Franklin chronicle
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 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: April 21, 1995
Copyright Date: 1995
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00089928:00009

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25


h k ...Page 6







he Franklin chronicle


Published every other Friday


Volume 4, Number 8


21 April 4 May 1995


New WINGS
Coordinator ('
Hired
Native Apalachicola resident
Nikiti Williams began her first day
as the WINGS Coordinator on 18
April for the Franklin County Mr. Van J(
Library's youth program. Ms. Wil- Franklin C
lams replaced previous coordina- work done
tor Chaz Mikel. fill. A lette
tion (DEP)
A graduate of Apalachicola High commend
School's class of 1979, Ms. Will-
iams still spends some of her time Mr. Van Jo
at the "old school" as a volunteer. County Ce
Williams donates her time to the tion indice
Apalachicola High School Basket- Mr. Johns
ball team as a friend and counse- ciency.
lor and belongs to the school's
booster club, also. "I love kids," The consti
states Williams, "I thought it best exam
would be challenging for both the any facility
students (in the WINGS program) ary 1 and
and me. that your
have set ii
Ms. Williams hopes to provide propriate
academic instruction to the forth for c
program's students in such areas maintain
as computer science and math-
ematics. Williams also hopes to Congratul
provide job readiness skills to the
students, as well as promote Thomas W
character building traits as Waste Ma
promptness, respectfulness and
stress and anger management. "I
think right now that some of our v
kids need to work to improve their
attitudes to life. They need to
know that they can reach their eirp
goals if they're willing to work for Rej
them." Ms. Williams also stressed
an importance of teaching the |l r
children to resist the temptation la
of using drugs. "I'll be working
with children as young as ten
years old. This is the perfect age in A
to teach them to say no to drugs."
Above all, Ms. Williams noted that While the r
she will strive to meet the personal the Dr. Ben
needs of the children. She con- Florida L
eluded, "This is supposed to be a Adjudicate
program for at-risk children; but (FLWAC) is
I'm sure that there were times that entire pack
some of my teachers thought that mended Ord
I was at-risk when I was younger. Officer Micd
I'm here to let the kids know that Village ma
you can be what you want to be." FLWAC at tl
net meeting


' : :



'--

.. .-
Bs~- 5 .sBBB81s~8aa~


aim

ohnson was recognized and complimented by the Board of
countyy Commissioners at the 18 April 1995 meeting for the
by county employees and Mr. Johnson at the County land-
r received from te Department of Environmental Protec-
commended Johnson and his men for their work. The
atory letter read, in part:
ohnson has shown exemplary supervision of the Franklin
central Landfill. The operation continually exceeds inspec-
es and your record of maintenance is superior. Additionally,
on's skill at maximizing public resources is a model of effl-

ruction, operation, and maintenance of this landfill is the
pie of sound engineering and environmental awareness, of
es this Section has inspected in the quarter beginning Janu-
ending March 31, 1995. It is obvious to the Department
operation reflects a dedication to the high standards you
n providing service to the public in an environmentally ap-
way. We appreciate the standard and example you have set
other facilities in our District. A copy of this letter will be
d in the landfill's compliance file.
nations on a job well done.
r. Moody, P. E.
nagement Program Administrator

ernor and Cabinet

ect Multi-Family

is for Resort Village

Appeal


nulti-family aspect of
Johnson appeal to the
Land and Water
ory Commission
far from "dead", the
kage of the Recom-
der issued by Hearing
hael Ruff in the Resort
tter was rejected by
ie Governor and Cabi-
g on Tuesday, 11 April


S.G.I. Bridge Construction

Ahead of Plans

According to Tommy Speights of the Department of Transportation in
Marriana, construction on the St. George Island, bridge is approxi-
mately seventy percent complete. Speights estimates that the bridge
construction l be completed in July. Mr. Speights said that the
original completion date was October. He noted that there was an
incentive cause in the construction contract to have the support sys-
tem on the St. George Island Bridge replaced early.


1995. The Governor and Cabinet
also sit as the FLWAC.
In part, the FLWAC official deci-
sion, reads: "...Based on a review
of the record as a whole, the Com-
mission hereby rejects the Recom-
mended Order as further speci-
fied herein. Therefore the Com-
mission denies the proposed
amendment to the St. George Is-
land DRI development
order..."(DO).
Additionally, the official opinion
of the FLWAC decision outlines,
changes in the Dr. Ben Johnson
development proposal which
...will make it eligible to receive
approval..."
"The commission, therefore.re-
jects the Recommended Order for
the reasons stated above, and is-
sues this final order denying the
proposed amendment to the St.
George Island DRI development
order. Pursuant to Section
380.08(3), Florida Statutes
(1993), the following changes in
the development proposal will
make it eligible to receive ap-
proval:
1. Competent and substantial evi-
dence on the record Pursuant to
a public hearing in Franklin
county to address the change in
land use to condominiums and
multi-family residences.
2. The proposal of a specific plan
of development, which includes
the density, intensity, and loca-
tion of the proposal, and also com-
plies with the other requirements
in Chapter 380, Florida Statutes,
Continued to Page 10


Paige Ellison

Healthy

Start

Concerned

with

Nemours

Clinic

Transition
Executive Director of the Bay,
Gulf and Franklin County Coali-
tion of Healthy Start Paige Ellison
addressed the county commis-
sioners at their regular 18 April
meeting with concerns of the fu-
ture ofNemours Children Clinic
without the support of the Dupont
Foundation.
Ms. Ellison stated that approxi-
mately 1,700 children in Frank-
lin County would be left vulner-
able without a pediatrician if the
Nemours Clinic closes down.
Ellison stated that Nemours
Foundation General Manager Jeff
Wadsworth had expressed to her
that the foundation would defi-
nitely pull out of the clinic by its
targeted 29 May date. Ellison said
that the ten state Nemours Clinic
have lost as much as 1.5 million
dollars last year and that the
Eastpoint branch of the Nemours
Clinic has lost as much as one
hundred and fifty thousand dol-
lars last year. The clinics, which
help to pay for uninsured chil-
dren, has generally operated at a
loss.

Ms. Ellison stated that Dr. Eliza-
beth Curry was in negotiations
with the Nemours Clinic to pur-
chase both the Eastpoint and Port
St. Joe clinics. Jane Cox said that
Dr. Curry could purchase the clin-
ics and try to run them at profit,
but that the critical area of con-
cern remained those uninsured
children who will be unable to
receive needed treatment with the
Nemours funding. Pamela A'mato
stated that Franklin County, as
an area of tourism, needed to be
able to provide quality pediatric
care in order to continue the
steady stream of tourist dollars.
"Our tourists, for the most part,
have insurance for their children.
It will impact our tourism if they
find that their is no competent
pediatric care. The summertime
is coming and the word will
spread quickly if there is no pedi-
atric care in the county."
Apalachicola resident Alma Pugh
read also addressed the board
and read a letter from Rene Will-
iams, who stated that it would be
inconvenient to take her asth-
matic child two hours away to a
Panama City facility for pediatric
care. "She has children," stated
Pugh, "I want you to understand
that."
Ms. Ellison made three requests
of the board. She asked for the
board's support, direction and
possible financial assistance. "You
Continued on page 6


Inconsistencies Loom

Over Kirven-Floyd Case


The trial continues for Ms.
Jeanette Kirven-Floyd, who was
originally charged with Resisting
Arrest without Violence via Ob-
struction, and whose case is ex-
pected to be retried in May.
Floyd's 29 March case ended in a
mistrial. The retrial will include a
second charge of Resisting Arrest
without Violence.
In the meantime, inconsistencies
loom over the original case and
arrest report of Ms. Floyd. Ac-
cording to a police report from
Deputy Michael Moore, Jeanette
Kirven-Floyd was stopped on the
evening of25 October on the sus-
picion of driving while under the
influence of alcohol. In Deputy
Moore's report, Ms. Floyd swerved
over the center line several times,
while he followed her on St.
George Island. And although Ms.
Floyd was stopped on the suspi-
cion of drunk driving, she was nei-
ther offered or given a blood-al-
cohol test. Furthermore, in a
taped recording within Deputy
Moore's vehicle, Ms. Floyd made
the statement, "You didn't even
check my breath for alcohol...I'm
drunk."
A member of the Franklin County
Sheriffs Department stated that
Floyd was not tested for driving
while intoxicated, because she
was prematurely released before
the department could administer
the test. Ms. Floyd was arrested
at approximately 10:07 PM and
was released on bond at 12:01
AM. Ms. Floyd was released
through the assistance of Captain
Don Hammock. An inconsistency
remains between Captain Don
Hammock's written report of Ms.
Floyd's physical state upon re-
lease, and those written summa-
ries of almost one-half dozen other
Sheriffs Department personnel.
In his report, Captain Hammock
described Ms. Floyd as "very up-
set, breathing rapidly, crying, ask-
ing for help, complaining of hurt-
ing and needing to go to the hos-
pital." In an Internal Investiga-
tion report for Case number 4317-
94, the findings stated, "There
were no external signs or indica-
tions of any injuries to Ms. Floyd
and no request for medical atten-
tion was made by Floyd to any
officer until the arrival of Cpt.
Hammock." Additionally, "All of-
ficers present in the sallyport
when Deputy Moore arrived
stated that Ms. Floyd's clothing
was not in a state of disarray, was
not dirty, and that there was no
sign of a struggle, additionally,
they stated that there was not a


hair out of place on her head." Ac-
cording to a written sheriffs re-
ports, Captain Hammock was
contacted at home by personnel
at the Sheriffs Department and
requested to come to the depart-
ment in order to calm Ms. Floyd
and expedite the booking process..
According to the report, Ham-
mock requested that the paper-
work for the booking procedures
be continued the following day,
and that Ms. Floyd be released
quickly to receive medical treat-
ment.
The added charge of resisting ar-
rest has been leveled against Ms.
Floyd for the alleged obstruction
of booking procedures at the
Franklin County Sheriffs Depart-
ment. Some of Ms. Kirven's state-
ments were also recorded at the
sheriffs department On the taped
recording, Ms. Floyd refused to sit
down when ordered to do so and
would not state her social secu-
rity number, claiming that she
could not remember the identify-
ing number. Floyd also requested
to know why she was arrested.
Deputy Moore, after receiving little
cooperation from Ms. Floyd,
vented, "This is why you are here,
because you won't listen to any-
one, but yourself."
According to an internal investi-
gation of the Franklin County
heriffs Department, Corrections
Supervisor Barbara Crum alleged
that Ms. Floyd refused to be fin-
gerprinted and photographed in
the booking procedures. Super-
visor Crum noted that Ms. Floyd
threatened her stating, "Barbara,
I know where you live and honey,
I'm coming to see you." Crum
stated that she replied, "Come on
honey, I'll be waiting." Supervisor
Crum alleged that Ms. Floyd also
demanded special treatment, be-
cause of her family's name. She
maintained that Ms. Floyd stated,
"I'm a Kirven. You can't do this to
me." Supervisor Crum also noted
in the internal report that Floyd
taunted the officers and called
them names. "She called us pigs,"
asserted Crum, "green pigs." Su-
pervisor Barbara Crum gave tes-
timony at the original 29 March
trial thatshe smelled alcohol on
Ms. Floyd's breath.

