on September 5 for the
election results.


Watch out for that bear,
Commissioner!! Smokey the
Bear sneaks up behind
Commissioner Dink Braxton at
an October 3 meeting.


.--
= -v .- _. _. -~ --.




-.--e



Two other developments
affecting the seafood industries
occurred in the panhandle in
1995. The Constitutional
appeal in the aquaculture arena,
seeking to declare as
unconstitutional the county
power to veto leases, was lost
by David Jones and Joe Squire
when the State Supreme Court
refused to certify the case to
their docket, allowing the lower
court decision to stand.
Secondly, the claim by Gulf
Trading Company to 6000 of
bay bottom based on a 1904
lease, was declared without
merit and dismissed by the
First Circuit Court of Appeals.
Ironically, this claim at one
time was used by one or two
Franklin County
Commissioners as a rationale
for refusing to approve leases
of bay bottom in Franklin
County lest there be more such
claims which would threaten
tongers who did not hold leases
anywhere.


-


I


r-.ui









Page 8 29 December 1995 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every


other Friday


Dixie Theatre

to be Rebuilt

1995 w.as the last act for the old
DLxie Theatre in downtown Apa-
lachicola. Demolition crews
yanked down the remaiini wall
this summer of this nearly 100-
vear-old building
But the new owners say the cur-
K tains of the Dixie Theatre will nse
again when it is reconstructed
using nearly 3.000 of the old red
bncks salvaged from the demoli-
tion. The reconstruction of the
theatre is the latest of many res-
S oration projects underway in
i. Apalachicola. Now owned by Rex
and Cleo Partington. veteran the-
atre folk from Virginia. the Dixie
Theatre has been an Apalachico-
la landmark since the early
1900s According to William
Rogers's Outposts on the Gulf, the
Dixie Theatre originally featured
a main hall with 360 folding
chairs and a sunken orchestra pit
opposite a heavily curtained
stage. The theatre lit up the down-
town district with colored lights.
There was also a horseshoe-
shaped balcony with private boxes
and a conical ticket office with
glass block windows. But, in re-
S cent years, the building had suc-
cumbed to the weather with the
roof caving in, a collapsed bal-
cony, and an orchestra pit full of
debris. All that remained of the
theatre was the front brick facade
Sand, according to experts, this
was only being held in place by
the two brick structures shoul-
dering the front on either side.
The Partingtons were visiting Ap-
alachicola in 1992 when they first
saw the structure. They thought
S it was an omen. "Our daughter's
name is Dixie," Mr. Partington
r mused. "How could we not buy
this theatre?" The city of Apala-
chicola sold them the building
and lent them $50,000 from a re-
volving city loan program to help
in the renovation project. The
Partingtons, theatre owners and
performers from Virginia, plan to
restore the orchestra pit, the bal-
cony and the original ticket office.
The theatre will be rebuilt to ac-
commodate live performances,
guest artists' series, children's
theatre and theatre workshops.
"We want very much to make this
a community theatre," said
Mr. Partington.
Tourism has steadily grown in
Apalachicola over the years. Presi-
dent of the Chamber of Commerce
Dan Davis said, "...Our history
W and the resources are the basis
S for our economy. We're very pro-
tective of both...and it has paid
off." The Dixie Theatre, in its re-
stored version, will join a growing
number of art galleries, antique
J shops, restaurants and some low-
S key tourism-related businesses.


-'.-' .J
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Some of Franklin County's "New Faces" in educational, political, judicial and law
enforcement offices in 1995 have become readily known to the community. These
"New Faces individuals have taken on positions of authority and have become active participants in
the daily operations within the county.


... .. .NM




Nikita Williams was hired as the
new WINGS Coordinator in
APalcahicola at the Holy
A completely new Lanark Village Water & Sewer Commission was Family Center on April 18. "I'm
elected and met for the first time on January 3 for a special here to let'kids know that you
meeting. These new commissioners consisted of Jack can be what you want to be,"
Garrison(left), Phil Shiver (center) and James Lawlor (right); they said Williams during an
replaced Carl Bailey, Greg Yancey and Harold Sparks. interview. She replaced Chaz
-i'1 slm Mikell.
a ~ 1 aJ~s ..... ....


