Franklin chronicle
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 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: June 2, 1995
Copyright Date: 1995
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00089928:00012

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25


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APALACHICOLA, FL
32320
PERMIT #8


The Franklin Chronicle


Volume 4, Number 11


Published every other Friday


2 June- 14 June 1995


Carrabelle Hosts Waterfront

Festival and Saltwater Classic

Marine Street in Carrabelle will come alive Father's Day week-
end with the fifth annual Waterfront Festival, 17 and 18 June
1995, staged simultaneously with the Big Bend Saltwater Clas-
sic Fishing Tournament. Marine Street, which runs along the
Carrabelle River and Harbor, will have arts and crafts booths
and food venders of.all kinds in the midst of nearly continuous
entertainment.
This year will feature the First Fun Auction comprised of ser-
vices, goodies and "stuff' provided by Chamber of Commerce
members and others. There will also be a boat auction at the
Dockside Marina on Thursday, 15 June leading into the "big
event" weekend in Carrabelle. Both auctions will be "hosted"
by local expert auctioneer Wade Clark.
The schedule for entertainment is as follows:
9:00-9:45 AM Renegade
10:00-10:45 AM Lynn Hankins & Libby
11:00-11:45 AM Hula Dancers
12:00-12:45 PM Wayne Williams
1:00-1 :30 PM Sky Divers
(This means people jumping out of
airplanes...not a musical group.)
2:00-2:45 PM Nancy Redig
3:00-3:45 PM J.R. Smith
4:00-4-45 PM Renegade
The sponsor of the Seafood Gumbo Cook-off is the Gulf State
Bank. The Chamber of Commerce is assisting and the
Carrabelle Youth League is the beneficiary of the contest. All
cooks are invited to enter the competition. An entry blank is
available elsewhere in this issue. A first place winner will take
away $200, Second place $150, third $100 and fourth $50.
Fifth, Sixth and Seventh will be awarded gift certificates.
Saturday night after the Waterfront Festival, additional enter-
tainment will be available at the Moorings, headquarters for
the Saltwater Classic, with performers Tom and the Cats.


Legal Challenge to

County Veto Power

Over Leases Fails


Aquaculture trainees David Jones
and Joe Square, both of
Apalachicola, lost their constitu-
tional appeal from a judgment in
the Second Circuit Court in 1993,
which upheld Franklin County's
veto power over submerged land
leases.
The statute 253.68 grants veto
power to Florida counties to dis-
approve lease applications in their
contiguous waters. Jones and
Square wanted one acre leases in
Apalachicola Bay as part of a job
training and Oyster aquaculture
project conducted in the Bay from
1989 through 1991. Upon gradu-
ation, they applied for leases but
the County Commission denied
all leases in the project in Febru-
ary 1992, upon a close vote. At
that time, the Seafood Workers
Association headed by LeRoy Hall
presented petitions to the Com-
mission urging a vote against
leases. Jones and Square, repre-


sented by Legal Services oi North
Florida, Inc, challenged the con-
stitutionality of the rule which
gave the county such power to
disapprove leases. In the court of
first jurisdiction, the Second Cir-
cuit decision went against the two
and they appealed to the First
District Court of Appeals, which
sustained the decision of the Sec-
ond Circuit. Does that end the is-
sue? According to a conversation
with Kristine Knab, attorney for
Jones and Square, there is still
time to appeal this decision but
an appraisal is not automatic.
The First District Court of Appeals
(Tallahassee) filed their unani-
mous opinion 22 May 1995, sus-
taining the decision reached by
Judge P. Kevin Davey of the Sec-
ond Circuit. It would appear that
this would end the judicial trail
taken by the two aquaculture
graduates since the beginning of
Continued on page 9


Escaped

Inmate

Commits

Suicide

Stephen E. Bosserman was mid-
way through a twelve year sen-
tence for Burglary when he es-
caped from the Franklin Work
Camp in March from an outdoor
work detail. He escaped with the
help of his wife, Cynthia
Bosserman, who had picked him
up in her vehicle and drove away
with him.
On 30 May 1995 at 8:31 PM,
Bosserman was stopped in Fre-
mont County, Idaho by Corporal
Ismael Gonzales of the Idaho State
Police. Gonzales stopped
Bosserman after he received a
report that the suspects had been
driving recklessly in Ashton,
Idaho in a stolen Jeep Cherokee.
Bosserman, upon being stopped,
shot Gonzales four times in the
chest. Corporal Gonzales, who
had been wearing a bullet proof.
vest, was able to return to his ve-
hicle, follow the suspects for a
distance and radio for help.
Gonzales described the suspects
as one male with dark hair and a
mustache and one female with
blonde hair. When he lost contact
with the suspects, Gonzales re-
ported that they were probably on
foot south of Ashton.
Several law enforcement agencies
began searching the South
Ashton area. The two suspects
were tracked to a barn a day later
located southeast of Ashton. They
had abandoned their vehicle by a
stream called Fall River. Law En-
forcement agencies tried to talk
the suspects out of the barn.
When the suspects refused to exit,
tear gas was thrown in. Cynthia
Bosserman came out of the barn
after the tear gas. The twenty-five
year old Stephen Bosserman re-
mained in the barn. When law
enforcement agencies stormed the
barn, Bosserman put the gun that
he Corporal Gonzales with to his
head and shot himself.
Cynthia Bosserman, who nine-
teen years of age and from Ten-
nessee is being held in the Fre-
mont County Jail on a $10,000.00
bond for felony eluding of an of-
ficer.
Corporal Gonzales was taken to
the Idaho Regional Medical Cen-
ter. He is being treated for the
gunshot wounds and is reported
to be in stable condition.

Student

Writing Skills

Improving

The Florida Writing Assessment
Program results for Franklin
County's fourth, eighth and tenth
graders were released by the De-
partment of Education on 17 May
1995. Although each of the three
classes in Franklin County scored
below the state average, all three
classes also showed a measurable
improvement from the previous
year.
Franklin County's fourth grade
class came the closest to the state
average. While the state average
on the writing assessment for the
fourth grade is 2.4 on a scale of
6, the entire fourth grade class
averaged 2.3; the score was up .2
from last year. Both Brown El-
ementary, which scored 2.6, and
Chapman Elementary, which
scored 2.4, met or exceeded the
state average. Carrabelle Elemen-
tary fell short of the state average
with a 1.8 score.
Franklin County's eighth grade
class fell well short of the state
average, which is 3.1 on a scale
of 6. Both Carrabelle and
Apalachicola High School scored
Continued on page 5


Investigation Finds

Emerald Coast Deficient

in Governing Body and

Quality Assurance


New Board
Member Looks
to the Future

A freshman to politics, newly ap-
pointed Carrabelle City Commis-
sioner Michael Horvath will take
over seat number four, which was
vacated by Tommy Loftin.
Horvath will will assume the re-
sponsibilities of the finance and
revenue department.
A native of Ohio and resident of
Carrabelle since 1973, Horvath is
presently employed with the
Florida Marine Patrol; he is a
member of the Carrabelle Volun-
teer Fire Department and has pre-
viously assisted Carrabelle's Rec-
reation Board.
An advocate of controlled commu-
nity growth, Horvath welcomes
new and clean industry. "I would
like to see Carrabelle grow, but
not haphazardly. I'm not for
growth for the sake of growth."
Horvath stated that he supported
the proposed prison site in
Carrabelle. "With the net ban
coming," said Horvath, "that's
gonna' really hurt us. As long as
the industry is clean, I support it."
Horvath also stated support for
Carrabelle's proposed River Walk.
"It will bring in tourism and those
tourists will spend their money in
our community."
Mr. Horvath is anxious to provide
more recreational activities for the
youth ard to expand educational
opportunities; he provided assis-
tance in surveying what residents
now refer to as the "kiddie park"
across from Carrabelle's Senior
Citizens Center.
'The kids really don't have a whole
lot to do except walk up and down
the street," remarked Horvath.
Concerning high school consoli-
dation, Horvath felt that the move
to consolidate would generally
improve the state of education in
Carrabelle and Franklin County.
New Commissioner Horvath will
be able to enjoy his appointment
for roughly four months, before
his seat will be up for election in
September; he received his ap-
pointment at the regular May 18
Carrabelle City Commission.

AHS Principal
Named
By Amanda Loos
Beverly Kelley was officially named the
new principal for Apalachicola High
School at a May 31 special meeting of
the Franklin County School Board.
Ms. Kelley received the recommenda-
tion of Superintendent C.T. Ponder on
May 30 and was unanimously voted
into the AHS principal's position at the
school board's special meeting. "I ad-
mire all those who applied {for the
principal's position)," noted Chairman
Will Kendiick. He then addressed the
new AHS Principal. "Ms. Kelley, you
certainly have your work cut out for
you. We're here to help you." Kelley
returned simply. "I'm ready."
Superintendent Ponder earlier stated
that he had recommended Ms. Kelley
for the principal's position because he
liked her plans for the high school.
"She has good relations with parents,
students, faculty and the administra-
tion. And that's important."
Ms. Beverly Kelley has taught read-
ing at Apalachicola High School for the
Past twenty-six years. Kelley will as-
sume the duties of AHS Principal on
Jully 1.


Allegations concerning quality
assurance and deficiencies in
a viable governing body at the
Emerald Coast Hospital were
confirmed in an investigation
conducted by the State of
Florida Agency for Health Care
Administration this spring
(1995). The survey team con-
ducted their investigation in
March 1995, and released
their findings recently.
Attempts made by the
Chronicle to interview Mr.
Kenneth Dykes, Hospital Ad-
ministrator, for a response to
the findings of the investiga-
tion were not successful, as
Mr. Dykes did not return sev-
eral telephone calls made on
Friday, 26 May 1995 although
the paper was told he was in
his office. Earlier attempts in
late April to talk with Mr.
Dykes were also unanswered.
.. .


Kenneth Dykes
The letter advising Mr. Dykes
of the investigation findings
contained this language,
which read:
The survey team found that the
allegation regarding the ab-
sence of a functioning quality
assurance committee was con-
firmed. Therefore, the confirma-
tion resulted in deficiencies of
a Federal Condition level. Con-
ditions of Participation, govern-
ing body and quality assurance
were found to be out of compli-
ance. Related federal standards
were also found out of compli-
ance during this visit.


The Chronicle did interview
staff members of the State of
Florida Agency for Health Care
Administration in Tallahassee
in order to explain some of the
administrative and medical
jargon contained in the inves-
tigation.
According to Tanya J, Williams
of the Hospital and Medical
Services Section, and Elmo
Elrod, Program Analyst in
Licensure and Certification,
Emerald Coast and all other
Florida hospitals fall under the
purview of Chapter 395
Florida Statutes. Emerald
Coast is regulated under 395
licensing provisions and also
through compliance with fed-
eral Medicare and Medicaid
programs. Every Florida hos-
pital is required to establish
some system or process for
self-evaluation so they can
assure the quality of services
they are providing. This is
called quality assurance. Un-
der federal rules, if hospitals
are to provide and be paid for
Medicaid and Medicare ser-
vices, they must have met the
various Conditions of Partici-
pation. The governing body in
a hospital is that part of the
organization which has ulti-
mate authority for operations,
and this must be specified in
bylaws, along with maintain-
ing minutes of meetings,
records of decisions, and other
evidence to demonstrate that
the governing body is cogni-
zant of the dynamics in qual-
ity assurance and other evo-
lutions.
The investigation's formal list
of deficiencies are several in
number but these relate to
more general conditions. For
example, the first specification
cited was the determination
that Emerald Coast's govern-
ing body had been ineffective
in carrying out the functions
that pertain to the governing
body. Specifically, the govern-
Continued on page 9


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Page 2 2 June 1995 The Franklin Chronicle


Preliminary Plans for

Resort Village Shared

with Islanders


In a four page letter being sent
to all St. George Island prop-
erty owners, Dr. Ben Johnson,
owner of Resort Village, has
described in general terms his
proposals for developing a por-
tion of the 58-acre tract des-
ignated as commercial prop-
erty within the Plantation on
the island.