At present, the prosecution has
both filed and received approval
for a motion to disqualify. The
motion, which requested that
Judge Van Russell step down
from the case, was granted by
Judge Russell.


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Page 2 21 April 1995 *


The Franklin Chronicle


Published every other Friday


PRESCRIBED
BURNING
URGED FOR
FRANKLIN


Roy Oglesby
State Park Ranger Roy Oglesby y
urged the Franklin County Com-
mission to'pass a resolution en-
couraging the use of prescribed
burning as a forest management
tool to reduce any impact in the
event of catastrophic fires in the
county.
Citing a resolution passed in
Billsbrough, Oglesby pointed out
that prescribed burning reduces
accumulated fuels for uncon-
trolled and damaging wildfires,
and that such benefits were for-
mally recognized in the Chapter
590.026 of Florida Statutes. Dink
Braxton moved to adopt the reso-
lution but Chairperson Jimmy
Mosconis wanted to consult with
Tony Millender on coordinating
the adoption of the resolution.
The matter was put on hold until
the next meeting.



COUNTY
OWNERSHIP
OF MAIN
ROAD ON
DOG ISLAND
AWAITING
RESOLUTION















Fred McCormick
Mr. Fred McCormack, represent-
ing the Dog Island Conservation
District, requested that the Board
of County Commissioners get le-
gally involved in settling the ques-
lion of who owns the main road
on Dog Island, so a pier system
with 32-35 slips could be con-
structed. McCormack gave the
Commissioners a brief history of
the island and the problem de-
scribing the Lewis family, who for-
merly owned much of the island
until they sold It to the Nature
Conservancy, but deeded the road
to the County. The Nature Con-
servancy says it is the successor
in title to the road, as well. At the
-present time, any application for
a dock facility to the Department
of Environmental Protection
(DEP) must also involve the road,
and DEP will not approve the per-
mit for construction until the
question of who owns the road is
cleared up. Thus, McCormack
asked the Board to seek a declara-
toryjudgment on the question of
road ownership but the Conser-
vation District of Dog Island
would pay all costs of such an ac-
tion, since they are the benefac-
tors of the new pier. There are
some additional questions about
a reverter clause and whether the
County still retained ownership
when the ferry operation ceased.
The Board Is to write the Dog Is-
land Conservation District for
written assurances of payment
and plans to take further action
later.


(


FRANKLIN
BRIEFS
County Planner Alan Pierce rec-
ommended that the Board of
County Commissioners increase
the rate at which the county cal-
culates building value for the pur-
pose of establishing building fees.
He had discussed with the County
Planning and Zoning Commission
the possibility of increasing rates.
Pierce then proposed that the
county increase the value of on-
grade construction to $60 a
square foot from $40 a square
foot, and raise the value of piling
construction to $75 a square foot
from $50 a square foot. County
Building Inspector Roscoe Carroll
disagreed. The Board decided to
wait for a recommendation from
the Planning and Zoning Board.
Jean McMillan notified the Board Atto
of County Commissioners on 18
April that she and a citizen group trying
are working on the jet ski ordi-
nance and that the ordinance will "Who's
be presented at the Commission Carlton
meeting on 2 May. cial mee
Commit
Mr Elwin Cooper, of the Soil Con- mark c
servation Service, has notified the sphere
board that the Alligator Point Re- sion at
vetment project will be completed
within 30 days. In order to limit Commis
the time that the road is left un- over an
paved, County Planner Alan Commi
Pierce recommended that the Putnalt
Board direct County Engineer Joe sioners
Hamilton to prepare specifica- Septem
tons and place advertising for a mission
bid on the project. tially
switch
The Board of County Commis- commis
sioners also approved the Joint when h
Participation Agreement and on sup
Maintenance Agreement with the roads, r
Dept. of Transportation for the St. mission
George Island bike path. The seat 3
County's share was voted to be was inl
paid to DOT as the project con- whether
tinues. ning i
Alan Pierce reported that the St. "WVhate%
Joe Telecommunications Co. sent "That's
a revised proposal for maintain- Putnal'r
ing the enhanced 911 service, al- tUon was
lowing the county to go on-line in c tsslon
the Fall 1996. The Board accepted sooner c
the proposal. flee via
William
The Board approved advertising riddle s
advising the public that the fol- term, w
lowing hearings will be held on is- Mayor,
sues described below: an appc
2 May Airport land swap
16 May Lanark Village Nuisance
ordinance Alligator Point
..: ,speed zone Cable TV
ordinance

BIG BEND
WILL NOT BE
INVOLVED IN
PROPOSED
MISSILE
TESTS for the
time being...
Comn
out fr
The two ranges finally selected for motic
extended missile testing are the U. c
S. Army Kwajalein Atol with off- UPCOI
range launches coming from the n
Wake Island, and the White Sands
Missile Range with off-range Traditic
launches from Fort Wingate De- viewed
pot Activity in New Mexico. Eglin seat an
Air Force Base had sldo been con- in regard
sidered for missile launching. In would
a document signed by Lieutenant question
General Malcolm R. O'Neill, he could e:
stated "...I have decided not to se- commi
lect sea-based target missile rather
launches at this time. I select only public
the land-based target launch op- commit
tion from Wake Island for the KMR years or
alternative. Missile intercepts will person
take place over existing impact ar- vacated
eas or open sea areas at KMR
(Kwajalein Missile Range).
Preparations and testing will be- M.V
gin late this year and continue af-
er 2000, the General said. With
regard to the Eglin base as a test
area alternative, this alternative
"...is not selected at this time be-
cause test objectives could be met
at other ranges, sea launch ca-
pabilities will not be available, and
additional test instrumentation is
needed," the General said.


Sarrabelle City Commission Animates


Discussions on Appointments and


Elections
-- *ae.e.s,.. ,:' ,,_. :' -2 :i -"".- .-, ,


rney Webster (R), Commissioner Phillips (C) and Commissioner Putnal (R) each take their turn at the blackboard
g to figure out who will run in the next election


on first?," joked Mayor
Wathen at a 17 April spe-
eting of the Carrabelle City
ssion. Mayor Wathen's re-
haracterized the atmo-
of some board's discus-
the special meeting.
ssioners were stymied for
hour on a motion from
ssioner James "Buzz"
to discuss which commis-
would be running in the
ber 1995 election. Com-
ner Putnal, who was ini-
appointed to seat 4,
edduties with then city
sioner Raymond Williams
e requested to be placed
ervislon of streets and
ather than finance. Com-
er Putnal, who now holds
on the city commission,
terested in finding out
r his seat would be run-
in the 95 election.
v'er's right," said Putnal,
s what I want to do."
s seemingly simple ques-
s met wilt the lengthy dis-
of whether a commls-
can extend his term of of-
appointment. Attorney
Webster finally solved the
eating that an appointees
ith the exception of the
could not be extended by
iLntment.


nissioner Putnal tired
rom discussion of his
on to find out the
ning candidates in
ext election
onally, the community has
both a commissioners'
id duties as synonymous
d to when a commissioner
run for reelection. The
n was whether a person
extend their term on the city
ssion via appointment,
than having to run in a
election. For example, if a
ssioner had served several
n a specific seat, could that
be appointed to a recently
1 seat and gain added time


to their term without having to
endure the trouble of running for
public reelection? The board fi-
nally concluded with the advice
of their attorney that a commis-
sioner could not extend his term
by board appointment. With the
influx of resignations in the past
two years, however, and with the
request of some board members
to change duties that are normally
assigned to specific seats, the tra-
ditional period in which a seat is
slated for reelection has changed
and has brought some confusion
with the change. Traditionally,
seats 1 (Mayor), 4 (Finance) and
5 (Police Commissioner) ran on
two year intervals from seats 2
(Water & Sewer) and 3 (Streets &
Roads). In September 1995,
Mayor Carlton Wathen, Commis-
sioner James "Buzz" Putnal and
the vacated seat 5 that Ex-Com-
missioner Tommy Lofton resigned
will be up for grabs.


Commissioner Phillips
looks for divine interven-
tion to the unanswered
election question
In other city business, the com-
missioners addressed restricUive
action regarding annual, sick and
bereavement leave. This bereave-
ment leave Is so open-ended that
you can read into It anything that
you want," said Commissioner
Putnal. Under the present city
rules, a city employee is entitled
to three days of paid leave if they
request to attend a funeral. Com-
missioner Putnal worried that
some city employees might be able
to misuse the bereavement leave
privileges by requesting to attend
a funeral and then not attending
the occasion. Commissioner
Putnal also suggested that the
paid bereavement leave be limited
to an employees immediate fam-
ily. Commissioner Phillips re-
sponded, "If you're gonna' box
yourself in, you're gonna' box
yourself in." Putnal countered
that he wanted to be fair about
granting bereavement leave and
not show favoritism. Attorney
William Webster stated that the
city's policies for annual, sick and
bereavement leave were identical


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^Owners


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S9&"zdCAdz


to the state's policies. The board
decided to review the state poli-
cies and bring the matter up at
their regular June meeting.
The meeting closed with Commis-
sioner Jim Phillips complaining
about the city's police patrol in re-
gard to the number of traffic cita-
tions. Phillips said that he wanted
to review the number of traffic ci-
tations per month with the police
chief. "I'm sick and tired of hear-
ing complaints about four wheel-
ers, speeding and running stop
signs on the back roads," said
Phillips. Officer Jep Smith, who
was attending the meeting, stated
that he hadbeen patrolling the
back roads. Commissioner
Phillips said that he would speak
to Police Chief Jessie Smith about
the matter. "It's not just you {Jep
Smith} that I'm talking about. It's
all of you," concluded Phillips.




CONT
CHRONICL


Peterson to
Speak on Health
Care Reform in
Tallahassee

On Monday, April 24, from 2:30
pm to 3:30 pm (EST) Congress-
man Pete Peterson, D-Marianna,
will speak on the status of health
care reform. The Congressman
will address Department Heads,
Vice Presidents, administrative
and medical staff members on the
second floor auditorium of the
Tallahassee Memorial Regional
Medical Center, Tallahassee.
Since coming to Congress in
1990, Congressman Peterson has
been a major player on the issue
of Health Care Reform. In the last
Congress, he introduced a Long
Term Health Care bill and has co-
drafted the Managed Competition
Bill of 1993 and the Managed
Competition Bill of 1994.
If you have any questions, please
contact Dylan Sumner or Tom
Pitcock, in the Congressman's
Tallahassee office at (904) 561-
3979.