- ,



The September 7 election in
Carrabelle yielded only one
"new face" to local government.
The Carrabelle City
Commission received a new
mayor from the past in Charles
Millender. Mr. Millender edged
out Jim Phillips 169-137 in the
race for mayor.


g


George Jackson holds a valuable and historic artifact from the
World War II period, tied to Camp Gordon Johnson. A reunion of
veterans who survived the amphibian training at the historic
Carrabelle base is being planned for the first weekend in March
1996, for 2 1/2 days, starting on Friday evening, March 1, 1996.
This becomes a fabulous weekend for the entire family in Franklin
County, with the Camp Johnson festivities, open to the public,
and the St. George Island Chill Cookoff on March 1-2, and the
Natural Bridge Reenactment, March 2-3 in Wakulla County, at
Woodville.


On July 10, Judge William Gary
would receive the "Plum
Assignment" as Franklin
County's new Second Circuit
Court Judge. Judge Gary
replaced Judge Kevin Davey.


--~~. .....-; -


Assistant Public Defender Kevin
Steiger was hired five days into
1995. During an interview, the
former navy lawyer proclaimed
his interest in,legal defense as
a "Don Quixote fixation."
Steiger replaced Julius Aullsio.


|I


Woodrow Judy was appointed to
the Carrabelle City Commision
on August 28, though later
resigned his seat on December
5 due to family health
problems. Mr. Judy would later
move to Alabama.


Royce Pippin (left) was
recruited from Holmes
Correctional Institution and
become the new major at the
Franklin Work Camp on October
7. I'm just happy to be here and
I'm eager to get out into the
community," said Pippen. Major
Pippin replaced Major Tim
Whitehead.


On May 17, Virginia Kelley was
named the new principal of
Apalachicola High School. After
being hired at a special meeting
of the Franklin County School
Board, she declared simply, "I'm
ready." Ms. Kelley replaced Ed
Duggar.


Following the September 7
Carrabel e City elections,
George Jackson was appointed
to Commissioner Woodrow
Judy's vacant seat the following
day. "There's definitely some
changes that need to be made,"
affirmed Jackson during an
interview.


On May 18, Michael Horvath
(left) was appointed to the
Carrabelle City Commission
and filled Tommy Loftin's
vacated seat. Horvath would
later resign his seat shortly
after defeating Pam Lycett in
the September 7 city election
due to a conflict with his job.


;-


'






On December 4, Virginia
Sanborn attended her first
meeting as a Carrabelle City
Commissioner. "It was not a
snap decision to apply for
appointment to Seat 5, said
Sanborn in an interview,
"friends and clients had been
urging me for some time to seek
the position." Ms. Sanborn
replaced Michael Horvath.


S -. ..


Jeanette Pedder was appointed
to the Lanark Village Water &
Sewer Board on December 5 by
the Franklin County
Commission. The New York
native's reason for entering the
political arena? "I live here,"
stated Pedder, "and have a
vested interest to get involved
in what goes on here." Ms.
Pedder replaced Jack Garrison.



N W IS I0


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SUBSCIBET

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Published every other Friday


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle 29 December 1995 Page 9


A Highlight of Franklin County's Fundraisers,

Banquets, Festivals and Seasonal Events ;


The Fourth of July at the village
Fina featured this young
contestant in the watermelon
eating contest. The event was
hosted by Bob Evans and
coordinated by American
Legion Post 82 Commander Vic
Larimore. In addition to the
many donations pledged to the
American Legion, the event's
auction raised over $500 for the
the Post 82.


S1 Red Rabbit Owner Lee McLemore and other contributors are hon-
Wally "Famous" Amos visited ored at a luncheon hosted by the Summer Fun Program on June
Apalachicola High School on 29. The event was coordinated by Jack Dakota.
January 19 and gave an
inspirational and instructional
speech to the students. "You
need to take responsibility for .
yourselves," urged Mr. Amos. "If
you don't pay attention in life,
you will miss out and it will be
nobody's fault but your own."

~u r


On the steps of the courthouse, city and county representatives
join their community on April 17 to proclaim the start of Juvenile
Justice Week.


41 Carrabelle kindergarteners sang soulful tunes to the seniors
at the Carrabelle Senior Citizen Center on Valentines Day. "I dearly
loved it," said Senior Jewell Lively, "The little children sang to us
and they hugged our necks."