The first phase of his develop-
ment consists of three restau-
rants housed in one building,
four small inns about the size
of Apalachicola's Gibson
Hotel(in terms of rooms), a
beach club and conference
center. Dr. Johnson cautioned
the Chronicle that these will
take five years to reach
buildout. In his letter, he said,
...When you see the results
merge over the next five or six
years, I am confident you will
be impressed by our efforts to
complement- rather than com-
pete with, or detract from- the
existing pattern of develop-
ment in the area.
While there is no specific date
set for the formal presentation
of the plans for approval be-
fore the Franklin County
Board of County Commission-
ers, Dr. Johnson hopes the
presentation will be made in
June 1995. About six build-
ings are planned on ten acres.
The beach club and confer-
ence center would be located
in one building. The "small
inns" would be in separate
buildings, and the three res-
taurants would occupy each of
the three floors of the sixth
building.
In his letter to island property
owners, Dr. Johnson wrote,
If this site were developed in
the conventional manner, it
would include one or two huge
resort hotels, sprawling across
the entire site. My vision is
strikingly different. I want to
preserve the best of the natu-
ral environment, while gently
introducing man-made ele-
ments that enhance our plea-
sure, rather than detract from
it. I visualize a variety of small,
local businesses, introduced
gradually over many years.
The buildings are small (none
over three stories) and per-
fectly matched to their settings
of natural greenery, dunes and
sea. The support functions are
unobtrusive, the cars and
trucks are largely out of view,
with brick driveways and
gravel parking, instead of as-
Dhalt.
Dr. Johnson said his plans for
the restaurants were greatly
influenced by surveys of island
visitors who identified restau-
rants as the number one
choice of amenities. Member-
ships for the island beach club
will be available to local resi-
dents and property owners
and island visitors. The letter
closed with Dr. Johnson's
words as follows:
For me, this project is much
more than a labor of love the
realization of a dream. I hope
and believe that the Resort Vil-
lage will set a standard of
beauty, realization, and har-
mony with nature to which
other coastal areas will wist-
fully aspire.


A I
.Commissioner
Jimmy Mosconis


Grady Leavins


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DEP Says "Let's

Get Real About

Rules"

By Rene Topping
Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP) officials called for
a meeting at the Estuarine Sanc-
tuary on 22 May to discuss their
department rules.
In her opening remarks, Pam
McVety, Executive Coordinator,
Office of Ecosystem Management
for DEP, said Governor Lawton
Chiles had sent down Executive
Order 85-74, in which, after not-
ing that citizen frustration with
government was at an all time
high, each agency of State govern-
ment was to review all rules and
conduct meetings with the public
to get their input. Other meetings
are being held in each of the .67
counties and have been named as
"reality checks."
In addition to McVety other offi-
cials present were: Woody Miley
of the Apalachicola River and Bay'
Natural Estuarine Sanctuary;
David Hell of Tallahassee, Chief
of the Bureau of Marine Re-,
sources Development; Phillip
Mesder of the Florida Marine Pa-
trol; Roy Ogles, Division of Recre-
ation and Park Services; and,
Donna Pope from the local DEP
office.
Members of the audience, in-
cluded seafood dealers and work-
ers, three members of the Frank-
lin County Commission, Jimmy
Mosconis, Dink Braxton and
Raymond Williams, with a sprin-
kling of other concerned citizens:
All present were invited to write
their views of the DEP and ques-
tionnaires were passed out to on
which to fill in their individual
answers to four questions. 1.
What are we doing that is help-
ful? 2. What can we improve on?
3. What are your concerns about
DEP? 4. How can we work to-
gether better? In this way, she
extended an olive branch to the
citizens present and issued a plea.
for help. McVety also promised,
that the questionnaires would be
gone over carefully, questions
raised at the meeting would be
looked into and answered in writ-


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inspection. "I have a real problem
with that rule." he said.
Apalachicola resident, Marie
Marshall, speaking as a con-
cerned citizen said, "I hope that
we do not continue to pollute the
wetlands." She felt that everyone
needed to get a look at the full text
of the net ban ruling and really


see how it affected the area.


-Oro4

1u"


ing. Copies of the answers will be
made available to the media and
to anyone concerned with the
problems.
Among the people who chose to
speak at the meeting, Jimmie
Mosconis got the lead-off spot, as
he made clear that the Franklin
County Commission were con-
cerned about the waste of money
the Commission was undergoing
because of what he dubbed, "Un-
necessary and expensive tests of
monitoring wells at the landfill."
Mosconis asked,that the DEP look
into the number of times the wells
must be tested each year.
Mosconis claimed the plethora of
tests has, in times past, cost the
County up to $100,00 per year. He
added that the county had not
been getting any bad tests this
year, as far as he knew. He said,
"We need to get some relief."
Mosconis requested that the de-
partment ask for only one set of
tests annually as long as there
were no abnormalities.
County Engineer Joe Hamilton
backed Mosconis in his com-
plaints on the tests at the land-
fill. He said, "It has been a real
budget-buster." He asked that the
amount of parameters now used
in the testing could be reduced if
possible. He explained the county
is charged on a basis of each pa-
rameter tested. Hamilton stated
that over 200 parameters are be-
ing tested at the present time.
Willoughby Marshall spoke on the
net ban. He asked if the ban was
due to lack of fishes and if so was
the shortage due to pollution. He
added, "If this is true then we
should limit the amount of con-
dos being built up and down the
coast."
Mosconis remarked that Frank-
lin County has the largest estua-
rine sanctuary anywhere. "We
don't ever get any credit for that."
Seafood dealer Grady Leavins re-
marked that under the new rules,
if an inspector found two key
items and three items listed as
"other" deficient in any other way,
he could be shut down for thirty
days. A key item would be some-
thing serious but the other items
could be a coke can in the work
area or dust on a fan. Leavins said
that even if he cured all of the
deficiencies right away he: could
still be shut down for thirty days
because DEP has up to that
amount of time to carrv out a re-


Lee McKnight
Lee McKnight said that he was
speaking as a "disgruntled ex-
employee of DEP," and challenged
several acts of the department,
such as the closing of the entire
bay while leaving the two leased
areas open. He claimed the DEP
showed favoritism in policing of
local seafood operators. He also
cited what he called waste and'
mismanagement in the local of-
fice. He said DEP had been wrong
in permitting projects in the large
seagrass areas, adding, "These
are primary breeding areas."
McVety said that the various staff


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present had taken notes of his
complaints and they would be
looked into.
James Miller had problems with
the way the DEP dealt with the
warning labels that have to, by
law, be placed on all oyster con-
tainers. He stated, "No one is say-
ing that there should not be warn-
ing labels." He explained that pe-
riodically the DEP would change
just a few words and it would
make all the labels void. He
added,"We want to be in compli-
ance, but it seems like every 6 to
8 months you make a change." He
said it was a costly procedure
each time there was a change
made and asked for relief from
that. It was pointed out that he
was a main supplier of contain-
ers in the area.
Other questions asked were about
the seeming inequality with which
the Turtle Excluder Devices
(TED's) were required on the nets,
Complaints that the department
should conduct more seminars
when rules have been changed.
McVety urged anyone interested
to get their concerns in writing to
the DEP. She promised that DEP
would hold a seminar in the near
future on the rules and that there
would be a written response to the
questions raised at the meeting
and by other concerned people.


-I








Published every other Friday


The Franklin Chronicle 2 June 1995 Page 3


City Receives

Wastewater Treatment

System Report

By Toy Keller
Committee Secretary
The Apalachicola Bay Area Resource Planning and Manage--
ment Committee (RPMC) met on 18 May 1995 at City Hall to
receive reports on several topics. Mark Currenton chaired the
meeting in Alan Pierce's absence. The committee was estab-
lished in conjunction with the continued designation of
Apalachicola as an Area of Critical State Concern.

Bill McCartney gave a report of the City of Apalachicola's waste-
water treatment system. Mr. McCartney thanked Mayor Howell
for all his time and energy in making this project a reality. The
final product will be a $7.6 million plant at no cost to the City
of Apalachicola. He explained that design and permitting were
underway with construction phased to have everything in op-
eration by 1997.
Toy Keller explained that subsequent to a Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU) between the Department of Community
Affairs and the City of Apalachicola many of the City's permits
were no longer being reviewed by the Department. Minor ex-
pansions or remodeling, electrical or plumbing permits are no
longer transmitted. Single family permits, permits in the spe-
cial waterfront district or permits with some level of impact
are still transmitted and reviewed. Two permits which were
not exempted by the MOU have been transmitted to the De-
partment since September of 1994. One is a single family resi-
dence and the other is dock repair and new roof construction.
Mark Curenton gave a report on development outside the City
of Apalachicola stating that 192 permits had been issued in
Carrabelle and St. George Island during the last year with 38
of those being single family homes mostly on St. George Is-
land. This figure is close to last year's figure of 36 single fam-
ily. The roads and clubhouse are in at Sunset Beach with 43
total lots; about half have been sold.
The City of Carrabelle is being considered for the location of a
prison. The Department of Corrections has already advertised
for engineering services for the facility.
The St. George Marina is being planned on a 40 acre parcel at
the foot of the causeway. It will be on an advanced wastewater
treatment system. The canal has been dredged and rip-rapped
for the Marina. A site clearing permit has also been obtained.
The intention is to develop multi-family units, a hotel/restau-
rant, some retail shops and a wet and dry storage marina.
Some flood relief money is available for economic development,
a Florida Communities Trust grant has been awarded to
Carrabelle for a bike trail.
Bridge repairs on the bridge to St. George Island should be
completed by July 4. Alligator Point Road was washed out by
the last hurricane but should be repaired by late June.
Ben Johnson's development (at Nick's Hole) was discussed.
The project was turned down by the County, overturned by a
hearing officer at an administrative hearing, and the hearing
officer's order was rejected by the Governor and Cabinet. Now
Dr. Johnson has appealed the case to District Count. The De-
partment has been granted intervenor status.
There is an 18 acre, 38 unit subdivision being planned near
East Point that will connect to East Point water and sewer.
This connection will allow a higher density than Idu/ac al-
lowed on septic tanks. A nuisance ordinance was recently
passed that will allow health issues to be addressed in Lanark
Village. Also, a three-member review committee will review and
approve all Lanark Village permits.


dy


301 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(904) 229-9090


Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9:30-5:30
Specializing in Ladies &
Children Apparel &
Accessories.