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I


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4E)










Published every other Friday


The Franklin Chronicle 21 April 1995 Page 3


Editorial and Commentary


We are now in the seventh week
of the road preservation work on
County Road 370 and according
to Wayne Wiggs, federal inspec-
tor for the Department of Com-
munity Affairs (DCA), the con-
struction process is on schedule
for completion around April 25.
So far, the only unanticipated
problem encountered has been
the need to temporarily erect
sheet piling (interlocking sheets of
steel strips) at the West end of the
site to ward of surf surges pro-
pelling sand and water into the
ongoing revetment construction.
Wiggs explained that if sand is
permitted to permeate onto the
geo-textile fabric which has been
installed between the road sand
bed" and the strategically em-
ployed granite rock that a later
storm water surge would cause


the sand to drain out from under
the rock, thus leaving a void in
space within the rock structure.
This would result in a fault that
would most likely cause a physi-
cal shift along the construction
line compromising the reliability
of the revetment.
Ben Withers, a local heavy equip-
ment contractor, was called in to
get the Job done. Withers very
quickly had his pile-driving-
equipment in place and began the
leap-frog process of erecting and
removing the pilings and assur-
ing that the revetment construc-
tion stayed on schedule.
Once the granite rock, concrete
apron, and pedestrian walkover
are in place the contractor and the
DCA are history, they are gone
To the dismay of the residents of
the Point, they were being advised


Letter to the Editor

The symposium held on the Florida State University campus on March
29, 1995 went a long way toward explaining how the conduct of the
Florida Marine Fisheries Commission since its inception in 1983 could
be so at odds with the legislation which created that commission
Florida Statutes Chapter 370. The reason we could be so enlightened
was that the Commission's executive director, Mr. Russell Nelson was
a panel member.
While the commission is the body that passes regulations (subject to
approval by the Governor and Cabinet), Mr. Nelson is the final arbitor
of the data presented o the Commission members. The relevant in-
formation Is obtained by MFC staff from the Division of Marine Re-
sources. It is in turn passed on to each of the Commission members.
It is my view that this information is sifted for a favorable result by
the MFC staff at Mr. Nelson's direction.
At the symposium the director presented the scenario of his perfect
world. Here the all knowing director would impose the regulations he
felt best protected the marine resources with no oversight by the Gov-
ernor and Cabinet. He would accept the views of scientists, but since
they did not know fisheries management he would be at liberty to rely
on anecdotal information when his view was not supported by scien-
tific date. This is not the democratic way and is not the view of the
legislature.
The most disturbing statement made by Mr. Nelson was that by the


Vo ,R1 POST OFFICE BOX 590
%n EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
a 904-927-2186
1VI, 904-385-4003 (TALLAHASSEE)
% N Facsimile 904-385-0830
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE, INC.
Vol. 4, No. 8 21 April 1995
Publisher ................................................ Tom W Hoffer
Editor and Manager ................................. Brian Goercke
Contributors ............................................. Carole Ann Hawkins
........... Paul Jones
........... Randle Leger
............ Bonnie L. Dietz
............ Rene Topping
........... Judy Corbus
........... Wayne Childers
............ Laura K. Rogers
............ Amanda Loos
Survey Research Unit.............................. Tom W. Hoffer
........... Eric Steinkuehler
Sales Manager ....................... Teresa Williams
927-3361
Computer Systems,
Advertising Design,
Production and Layout ............................ Christian Liljestrand
........... Eric Steinkuehler
............ Audra Perry
Circulation .............................................. W ill M orris
........... Bonnie Dietz
Citizen's Advisory Group
George Chapel....................... .......... Apalachicola
Sandra Lee Johnson ........................... Apalachicola
Grace and Carlton Wathen .............. Carrabelle
Rene Topping .......................................... Carrabelle
Pat Morrison ........................ .......... St. George Island
Tom and Janyce Louthridge .................... St. George Island
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung................ Eastpoint
Brooks W ade.... ............................ Eastpoint
W ayne Childers ... ...... .. ........... Port St. Joe
Back Issues
For current subscribers, back issues of the Chronicle are available
free, in single copies, if in stock, and a fee for postage and
handling. For example an 8 page issue would cost $1.75 postpaid.
To others back issues are priced at 350 each plus postage and
handling. Please write directly to the Chronicle for price quotes
if you seek several different or similar issues. If a single issue,
merely add 350 to the price quote above. In-county subscriptions
are $16.00 including tax. Out-of-county subscriptions are $22.26
including tax.
All contents Copyright 1995
Franklin County Chronicle, Inc.


Board of County Commissioners
public meeting Tuesday, April 4,
in Apalachicola, to oppose the
zoning change request by the
Mader Company for a 10 acre
parcel of property bordering
CR370 from residential to com-
mercial.
Once there, the group was advised
that the Mader Company had
withdrawn the request due to the
mounting opposition. It is a safe
bet that this rezoning request will
surface again in the future.


by officials of the county, yes
(gasp), Franklin County would be
responsible for the reconstruction
of the roadbed.
A local resident exclaimed, "Oh
My God, Oh Sh--, that might take
until sometime In the 21st cen-
tury." Now representatives of the
Save the Alligator Pint Road Inc.
have acclaimed that their lobby-
ist has identified emergency fed-
eral funds to do the road work.
It is not yet certain whenever of
whomever will be responsible for
laying down a limestone base and
paving the 1700 feet of road bed,
until then, residents and visitors
will still be either b-o-u-n-c-i-n-g
through the camp grounds or ar-
ticulating through the ruts in
front of the camp grounds trying
to avoid damaging concrete revet-
ment apron.


LIMESTONE BOULDERS
The good news, the county has
begun removing the limestone
boulders lined up on both sided
of the right-of-way along CR370.
It is certainly good news for the
Alligator Point Water Resource
District, as it reduces the possi-
bility of rupturing the main water
line from the pumping station.
According to Prentiss Crum,
Franklin County Road Mainte-
nance, the boulders will now be
crushed and used for roadbed
preparation.
REZONING REQUEST
A sizable contingent of represen-
tatives from the Alligator Point
Taxpayers Association were on
hand at the Franklin County


year 2000 Florida would be a non-consumptive user of marine re-
sources. This means no recreational harvest and no commercial har-
vest. Florida would be a catch and release state. No fish to take home,
no crabs and no oysters. This is blatantly in oppositionto the view of
the legislature which has said that
Conservation and management measures shall permit reasonable means and
quantities of annual harvest, consistent with maximum practicable sustain-
able stock abundance on a continuing basis.
This ispnot the first time Mr. Nelsornhas made this statement.
Everyone is well aware of the present pllgh t of the commercial fishing
industry in Florida. What everyone is not aware of is that the recre-
ational fishing industry will soon have its own failed businesses and
displaced workers if Mr. Nelson and the environmental extremist view
prevails and not that of the legislature. The decreased daily bag limits
imposed on recreational fishermen has already drastically reduced
both guide fishing business and weekend fishing activity. Informal
surveys of fishermen have shown that they wouldn't bother coming
to the coast to fish if they had to release everything caught. Certainly
conservation regulations are necessary but not this extreme mea-
sure.
Since Mr. Nelson has revealed that his philosophy is not in accor-
dance with that of the legislature and his past conduct has proved
his lack of inclination to moderate his view while receiving a state
salary generated by taxpayer money, he should resign ( or be re-
placed) and pursue his agenda from outside government and not as
director of the Marine Fisheries commission.
Allan Rankin

Publisher's Note: Mr. Rankin has been a commercial fisher-
man since 1971 with the exception of a three year stint in the
FSU School of Law. The story of the FSU Symposium was
published in the Chronicle issue of 7 April 1995. A slightly
edited audio tape of the Symposium is advertised in this issue
on another page.


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FAX: (904) 927-2230


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homesites. You may reach us after

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Noxious Tropical
"Plant From
Hell" Spreading
Through Florida

A nuisance weed that research-
ers have dubbed "the plant from
hell" is spreading throughout
Florida at an alarming rate and
is now showing up in hay and sod.
"Finding tropical soda apple in
hay and sod means that the weed
is going to be a problem for
homeowners and landscapers, as
well as farmers and ranchers,"
Florida Agriculture Commissioner
Bob Crawford said.
The weed has already invaded al-
most a million acres of pasture,
natural areas and roadsides in
Florida, he said.
The "plant from hell" is aptly
named because of 3/4-inch
thorny prickles on its leaves and
stems, as well as its ability to
spread rapidly. Plants can grow 6
feet tall and they produce small,
green-striped fruit, which can
contain up to 400 seeds each.
Cattle and wildlife eat the fruit,
spreading the seeds.
Tropical soda apple appeared in
Florida in the early 1980s and it
has now been confirmed in Ala-
bama, Georgia and Mississippi. It
is a severe problem in pastures
because it displaces grasses used
for grazing.
For information about identifying
and destroying tropical soda apple
contact your county Cooperative
Extension office or:
Fla. Dept of Agriculture and
Consumer Services
Division of Plant Industry
P. 0. Box 147100
Gainesville, FL 32614-7100


rateae Flori,,

R*











TM



A Brief History of

Florida...A Series
British Period
For the European heads of state, Florida was a pawn in a
complex political rivalry. At the conclusion of the French
and Indian War, Florida was ceded to England in the Treaty
of Paris. The British plan of settlement depended on es-
tablishment of commercial plantations, in contrast to the
Spanish religious and military settlements. During the brief
two decades of British rule, St. Augustine and Pensacola
were tne principal towns, but many private plantations
were established along the St. Johns River and in west
Florida. During this time Creek Indians from Georgia and
Alabama, already allies of the British, began to enter the
peninsula, eventually forming the groups today recognized
as the Seminole and Miccosukee tribes. During the Ameri-
can Revolution the Florida colonies remained loyal to the
British. At the conclusion of the war, Florida was returned
to Spain which had been an ally of the new United States.