Doing his best Elvis imitation, WOYS News Director Michael Allen
waits to make bond during the May 18 Jail & Bail fundraiser. The
event raised over $15,000for the benefit of the American Cancer
Society.


Carlton Wathen takes time for
a photo during the Carrabelle
Waterfront Festival.


The special Arts Festival was "
held at Browne Elementary b
School on April 28 and featured "
arts & crafts, educational games
and activities as well as
dramatic performances. The
event was coordinated by Nina
Marks.


Franklin County Adult Reading
Program Coordinator Jane Cox
Recognizes Cliff Butler at the
. September 30 Lasagna for
Literacy Fundraiser. The event
raised over $750 for local
literacy efforts.


sR -


Ashley Allen gives an instructional lecture to her peers on dating
safety tips at the Health Fair in April coordinated by Doctors
Tom and Elizabeth Curry. The Health Fair was held at the Apala-
chicola Community Center.


Students from the WINGS Program entertain at a Wings for WINGS
and Library Ribs Fundraised hosted by the Franklin County Pub-
lic Library. The event raised $700 for the benefit of the Franklin
County Public Library.


Chico the clown was up to his
S usual antics during the three
day March 16-18 Franzen
Brothers Circus which was
hosted by the Franklin County
Public Library as a fundraiser
and yielded $2,500.


a.~S


Ul-MANE SOCIETY


Chapman Elementary teacher Audrey Gaye was chosen as Teacher
The Franklin County Humane Society celebrated their Sixth An- of the Year on February 29. "She is very close to our hearts and
nual Bow Wow Ball at Harry A's in St. George Island on February especially close to the hearts of her students," praised Chapman
25. Live music was provided by Low Flying Planes from Tallahas- Principal Jerry Burns (right of Ms. Gaye).
see.


The 13th Annual Chili Cookoff
Festival raised nearly $60,000
on March 4 and was dubbed by
Chill Cookoff Festival President
Harry Arnold as, "The best year
ever, in all categories."


-lb. Carrabelle 4th Grader T.J. Jackson took district honors in the
Tropicana 4-H Public Speaking Contest on March 31. T.J. won on
the strength of his "Bratty Sister" speech.


King Retsyo and Queen Erin Butler (far left) sample Seafood
Festival oysters in Battery Park. There were about 9000
registrations and a distinct lack of finflsh and shellfish at the
festival, most likely due to the net ban.


-: I
Coach Eddie Joseph is honored at the Student and Teacher Awards
Night Ceremony hosted by the Franklin County School Board on
May 18.


The St. G rigc Volunteer Fire
Department celebrate their
20th anniversary. "Your
commitment to safety and well
being of your community,
stated Fire Chief Jay Abbot, "are
an inspiration to all."


~--~-


-- I










Pag 10 29Dcme 95*TeFaki hoil OALYONDNWPPRPbihdeeyohrFia


(58) New. The Dream Is
Alive: A Flight Of Discov-
ery Aboard The Space
Shuttle by Barbara
Embury. A souvenir of the
IMAX presentation. Large
color format featuring stun-
ning photographs from the
big screen presentation.
Documents the activities of
three space shuttle mission
crews who flew in 1984.
Sold nationally for $14.95.
Bookshop price = $7.95.
Hardcover.


the Chronicle Bookshop



Mail Order Service *


2309 Old Bainbridge Road

Tallahassee, FL 32303


(54) New. The 1996 Florida
Almanac by Del and Marty
Marth. Swanee River Press:
Branford, Florida, 1996.
Sold nationally for $14.50.
Paperback. Available from
the Chronicle Bookshop at
$11.50. 508pp. Paperback.

Y^ijts >m.


A FLIGHT OF DISCOVERY ABOARD TIE SPACE SHUTTLE Written by Barbara Embury


IooXAYS

TOLTIVRETO
0

.


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(56) New. 100 Ways To Live
To Be 100 by Charles B.
Inlander and Marie Hodge.
Published by the People's
Medical Society, a nonprofit
consumer health organiza-
tion; Distributed by Outlet
Books, a division of Random
House. The first complete
guide for reaching the Cen-
tury mark. Combining the
best scientific data and in-
terviews with successful
centenarians. An upbeat
look at how to live a long and
productive life. Offering
more than simple tips, this
book shows you how to get
to know yourself better, im-
prove your habits, gain in-
spiration from those who
have made it to 100. Sold
nationally for $20.
Bookshop price = $13.00.