The entire family can enjoy the beach in this 4BR/4BA gulfview duplex. Each side has
attractive furnishings, full kitchen, 2BR/2BA, carpet & vinyl, ceiling fans, easy beach access
and located near shops and restaurants. $149,000.00
HOMESITES
BEACHFRONT building site in St. George Plantation, Casa Del Mar, near boardwalk access
and includes water tap. $230,000.00
BAY/CANAL view home site located on corner. Must be owner financed. $32,500.00
GULFVIEW residential building site with great view and easy beach access. $44,500.00
ST. GEORGE PLANTATION interior home site located on corner and nicely vegetated.
$38.000.00
INTERIOR bayview home site within walking distance of bay. $25,000.00


*Tit~~s * *


Mayor Bobby Howell


Harbor Branch
Oceanographic
Institution
Aquaculture
Workshops
The remaining dates and loca-
tions for this series of workshops
are as follows:
June 7-
Edison Community College
Doris Corbin Auditorium
8099 College Parkway
Fort Myers, FL 33907
Phone (813) 489-9321
Jpne 14-
Harbor Branch Oceanographic
Institution (Cocoa Area)
5600 U.S. 1 North
Fort Pierce, FL 34946
Phone (407) 465-2400 Ext. 400
June 15-
Harbor Branch Oceanographic
Institution (Fort Pierce Area)
Fort Pierce, FL 34946
Phone (407) 465-2400 Ext. 400
June 21-
Banana Bay Resort and Marina
4590 Overseas Highway
Marathon Key, FL 33050
Phone (305) 743-3500


There are job openings currently advertised for skilled labor in
Franklin County, but the citizens are unaware of any opportu-
nities to acquire the needed skills for these positions. Roxane
Dow moved and it was seconded that the RPMC send a letter
to the Department of Labor requesting that they inventory,
publicize and encourage vocational training opportunities in
Franklin County in response to the economic dislocation cre-
ated by the constitutional limitations on net fishing.
Mark Curenton reported on land acquisition within Franklin
County. The State of Florida purchased 30,000 acres in Tate's
Hell Swamp in February of 1994 and is looking at another
4,000 acres. The plat for this land has been abandoned by the
County. The National Forest Service would like buy a corridor
down both sides of the River over the next several years. Ben
Johnson wants to sell 30 acres of marshlands and Pelican
Point wants to sell 20 acres to complementt the Nick's Hole
acquisitions.
Mayor Howell reported on land acquisition in the City of
Apalachicola. The State has purchased the land between Av-
enue D and E which the City wants to develop as a riverfront
park with brick walks, street lamps and a gazebo. Commercial
boats will be encouraged to continue docking at the wharfs
because tourists are interested in observing working water-
fronts.
Graham Lewis from the Northwest Florida Water Management
District (NWFWMD) gave a presentation on freshwater needs
and external influences on water delivery to the Apalachicola
Bay. Unfortunately, only 12% of the river's watershed lies within
the State of Florida. This river is a highly used resource with
many demands and multiple conflicts. As a result, a compre-


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hensive study is being done to document ground and surface
water availability and develop a strategy for allocation. Through
population projections to the year 2050, demands will be esti-
mated and alternatives proposed for use.
A River and Bay Needs Assessment is being done by the North-
west Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD). They are
looking at the effects of decreasing amounts of freshwater on
the physical and biological structure and functions of the river
and bay from Lake Seminole south to the Apalachicola Bay. In
addition, they are looking at the nutrient dynamics and pri-
mary productivity through hydrodynamic modeling and hy-
drological conditions within the floodplain habitats. Between
March of 1993 and September of 1994, data were collected on
temperatures, salinity, and tidal functions in the bay for a state
of the art, 3-dimensional computer model.


Graham Lewis


Bill McCartney


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should use if you want the best.
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Carrabelle Apalachicola Eastpoint
Medical Pharmacy Lanier's Eastpoint
Flower Shop IGA Pharmacy


Aquaculture Workshop Held in

Franklin County Courthouse

Sponsored by the Florida Department of Labor anrd Employment Security (FDLES) in conjunction with the
Harbor Branch oceanographic Institution (HBO), a one day briefing session on various aspects of aquac-
ulture was held in the Franklin County Courthouse on Thursday, 25 May 1995. Most of the participants
were from out-of-Franklin County, with several from Gulf and Wakulla, the total numbering about 30.
Mr. Mike Ednoff, formerly of the Florida Dept. of Agriculture, and a new employee of HBO, began the day-
long session. Ednoff was a familiar face in Franklin as he had been a member of the state advisory group
involved in the 1989-1991 aquaculture project conducted by HBO and FDLES. Dr. David Vaughan of
HBO spoke on the aquaculture opportunities, followed by a report from Leslie Sturmer concerning the
successful "Project Ocean", an aquaculture project for clams and oysters in Dixie and Levy counties.
Vaughan and Sturmer were also involved in the earlier Franklin project. A number of additional reports
were presented throughout the day, including one on finfish aquaculture, freshwater fish, aquaculture
economics, and other areas. The FDLES and Dept. of Environmental Protection (DEP) presented reports
on pending legislative bills and leases, and other regulations. Lance Rodan presented materials on the-
Dept. of Agriculture marketing program.
The aquaculture workshop was presented as part of the recent bill passed by the Legislature involving
economic assistance for those affected by the so-called "net ban".,
With regard to the aquaculturing of oysters, an important crop from Franklin County, briefing materials
from the Workshop indicated that the oyster aquaculture potential in Florida begins with the nearly $1
million of oysters produced in 1993 from state leased bottom, which amounts to about 10 per cent of the
total state production. This figure is from the National Marine Fisheries Service. The average value of
aquacultured Florida oysters was $32.05 per bushel, based on the 1993 data. Other materials revealed
that total Florida aquaculture sales totaled $73 million in sales for 1993. The values are based on farm
gate sales of aquatics produced by Florida growers and excludes harvest from open waters or the wild.
Tropical fish dominated sales in Florida's aquaculture industry, accounting for 60 per cent of the total
sales in 1991. Second in values were growers of aquatic plants. Oysters and clams accounted for the third
step in sales, sold by 191 growers, according to the Florida Agricultural Statistics Service, (June 1994).


JL L UJAOAA-


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Paoe 4 2 June 1995 The Franklin Chronicle


Published every other Friday


Franklin County

Aquaculture-A Missed

Opportunity

Years of interpersonal acrimony, political machinations and nearly
$10,000 of Franklin County taxpayer's money have sustained the
county's power to veto lease applications for Apalachicola Bay. The
First District Court of Appeals, on 22 May, reached their decision
which affirmed an earlier judgment sustaining the county's power to
veto leases. The litigation started by David Jones and Joe Square was
to challenge the constitutionality of Florida Statutes 253.68 which
identified the county's power.
The litigants do not have an automatic right of appeal to the State
Supreme Court, but, if "invited", Jones and Square might continue
the legal fight, This does not appear likely at the present time.
But for one, or two votes at most at the County Commision level, the
entire matter would have had a different outcome. The County Com-
mission would not have had to spend nearly $10,000 to the Shuler
law firm to litigate the matter, and it was clearly a County Commision
decision to pursue the appeal. Now, in this particular time (June
1995), the situation in the seafood industry is far, far different. Just
last week, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute (HBOI) was in
Apalachicola with hundreds of handouts, journal reprints, slide pre-
sentations and much advice concerning the present and future of
aquaculturing many species of shellfish and finfish. Unlike the un-
certain days in the late 1980s, the demonstrated profitability of
aquacultured fish product is a fact too real to be ignored. Unfortu-
nately, not many from the Franklin County Commission bothered to
attend the sessions held in their own chambers. Only a handful of
interested fishermen from Franklin were attending; one was David
Jones.
Aquaculture is a relatively pollution-free industry which could poten-
tially supplement the local seafood industry, and still can. HBOI's
success in Dixie and Levy counties, certainly benefiting from the bad
experience in Franklin County months earlier, was presented and
affirmed. There, the future is bright. In Franklin, there are still many
uncertainties. One argument used to thwart approval of the leases,
very restrictive leases at that, was the earlier claim by Gulf Trading
Company on the entire 6000+ acres of Apalachicola Bay. That case
now is history, having been dismissed by the First District Court of
Appeals months ago. If careful homework on the leases had been
done, Commissioners would have realized that the proposed one acre
leases could not be combined, could not be resold, and if the one acre
plots were not worked, the bay bottom would revert back to the State.
There were other restrictions. But, hysteria led by the leadership of
the Seafood Workers Association, some seafood houses and other dis-
sidents, ruled the day, and in a close vote, the Franklin County Com-
mission refused to grant leases for a few acres of bay bottom. Over
two million dollars had been spent to help Franklin County, and the
County Commission simply turned its back to the future. A few Com-
missioners voted for the leases.
Then, the County Commissioners continued to approve expenditures
to fight the legal appeal. I think the County lost much in this experi-
ence, concluding with the latest judicial round.
Aquaculture holds the promise of more jobs in the seafood business
and potentially removes some of the risk brought by the natural forces
such. as hurricanes, which have in the past devastated oystering.
Aquaculture contains a greater certainty of production of a large num-
bler of species for which new markets are developing, along with the
traditional ones. And, Franklin's young people, recently celebrated at
graduations last week, would have a reason to stay in Franklin County.
There may be a perceived threat to the "establishment" businesses
but I think this would be short-lived. As one seafood manager put it,
"...I can't control the prices and I can't control the people." That is
thinking which ignores the potential of aquaculture for everyone and
the promise of new markets.
Before making this argument into a hymn to aquaculture, perhaps a
couple of other points ought to be mentioned. Making the transition
from hunter to farmer is not a sure-fire solution for everyone. Some
may want to continue to fish for product and there is plenty of Bay to
accomplish that. Others, however, will have to seek training, keep
abreast of recent developments and techniques, accept the risks along
with the very hard work, and obtain financing. None of these tasks

ViE POST OFFICE BOX 590
r---"-- EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
t 904-927-2186
I V 904-385-4003 (TALLAHASSEE)
" Facsimile 904-385-0830
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.
Vol. 4, No. 11 2 June 1995
Publisher .............................................. Tom W Hoffer
Editor and Manager................... Brian Goercke
697-2675
Contributors ...................... ................... Carole Ann Hawkins
............ Paul Jones
............ Randle Leger
. .R........Bonnie L. Dietz
.............. Rene Topping
............ Judy Corbus
............ Wayne Childers
............ Laura K. Rogers
........... Amanda Loos
.............Becky Shirley
Survey Research Unit .............................. Tom W. Hoffer
............. Eric Steinkuehler
Sales Manager ............................... Teresa Williams
927-3361
Computer Systems,
Advertising Design,
Production and Layout ............................ Christian Liljestrand
............ Eric Steinkuehler
............ Audra Perry
............. Phil Salem
Circulation ...................... ..................... Lee Belcher
............ Bonnie Dietz
Citizen's Advisory Group
George Chapel ..................................... .... Apalachicola
Sandra Lee Johnson................................. Apalachicola
Grace and Carlton Wathen ...................... Carrabelle
Rene Topping ........................................ Carrabelle
Pat Morrison ............................... ..... St. George Island
Tom and Janyce Louthridge .................... St. George Island
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung......................... Eastpoint


Brooks W ade ........................................ Eastpoint
W ayne Childers .................................... Port St. Joe
Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are available
free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for postage and
handling. For example an 8 page issue would cost $1.75 postpaid.
To others back issues are priced at 35o each plus postage and
handling. Please write directly to the Chronicle for price quotes
if you seek several different or similar issues. If a single issue,
merely add 350 to the price quote above. In-county subscriptions
are $16.96 including tax. Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26
including tax.


are easy. They will become entrepreneurs. Risk-takers. Is this a tal-
ent that can be learned? Each farmer would become an independent
businessman. An Association has already been formed, and some of
its funding has been used to promote Florida seafood nationally. But,
in these associations may come more experimentation and demon-
stration. Already, HBOI and others have been at work on a disease-
resistant oyster and clam. Such a development would help turn-
around the entire shellfish business to a positive end, it would seem.
Hundreds of persons devoted many long, painfully hard labor hours
to the aquaculture training and demonstration project in Franklin
County, 1989-1991. Some still hold very hard feelings about the mat-
ter, even today. This is regrettable but life goes on and the dynamic of
the times requires seizing opportunity instead of holding old grudges.
The challenge to the county's authority was perceived by the Com-
missioners as a threat to their power, so they got involved in the
litigation to prove their point. They won. But, what have they won?
The ability to hold back the future? Hardly.
Some have left the county already because of hard times in the sea-
food business. Times change. And, thankfully, so do some tradi-
tional attitudes. For example, two of the traditional seafood business
leaders have argued before the Apalachicola City Commission that
condos on the river are going to come to Apalachicola eventually. We
have those speeches on videotape, as we do LeRoy Hall asking for
leases in the aquaculture project. The future of Florida seafood is in
aquaculture, and it is time the Franklin County Commission woke
up to that idea before it is too late.