Second Spanish Period
At the change of flags, St. Augustine was reoccupied by
many of the residents who had left 20 years earlier. The
advances of the last two decades were continued as many
of the coastal and river plantations established by the Brit-
ish were taken up by prominent Spanish citizens. Many
cultures were present in the territory, including free Afri-
can Americans, Seminoles, Americans, Minorcans, Span-
ish colonists and others, thus providing a cultural diver-
sity that remains typical of the area today. Still, the suc-
cess of the Spanish colony remained tenuous, especially
in the new town of Fernandina near the Georgia border, a
focus of political and social intrigue. In 1818, in what is
known as the First Seminole War, Andrew Jackson led
American forces into the Floridas to punish troublesome
Seminoles and runaway slaves. He also executed two Brit-
ish subjects accused of inciting the Indians. By the end of
the war, it was clear that Florida was on the way to becom-
ing an American territory. Spain and the United States
signed the Adams-Onis Treaty in 1819 and when it was
ratified in 1821, Florida became a United States territory.


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511 Highway 98 West Apalachicola, Florida 653-9228


ALLIGATOR POINT ByPaulJones


_I _


I -- I -










Page 4 21 April 1995 The Franklin Chronicle


Published every other Friday


Rick Taylor's Astro Tables



A PR NOTE: I your water is above 70 degrees (ie: in the south), disregard "Heat-of-the-Day" period.
95 _*J*j' BEST 2nd Best 3rd Best 4th Best SthBest I
I Sat |I1 I ,l s55 HEAT/DAY iKltb^,Il0 NOON II DAWN SIIEE YESTERDAY | |
THIS LUNAR PERIOD OVERLAPS A SOLAR PERIOD TODAY. SO ONLY THE LUNAR TIME IS LISTED
Fri 21 l5 HEAT/DAY I l 0 NOON 6:41-7:47p* HALF
Sat 22 55 I HEAT/DAY I R 7:30-8:46p* 0 NOON \| L


Sun 23
Mon 24
Tue 25
Wed 26
Thu 27
Fri 28
Sat 29

0 25 50 75100








S-k
MAY A
95 1
Mon I
Tue 21
Wed 3
Thu 4
Fri 5
Sat 6

Sun 7 1
Mon 8
Tue 9
Wed 10
Thu 11
Fri 12
Sat 13

Sun 14 L
Mon 15
Tue 16
Wed 17
Thu 18
Fri 19
Sat 20

'Sun21
Mon 22
Tue 23
Wed 24U
Thu 25
Fri 26
Sat 27


.Sun 28 ]
Mon29HIPM
Tue30

o 25 50 7510o


ON


Search and
Rescue Group

'Provide Worthy

Community

Service

By Laura Rogers
The Gulf County Search and Res-
cue (GCSSR) organization have. in
the past, turned out for flood and
storm rescue, evacuations, boat-
ing problems, drownings, and all
the manner of other emergencies
within both Gulf and Franklin
counties. They were a key part of
the rescue effort that took place
last summer when Hurricane
Alberto threatened the Northwest
.Florida coast.
The group, which was organized
in 1982 was formed to assist law
enforcement and other agencies
in crisis situations where extra
man-power was needed. All refer-
rals to GCSSR come through the
Sheriffs department. A referral
may be something as simple as
providing transportation of equip-
ment or as complicated as
searching for a lost hunter in
many miles of woods in harsh cold
or heavy rain, or the dead of
night. The group meets every 1st
and 3rd Tuesday of the month.
The first monthly meeting is a
business meeting The second
meeting is a training meeting for
current and new members. Train-
ing offerings can be on such di-
verse subjects as CPR or boating,
or may be lectures by members
of the Coast Guard, helping team
members develop skills which
might make a vital difference
when they count the most.
According to Ms. Debble Frye,
secretary of the group, the


555 HEAT/DAY W- Q NOON 0 DAWN 8:16-9:42p
55 HEAT/DAY L NOON 0 DAWN I:iH l 8:56-10:40p
55 HEAT/DAY 0 NOON 0 DAWN I jir 9:36-11:32p
S55HEATDAY I?1 1I1 0 NOON 0 DAWN 10:151225a
55 HEATIDAY 0l' Q DAWN 0 NOON 10:53p-1:17a
55 HEAT/DAY i C DUSK DAWN 11:32p-2:08a
i555. HEAT/DAY Q DAWN SEE YESTERDAY DUSK


55 HEAT/DAY


I 0o00-0:0o
IO QNOON


I <-. I


I DAWN 12:13-2:59a DUSK I


OVERHEAD 55 HEAT/DAY MID-AFTERNOON (3 HRS)
S UNDERFOOT I DAWN FIRST 3 HRS. OF LIGHT
2SUN OVERsHEAD I DUSK LAST 1.5 HRS. OF LIGHT


NOTE: If your water is above 70 degrees (ie: in the south), disregard "Heat-of-the-Day" period.
BEST 2nd Best 3rd Best 4th Best 5thBest
55I HEAT/DAY |QCLBlil l 0 DAWN 0 NOON 12:54-3:50a
P"I I DAWN Q NOON i DUSK 1:39-4:39a
n Q DUSK Q NOON i DUSK 2:25-5:29a
0 r r NOON 0 NOON 0 DUSK 3:13-6:17a
Sl 555 HEAT/DAY Q DAWN 0 NOON 4:02-7:02a
555 HEAT/DAY 4:52-7:46a* I :EEEE: I 0 NOON MIDNIGHT
" THIS LUNAR PERIOD OVERLAPS A SOLAR PERIOD TODAY. SO ONLY THE LUNAR TIME IS LISTED
5:43-8:29a* |55 HEAT/DAY Q NOON MIDNIGHT
55 HEAT/DAY i 0R 6:35-9:09a O DAWN 0 NOON
55 HEAT/DAY DAWN 0 NOON r7:27-9:51a
555 HEAT/DAY 0 DAWN Q NOON 1:2 8:23-10:29a
55i HEAT/DAY Q DAWN Q NOON : !9:20-11:10a
55 HEAT/DAY 0 DAWN 0 NOON E 3 10:18-11:543
M HEATIDAY .Q DAWN Q NOON 11:21a-12:41


12:27-1:29p* 5 DAWN I5 HEAT/DAY S I1
0 DAWN I 55HEAT/DAY 1:29-2: 29p I N E
0 DAWN 2:34-3:30p 55 HEAT/DAY I NOON


3:36-4:32p* 0Q DAWN O NOON | DUSK
DAWN 4:33-5:35p 55 HEAT/DAY 0 NOON
Q DAWN :5:26-6:36p 55 HEAT/DAY il ."
555I 8 HEAT/DAY '6:13-7:37pl O NOON


C DUSK'

311-4:07

NOON


n DUSK


:6:57-8:33p* O NOON ||5 I HEAT/DAY |p DuMIDNIGHT
I DAWN 7:38-9:28o O NOON I DUSK


I ONLi~1i~


Q NOON I DUSK 9:31p-12:05a


0 DAWN
.0 DAWN


-Q DAWN EO~J~~f~~RrlnQ NOON I 4DUS
Q DAWN I AfM ol Qs NOON 21DIn DUSK 110n:59D-1046al


m.... ...i .&-> .- I-n --- II ..-- r .-tw1

l ODAWN DUSK 11:36p2:36a* 55 HEAT/DAY
S DAWN SEE YESTERDAY DUSK 555 HEAT/DAY
I DAWN 12:22-3:26a* DUSK 55i HEAT/DAY
. DAWN 0 NOON n DUSK 1:09-4:13a
OVERHEADAD F -O5 HEAT/DAY MID-AFTERNOON (2 HRS)
: I MERFOOT ., :. 0 DAWN [ FIRST 3.5 HRS. OF LIGHT
(OON HNO) ERHED) I DUSK LAST 1.5 HRS. OF LIGHT
) 2. MR.


GCSSR group 'utilized in a lot of
ways' during the recent floods.
She said candidly of the flooding
in Gulf county "People still don't
realize how bad it was." The
group which receives its basic
budget from the county, is ex-
pected to raise the rest needed
through fund-raisers and dona-
tions. The group is very concerned
with their counties, attending
county commission meeting to
keep abreast of county develop-
ments. Recently at the last county
commission meeting assistance in
the amount of $2000.00 was
given to the group to purchase
new radios to assist them in their
relief efforts. But such a gift is a
drop in the bucket when it is
taken into account that human
suffering from natural disasters,
accidents, and other tragedies is
more or less constant, and re-
sources must be continuously
replenished.
To this end, fund raisers are given
on a consistent basis.Recently a
gospel sing was given in the
Wewahitcha area in which partial
proceeds went to the group. Other
benefits are planned for the re-
mainder of the year to be an-
nounced later.
Membership recruitment is an
ongoing project and is very impor-
tant to the group. Prospective
members are asked to choose a
unit or units that they would be
most willing to be called out on to
help. Choices are land, river/lake,
salt water searches, underwater
searches requiring divers, and
disasters. New members receive
extensive training before they are
sent out and have the advantage
of working with seasoned team
members.
Meetings are held in the building
behind the library with Search
and Rescue painted on the roof
at the designated times. If you
wish to be a member, are at least


APOGEE
HIGH




HALF



-


FULL
PERIGEE
LOW









NEW




...
1 ..........


18 years old, have been a citizen,
of Gulf county for one year, and
have a clean criminal record, you
are encouraged to volunteer for
this worthy organization. Dona-
tions can be sent to the Sheriffs-
department ear-marked for'
GCSSR.

U. S. Coast Guard

Auxiliary News

By Holly Gallups

U. S. Coast Guard Aux-
iliary Celebrates 56th
Birthday on 23 June
1995


ated by Act ot Congress in itou,
is the Volunteer Civilian Arm of
the United States Coast Guard.
In promoting safe boating in the
U.S.A ,it performs these non-
profit services: 1. Teaches several
public boating courses, 2. Exam-
ines recreational boats for proper
safety equipment, 3. Assists regu-
lar Coast Guard in Search & Res-
cue, 4. Patrols navigable and state
waterways.
Both the "Auxiliary Manual" and
the "1992 Membership Recruiting
and Retention Guide" currently
emphasize a flotilla may recruit
new members not owning a facil-
ity who "enhances the flotilla's
ability to carry out the Auxiliary
Program." Almost any skill can be
used now and especially in the
near future in view of increased
"non traditional tasks" as well as
provide crew members,
instructors,vessel examiners and
other flotilla staff.
WE NEED NON-FACILITY OWN-
ERS. Here is an opportunity to
recruit young motivated members
to perform the many non-tradi-
tional tasks who do not own a fa-
cility, BUT SOME DAY WILL. In
the meantime,they will help us
carry out our increased respon-
sibilities.