ALL THE TROUBLE
IN TH .WORLD


(59) New. P. J. O'Rourke's
All The Trouble In The
World. The pre-eminent po-
litical humorist of his time
criss-crosses the globe in
search of solutions to
today's vexing issues, and in
the process produces a hi-
larious and informative
book. The Houston Post
says "All the Trouble in the
World is O'Rourke's best
work since PARLIAMENT OF
WHORES." The Wall Street
Journal: "Bottom line: Buy
the Book." Sold nationally
for $12; Bookshop price
$7.95. Paperback.

(48) New. GIVE WAR A
CHANCE by P. J. O'Rourke.
A political humorist
O'Rourke does for the world
in this book what he did for
the U. S. Government in
PARLIAMENT OF WHORES.
As he puts it, "Eyewitness
accounts of mankind's
struggle against tyranny, in-
justice and alcohol-free
beer." Sold nationally for
$20.95. Bookshop
price = $10.95. 233pp.
Hardcover.


(55) New. To The Stars: The
Autobiography Of George
Takei (Star Trek's Mr. Sulu).
Pocket Books, a division of
Simon and Schuster. Sold
nationally for $22.00.
Bookshop price $14.00. Pa-
perback.


(61) New. James Earl
Jones: Voices And
Silences. Charles Scribner's
Sons, New York. A memo-
rable and moving book
about the life of James Earl
Jones. Sold nationally for
$24.00. Bookshop price =
$15.00. 393.pp. Hardcover.


(51) LEONARD NIMOY: I
AM SPOCK. The long-
awaited autobiography of
Leonard Nimoy is now avail-
able through the Chronicle
Bookshop. Mr. Nimoy opens
up to his fans in ways the
Vulcan never could. He gives
the reader his unique per-
spectives on the Star Trek
phenomenon, his relation-
ships with costars and in
particular, the creation of
the pointed-eared alien that
the author knows best. Pub-
lished by Hyperion, sold na-
tionally for $24.95.
Bookshop price = $19.95.
Hardcover.



(9) New. Wall Street Jour-
nal Guide To Understand-
ing Money And Investing.
This book initiates you into
the mysteries of the finan-
cial pages, but it is an easy-
to-use primer. Very useful.
Sold nationally for $13.95.
Bookshop price: $6.95. Pa-
perback.



U UIDETO

G D
UNDERSTANDING

IVIONEY&.

INVESTING





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(8) New. Home-Sharing And
Other Lifestyle Options.
An AARP book. This book is
about choices in housing.
You will discover many new
ideas about alternative liv-
ing arrangements that can
lead to better housing for
less money. Sold nationally
for $12.95. Bookshop price:
$7.95. Paperback.


TI TE
CIVII. WAR

OF A
SOUTHERN
V OMAN

I ; Ii A1
XD0NIA Ni


CHARLES EAsr

(60) New. Sarah Morgan:
The Civil War Diary Of A
Southern Woman. Edited
by Charles East. "Sarah
Morgan's diary is not only a
valuable historical docu-
ment. It is also a fascinat-
ing story of people, places
and events told by a won-
derfully talented writer,"
says the Christian Science
Monitor. Now published in
its entirety for the first time,
Sarah Morgan's classic ac-
count brings the Civil War
and the Old South to life
with all the freshness and
immediacy of great litera-
ture. "Refreshing a real-life
Scarlett O'Hara," says the
Greenwood, S. C. Index-
Journal." Sold nationally for
$15.00. Bookshop price =
$11.95. 624pp. Paperback.


(57) New,. A Really Big
Show: A Visual History Of
The Ed Sullivan Show.
Edited by Claudia
Falkenburg and Andrew
Stolt. With lavish photo-
graphs and text, this book
is the first to chronicle the
program that defined the
golden age of television. A
spectacular showcase of tal-
ent that for 23 years enter-
tained the American family
each Sunday night from
1948 to 1971. Sold nation-
ally for $35.00. Bookshop
price = $16.00. Large format
(9.75 x 12.5 inches), 256pp.
Hardcover.


(37) New. The Last Bus to
Albuquerque. By Lewis
Grizzard. Volume following
Grizzard's death in March
1994, consisting of about 60
of his best columns, remem-
brance from media
practicioners and photo-
graphs. 235pp. Sold nation-
ally for $20.00. Bookshop
price: $14.98. Hardcover.