Tom W. Hoffer


Aquaculture Facts

Results of a recent survey conducted by the Florida Department of Agricul-
ture revealed that Florida growers sold $73 million in aquacultural products
during 1993. This compares with $54 million (based on a similar survey) in
1991 and $51 million in 1989. The first survey for Florida Aquaculture esti-
mated sales in 1987 at only $35 million. The 1993 sales were more than
double 1987 sales and represent a 35 percent increase from two years earlier.
There were about 10,300 acres of land, including water surface area, devoted
to aquaculture production in 1993. This compares with 8,100 acres reported
in 1991. Aquatic species identified in the survey were tropical (ornamental)
fish, catfish, alligators, oysters, clams, sport and game fish, crawfish, eels,
tilapia, shrimp, aquatic plants and other minor aquatics. The value is based
on farm gate sales of aquatics produced by Florida growers and excludes har-
vest from open waters or the wild. Growers sold another $7.3 million worth of
tropical fish which they imported for immediate resale. All statistics shown in
the tables of this report are for net Florida production and value and exclude
imports and purchases from other Florida producers for immediate resale.
There were 523 active producers of which 501 reported sales in 1993. As in
previous surveys, tropical fish continued to dominate Florida's Aquacultural
industry. There were 187 active growers of tropical fish accounting for $46.7
million, 64 percent of total sales. Tropical fish accounted for 60 percent of
total sales in 1991. Aquatic plants, with 67 growers and $13.2 million net
sales, were second in value. Oysters and clams, valued at $4.63 million, were
sold by 191 growers. Alligators, with 38 active growers contributed $4.43 mil-
lion from combined hide and meat sales. Sport and game fish sales totaled $
1.23 million and sales from tilapia reached $1.04 million. Thirty seven catfish
growers contributed $0.55 million. All other aquatic sales totaled $1.24 mil-
lion from 13 growers.

The survey also identified 50 other potential new growers with intentions to
produce aquacultural products for sale in 1994 or later. The largest increase
is expected in catfish with 13 newmgrowers. There are 11 growers each for
tropical fish and aquatic plants expected to have sales for the first time in
1994 or later. There are six new'clam growers and three new sport and game
fish producers with intentions to have future sales. Among other species there
are six other operations expected to have aquatic production in 1994 or later.
Based on survey findings, production of tropical fish, aquatic plants, and clams
will show slight to moderate increases in 1994. Tropical fish production is
well established in Florida, with orderly growth expected to continue. Overall,
the aquacultural industry will likely continue good growth and development
in Florida, with its mild climate and vast waterways. However, some hindrances
to expansion reported in past surveys include obtaining finances, government
regulations, poor market for production, and problems with pilferage.
Source: Florida Agricultural Statistics Service, 1222 Woodward Street, Or-
lando, Florida 32803 Florida Agriculture (June 1994), p. 1.


'Foreign Followers: Solution
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Y AM I ASY = E I m _S


The

Puzzle

is

on

page

9


THE NEMOURS CHILDREN'
is pleased to announce the transfer of owners
the Eastpoint and Port St. Joe Cl

SHORELINE MEDICAL GR

* The target date for transfer of ownership is May 31, 1995.
* The Eastpoint office will schedule patients throughout the tr
* All patients who have received services at the Nemours Ch
continue to receive services at Shoreline Medical Group. Ne
and invited to call the office for appointments.
* Patients who were participating in the Nemours funding pro
services through the program until December 31, 1995.
* By midsummer, Shoreline will begin to accept adult patients
announcement will be made at the time the offices are open
* SHORELINE MEDICAL GROUP, P.A. is a multispecialty me
primary care by BOARD CERTIFIED PHYSICIANS for child

SHORELINE MEDICAL GROl
accepts Medicare, Medicaid and most major h


ELIZABETH F. CURRY. M.D.
Board Certified in Pediatrics


THOMAS
Board Certifie


Call (904) 670-8585 for appointm


IEditoria and Commentary


Statehood
Floridians were divided over the issue of statehood. The
main argument in favor was the advantage of home rule.
The main issue against was the expense of paying for their
own government and improvements such as roads, like
the Bellamy Road built between St. Augustine and Talla-
hassee. Some wanted to wait until the population was big
enough to make two states in order to strengthen the po-
sition of the South in the U.S. Senate. East and Middle
Florida wanted federal protection from the Seminoles.
Middle Florida, the most prosperous area, was in favor of
statehood. West Florida was evenly divided over the issue.

Ongoing disputes and skirmishes with the Seminoles con-
tributed heavily to the statehood dilemma. The Second
Seminole War (1835-1842) would further erode an orga-
nized effort for statehood. Although the Seminoles tech-
nically never surrendered, many agreed to removal or to
confinement to an area set aside for them in the interior
of the territory. Some took refuge in the Everglades. With
the cessation of hostilities, more settlers came to Florida,
and there was renewed talk of seeking statehood. A Con-
stitutional Convention was held at St. Joseph (present-
day Port St. Joe) from December 3, 1838 to January 4,
1839. Delegates wrote a constitution modeled after other
southern state constitutions.

By 1844, there was a better outlook for statehood because
the Seminole hostilities had ended, the country had re-
covered from the financial panic of 1837, Iowa (a free state)
was ready to be admitted to accompany Florida (a slave
state) and the new legislature was in favor of statehood.
The bill to admit Florida into the Union was passed by the
U.S. House on February 13, 1845. The bill passed in the
U.S. Senate and was signed by President John Tyler, mak-
ing Florida the 27th state on March 3, 1845. The official
copy of the Act of Statehood was received by Governor
John Branch in Tallahassee on March 13, 1845.

S CLINIC Letter to
ship and operation of the Editor
inics to
OUP PA Dear Editor:
OUP, P.A. Due to a problem with a back injury
on the part of our animal control of-
ficer, Earl Whitfield, and his place-
ment on the light duty roster Sheriff
Warren Roddenberry and the Frank-
ansition period. lin County Humane Society are ask-
ildren's Clinic are invited to ing for your help during this time.
Temp orarily, the shelter open hours
ew patients are encouraged will be changed as follows: Monday.
Tuesday. Thursday and Friday, the
shelter will be open 9-12 and 2-4:
gram may continue to receive Saturday hours will be 9-1 p.m.
Closed on Wednesday and Sunday.
Temporarily, we are having to suspend
swell as child ren. An the pick-up of stray animals. However,
Sas well as children. An all animals can be brought to the shel-
led for adult patientS. ter and will be received during the new
hours. The animal control officer will
3dical practice offering quality continue to answer in person all vi-
dren and adults. mcious dogs or dog bite calls. All ani-
drerl and adults. mal calls should still be directed to
the sheriff s department at 670-8500.
All calls on adopting of pets, lost or
IP, P.A. found animals can be directed to the
Humane Society at 670-8417. We
health insurance, thank you for your understanding and
will notify as soon as we can getback
to regular hours and pick-ups. Sher-
L. CURRY, M.D. iffWarren Roddenberry and The Fran-
klin County Humane Society give you
Ad in Internal Medicine thanks in advance for your coopera-
tion.
ents. Sincerely.
Rene Topping


Alligator Point

By Paul Jones
Mainly due to the lack of repair and maintenance of County Road
370, the Alligator Point Taxpayers Association (APTA) is embarking
on a statistical study to determine the relational equivalent (if that is
the correct term) of resources in (property taxes) versus services ren-
dered by the county. Under the leadership of APTA President Taylor
Moore, volunteer members of the association will be screening Fran-
klin County computer generated property tax rolls to extrapolate the
needed fiscal data.
Moore has divided the tax roll printouts into six geographical dis-
tricts' of the county. These so called districts are representative of the
demographic makeup of the county...that is, a proportionate tax base.
To correlate the equation of who is paying versus who is receiving the
services' the APTA will also be reviewing and analyzing the county
budgets and financial statements for 1993, 1994, and 1995.
According to President Moore, this study should be concluded no
later than August of this year.

Water Department
The Alligator Point Water Resource District (APWRD) held their quar-
terly meeting Saturday 20 May 1995. Usually, the meeting is no more
than a business get together to recap the department's progress dur-
ing the previous three months.
At this meeting representatives of the Mader Corporation (developers
of the properties located on Bald Point) approached the APWRD di-
rectors to review options for their inclusion under the APWRD's water
system.
According to President Joe W. Cordell, Jr, the Mader Corporation
currently has 120 properties on Bald Point of which 20 have been
sold for improvement. And the corporation is eager to get the problem
of the provision for water behind them.
Cordell and the other officers of the water district are well aware of
the immediate need of water resources by the Mader group. However,
again according to Cordell, system resources cannot be committed
until a comprehensive capacity study in undertaken by Mader to de-
termine the current and projected system capacity requirements. There
was no estimate by either side as of how long this study would take.
Another little tidbit from the meeting will most likely cause a flap with
the Alligator Point/St. Teresa Volunteer Fire Department. The board
issued a mandamus to the fire department requiring that except for
emergencies, no water is to be taken from the system during the weekly
period of Thursday pm through Tuesday am. This is the peak period
of water use by residents of the Point.
If the fire department adheres to this policy they will be able to con-
tinue using the system water without cost.

Road Update
Immediately following the Memorial Day break the Franklin County
Road Maintenance crews began the preparatory clearing of CR370 in
front of the Alligator Point Camp Grounds. Private paving crews should
be arriving soon to begin the final paving process of this 1700 foot
stretch of road bed.


"b- - ---- -- - -- i


i









KPILII ee t rT-- eer oh a


Student

Reporter

Graduates


11 v
On 25 May 1995, student re-
porter Amanda Loos graduated
from Carrabelle High School as
the class Valedictorian.

As a Franklin County Chronicle
reporter since December of 1993,
Amanda has contributed many
feature stories detailing high
school academic activities. From
her reporting, she has received
community praise as well as pub-
lic recognition from Franklin
County School Board member
Willie Speed. Amanda has been
able to cross the barriers of race
and age with articles about Rosa
Parks and Maya Angelou and has
touched the lives of many Frank-
lin County residents with much
of her writing.

"I think I've been able to provide
a younger point of view," said.
Amanda, "It's a point of view that
sometimes goes against the
norm."

Amanda moved to Franklin
County in 1991 from a small fish-


ing community in Long Island,
New York called Sag Harbor. She
feels that her residence in Frank-
lin County has provided her with
many "eye-opening" experiences
and cultural opportunities. "You
can get trapped in an attitude that
thinks there is only one way of life.
Coming here {to Franklin County),
I've found that there are a million
ways of life that are perfectly fine."

Among her influences in the
county, Amanda credited
Carrabelle High School's Nan
Collins for "keeping me involved
and feeding me energy;" she also
thanked Melanie Humble for her
assistance with the school's cre-
ative writing magazine, The Paws
Pause, and Tamolynne Jefferson
for her work with the high school
band. "Everyone has really con-
tributed something to my psyche,"
said Amanda.

Amanda will be going to Sarasota
after the summer and will attend
New College, a branch of The Uni-
versity of South Florida. She
hopes to remain active as a writer,
a thespian and a community par-
ticipant. "There's an incredible
amount of opportunities waiting
for me at New College and I plan
to take part in as much as I can."