Flotillas in Our Area
Are:
FLOTILLA 15- Apalachicola-
FC Ron E. Meloche
FLOTILLA 11- Alligator Point-
FC Mark Davidson
FLOTILLA 13- Shell Point-
FC Eleanor S. Carlan
FLOTILLA 12- St. Marks-
FC Elaine Townes
These are the only Flotilla's cov-
ering from Yankeetown Fl, to
Panama City Fl. We would like to
have you with usl
Flotilla 1-1 had a rescue on the
water Saturday, 15 April. The dis-
abled boat was a 24 foot power
boat with five people aboard. They
were located south of Dog Island
Reef.
Mark Davidson, operator, and
Paul Gallups, crew member, of the
Coast Guard Vessel towed them
to Alligator Point Marina with no
problems.
Flotilla 1-1 held a Boating Safety
Class at the F S.U. Lab on Tur-
key Point 7 April. There were eight
students who graduated and are
now qualified to be aboard the F
S.U Research Boats. Teachers
were Maxine Fisher, John
Probert,and Mark Davidson.

Memorandum:
Division 1 Conference will be held
in Panacea, Fl. on 24-25 June
1995; '
Make your reservations now:
Dead line on reservations for
MOTEL ROOMS is 13 June
1995. The price is $31.95, plus
each room occupant must have a
tax exempt paper with them.
Dead line for the BANQUET is 20
June 1995. Price is $15 00 each
Send Reservations to:
Maxine Fisher
Project-Officer
P.O. Box 854
Panacea, Fl 32346
(904) 984-5712
LOCATION OF CONFERENCE:
Posey's Beyond The Bay
Panacea, Fl.



SEAFOOD
RESTAURANT


ASTRO TABLES 2000 MONTHLY
INFORMATION COLUMN

Rick Taylor's Astro Tables 2000 adds a new, more accurate dimen-
sion to predicting fish and game activity.
* While the overhead and underfoot moon and sun are still large
factors in the best times of any day, this calendar is the first to in-
clude your area's hourly changes in light and temperature levels, as
generated by the sun. The three new periods are dawn (darkness
turning into light and the coolest time of day), heat-of-the-day, and
dusk (light turning to darkness). By itself or coinciding with a lunar
period, each can be instrumental in daily fish and game movements.
* The "Best" column in the "Daily Periods" section suggests which
period may have the most potential for that day. The "2nd Best" col-
umn shows the next best choice, and so on. The top pick each day
gears more to fish and depends mostly on seasonal water tempera-
ture; some adjustment may be needed for your purposes in spring
and fall.
* Every 24-hour stretch has six or seven potential periods, but due
to space limitations only the best five are shown here.
* Each day's evaluation (see "Daily Ratings").is determined by the
ever-changing positions of the sun and moon. On a sliding scale of)0
to 100, the higher the number (see "Value" column or black bars) the
more solar/lunar influence it is experiencing.
* Astro Tables 2000 is based on the PrimeTimes Wall Calendar, which
in turn is based on solar/lunar research at a leading college of astro-
physics, radio-tracking studies, and the general consensus of expert
outdoorsmen. Annual astral data is supplied by the U.S. Naval Ob-
servatory. All lunar times are adjusted to the center of your time zone
and for Daylight Saving Time.
SPECIAL CALENDAR PACKAGE AND BOOK OFFER
The PrimeTimes 1995 Wall Calendar, with its FREE take-it-with-you
1995 Pocket Calendar, are available to Franklin County Chronicle
readers. This first-ever, fullcolor, 22" x 9" wall calendar uses a graphic
format of peaks-and-valleys to accurately show fish and game activ-
ity periods. It includes special summary charts, "Timely Tips," and a
look ahead at 1 996. The Free pocket calendar uses the Astro Tables
2000 format seen here. Both: $9.95.
Also available, "Under the Solar/Lunar Influence" by Rick Taylor. This
informative book offers the scientific facts and theories behind the
solar/lunar phenomenon, provides honest answers to your questions,
and has good tips. Over 12,000 words and well illustrated. $7.95.
SPECIAL OFFER--Get both the book and calendar package for
$ 15.95


Send to:


PrimeTimes 95
Dept FC
P.O. Box 395, Ankeny, IA 50021


For MasterCard or Visa orders, call (5 1 5) 964-5573


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super i
Secr ta Secretaries'

Week
April 23-29, 1995
Every day, your secretary works to
make your job a little easier. Send a
gift of beautiful flowers to let your
secretary know how much you
appreciate a job well done.

The Flower Shoppe

697-3852 Carrabelle
Fresh MugArrangements / Balloons-$10.95








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OWNER


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DAN BENNET
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Published every other Friday


The Franklin Chronicle 21 April 1995 Page 5


Camp Gordon Johnston Association


Board Members Betty Mason (L), Jim Miller (C) and Kay Arbuckle (R)


Consumer

News You

Can Use

Don't Get Nailed: Use
Reputable, Licensed
Contractors
Spring is a popular time for many
people to make improvements to
their homes. And while there are
many skilled contractors to
choose from, there are also con
artists posing as legitimate crafts-
men, builders andrepair people,
whose primary skills are to sepa-
rate homeowners from their hard-
earned money.
These unscrupulous people act
friendly, knowledgeable and sin-
cere, and offer money-back guar-
antees. Some may even deliver a
small supply of materials to the
Job site. Often these "supplies" are
Just props scrap wood, empty
uckets and other discarded con-
struction items. They make prom-
ises of quick and inexpensive im-



For Food Orders


provements, pressure the
homeowner into paying a large
up-front deposit, and then disap-
pear without completing the work.
Sometimes no work is performed
at all.
Here are some tips on how to spot
a con artist:
*Usually solicits door-to-door and
has "just finished a job down the
street."
*Arrives in an unmarked car, van,
or truck.
*May claim to have materials left
over from another job and can do
the work at a discount.
*Has a post office box or local mo-
tel as an address, but no regular
street or business address.
*Asks the homeowner to obtain all
necessary building permits.
The Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services
advises homeowners to deal only
with reputable, licensed contrac-
tors, and to observe the following
guidelines:



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*Check to see if the contractor Is
properly licensed by calling your
city and county building depart-
ments, and the Florida Depart-
ment of Business and Profes-
sional Regulation (BPR) at 1-800-
342-7940.
*Determine how long a coritrac-
tor has been in business. Check
with local building supply retail-
ers. Ask for and verify local refer-
ences.
*Obtain more than one written es-
timate, especially on large jobs.
Make sure the estimate contains
a complete description of all the
work to be done, costs and
completion dates.
*Don't automatically select the
lowest bid, especially if it is con-
siderably lower than all the oth-
ers. The "low-ball" contractor may
intend to seek more money after
the job is underway, and may not
be able to meet contractual speci-
fications and obligations.
The construction lien law permits
a homeowner's property to be sold
in a court proceeding if a lien is
filed against the property as a re-
sult of an unpaid bill for labor,
materials and other home Im-
provement services. But
homeowners who hire contractors
for more than S2,500 worth .of
improvements can protect them-
selves by obtaining a written "re-
lease of lien" statement from all
unpaid workers, subcontractors,
and suppliers. After all the work
is done, homeowners should
make sure their contractor ob-
tains all appropriate lien releases
before making final payment. For
more information about the Con-
struction Lien Law, call BPR at 1-
800-342-7940 and request a free
brochure.


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Senior Center
"Fashions and
More"
The Senior Citizens Center in
Carrabelle was the site for "Fash-
ions and More," the tenth annual
fashion show luncheon presented
by the Yaupon Garden Club on 25
March.
Amidst a room decorated with
Franklin County grown spring
flowers, the show opened with a
welcome address from Yaupon
Garden Club's President Marcy
McSweeney. A musical skit en-
titled "God Bless the U.S.A." fol-
lowed and was choreographed by
Brandy Waller.
The fashion show then proceeded
with a display of various dresses,
shirts, shorts, spit-skirts and
both men's and women's trousers.
The fashion items were shown in
coordination with jewelry and
other accessories. Some of the
community member who partici-
pated included: Valerie Hampton,
who modeled a reversible velve-
teen cape, which was designed by
her mother, Joan Mahaffey and
her father Ray, who modeled
southwestern clothing accented
with authentic Hope Jewelry,
Shantia Cargill, who was named
the 1994 Miss Franklin County
Seafood Queen, showed off her
self-modeled gowns, Bonnie
Stephenson modeled one her line
dancing outfits, Hess and Alice
Lang Hall modeled their Easter
jewelry, Irene Murray modeled a
springtime outfit, Muriel Crusoe
modeled two formal dresses and
also wore a pinafore made of feed
sack and a hat decorated with cu-
cumbers, fruit and sunflowers,
Wilma and Gwen Barks modeled
their Easter outfits and bonnets,
Nathan and Ryan Martinez mod-
eled beach wear, Norm Boyd fol-
lowed in sportswear and Lorraine
Simmons, Evelyn and Norm
Bergen modeled international
wear. The Bergens wore yukatas,
which are often used by the Japa-
nese as pajamas. Lorraine mod-
eled a reversible coat with two
matching dresses, which were tai-


St. Marks River Ent., Fla., 1995

Times and Heights of High and Low Waters


April


May


Time Height Time Height Time Height


Tide Corrections For Your Area
High Low High Low
Steinhatchee River -0:15 -0:03 Dog island +0:07 +0:06
Aucilla River +0:03 +0:05 St. George Island (East End) -0:15 +0:06
Shell Point +0:05 +0:03 St. George Island (Sikes Cut) +0:49 +1:32
Dickerson Bay +0:16 +0:20 Apalachicola +2:00 +2:44
Bald Point +0:33 +0:19 St. Joseph Bay -0:24 -0.51
Alligator Point -0:08 +0:11 Panama City -0:43 -0.44
Turkey Point -0:12 -0:18 St. Andrews Bay (Channel Entrance) -1:31 -2:02


lored in Hong Kong.
Behind the scenes, Barbara
Randall and Mary McSweeney
worked hard keeping the models
on track. Models who participated
in the show included:
Susan Creek, Bridget Tucker,
Donna Spacey, Parson Moore,
Ryan Martinez, Norman Boyd,
Andrew Kaboli, Tiffany Garrett,
Crystal Hall, Sara Hall, Brandy
Waller, Jo An Mahaffey, Elizabeth
Eller, Michelle Kaboli, Nathan
Martinez, Ray Mahaffey, Robin
Hall, Alice Lang Hall, Betty
Neylon, Mary Katha, Bonnie
Stephenson, Evelyn Bergen,
Norm Bergen, Lorraine Simmons,
Valerie Hampton, Irene Murray,
Shantia Cargill, Katie Cargill,


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Katie Bilbo, David Langston,
Maggie Langston, Hess Hall,
Wilma Barks, Gwen Barks and
Muriel Crusoe.
The chairpersons for the event
were Helen Schmidt and Jo
Woods. The musical accompani-
ment was provided by Barbara
Martin. Participating merchants
included The Camouflage Shop,
Two Gulls and Island Cottons &
More.