(21) New. University Of
Florida Press. William
Roger's History, Outposts
On The Gulf: St. George Is-
land And Apalachicola
From Early Exploration To
World War II. Sold Region-
ally For $30 Or More. Avail-
able From The Chronicle
Bookshop For $25.00.
Hardcover.





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(22) New. University Of Ala-
bama Press.- Fair To
Middlin':The Antebellium
Cotton Trade Of The Apa-
lachicola-Chattahooche
River Valley. Sold nation-
ally at $26.95. Available
through the Chronicle
Bookshop at $21.00. Hard-
cover.
(31) New. Game Wars: The
Undercover Pursuit of
Wildlife Poachers. By Marc
Reisner. An unprecedented
and astonishing report from
the front lines of the battle
to save the world's endan-
gered wildlife. Because of an
enormously lucrative black
market in wildlife and wild-
life parts, poaching of wal-
rus and elephants, of black
and grizzly bears, even of
more common species such
as ducks and animals' sur-
vival as the relentless de-
struction of their habitat. In
Game Wars, author Reisner
offers a written firsthand ac-
count of how undercover
game wardens operate, the
elaborate covers they devise,
the groundwork of subter-
fuge and lies necessary to
pull off a success and the
dangers they face as they
impersonate smugglers and
big-game hunters, poaching
anything from alligators to
gamefish. There is a hero in
this true story as Reisner's
tale unfolds in the Louisiana
bayous. Sold Nationally for
$19.95. Bookshop price:
$6.95. Hardcover.


(53) New. Picture History,
American Painting 1770-
1930. Edited by William
Ayres. Rizzoli, New York in
association with Fraunces
Tavern Museum, New York.
In twelve chapters, profusely
illustrated, many in color,
scholars review the master-
pieces of American history
painting to show how pub-
lic opinion, governmental
patronage and imaginative
artistry combined to record
events and shape how we
interpret history. Sold na-
tionally for more than $40.
Chronicle Bookshop price =
$29.00. 256pp. Large for-
mat (9.75 x 12.50 inches).
Hardcover.

PICTURING HISTORY
"l,'i.Ict eu I',laIn,, I i --i'll /


(23) New. University of Ala-
bama Press. Navy Gray-A
Story Of The Confederate
Navy On The Chattahoo-
chee And Apalachicola
Rivers. Sold Nationally at
$27.50. Available through
the Chronicle Bookshop at
$22.00! Hardcover.
(40) New. Major Robert
Farmar of Mobile. By Rob-
ert R. Rea. This book recre-
ates the life and times of an
18th-.Century Colonial
American whose family was
prominent in the early
settlement of Pennsylvania
and New Jersey. Born in
1717, Farmar sought his
fortune in the British Army.
Eventually, he was ordered
to occupy French Mobile in
1763 and led a successful
ascent of the Mississippi
River. He became a leading
figure in colonial affairs and
was elected five times to the
General Assembly in West
Florida. Rea is a professor
of history at the University
of Alabama (Auburn).
184pp. Sold nationally for
$33.95. Bookshop price:
$22.00. Hardcover.

.. -- .


4,"


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Books from the mall service of the Mail Ol
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"TO FIND YOUR WAY
AROUND FLORIDA, THIS
IS THE GUIDE TO TAKE."
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"GREAT FOR RESIDENTS
AND TOURISTS."
Destin Log


(34) New. The Red Hills of
Florida, 1528-1865. By
Clifton Paisley. "A superior,
very superior, example of lo-
cal or regional history...The
research is especially
strong; it is exhaustive, solid
and first rate" (Gilbert C.
Fite, University of Georgia).
A history of Leon County,
and neighboring counties
Gadsden, Jackson,
Jefferson and Madison. Uni-
versity of Alabama Press.
290 pp. Sold regionally for
$34. Chronicle bookshop
price: $18.95. Paperback.


Ord
order Dept


-------------1
Ler Form
., Chronicle Bookshop


State ZIP


BriefTitle


Cost


Total book cost
Shipping & handling Sales tax (6% in Fla.) +
1 book....... $2.50
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29 December 1995
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L_____________________-


Page 10 29 December 1995 The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Published every other Friday


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