Some of Amanda Loos' contribu-
tions and accomplishments in
Franklin County include: Student
Liaison to the Franklin County
Public Library Board, active par-
ticipant with the Juvenile
Justice's WINGS Program, thes-
pian with the Panhandle Players,
Zero-Budget Players and
Carrabelle High School Drama
Club, Editor for Carrabelle High
School's Creative Writing Journal,
The Paws Pause, reporter for the
Franklin County Chronicle, con-
tributor to the Apalachicola
Time's Poetic Edge and class Vale-
dictorian.


Boyd Brings

Money to

Library


By Rene Topping
State Representative Allen Boyd
says he always enjoys coming to
Franklin County and added that
this Friday 19 May, he was also
especially welcome to be bringing
much needed funds. Boyd was the
bearer of.a check for $7,488.50
which represents one half of the
$14,977.00 state funding for this
year. The check was presented to
Franklin County Commissioner
Dink Braxton who immediately
handed it into the custody of Clerk
of the Court Kendall Wade. In in-
troducing Boyd to the guests as-
sembled Cheryl Turner of Wilder-
ness Coast said that Boyd has
been a great supporter of the tri-
county public library system.
"This money is coming tous be-
cause of the hard work of Mr.
Boyd. In fact I believe we can call
the bill that granted it the 'Boyd
Bill.'" she said. Franklin County
Library Director Eileen Annie said
that the check would be spread
over the library budget. After the
presentation several of the people
present turned the meeting into
a mini town hall as they ques-
tioned Boyd on various problems
and projects in the county. Boyd
announced that at that time Fran-
klin County had moved into the
number one position for one of the
three state prisons that have been
proposed to be built in the near
future.
Oysterman Richard Poulus told
Boyd that the rules concerning
the commercial fishermen don't
always seem to make sense. He
cited the fact that a new rule
would have the oystermen cove
their oysters with a tarpaulin
while in the boat. He said, "The
tarp will do more harm than
good." He added that he felt it
would only generate more heat,
He also demonstrated that the
commercial fisherman has to
carry a small flashlight in a pocket
on his life jacket while the sport
fisherman is not required to do
so. He said that he had no objec-
tion to the rule as it would aid a
search for a man overboard. How-
ever he could not understand why
they did not include the sports
fishermen in the safety measure.
Boyd suggested that the matter
be brought ip at the State Depart-'
ment of Environmental Protection
(DEP) meeting on 22 May when
pros and cons of all the rules
would be up for discussion.
The visit also gave Braxton a
chance to ask Boyd to check into
the Federal disaster money that
had been promised to the county
several months ago and has never
arrived. Boyd said he would con-
tact Congressman Connie Mack
for information.
Boyd then had to hurry on to the
Trinity Episcopal Church where
he presented Father Tom Weller
with a check for $60,000.00, the
third installment of a State resto-
ration grant.


"GO 'ROUND"

FOR KIDS

CHALLENGE

Saturday, June 24th Lake Ella
A Joint Walk-a-thon Project of the
Kiwanis Clubs of Leon & Wakulla County
and the Florida Department of Corrections
Units of Leon & Wakulla County.


To establish' a
Children's Acute Care Psychiatric Unit at
Tallahassee Memorial Regional Medical Center
(TMRMC)

Unmet Needs of Children
About nine children (12 years of age and under 6 years on the average) are admitted to TMRMC each month
for ACUTE IN-PATIENT PSYCHIATRIC CARE. Typically, they have "flunked" foster care, have mental
illnesses which predispose them to hurting themselves and others; and are referred by HRS, Department of
Corrections, etc., as THE LAST RESORT. TMRMC is the only medical facility in the 16 county Panhandle
area providing such acute in-patient psychiatric care. It has been "making do" using equipment in its adolescent
unit. There is NO PLACE ELSE for the children to go. TMRMC needs $10,000 to establish this Children's
Acute Psychiatric Care Unit.
A Working Partnership
Leon and Wakulla Counties have six Kiwanis Clubs (280 members) and four Department of Corrections
(DC) units (1000+ employees). These organizations are undertaking this joint project to raise the $10,000. It is
only one of many similar joint Walk-a-thon projects of Kiwanis and DC in counties throughout Florida that are
now underway to help young children. Local clubs of Kiwanis International perform community service in
many, varied areas but their main emphasis is placed on their "Young Children Priority One" projects. The
Florida Department of Corrections (DC) encourages its employees to work to help prevent children from
becoming criminals by volunteer participation in programs for children. Kiwanis and DC are enthusiastic
partners in this "Go 'Round" for Kids Challenge, a part of the Second Annual Kiwanis DC Florida Walk-
a-thon.

Give your donation to the volunteer who contacted you or send it to:
I


Space and Layout Contributed
by The Chonicle


Florida Kiwanis Foundation
c/o Dr. B. H. Colmery, Trustee
5004 Tallow Point Road
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Telephone: (904) 893-4749


Student Writing from page 1
2,6 on the assessment. The scores
increased by .6 from the previous
years.
Franklin County's tenth grade
class showed the most improve-
ment from last year by scoring a
combined 3.0. Apalachicola High
School's tenth graders scored a
3.2, while Carrabelle's tenth grad
ers scored a 2.9. The combined
effort was an improvement of 1.1
from the previous year. The state
average is 3.3.
The Florida Writing Assessment
judges a student's ability to:
*Focus on and maintain a central
idea or theme
*Organize the logical scheme of an
essay from beginning, middle and
to the end
*Support, explain and clarify the
ideas expressed in an essay
*Adhere to acceptable codes of


I


Hurricanes...The Greatest

Storms on Earth

Number 1 of a 4 part series

By Chris Floyd
Disaster Service Director
Capital Area Chapter
American Red Cross

What is a Hurricane?
There are no other storms like hurricanes on earth. Views of hurri-
canes from satellites located thousands of miles above the earth show
how unique these powerful, tightly coiled weather systems are.
Hurricanes are products of the tropical ocean and atmosphere. Pow-
ered by heat from the sea, they are steered by the easterly trade winds
and the temperate westerlies as well as by their own ferocious en-
ergy. Around their core, winds grow with great velocity, generating
violent seas. Moving ashore, they sweep the ocean inward while spawn-
ing tornadoes and producing torrential rains and floods. Each year
on average, ten tropical storms (of which six become hurricanes) de-
Svelop over the Atlantic Ocean Caribbean Sea or Gulf of Mexico. Many
of these remain over the ocean. However, about five hurricanes strike
the United States coastline.every 3 years. Of these five, two will be
major hurricanes (Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson Hurri-
cane Scale).

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale
Scale Sustained Examples
Number Winds Damage fStates Affected)
1 74-95 Minimal Florence 1998 (LA)
Charley 1988 (NC)


96-110 Moderate Kate 1985 (FL Panhandle)
Bob 1991 (FL)
111-130 Extensive Alicia 1983 (N. TX)
Emily 1993 (NC)
131-155 Extreme Andrew 1992 (S. FL)
Hugo 1989 (SC)
<155 Catastrophic Camille 1969 (LA/MS)
Labour Day 1935 (FL Keys)


Timely warnings have greatly diminished hurricane fatalities in the
,iUnited States. In spite of this, property damage continues to mount.
,There is little we can do about the hurricanes themselves, However
qwe can take steps to prepare our property and our families.


Sea Breeze Motel


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* Consultation
* Examination
* Manipulation
* X-ray on site
* Ultrasound
* Traction
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* Hot/cold therapy
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Treatment for:
* Neck pain
* Low back pain
* Headaches
* Arm/shoulder pain


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ints


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American
Red Cross


grammar (punctuation, capitali-
zation, spelling, etc.)
The fourth grade students are re-
quired to write in order to explain
and to tell a story. The eighth and
tenth grade students are required
to write in order to explain and to
convince. In the assessment, the
students are given forty-five min-
utes to read an assigned topic,
plan and then complete a written
response.
WAYS TO IMPROVE
YOUR CHILD'S TEST
SCORES
*Talk to your child about what
he/she has written at home or at
school
*Have your child write letters to
friends and relatives
*Speak with teachers about your
child's developing writing skills
*Promote writing for a variety of
I purposes in your child's school
Curriculum


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By Chris Floyd
Disaster Service Director
SCapital Area Chapter
I American Red Cross
The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross reports that
a total of 11 local Disaster Ser-
vices Volunteers have been sent
to the New Orleans area to help
over 33,000 families cope with the
Louisiana flooding. These volun-
teers are Dorothy Patterson of
Chattahoochee; Morris Thomas of
Midway; Jay Alexander of Talla-
hassee; Marlene Wimberly of
Crawfordville; Frances Johnson of
Steinhatchee; and Alana Walker,
Betty Jean Morgan, Lee Roy Mor-
gan, Henry Grubbs, Annie Jo
Brannen, and Yancie Brannen, all.
of Perry.
Some of these volunteers have
been helping the efforts of the
Emergency Response vehicle
teams to provide food to the fami-
lies. More than 108,300 meals
have been served from just one of
the 63 Emergency Response Ve-
hicles on site. Others are work-
ing in one of 11 service centers to
provide casework to an estimated
23,500 families needing financial
assistance.
This is not the first time the Capi-
tal Area Chapter has sent Disas-
ter Services Volunteers to assist
in out of state disasters, and it will
not be the last. At the present time
they have 102 volunteers regis-
tered to travel to any place in the
United States that needs help in
times of disaster. If you would like
to become a trained Disaster Ser-
vices Volunteer, please call Chris
Floyd at 878-6080. Also, dona-
tions are appreciated.
The Capital Area Chapter's uses
donations to maintain their abili-
ties to send these volunteers to
disasters. If you would like to
make a financial contribution,
please send it to the Capital Area
Chapter, American Red Cross,
187 Office Plaza Drive, Tallahas-
Ssee, FL 32301. (904)878-6080.


ml WME


'


Local Disaster
Volunteers on

Assignment


-


r


The Franklin Chronicle 2 June 1995 Page 5


Pubhlished every other Friday


i









Published every other Friday


Pane 6 2 June 1995 The Franklin Chronicle


x "r-


St. Marks River Ent., Fla., 1995

Times and Heights of High and Low Waters

June
Time Height Time Height


h m
0408
h 0919
Th 1504
2212

2 0444
S 0959
1539
2244
3 0522
1043
Sa 1619
2321
4 0605
1135
Su 1708


'5 0004
M 0653
M 1240
1812
6 0056
0747
Tu 1357
S1939
0157
0843
w 1517
2119
8 0303
Th 0939
1628
2245
0408
9 1030
F 1730
2355

10 0507
1119
Sa 1824

0053
0601
Su 1205
1915
12 0145
m 0651
1251
0 2003
1 0233
13 0737
TU 1336
2050

14 0317
0823
S 1421
2134

15 0400
Th 0908
1507
2217


0.4
3.2
1.5
3.1
0.7
3.2
1.4
2.9
1.0
3.3
1.0
2.8
1.2
3.4
0.6
3.0
1.4
3.6
0.1
3.2
1.5
3.8
-0.4

3.4
1.6
4.1
-0.7
3.5
1.6
4.2
-0.9
3.6
1.5
4.3
-0.9
3.6
1.5
4.3
-0.8
3.5
1.5
4.2
-0.5


Chapel Joins

Florida Trust

for Historic

Preservation,


George Chapel is the first trustee
from Apalachicola to join the
Trust for Historic Preservation, a
citizen support organization to the
Division of Historic Resources of
the Florida Department of State.