What's Free
For a free, monthly newspaper
with news and information of in-
terest to older Floridians, write for
Elder Update, Department of El-
der Affairs, 1317 Winewood Bou-
levard, Building E, Room 317,
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0700.
Who to Call
Join the "Clunkers for Clean Air"
campaign by donating your no-
longer-needed vehicle to the
American Lung Association.
They'll pick up your clunker, and
you'll receive its full value as
stated in the Used Car Guide as a
tax deduction. Call 1-800-LUNG-
USA () for details.




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* We use only the finest-quality paper and chemicals, allowing you to enjoy
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Franklin County Juvenile Justice

Week Council Recognizes

Business Partners for Prevention

By Sandra Lee Johnson, Chairperson
Business Partners for Prevention, established in October 1994, is an
organized effort by multiple business groups to share information
and opportunities for investment in Florida's "at risk" youth In
partnership with the Department of Juvenile Justice, founding Busi-
ness Partners for Prevention are the Florida Chamber of Commerce,
the Florida Retail Federation, and the Florida Council of 100. The
Business Partners are committed to the principle that public and
private sectors can and must work together to Invest collectively In
Florida's future.
Governor Chiles, the Department of Juvenile Justice, and Business
Partners for Prevention have developed the Community Investment
Awards program to recognize the outstanding efforts of business lead-
ers, Individuals, and organizations involved In enriching delinquency
prevention and Intervention programs for "at risk" youth. The Gov-
ernor and Lt. Governor will select the winners. Governor Chiles will
present The First Annual Governor's Community Investment Awards
at the conclusion of Juvenile Justice Week 17-21 April during a
ceremony in Tallahassee on 21 April 1995.
There are seven categories for which businesses can be nominated.
Businesses' involvement in local prevention and intervention programs
serving Florida's "at risk" youth is required. Nomination forms were
mailed to various agencies and facilities in each county all across the
state of Florida. Each county had the opportunity to nominate in-
fluential Business Partners with in their community.
Franklin County Juvenile Justice Council is happy to acknowledge
the Business Partner Nominees from this community:
a. GULFSIDE IGA and owners Wayne Dooley and Jimmy Gibbs
Nominated by Wanda Teat, representative from the Franklin County
School District
b. THE MARITIME MUSEUM and Director Kristen Anderson
Nominated by Lanette Griffin, representative from the Juvenile Jus-
tice Department
We would also like to take this opportunity to say "THANK YOU" to all
of the businesses and agencies who have supported our effort to make
a difference in this community. Your contributions, cooperation, of-
fice and clerical assistance, postage facilitation, provision of meeting
space, public service announcements, advertisements, and encour-
agement are noted. My acknowledgment and appreciation are ex-
tended to:
The Apalachicola Times
Eastpoint Firehouse
WOYS Radio Station
Apalachicola High School
Cook Insurance Agency
Apalachee Mental Health Center
Chapman Elementary School
The City of Apalachicola
St. George Island Inn
Franklin County Library- Eastpoint
Holy Family Center
Gulside IGA
Franklin County Superintendent's Office
Carrabelle Senior Citizens Center
The Franklin County Chronicle
Brown Elementary School
HRS
Franklin County Clerk of Courts
Carrabelle High School
Ard's Grocery Store
The Gibson Inn
Franklin County Library- Carabelle
The Maritime Museum
Gilf State Bank


Juvenile Justice
Resolution

From the Board of County
Commissioners, Franklin
County
WHEREAS, the state's juvenile
crime problem has ramifications
far beyond the juvenile justice
system and affects the health and
integrity of the state's business,
community, education, and fam-
ily institutions; and
WHEREAS, the state as well as
the county must therefore employ
a comprehensive strategy to ad-
dress the problem of juvenile
crime if the problem is to be ef-
fectively solved; and
WHEREAS, statewide there has
been an Increase in the number
of youths committed for delin-
quency of 16% in the last fiscal
year; and
WHEREAS, the county will not
tolerate the criminal activities of
our youth; and


WHEREAS, the citizens of our
community need to have a height-
ened awareness of juvenile justice
issues; and
WHEREAS, the county will work
with the Department of Juvenile
Justice and local businesses on
programs for the prevention and
intervention of juvenile delin-
quency;
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Franklin
County Commissioner, in con-
junction with the city of
Apalachicola, the city Carrabelle,'
and the Franklin County School
Board, proclaim April 17 through
April 21, 1995, as
JUVENILE JUSTICE WEEK
in Franklin County and urge all
citizens of our community to take
part in stopping or preventingju-
venile delinquency and to make a
conscious effort to learn more
about the programs for prevention
and intervention. I further call
upon all the citizens of our com-
munity to join together in the fight
against crime in our society.


r
p
t
t
I
p
1


Workshop at the LAPS Program


Juvenile

Justice

Council

Makes

Proclamation

at County

Courthouse


The Juvenile Justice Council met
on the steps of the Franklin
County Courthouse on 17 April
to proclaim the start of Juvenile
Justice Week, which had already
been declared by the state depart-,
ment.
Mayors Bobby Howell of
Apalachicola and Carlton Wathen
of Carrabelle were on hand for the
event to sign their names to the
the Juvenile Justice proclama-
tion. Franklin County's Juvenile
Justice Chairperson Sandra Lee
Johnson stated, "It was great in
that they {the mayors} came to-
gether. I like'to that see that unity.
And I'm glad to see that they are
taking ownership of this."
Also on hand for the event was
Apalachicola IGA owner Wayne
Dooley, who won the Governor's
Award for his Independent busi-
ness' service to the community.
Mr. Dooley was honored locally at
the Juvenile Justice Counsel's 19
April luncheon and in Tallahas-
see on 21 April. Mr. Dooley was
nominated for the award by
Wanda Teat, the school board's
representative to the Juvenile
Justice Counsel.
Others in attendance included
county commissioners Dink
Braxton and Bevin Putnal,
D.A.R.E. Officer Bruce Varnes,
Franklin County Library Director
Eileen Annie, Franklin County
Adult Reading Program Coordina-
tor Jane Cox, VISTA {Volunteers
in Service to America} Alma Pugh,
Eastpoint WINGS Coordinator
Gloria Rounsaville and children
from the WINGS program.
Juvenile Justice Chairperson
Sandra Lee Johnson also noted
that the first place winners of the
Juvenile Justice Counsel's poster
and t-shirt contest would be hon-
ored at the 19 April luncheon.
IThe contest's theme was "Making
The Right Choice."


Healthy Start From Page 1
hit us at the wrong time of the
year," explained Commissioner
Toliver. Chairman Jimmy
Mosconis requested to know
Healthy Start's budget and then
suggested that Healthy Start give
Franklin County fifty thousand of
its budgeted dollars. "You have
these self-supporting agencies in
the bureaucracy, explained
Mosconis, "And many of these
study's that they offer...we already
know {the data}" Ms. Ellison said
that Healthy Start provided many
direct services to Bay, Gulf and
Franklin counties. She also noted
that, in a year when only 46% of
the requested grants were being
funded, Franklin County was for-
tunate to receive some of Healthy
Start's services.
As of 19 April, General Manager
Jeff Wadsworth of the Nemours
Clinic states that negotiations
with Dr. Elizabeth Curry to pur-
chase the two clinics are moving
ahead and should be completed
before the anticipated 29 May
pullout of Nemours Clinics. Dr.
Elizabeth Curry called the pur-
chase and transition of the clin-
ics a "difficult, but do-able" task."


Camp Gordon Johnston

Association
Members of the Camp Gordon Johnston Association met on 12 April
at Julia Mae's Restaurant to begin progress on commemoration ef-
forts of Camp Gordon Johnston.
"My feeling is, to keep the momentum going, we are going to have to
meet regularly and get going with some of our plans," stated member
Horn. The group is planning to place historic Camp Gordon markers
on Highway 98 and also hopes to stage a parade.
Board members include: Chairperson Bill Mill, Secretary Betty Ma-
son and Historian Kay Arbuckle. Individuals interested in participat-
ing with the Camp Gordon Johnston should contact Chairperson Bill
Miller at 697-3751.


,, , : ,..,,. .., ,-... . ,



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New computers acquired by LAPS Program




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Published every other Friday


Franklin Chronicle


PDqo,, 6 2 Anril 1995 The


I ~ ,. LZI = A J-i . . . . .


-. -' '" ,.

LAPS (Literacy Action Pioneer Services) Outreach Specialists Beth Gibbs (L), Annie
Townsend (C) and Bonnie Segree (R) meet for a computer workshop. The LAPS program
received their much awaited computers in early April. The LAPS Outreach
Specialists will be going out into the community trying to encourage potential stu-
dents to enlist in the free program. The computers are equipped with software, to help
improve basic educational skills. There will also be computers at the Carrabelle and
Eastpoint Branches of the Franklin County Public Library for interested students to
use.


NOW Ig THE]
1 1,
TIME TO
) ICL
-SUBSCRIBE TO

C j Ty
THE FRANKLIN
S ' "
OUNTY
CHRONICLE


SUMS~e

ornVIC:

HUMIC









Published every other Friday


the


Chronicle Bookshop


Mail Order Service -


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Tallahassee-FL 32303


(Hardcover) (16) New. ANDREW: SAV-
AGERY FROM THE SEA. As-
sembled by the staff of the
.'-' ,& g $\:"<' Sun-Sentinel, Fort Lauder-
: dale, Fla., on ANDREW. Sold
S.. nationally for $9.99.
SBookshop price = $4.00.
0ut sts on
u tposts (17) New. RUSHLIMBAUGH's
If THE WAY THINGS OUGHT
th S. f TO BE. Sold nationally for
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Sarir Cnse l~l3nd & Ayl~eiucrbli
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$6.95. HARDCOVER only.





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(20) New. William Roger's
history OUTPOSTS ON THE
GULF, St. George Island and
Apalachicola from early ex-
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Hardcover. Sold regionally
for $30 or more. Available
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Bookshop for $25.00.


HOW TO GET

MOiRE IL :

PER GALjE,

IN THE <


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1812Ill oIKtOR (Y


(1) New. HOW TO GET MORE
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(2) New. DON'T GET MAR-
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CRlECHOICES




(10) New. THE ENCYCLOPE-
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FOR THE 1990s. Nearly
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today's job hunter. Sold na-
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Bookshop price = $12.95.
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(13) New. THE
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r
Please Note
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Books arc shipped In 48 hours,
normally. Some of our books are
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Shd Horowitz
(14) New. MARKETING
WITHOUT MEGABUCKS;
How to Sell Anything on a
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= $5.95. PAPERBACK.


GUIDE TO

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but it is an easy-to-use
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A BUNDLE
202 Ways to
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ii EDGE. An Introduction to
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world's shorelines. Nation-
ally sold at $14.00.
Bookshop price = $9.00. PA-
PERBACK.


---------------------l
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(Please Print)
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Address
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Book
Number Brief Title Cost
I I
I I I
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Total book cost __
Shipping & handling Sales tax (69 in Fl.) +_
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ordered on this form. When
form and your check or money
Ie, 2309 Old Bainbridge Road.
re to add sales tax and shipping
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----------_J


The Franklin Chronicle 21 April 1995 Page 7


A Concert in the Park


On Sunday afternoon at 4 PM, April 30th, the Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts will present a
concert in Lafayette Park in Apalachicola, with Fiegenschuh's Social Orchestra under the direction of Dr.
Charles DeLaney of the Florida State University's School of Music. Fiegenschuh's Social Orchestra was
established around the turn of the century in Mt. Pulaski, Illinois, to provide dance music for the commu-
nity. Karl Fiegenschuh, its leader was a self-taught violinist who served also as postmaster and house
mover.
At the turn of the century, similar dance orchestras existed around Franklin County and performed for
parties in private homes and public places. William Henry Hall, with his artistry with the bow, was the
unrivaled king of Apalachicola's night life with his rendition of "The Bed Fell Down." One person later
regretted that he gave up his fiddle and joined a church. At special dances such as New Year's, the men
wore derbies, swallowtail coats, and long, striped cravats. Theodore Jones would call square dances, and
Sam Hill would sing, while in the Eastpoint of 1912, Herbert Brown, violin, Tobar Williams, mandolin,
and Tonner (Bubber) Segre, guitar, provided the music. Parties in the houses surrounding Lafayette Park
would spill out in o the park and down the long pier,which at that time.spanned a white sandy beach
south of town.
The music played back then consisted of waltzes, two-steps, polkas, quadrilles,and rags. Many of the
occasions were called program dances wherein the responsibility of the male escort was to line up fellow
dancers for his partner, as well dance with her himself.
Charles DeLaney, professor of music at Florida State University and great grandson of Karl Feigenschuh
has been doing research on a large collection of dance music used from 1890 to 1920 and is now re-
establishing the orchestra for performances, dances and recordings. A gift of its sponsors, admittance is
free. The afternoon is intended as both a listening and dancing event. You are asked to bring your own
chairs.
The Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts, now in its ninth year, is a publicly supported effort to bring
community concerts into the area. Supported primarily by its 83 sponsors, it operates under the umbrella
of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society, a not-for-profit, 501-(c)-3, educational, corporation serving
the area through museums, programs, and publications.

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Page 8 21 April 1995 The Franklin Chronicle


County Healtl
Fair Attracts
Youths & Adulti
The month of April began with a
community-wide Health Fair that
attracted over one hundred adults
and young adults at
Apalachicola's Community Cen-
ter.
The day began with a presenta-
tion by Dolores Windoff ol
C.A.RE. on the topic of substance
abuse; the presentation featured
a personal testimony from a com-
munity member who had battled
with an addiction to drugs.
Nemours Clinic Pediatrician Dr.
Betty Curry presented facts about
eating disorders and Dr. Tom
Curry later led a discussion on the
affects of puberty on young men
and women. Sharon Hobbs of the
Bay County Health Department
used a slide presentation to pro-
vide information on sexually
transmitted diseases.


Ri;'j'! r;\


Dr. Elizabeth Curry
Volunteers from Bay County's
BASIC program brought the so-
bering issue of AIDS to the forum.
Three adults living with the AIDS
virus spoke to audience members
about the hardships of finding a
doctor who will treat an AIDS pa-
tient and of the prejudice that
AIDS patients receive from soci-
ety. After the three individuals
spoke to the group, they answered
many questions from adults and
young adults. The AIDS virus,
mentioned one patient, is the
greatest killer of young people
aged 25-34.


Patient from B.A.S.I.C.
A discussion of dating issues was
led by several students. The stu-
dents spoke about the impact on
a young adult's life by engaging
in sexual intercourse before the
individual is ready. A panel dis-
cussion of written questions was
led by Reverend Kip Younger of.
the First Methodist Church in
Apalachicola. The health fair
reached its pinnacle of success
with the promise from Franklin
County School Board member
Jimmy Gander's promise to pro-
vide a similar event in Franklin
County's schools in the next
school year.
The Health Fair was made pos-
sible by the following human ser-
vice partners involved in the
event: HRS, Franklin County
School Administrators, the Fran-
klin County Health Department's
Health Services Team, Bay, Gulf


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P.T.O. Recommends
SDrug Dogs and
Panic Buttons


The Parent/Teacher Organization
(P.T.O.) for Apalachicola High
School recommended random
drug inspections by drug dogs
and panic buttons for classrooms
at their 10 April meeting.
Officer Bruce Varnes brought up
the possibility of using drug dogs
Sfor random student locker inspec-
Stions. He stated that Principal Ed
Duggar was in favor of using drug
dogs and hoped that the drug
dogs could be brought in before
the end of the school year. "This
would at least give the students
the knowledge that a drug dog
might be brought in at any time,"
said Varnes. The P.T.O. then rec-
ommended the use of drug dogs.
The possibility of installing "Panic
Buttons" in classrooms was also
suggested. At present, teachers
cannot make contact with the
main office, unless they leave
their classrooms. "If you've got a
fight and need help," said Cliff
Butler, "You've got to leave a bad
situation to get that help." With
the installation of panic buttons,
i instructors will be able to con-
Stact the main office to ask for as-
sistance If an emergency situation
arises. Some members did worry
that students would begin push-
ing the emergency button as a
prank. Others felt that, if the ini-
tial pranksters were made an ex-
ample of, the students would soon
stop such antics. The P.T.O. then
recommended the installation of
panic buttons.
A concern was raised by board
member Monica Lemleux that
students ought to have a compli-
ment and complaint box, as the
P.T.O. members have. Ms.
Lemieux said that many students
i were reluctant to address the
P.T.O. in a public meeting, but
would more easily be able to write
their concerns. Ms. Lemieux also
mentioned the possibility of hav-
ing a student government liaison
between the students and the
P.T.O.


The meeting commenced with a
film shown by Officer Varnes con-
cerning seat belt safety and the
dangers of drinking and driving,
which was hosted by Police Officer
Pete Collins. In the film, Officer
Collins stressed the importance of
wearing seat belt: "In nineteen
years, I've never unbuckled a dead
person. As the film concluded,
Officer Collins chronicled the
times that he had to meet with
parents and inform them that
their children were injured, due
to driving while intoxicated. "The
greatest heartache you'll ever
know," said Collins, "is when your
child gets hurt." After the film,
Officer Varnes requested and re-
ceived the recommendation of a
Swet-eyed P.T.O. to show the film
to Apalachicola's students before
their prom and graduation.
The Apalachicola High School
i P.T.O. will meet next on 8 May.

Carrabelle High
School Improvement
Advisory Council
Seeks Greater
Participation

The CHS Advisory Council met on
12 April with a full agenda of
school improvement items, which
included drumming more com-
munity participation at the twice
monthly meetings.
Instructor Marian Morris sug-
gested moving the next meeting
to Eastpoint as an outreach effort
to Eastpoint parents. "Browne El-
ementary is our feeder school and
we should reach out to the East-
point community," urged Morris.
Ms. Morris also suggested chang-
ing the meeting time from 3:00 to
5:30 PM to attract more of the
community's working parents.
While fellow instructor David
Meyers agreed with Ms. Morris'
suggestions, vocational Instructor
Mickle Gaye disagreed stating
that the board should concentrate
on fulfilling its Blueprint 2000 re-
quirements, rather than looking
for added community participa-
tion. Advisory Board Chairperson
SMaribeth Diflorio argued, "We're
supposed to make this accessible.
IAnd now it's turning into a school-
Sbased meeting." CHS Principal
Clayton Wooten stated, "The
people that want to make it to
these meetings will make it at any
time that you have them." The
board then voted to maintain the
current meeting time at 3PM and
meeting place at Carrabelle High
School.
SConcerned with strangers enter-
ing Carrabelle High School, the
advisory board made the recom-
mendation to have visitors check
in at the main office and wear
identifiable tags for the duration
I of their visit.
The advisory board also consid-
ered hiring a resource officer. In-
structor Marian Morris initially
Spoke against the idea, feeling
! that problem students needed to


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be transferred to a facility that
would provide counseling. Princi-
pal Wooten stated that a resource
officer would not only keep order,
but provide counseling. Officer
Bruce Varnes concurred, "A re-
source officer is an all purpose
trouble shooter."
Chairperson Diflorlo stated that
SCHS was unable to equally en-
force detention upon all of its stu-
dents. She said that Eastpoint
students, who depended on a
lengthy bus ride home, could not
receive a detention that would
cause them to miss their trans-
portation home.
On the topic of crime in the
schools, Officer Varnes said that
he would intervene in school
problems only if he was contacted
by the school principal. "We are
i Varnes, "by working against each
Other, you defeat your purpose.
He concluded, "A battery's a bat-
tery, whether you've got someone
iith a club or a stick that beats
someone half to death. Whether
the battery's on the street or in
school, it's still a felony."
The meeting concluded with a dis-
cussion concerning students
drinking soda in school. Chair-
person Diflorio felt that students
Should not be allowed to drink
Ssoda in school. She worried that
some students were bringing al-
cohol into the school via soda
bottles. Ms. Diflorio also felt that
that some of the sodas contained
too much caffeine and that stu-
dents were drinking two and three
bottles of the soda in the early
hours. Mickie'Gaye countered by
saying that his students worked
.betterwhen they were able to take
a "coffee break" before beginning
their work. Principal Wooten
stated that he worked at school
that both allowed and disallowed
bottled soft drinks in school. The
matter remained unresolved.


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The Franklin Chronicle *


21 ADril 1995 Page 9


Local Karate Students


Receive


"Yellow Belt"


apsqPE


. i i


By Bonnie Dietz

The Franklin County Martial Arts
Club celebrated the belt advance-
ment of three of their students on
Sunday Afternoon, 26 March. The
club is located behind Neel Auto
Supply on Avenue A in Carrabelle.
What used to be a storage garage
of everything from tools to an old
Volkswagen and motor cycle, is
now a freshly painted and car-
peted dojang.
The students of the club along
with their instructors did the re-
modeling themselves. The club
was originally held in
Apalachicoia and then it moved
to Eastpoint. After losing their
dojang in Eastpoint, they rented
a storage garage which they have
transformed into a karate dojang
right here in Carrabelle on Avenue
A off of Old School House Road.
The regular instructor at this lo-
cation is Robert Rickards, who is
a 1st Degree Black Belt. His regu-
lar ob is as an inmate supervisor
with the Franklin County Road
Crew. His instructor, George
Pruitt of Eastpoint, holds a 2nd
degree black belt, is the main in-
structor at this facility. George is
a member of the Eastpoint Vol-
unteer Fire Department as well as
an EMT with the Emerald Coast
Ambulance Service. In his "spare
time" he works for Pruitt Heating
and Air Conditioning. Jackie Rex,
Black Belt is also an assistant to
the instructors.