There are 26 trustees in the
Florida Trust for Historic Preser-
vation (FTHP) which was founded
to develop and maintain commu-
nications between the public and
private organizations and indi-
viduals concerned with preserva-
tion, historic preservation. Chapel
attended the annual meeting in
St. Augustine on 18-20 May 1995
and was accepted into the orga-
nization at that time.

The FTHP has been actively in-
volved in stimulating legislation in
partnership with the Division of
Historical Resources, which also
publishes a magazine entitled
FLORIDA HERITAGE. The journal
publishes three times a year, and
causes on materials about his-
torical places in Florida, events,
aesthetic values and the common
experiences of Floridians. This is
the only journal promoting travel
to Florida's historic sites and heri-
tage events. The FTHP itself holds
about $30 millions in historic
properties.

Chapel's duties will include mak-
ing recommendations for historic
preservation to the citizen group
and eventually to the Trust,
among many of the Trust's activi-
ties. One of those is the "insider
tour" which will feature
Apalachicola this fall. About 60
persons, including members of
the Trust board, will be on the
tour.

Membership in the FTHP may be
obtained through the office of the
Florida Trust for Historic Preser-
vation, Post Office Box 11206,
Tallahassee, FL 32302-3206.


h m
16 0440
S 0955
F 1553
2259
7 0521
1047
Sa 1642
2340
18 0602
SU 1146
u 1740


19 0021
S 0646
1300
O 1856

20 0106
0 0738
Tu 1430
2040
21 0200
1 0838
w 1559
2221
9 0302
Th 0941
Th 1708
2332
23 0406
F 1037
1801

24 0022
c, 0503
1124
1844
25 0102
0552
Su 1206
1921
26 0138
S 0635
M 1242
1956
7 0212
2 0715
Tu 1316
* 2027
8 0244
S 0753
W 1348
2055

29 0316
'- 0830
Th 1421
2122
30 0347
0907
S1454
2149


L


NO0S H
TIET


FSUReels ienNaertonal Rick Taylor's Astro Tables


Land New Institute i [J
TTT-TY W11, 1* I DI -R


ft
3.4
1.4
3.9
-0.1
3.3
1.4
3.6
0.3
3.2
1 .4
3.1

0.8
3.1
1.4
2.7
1 .2
3.1
1.3
2.5
1.6
3.2
1.0
2.5
1.8
3.2
0.7
2.6
1.9
3.4
0.5

2.8
1.8
3.5
0.2
2.9
1.8
3.6
0.1
3.1
1.7
3.8
0.0
3.2
1.5
3.8
-0.1
3.3
1.4
3.9
-0.1
3.4
1.4
3.9
-0.1
3.5
1.3
3.9
-0.1


w..3I I II I.- -- ---------.-- -- M .m mm mmI


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STU 101


.104
43
119
-3
101
43
110
9
98
43
94

24
94
43
82
37
94
40
76
49
98
30
76
55
98
21
79
58
104
15

85
55
107
6
88
55
110
3
94
52
116
0
98
46
116
-3

101
43
119
-3
104
43
119
-3
107
40
119
-3


Florida State University has
hooked up with a national fisher-
ies research center to jointly cre-
ate a marine institute that will
study commercially important
marine fishes and ways to in-
crease fish populations now in
decline in the Gulf of Mexico.

FSU and the National Marine
Fisheries Service's Southeast
Fisheries Science Center (NMFS-
SEFSC) officially signed an agree-
Sment May 22 that establishes the
Institute for Fishery Resource
Ecology at FSU.

"This agreement between state
and federal institutions is dy-
namic and will potentiate marine
finfish research in the Gulf of ,
Mexico," said Felicia Coleman, an
associate in research in biologi-
cal science at FSU and the new
institute's program coordinator.

The institute also will include a
private entity, the Mote Marine
Laboratory in Sarasota. Mote's
founder, William R. Mote, last year
endowed an eminent scholar
chair in fisheries ecology at FSU.

Churchill Grimes, director of the
NMFS Panama City Laboratory,
which is the lab most directly in-
volved in the agreement, said the
institute will blend the learning
and hands-on experience of FSU
graduate students with the work
of fisheries researchers to en-
hance marine science research
and education.

A primary aim of the institute will
be to facilitate training of the fu-
ture marine scientists in fishery
resource ecology. Researchers
and graduate students will work
on all life history stages of impor-
tant species found along the West
Florida coast, which contains 85
percent of all the seagrass beds
in the Gulf of Mexico. The
seagrass serves as a nursery habi-
tat for juvenile reef fish such as
red grouper, gag grouper, gray
snapper, hog fish and black sea
bass.
The research will allow scientists
to identify those species with high
potential to be reared in aquacul-
ture or captivity.

"The stocks of those species that
are heavily exploited may be re-
built through the supplemental
introduction of cultured young,"
Coleman said.

Based on FSU marine biologist
Christopher Koenig's project in
which he reared several species
of grouper from egg through lar-
val stages, gag grouper, for ex-
ample, may be an excellent can-
didate for aquaculture.-

In addition, work will be con-
ducted on the ecology and behav-
ior of sharks. A global demand for
shark meat has resulted in some
species of sharks being over-
fished.

Researchers both at the Mote and
NMFS Panama City labs have
studied the distribution, abun-
dance, life history and habitat
ecology of sharks, and Mote re-
searchers are exploring the me-
dicinal value of sharks related to
their apparent immunity to can-
cer.


4:28-7:08a* NOON .
5:21-7:47a* O NOON .
6:13-8:27a* 0 NOON I
miBfl 7".:06-9:06a ._ DAWN
SDAWN 8F.iiTrl 8:03-9:47a


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.a. DAWN 0 NOON 10:03-11!19a DUSK


th Best

57-5:01a a
48-5:44a
37-6:27a

MIDNIGHT
MIDNIGHT
MIDNIGHT HALF
MIDNIGHT
MIDNIGHT
MIDNIGHT
() '-


* THIS LUNAR PERIOD OVERLAPS A SOLAR PERIOD TODAY. SO ONLY THE LUNAR TIME IS LISTED
-.. DAWN NOON 11;08a12:10p DUSK |
12:1241:08p* O DAWN II DUSK i MIDNIGHT


DAW 117209* DUSK MIDNIGHT
.0. DAWN NOON Q DUSK 2:18-3:14p
-. DAWN 0 NOON n DUSK 3:1444:20p
.0. DAWN 0 NOON r DUSK 4:06-5:22p
.. DAWN ,; ;. 0 NOON DUSK 4:53-6:23p

*1- 0 NOON n DUSK 5:35,7:21p MIDNIGHT
I[ -- O NOON n DUSK 6:16-8:16p MIDNIGHT
[ .0. DAWN 6:54-910p* 0 NOON MIDNIGHT
r.. DAWN 7:32-.0o02p- 7 NOON ] MIDNIGHT
L.. DAWN 0 NOON 8:12,10:52p Q DUSK
,. DAWN : NOON 8:53--1:43p DUSK
.0. DAWN r 0 NOON 9:36p12:32a DUSK

.. DAWN I* 0 NOON Q DUSK 10:19p-1:23a
a .0. DAWN Q DUSK 11:06p-2.10a MIDNIGHT
1 1 .0. DAWN, 11:54p-2:58a* DUSK MIDNIGHT
.f DAWN SEED04AYEFORe8 DUSK MIDNIGHT
.-,,. .,. ,,r AMNIHT


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.DAWN NOON
.0. DAWN JONO


0 NOON


KrziHiaM MOON OVERHEAD .Q. D
0:00-0:00 MOON UNDERFOOT F C
O NOON SUN OVERHEAD (3 HRS.) O MID


Rick Taylor's Astro Tables 2000 adds a new. more
accurate dimension to predicting fish and game
activity.
While the overhead and underfoot moon and sun
are still large factors in the bet times of any day.
this calendar is the first to include your area's
hourly changes in light and temperature levels, as
generated by the sun. The three new periods are
dawn (darkness turning into light and the coolest
time of the day). heat-of-the-day, and dusk (light
turning to darkness). By itself or coinciding with
a lunar period, each can be instrumental in daily
fish and game movements.
* The "Best" column in the "Daily Periods" section
suggest which period may have the most potential
for that day. The "2nd Best" column shows the
next best choice, and so on. The top pick each
day gears more to fish and depends mostly on sea-
sonal water temperature: some adjustment may
be needed for your purposes in spring and fall.
* Every 24-hour stretch has six or seven potential
periods, but due to space limitatio*l only the best
ive are shown here.
* Each day's evaluation (see "Daily Ratings") is
determined by the ever-changing positions of the
sun and moon. On a sliding scale ofO to 100, the
higher the number (see 'Value" column or black
bars) the more soiar/lunar influecc it is experi-
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* Astro Tables 2000 is based on the PrimeTimes
Wall Calendar, which in turn is based on solar/


lunar research at a leading college of astrophys-
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zone and for Daylight Saving Time.
Special Calendar Package and Book Offer
The PrimeTimes 1995Wall Calendar, with its FREE
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Published every other Friday The Franklin Chronicle 2 June 1995 Page 7


Carrabelle High School

Graduation


Valedictorian Amanda Loos

By Amanda Loos
The school year has come to a
close. Final exams have been
taken, overdue library books have
been dug out of lockers and
turned in...and CHS students
have given a long, pronounced
and cheerful, "Yippee!," and have
headed to the beach for the sum-
mer.
For the class of '95, however, the
graduation ceremony on 25 May
marked the beginning a a sum-
mer that will not end with the re-
turn to CHS in August, but with
a wide network of opportunities,
choices and adventures.
As a senior, the commencement
ceremony was an emotional clos-
ing to four years at CHS. The first
chords of Pomp and Circum-
stance were struck at 8 PM by
Martha Kersey and the seniors
began to file down the aisles of the
CHS gym.


I .r- >



Salutatorian Michele Golden

Parents, relatives, friends and
classmates came to see the gradu-
ating seniors which included Vale-
dictorian Amanda Loos, Saluta-
torian Michelle Golden, Travis
Bentley, Bradley Blackburn,
Walter Cain,Teresa Crum, Terrah
Crum, David Curry, Dennis Flow-
ers, Frances Hand, Heather Jack-
son (Honors), Daniel Jeronymo
(Honors), Amanda Lycett (Hon-
ors), Gary Martina, Joe Massey,
Ronald Meloche, Catherine Mock,
Travis O'Neal, Joseph Rowell
(Honors), Ronald Taylor, Kela
Timmons (Honors) and Jonathan
Varner.
When all the graduates' green
caps and shimmering gowns
reached their seats, they re-
mained standing for the invoca-
tion by Reverend Don Glenn of the
Fellowship Baptist Church in
Carrabelle.Dale Millender fol-
lowed with a special music pre-
sentation. She was followed by Dr
Mattie Denmark, of the United


Church of the Redeemer in
Hawthorne, Florida. Ms. Den-
mark gave a powerful recitation
of a poem by Maya Angelou, "And
I Still Rise." The poem included
the verses:
Just like moons and like suns,/
With the certainty of tides,/Just
like hopes springing high,/Still I'll
rise,/You may shoot me with your
words,/you may kill me with your
hatefulness,/but still, like air, I'll
rise,/Leaving behind nights of ter-
ror and fear,/I rise,/into a day-
break that's wondrously clear,/
Bringing the gift that my ances-
tor gave,/I am the dream and the
hope of the slave,/I rise, I rise, I
rise.






... ..