Mr. Rickards stated that he has
approximately 15 18 students
at the present time ranging in age
from 6 to over 60. Classes are held
every Monday and Wednesday
night from 6:30 to 7:30 or 8:00
pm.
The type of karate taught at this
dojang is Korean Tai-Kwan-Do,
full contact. When asked the dif-
ference between Karate and Tal-
Kwan-Do Ms Rex told me that
Karate uses 60% hands and 40%
feet and Tai-Kwan-Do is more
aerial using 60% feet and 40%
hands. Tai-Kwan-Do also teaches
discipline of the mind. Mr
Rickards told me that when you
see Chuck Norris in the movies,
he is using Tal-Kwan-Do.
Mr. Rickards says that he empha-
sizes discipline and respect to his
students. Showing them the im-
portance of both and how they are
also important in everyday life. He
assured me that all of his stu-
dents are taught respect for each
other, themselves, as well as their
parents. They all refer to each
other as Sir or Mam regardless
of age as a show of respect.
This instructor also assured me
that he teaches this technique for
self defense only. All of his stu-
dents also know that they are not
permitted to use what they are
taught at school and they can only
practice their techniques after
their homework and chores are
completed. This proof was in the


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pudding so to speak as all the
children present were very well
behaved.
The celebration this afternoon
was to honor three students who
have advanced to the next belt
level. Everyone who enrolls starts
with a white belt. The belt degrees
go according to color and they are
as follows: Yellow, Orange, Green,
Purple, Blue, Brown, Black and
then your degrees of Black. It
takes approximately 3 months of
serious training to get your Yel-
low Belt. David Messer and his
oldest son Aston both received
their Yellow Belts in a presenta-
tion ceremony today as did Ms.
Dorothy Wasson. All three stu-
dents are residents of Carrabelle.
The Club is working on their tech-
nique or form taigaa) and sparring
with hopes to compete in compe-
tition. Mr. Rickards told me that
he hopes to enter some of his stu-
dents in the Sunshine Games in
Tallahassee next March. Mr.
Rickards competed in the Sun-
shine Games held in March of
1994, and brought home two 3rd
place medals in Taiga Forms and
Sparring. Ultimately Mr. Ricky, as
his students call him, would like
to see any of his students who
show promise go on to compete
in the Olympics, as Tai-Kwan-Do
is the official style used in the
Olympics. Good Luck to all his
students and one day we may see
one of them on the podium at the
Olympics accepting a Gold Medal
for the USA.


Consumer

Interest

From the Florida
Department of
Agriculture and
Consumer Services



Check Out Details of
Vacation Packages
Carefully

The arrival of spring traditionally
prompts an upswing in
vacation travel planning. But a
vacation package that looks like
a great deal could be a financial
disaster if consumers don't take
time to check out the details. Free
trips and other inducements are
often used to entice consumers.
A common scheme operates like
this:
Consumers fill out entry forms at
special events such as boat
shows, fairs, rodeos or flea mar-
kets in hopes of winning a "free,
fun-filled vacation" to some exotic
spot. A few weeks later, they re-
ceive a postcard or a phone call
informing them they have been
"selected to receive" the vacation.
But when consumers try to claim
their trip, they find out they must
first pay certain administrative
costs, taxes, upgrade fees or other
expenses. Sometimes they are
told the offer is only good if a sec-
ond, full-price package is also
purchased.
After receiving credit card num-
bers, checking account numbers
or money orders, some travel op-
erators are never heard from
again. Or, consumers may find
there are so many restrictions and
conditions placed on the offer that
it is virtually Impossible to take
the trip.
Consumers who deal with repu-
table local companies and agents
should not experience problems.
Keep these facts in mind:
*All non-exempt Florida-based
sellers of travel must be registered
with the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices. Some companies must also
post a bond.
*Out-of-state travel companies do
not have to register with the De-
partment. When Floridians use an
unregistered and unbonded out-
Sof-state travel business, they are
not afforded the same protection
under Florida law,


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104. British title
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110. Aimless
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115. German auto pioneer
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8. Singer Paul 68. Lamb producer
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Irving Berlin hit 87. Beans
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e 1Y


APALACHICOLA ANTIQUE AUTO Beautiful I
HOW OPENS UP THE PAST ful L.
5HOW OPENS UP THE PAST Iooein Loop Pe


i 1 ......... .- The Tenth Annlv
S .' I :- " :" "' tlion of th e G old C
Ir ,/..* '. M* -^ *. Race held in ear


versary celebra-
Cup Antique Car
lr Anil 19 (r i.


.' y^*IIT rJl C77i J I
Apalachicola brought visitors into
a time tunnel. The display of old
automobiles also reminded view-
ers of the historic, landmark mile-
stones such antique automobiles
brought to American life.
The Model T, tUn Lizzie", manu-
factured by the Ford Motor Com-
pany in and after 1908 up to
1928, brought the automobile


i erner


Call now for Free Estimate
The Supply Dock
Bayside Floorcovering
927-2674


Pine St. Mini Mall St. George Island


Resort Village Continued
From Page 1
and Rule 9J-2, Florida Adminis-
trative Code.
3. A sufficient plan and design for
an advanced wastewater treat-
ment facility, including provisions
for monitoring the impacts of ef-
fluent disposal.
4. Limitations on the amount and
type of development which may
occur prior to the construction of
the advanced wastewater treat-
ment facility, so that the facility
is constructed as soon as suffi-
cient flow is available for treat-
ment
5. Provisions for providing potable
water to the development from a
central water system and limita-
tions on the number of temporary
wells.
6. Provisions for addressing im-
pacts to wetlands.
7. Provisions pertaining to
stormwater management and
flood control including limitations
on the amount of non-pervious
surface and non-naturally veg-
etated surface in the develop-
ment.
8. Provisions for hurricane evacu-
ation.
9. Elimination of any dock or
walkway system to Apalachicola
Bay."
Thus, Dr. Johnson is not pre-
cluded from proposing multi-fam-
ily residences in a new plan, pro-
vided such a submission answers
the concerns described above.
In a press statement issued the
same day as the decision, Dr.
Johnson said "We plan to concen-
trate on developing the first phase
of the Resort Village. We antici-
pate submitting an application for
site approval to Alan Pierce, the
County Planner, within the next
30 days. This initial application
will involve less than 10 acres on
the Gulf side of Leisure Lane..."
Dr. Johnson indicated that his
company had not made any deci-
sion on seeking multi-family de-
velopment


Lost Hurrahl: Solution


Sources for statistical informa-
tion: Oscar Theodore Barck, Jr.
Et al. Since 1900: A History of the
United States in Our times. New
York: Macmillan Publishing Co.,
Inc. 1974.


The Recommended Order by Huff
contained a recommendation that
the County denial of multi-family
zoning be overturned and Dr.
Johnson be permitted to proceed
with multi-family plans. Huff cited
other County decisions which ap-
proved multi-family, thereby in-
voking estoppel a contract law
concept which implies that the
adverse party was placed at a dis-
advantage because of reliance on
earlier land use decisions.
FLWAC, by rejecting the entire
Recommended order by Huff, also
rejected the multi-family plan in
this particular matter. This does
not preclude the future submis-
sion of a new amendment to the
1977 DO.


within reach of many American
families. Priced at $850 in 1908,
$360 In 1917, and $290 In 1924,
this four-cylinder model T, the
mass-manufactured product of
Ford assembly lines,had enor-
mous Impact on the American
economy by the mid-1920s.
Henry Ford was able to produce
the Model T cheaply because he
concentrated on a single model
and pioneered the assembly-line
way of organizing production, al-
though the concept of using in-
terchangeable parts had been ex-
ploited as early as 1798 by Eli
Whitney and the manufacture of
firearms.
The production of automobiles
required large supplies of steel,
glass, rubber, aluminum and cop-
per and their operation consumed
the largest share of the nation's
petroleum products. The indus-
try not only provided 350,000Jobs
but Indirectly influenced employ-
ment in tire factories, salesper-
sons, repair men, filling station
attendants, truck drivers and oth-
ers. Road repair and construction
was also directly affected by the
presence of the ModelT, and other
autos, when up to nearly $10 bil-
lion was spent on highway work
in the 1920s.
For the farmers, the mass-pro-
duced automobile provided a new
means of transportation in bring-
ing product to market, and it also
diminished his isolation. As trav-
eling Americans became "tour-
ists", businessmen began to make
money in new enterprises such as
billboards, tourist camps, filling
stations, and short-order eating
shops. Indeed, the auto show,
staged at the Gibson Inn,
Apalachicola, on 8 April 1995,
reminded us of how important
this form of transportation has
been to the economic life of Fran-
klin County, bringing thousands
of visitors to Franklin's commu-
nities each year.


Grand Opening










926-3036
Directions: Take 319 to Sopchoppy. Turn left onto Bernard Avenue. Follow road to
Pullback,and turn on to Pullback. n ing Pullback1.25miles,
Look for tree sign and 434 on the left.


A l eicare Certifled Health Clinic

Riverview Medical -

(904) 697-4288 8"
Dn., H.,.nr 5th St. & Hnv. 98 Carrabelle, FL 32322

Internal Medicine Critical Care Dr. Mahmud Sheikh
InternalMedicine
Free Blood Pressure Check Home Visits Phrinr-,
School & Athletic Physicals Home Health Specialist
Minor Surgical Procedures Cardiac Event Home Monitor

Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm
Commercial Blue Cross/Blue Shield Medicaid Medicare Champus Workman's Comp.


This 3BR/2.5BA home offers comfortable living with private upstairs master suite and
balcony, kitchen with walk in pantry, storage area on ground level, vinyl siding and great
beach access. Great rental potential. $189,500.00
HOMESITES
BEACHFRONT home site in Casa Del Mar, St. George Plantation near boardwalk to beach.
Also includes water tap. $219,000.00
ST. GEORGE PLANTATIONone acre interiorbuilding sitewith nice vegetation. $45,000.00
GUFVIEWone acre home site in St. George Plantation with beautiful vegetation. 55,000.00
INTERIOR residential building site located in peaceful area. $16,000.00
BAYVIEW lot located ion comer in quiet are. Must be owner financed. $32,500.00







Audio Tape Recording

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Iv--~ ~


Page 10 21 April 1995 The Franklin Chronicle


Published every other Friday


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