Dr. Mattie Denmark
Salutatorian Michele Golden then
gave her address in which she
reflected on what graduation
meant for the class of '95 and the
choices and roads well will have
before us. She noted that the road
less traveled is preferred.
Our parents watched as their chil-
dren received awards and sat to-
gether as graduates.
Though the years, our parents
encouraged and cared for us as
we pursued our goals. It was time
to express our gratitude to them
through the special dedication to
parents by Nikki Mock. Each
graduate presented their parents
with a white rose.
As I stood to give my Valedicto-
rian address, I saw before me'a
community of family and friends
who I felt were quite unique. I
tried to convey to the class of '95,
the teachers, advisors and com-
munity of my extreme gratitude
for accepting me, even as a hip-
pie-haired Yankee, into the folds
of their community.
As Superintendent C.T. Ponder,
Nan Collins, Will Kendrick and
Principal Clayton Wooten pre-
sented our diplomas, I turned and
saw each of my classmates in a
whole new light. After four years
of growing together, we were each
standing as individuals in a world
of opportunities.


Reverend Ron Barks of the First
Assembly of God Church in
Carrabelle gave the benediction
and Ms. Kersey played the grand
march for the recessional. I made
my way down the white path
through the crowds snapping
photographs and with tears in
their eyes. And the sound of Maya
Angelou's verse still echoed in my
head, "I Rise, I Rise, I Rise."
Those receiving awards at the
CHS Graduation include:
* KelaTimmons, Michelle Golden
and Allison Sanders received
Gulf Coast Community College
Scholarships.
* Heather Jackson won an award
from Car Quest as well as the
Masonic Lodge for an essay.
* Mikki Mock received the Misty
Sexton Panther Pride Scholar-
ship.
* Mandy Lycett received the Fu-
ture Business Leaders of
America Award.
* Amanda Loos and Joey Rowell
received an award from
Apalachicola State Bank.
* Honors Students Amanda Loos,
Joey Rowell, Michele Golden,
Allison Sanders and Daniel
Jeronymo received plaques.
* Mikki Mock and Allison Sander
received the Misty Sexton
School Board Award.


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th padE yard
I


I


The Franklin Chronicle 2 June 1995 Page 7


Published every'other Friday


Carrabelle Elementary Awards














Carrabelle's younger students are tickled with their awards

Brown Elementary Graduation

U T- p


653-2882
653-8167








Page 8 2 June 1995 The Franklin Chronicle Published every other Friday


Apalachicola High

School Graduation


By Becky Shirley
Forty-two graduating high school
seniors from AHS walked two-by-
two down the length of "Pop" Wag-
oner field in their blue and gold
robes to collect their hard earned
diplomas and to say their final
good-byes to Apalachicola High
School.
Reverend Roy Bateman led the
invocation and Sharon Philyaw
sang the National Anthem.
Salutatorian Ashley Allen gave her
address, ever watchful of her
classmates and thanking them for
their class unity. Co-Valedictorian
Amy Daniels Followed with an
address. She read from a child's
book entitled, Oh The Places You'll
Go. Daniels encouraged her class-
mates to reach out for their great-
est dreams and to, most impor-
tantly, never stop believing in
them. Daniels' hopes to eventu-
ally work with the Centers For
Disease Control. Co-Valedictorian
Jacob Williams followed and first
jokingly apologized for not having
any stage props. Williams read
from a lengthy address that fo-
cused on the liberties and oppor-
tunities for each American Citi-
zens. His message was to use
these liberties to work for peace
and prosperity in the world. His'
comical parting advice to the class
of '95, "Wherever you go, there
you are."


r J^ x
Salutatorian Ashley Allen
The forty-two graduates then ac-
cepted their diplomas. These in-
dividuals included: Ashley Allen,
La'Keshia Barnes, Kim Bennet,
Angel Burch, Jimmie Burkett,
Kim Byrd, William Cargill,
Je'Neane Cole, Stacy Cummings,
Amy Daniels, Angie Davis,
Dwayne Davis, Laura Evans,
Tyrone Evans, Jennifer Howard,
Travis Huckeba, Angela
Hutchins, Cleopatra Jones,
Latonia Jones, Valerie Jones, Tar-
ek Julius, Paul Juno, Siouxniquia
Lampley, Caleb Lanier, Marcus
Manning, Alexander Martin,
Darrell Milliner, Arlithia Mitchell,
Scott Montgomery, Jonathan
Pace, Tracy Salter, Loney Smith,
Adam Teat, Jamie Tomlin, Wendy
Turned, Bruce Varnes, Jacob Wil-
liams and Natasia Wilson.
The following Senior Awards were
presented:
*The Good Citizen Award was pre-
sented to Amy Daniels
*The Curtis McLean Award was
presented to Amy Daniels
*The Dreamers and Doers Award
was presented to Amy Daniels
*Leadership Awards were pre-
sented to Ashley Allen, Amy
Daniels and Jacob Williams


SEAFOOD GUMBO
COOKOFF





NAME:_

ADDRESS:_



PHONE:_

CUT OUT AND MAIL WITH
$5.00 ENTRY FEE TO:
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Valedictorian Jacob Williams

*The Social Studies Awards were
presented to Amy Daniels and
Jacob Williams
*The Home Economics Award was
presented to.La'Keshia Barnes
LKg


Chapman Elementary School Graduation


Chapman Awards

All A's
Celeste Elliott: Valedictorian
Aimee Poloronis: Salutatorian
Adam Soberay
All A's and B's
Hunter Bartley
Miranda Elliott
Robert Johnson
Desiree' Ross
Bernard F. Simmons, II: SCA
President
Kayla Lee
Spelling Bee
Bernard F. Simmons, II
Desiree' Ross
Miranda Elliott
Juli Jones
Celeste Elliot
Margaret Creamer
Marquita Thompkins
Perfect Attendance
Miranda Elliott
Tremaine Ray
Mayson Page
Royce Rolstad: throughout all
school years
Antonique Cummings
Leon O'Neal
Margaret Creamer


*The English Awards were pre- M -
sented to Amy Daniels and Jacob
Williams
*The Science Awards were pre-
sented to Amy Daniels and Jacob
Williams
*The Journalism Award was pre-
sented to La'Keshia Barnes
*The WAHS Award was presented
to Bruce Varnes
*The Business Award was pre- ...
sented to Nicole Hutchins
After the turning of the tassels,
Eddie Joseph, III led a benedic-
tion. At that, the graduates were
on their way leaving behind the
sentiment, "It's not till you gradu- .
ate that you realize what you are "
leaving behind." ,," '
Congratulations Seniors, and
have a happy future full of sur- L .
prises and fun around every cor-
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Artwork Contributed by Jim Green


CALLING ALL

COOKS !!!
It's almost time for The 1995
Carrabelle Waterfront Festival and Gulf
State Bank, The Chamber of Commerce
and the Carrabelle Youth League would
like to invite all cooks (and want to be
cooks) to The Gumbo Cookoff for lots
of food, fun and prizes.
The top four contestants win cash
prizes from $50 to $200 and other
prizes for 5th through 7th place. But
the BIG winners will be the KIDS... as all
proceeds from the sale of the Gumbo
will go to The Carrabelle Youth League.
So dust off yor.r cookbook, or call
Grandma and ask her for her secret
recipe (if she hasn't already entered!)
and come join in the fun. You don't
want to miss it!

For more information contact:
Jean DePriest 697-2840
Betty Mason 697-2009
Barbara Kurtz 697-3395


Space and Layout Contributed
by The Chonicle


Chapman students making' music in the Chapman Elementary School Gymna-
sium with their school song, "You Gotta' Be."


Chapman's Salutatorian CPA President Bernard
Aimee Poloronus receives an Simmons, II addresses his
award class


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IN



RE Tt ROI1D LSPECTI







MCNAMABA'
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Iunl .. \\ ,il ,. II-. 164.1 1i
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ism; a moving, suspenseful
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Rooney is a nationally syn-
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regular commentator on
SIXTY MINUTES. Bookshop
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Chronicle Bookshop


Mail Order Service *


2309 Old Bainbridge Road
Tallahassee, Fl 32303
1 (20) New. Carl Van Doren's
Pulitizer Prize biography
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN sold
nationally for $14.00. Avail-
able from the Chronicle
Bookshop for $13.00.


SOUTH
(29) New. THE SOUTH by B.
C. Hall and C. T. Wood. Na-
tionally sold for $27.50. The
authors have traced the
spread of the Southern ide-
ology and culture from the
Tidewater through Appala-
chia, down the Blue Ridge
country, through the sunbelt
of Georgia, Alabama and
Florida. Here is the dispos-
session of the indian tribes
and full of revelation, anec-
dote, history and mythol-
ogy. Dee Brown wrote, "Ex-
plorers heading south should
throw away their standard
guidebooks and take along
THE SOUTH." Bookshop
price= $22.00. HARDBACK.


(16) New. ANDREW: SAV-
AGERY FROM THE SEA. As-
sembled by the staff of the
Sun-Sentinel, Fort Lauder-
dale, Fla., on ANDREW. Sold
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Bookshop price = $4.00.


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(24) New. FLORIDA SALTWA-
TER FISHING GUIDE. Sold
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side line on saltwater fish-
ing in Florida by Orlando
Sentinel writer Max
Branyon. Bookshop price=
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gal requirements, selling
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ally for $13.00. Bookshop
price = $9.00. PAPERBACK.
(15) New. THE OMEGA
THREE PHENOMENON. Sold
nationally for $16.95.
Bookshop price = $7.95.
HARDCOVER.


Published every other Friday


Page 8 2 june 1995 The Franklin Chronicle









Published every other Friday


The Franklin Chronicle 2 June 1995 Page 9


Robinson

Found Guilty

Roderick Robinson could be fac-
ing life in prison after being con
victed of Attempted Second De-
gree Murder on 18 May 1995.
Robinson was arrested on 10 No- ,
vember 1994 after brutally beat-
ing Alfred Shuler, Jr On the
strength of testimony from Gail
Woods, Jonathan Donaldson and
Glen Suddeth, Robinson was con-
victed after two hours of jury de-
liberation. Each individual testi-
fying against the defendant
claimed that he stated, "I'm
gonna' kill the next white man
who comes on the hill," before
assaulting Shuler. Each person
who testified also stated that they
tried to prevent Robinson from
assaulting Shuler. However, ac-
cording to a police report prepared
by Jerry Proctor, Jonathan
Donaldson accused Glen Suddeth
of assaulting Shuler, also.
Roderick Robinson is expected to
be sentenced on June 5. The pros-
ecution is requesting that
Robinson's assault be categorized
as a Hate Crime; this would
change the defendant's second
degree felony assault to a first
degree felony. The prosecution is
also requesting that Robinson be
sentenced under the Habitual
Felony Offender's act. With
Robinson's previous record, the
prosecution believes that the de-
fendant could serve a life sentence
under the Habitual Felony
Offender's act.
"With this individual's criminal
record," said Assistant State At-
torney Frank Williams, "We need
to be protected from him as long
as possible. Some people cannot
live in a free society without vic-
timizing and hurting other people.
This individual is like that."


Challenge from page 1
the demonstration project in
1989, when nearly 150 trainees
enrolled in an aquaculture train-
ing and demonstration project
conducted by Harbor Branch
Oceanographic Institution pursu-
ant to a program under the Job
Training Partnership Act.
The three-person First District
panel was not persuaded that in-
formal statements made by a
chairman of the county commis-
sion nor the county's cooperation
with the training project did not
demonstrate a basis for overturn-
ing their official decision to deny
leases. Jones, Square and others
had applied for one acre leases
but the Franklin County Commis-


mTHAiRI
EPA j N
BARBARA"tEAMING
(28) New. KATHERINE
HEPBURN by Barbara
Leaning. Sold nationally for
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secrets and awful truths dis-
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"You will not be able to put
this book down." Bookshop
price= $19.95. HARDBACK.

(21) New. William Roger's
history OUTPOSTS ON THE
GULF. St. George Island and
Apalachicola from early ex-
ploration to World War II.
Sold regionally for $30 or
more. Available from the
Chronicle Bookshop for


$25.00. HARDBACK.


slon denied them all in a close
vote.
The court, instead, reaffirmed the
county's power to exercise vari-
ous powers in a variety of events.
Justices Robert Benton, with Jus-
tices James Joanos and Larry
Wolf concurring, wrote:
...These provisions (of Florida
Statutes 125.01(4)... shall be lib-
erally construed in order to ...
secure for the counties the broad
exercise of home rule powers au-
thorized by the State Constitu-
tion...
Appellants Jones and Square also
maintained through their legal
briefs that the statute 253.68 was
unconstitutional because it failed
to prohibit county commissions'
discrimination against individual
applicants. The court observed
that no evidence of discrimination
was actually presented on un-
equal treatment, nor was there
evidence of County discrimination
among various applicants. The
ban was applied to everyone.

Carrabelle

Comes

through for

Ruby Elder

By Rene Topping
A young woman will no longer
have to face a future of wearing a
colostomy bag due to the persis-
tence of the members of the Li-
ons Club of Carrabelle and a host
of other caring people. These men
and women went on a fund rais-
ing program when they heard that
Ms. Elder had been denied fed-
eral aid in an operation to reverse
the colostomy. But Carrabelle
said, "We 11 help." And in the fin-
est tradition they dug deep. There
is a glow of satisfaction for all who
helped when they heard that the
$50,000.00 needed had been
raised and Ruby will go for the
reversal on June 7.
Mary Lou Bowman raised some
money with a rousing gospel sing.
The street dance raised $500.
Donations from area Lions Club
members totalled $1,700.00 and
on a Tuesday morning when all
the community donations were
counted it amounted to
$5,000.00. Then, an anonymous'
donor brought the figure up to
$5,000.00.
One person involved in the dona-
tions said, 'The way things are
right now, it could be me." It
seems that no one in the
Carrabelle area considered rever-
sal of the colostomv to be a "cos-


(8) New. HOME-SHARING
AND OTHER LIFESTYLE OP-
TIONS. An AARP book. This
book is about CHOICES in
housing. You will discover
many new ideas about alter-
native living arrangements
that can lead to better hous-
ing for less money. Sold na-
tionally for $12.95.
Bookshop price = $7.95. PA-
PERBACK.

(9) New. WALL STREET
JOURNAL GUIDE TO UN-
DERSTANDING MONEY AND
INVESTING. This book ini-
tiates you into the myster-
ies of the financial pages,
but it is an easy-to-use
primer. Very useful' Sold na-
tionally for $13.95.
Bookshop price = $6.95. PA-
PERBACK


",Sncc j~l.ad & A k 17.1~
4111r~prs
APdWtf
TO..a


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metic operation," as it was desig-
nated by government sources
when they turned Ms. Elder
down. "The community can stand
proud and the Lions Club was
wonderful," said another con-
tributor.
Lions International are famous for
their assistance to people in need
of help with vision problems and
also for selling the best brooms
in the world. A spokesperson for
the Lions Club said, "This was
somewhat out of our usual scope,
but we knew they needed help, so
we did it."

Audit from page 1
ing body had not ensured that
the medical staff is account-
able to the governing body for
the quality of care... There was
no written indicator criteria by
which to select individuals
based on training and experi-
ence relative to the appoint-
ment of physicians to the
medical staff.
In each section of the report,
there is a provision for re-
sponse by the hospital, and
the author, Mr. Dykes, sup-
plied information which dem-
onstrated that Emerald Coast
had bylaws which in turn es-
tablished a governing body,
and other functions. In re-
sponse to the finding about
"ineffectiveness", he cited ex-
amples from Minutes of gov-
erning body meetings showing
topics and dispositions of vari-
ous matters.
A second specification by the
investigators indicated there
was no Quality Assurance Pro-
gram or Peer Review Process
in place to ensure that the
medical staff is accountable to
the governing body for the
quality of care provided to pa-
tients. Mr. Dyke's response
was that the accountability
issue would be addressed at
the quarterly Governing Body
meeting, and a newly orga-
nized monitoring process now
in place.
An element of a standard deal-
ing with medical staff was an-
other deficiency cited by the
investigation. Specifically, the
governing body must ensure
that criteria for selection to the
medical staff include indi-
vidual character, competence,
training, experience and judg-
ment, The investigation deter-
mined that the governing body
had not ensured that those
criteria were present for the


(22) New. FAIR TO MIDDLIN':
THE ANTEBELLIUM COT-
TON TRADE OF THE
APALACHICOLA-
CHATTAHOOCHE RIVER
VALLEY. Sold nationally at
$26.95. Available through
the Chronicle Bookshop at
$21.001 HARDBACK.
. . T


The Antebellum Cotto~on Trade of the'
Apdlachikola/Chanahoeclhcc
River Valley


(23) New. Hardcover. NAVY
GRAY-- A story of the Con-
federate Navy on the
Chattahoochee and
Apalachicola Rivers. Sold
Nationally at $27.50. Avail-
able through the Chronicle
Bookshop at $22.00! HARD-
BACK.


A











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ACROSS
1. Elegant
5. Religious article
9. Poet who wrote
"Annabel Lee"
12. Impoverished
area
16. Regarding
17. Waterway
19. Has a purpose
20. Put away
21. German
followers
24. Solomon and
Hussein
25. Controllable
26. Felony
27. Burns
28. Ziegfeld and
namesakes
29. On _; trying
to reduce
30. Songbird
31. Part of the leg
34. Loch in the
Highlands
35. Pocket stuff
36. Place for an
unwanted ring
39. Russian
followers
43. Meathead
44. Worldwide:
abbr.
45. Actress
Dawn Chong
46. Finish
47. Oratorio
melodies
48. Address part
49. Swedish
followers
54. Cath. men's
org. members
55. Truth
56. Frozen
57. Plain
58. Farmyard noise
59. Nourishes
60. Ms. Bombeck
61. Work forces
64. Unable to relax
65. Hoity-toity one
66. Q trailers
69. Irish followers
72. Biblical verb
73. Puts in chips
74. Bladed tool
75. Continent: abbr.
76. Robert
77. Reel backwards
78. French followers
84. Make a blunder
85. Confines
86. Let.
87. Lean
88. Present
89. Slaves
90. Baseball's
Sandberg
91. Let in on
94. 100 paisas
95. Woes


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Rebound
Swiss followers
Entanglements
Capital city
Ayatollah or King
Forest creature
Ham accompaniments
Pompous fool
Effortless
Keats' specialties


DOWN
1. Gone
2. Dept. of Labor agcy.
3. Originate
4. In an optimistic way
5. Frozen lake crosser
6. Reiner and namesakes
7. Wave:. Fr.
8. G.l.'s destination In
the '60s, for short
9. Airline employee
10. Sign
11. Ending for heir or poet
12. Be offensive
13. Drawn out
14. Exhort
15. Disarray
18. Head
19. Impose a tax on
20. Go around
22. City In Germany
23. Go skyward


17 Ave. D
Apalachicola


selection of physicians based
on training and experience.
Mr. Dykes responded in the
report that all new appoint-
ments took into account the
Joint Commission on Accredi-
tation of Health Care Organi-
zations (JCAHO) criteria in-
cluding current licensure, cur-
rent insurance coverage, rela-
tive training and experience
and data on health status. He
concluded, "This will be re-
quired criteria for any new
appointment and will be thor-
oughly researched prior to rec-
ommended medical staff sta-
tus."
Another specification by the
investigators cited a deficiency
in the lack of a written plan of
implementation for a hospital-
wide quality assurance pro-
gram, in an on-going status.

FOREIGN


27. Crooned
29. Chile/Argentina border
30. Evans or Blair
31. Henry C. _; indus-
trialist (1849-1919)
32. Architectural style
33. In; interferes
35. Like school paper
36. Sheer fabric
37. Kennedy's Secretary
of the Interior
38. Domineering
40. Field's partner
41. From Yemen to Oman
42. Trucks
43. Play
47. Deadly weapon
49. Minister's home
50. Orange
51. Honkers
52. Senior
53. Fling
55. Wind instruments
58. Proposal
59. Throws a bash for
60. Afio opener
61. Climb
62. dopier need
63. Following
64. State
65. Decorative nailhead
66. Early colonist John
67. Unsmiling


68. Those people
would, for short
70. River in France
71. Months: abbr.
72. Outlaw
78. Duration
79. Boring tool
80. Bo
81. Contaminate
82. Long journey
83. Adoree of films
85. Does a beau-
tician's job
88. Boos
89. Plaintiffs
90. Cambodian
dollars
91. Unpleasant
92. Grandma's
nickname
93. Word on a
gift tag
94. Highways: abbr.
95. "...to St. Ives,
I ..."
96. TV's Three
Lives ('53-'56)
97. Fencing sword
98. Uzbek & Kirghiz
once: abbr.
100. Org. founded to
help little cos.
101. Make haste


(904) 653-9216
Owners- Judy and J. R. Thompson


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subscribe to the

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Lounge and Package Weekly Specials

Free Soft Shell Crab Cookout
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(In the backroom) Sports bar


Mr. Dykes responded that the
housewide plan would be re-
organized to encompass par-
ticipation of other hospital de-
partments "as well as restruc-
turing department specific
plans beginning phasing
implementation over the next
quarter."
Other element deficiencies in-
volved investigation conclu-
sions concerning the lack of
self-evaluation of all medical
services including contracted
services, composition of the
medical staff, and appraisals
of medical staff.
Two of the four allegations that
brought the investigation team
to Emerald Coast in mid-
March 1995 were neither con-
firmed nor denied based on
the investigation findings.

FOLLOWERS by c


There were no deficiencies in
the Emergency Medical Ser-
vice Department. An EMS co-
ordinator and medical direc-
tor were currently in place and
functioning with the use of two
ambulances. Another allega-
tion, involving so-called sub-
standard medical practices,
unqualified physician prac-
tices, failure to diagnose and
inappropriate admission and
treatment were not confirmed
or denied. During the inquiry
into the more general charges,
the investigators did flag the
deficiencies identified earlier.
The hospital had one month
to respond to the investigation
which Mr. Dykes filed by mid-
April 1995,
A financial audit is also being
conducted of the hospital.

alvin R. & Jackie Mathews


I


1 1 (


I . .. . ...; . .


( )
area









Page 10 2 June 1995 The Franklin Chronicle Published every other Friday


The two of you drive over from the mainland, park at the Beach Club, and change into exercise togs. One wants
to work out on the stair climber and Nautilus equipment; the other wants to play racquetball in the glass-walled
court. You wind up doing both. Afterwards, you enjoy a sauna and steam bath, then a long walk on the beach.


At the heart of the St. George Island Resort Village
will be a luxurious Beach Club.

Annual memberships will be available for local
residents and property owners. Short-term
memberships will be available for area visitors.

The fully equipped exercise area will include an
atrium, filled with lush vegetation and natural light,
providing an ideal setting for personal fitness
training

Massage therapy, facials, and body wraps will be
available in the spa.


Outside, members can swim in the
swimming pool or relax in the whirlpool.


freeform


Other options will include volleyball, tennis,
badminton, horseshoes, and more. A playground and
a wading pool will make a visit to the Beach Club
more enjoyable for younger children and their
parents.

A pool side bar will serve beverages, and an outdoor
cafe will offer sandwiches and other light fare.

St. George Island Resort Village
A Special Place


Page 10 2 June 1995 The Franklin Chronicle


Published every other Friday




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