Title: Franklin county chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089927/00019
 Material Information
Title: Franklin county chronicle
Uniform Title: Franklin county chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Tom W. Hoffer
Place of Publication: Eastpoint, FL
Publication Date: July 10, 1993
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089927
Volume ID: VID00019
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text





Carrabelle City proposed Budget, page 2


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
APALACHICOLA, FL
32320
PERMIT #8


The Franklin CountyChronicle


Volume 2, Number 13


Published twice monthly on the 10th and 26th


10 July 25 July 1993


COMPOST


RIVER R


FACI


COUSITE


SITE


By John C. McDonald
Opposing factions have agreed on
a single solution to a local war of
words over disposal of seafood
waste.
Franklin County should provide a
site where its principal industry-
seafood can dispose of waste
material and by-catch taken from
the waters offshore. (By-catch is
unsought sea life brought up in
scallopers' and shrimpers' nets.)
But Tuesday, 6 July 1993,, the
Franklin County Board rejected a
motion offered by Commissioner
Tom Saunders and seconded by
Commissioner Bevin Putnal to
open the county landfill to by-catch
(but not viscera) until such time as,,
acumpostingsite ismadeavailable.
Three votes in opposition werecast
by Commissioners Dink Braxton,
Jimmy Mosconis and Ed Tolliver.
Tolliver said he has lived in
Apalachicola all of his life, and he
disagreed vehemently with
Saunder's statement that the
motion must be approved or.
seafood workerswouldbe without
a job.
Chairman Braxton said that he,
too, supports the seafood industry
wholeheartedly, "But we are lucky
to have a landfill and we must
leave space available in the landfill
in case something happens to our
contract with Bay County. We
need to hang unto our space for
garbage disposal." Bay County
urns Franklin's garbage in its
incinerators; if that contract were:
voided, Franklin Officials don't
want the local landfill overflowing
with seafood waste, much of its,
perhaps, from large scalloping,
firms from other areas.


"IONS


NTY


A


'I


AND


LOAD


GREE:.


IASTE


NEEDED NOW


~j'.


I


Bob Allen


to Cape Canveral for processing,
said the lack of composting site in
Franklin County is nota scalloping
problem alone, "It's a sea ood
industry problem."
"Here we have Franklin County,
which is a seafood county and yet
we cannot process seafood. Every
other county (including Wakula
and Bay on either side) has compost
sites, but we don't. People will be
dumping waste in the woods,
where they dump garbage now.
Composting, if done properly, is
the way to go. Waste is mixed with
Pine bark, and after a few weeks
the smell is gone and the compost
can be sold as fertilizer. The county
could do this and save lots of
money by using scallop and oyster
shellsfor-theroads." said Saunders.
"Scallops are only the tip of the
1,'aipc r f qav.Mllh0WA0. id rTniphpp
0 VIft~l~U J tL~"


I Averg, says iencter. iveDeen
telling everybody for years all
Braxton and Mosconis suggested, the local governments but they
that Bill Mahan, extension agent, have not done anything."
and Van Johnson, solid waste
director, investigate without delay "I'm not backing Bob Allen," who
thefeasibilityofoperatinacounty owns 20 acres of pine bark (from
composting site at which local tthe Old Buckeye milling
seafood workers could deposit operation), "but I want something.
shells, viscera, and by-catch. They Ifthecountyhas no money,it coudl
are to report their findings to the charge a small tipping fee and
board. recoup its losses."


Johnny Millender, of the 50 year
old seafood company, Millender &
Son, Carrabelle, has told the
Chronicle, "Something must be
done to allow the seafood industry
to dispose of seafood remains
conveniently and legally, or it could
mean an end to the industry."
Ms. Kay Arbuckle, a spokesperson
fora group of River Road residents,
who filed suit, to prevent dumping
or composting seafood waste at
the Old Buckeye Mill industrial
site on River Road, said that the
residents would be glad to
contribute to a fund to buy land at'
a proper site for the purpose. A
"proper" site would be agricultural
or forest land remove from thie
mill which is zoned for heavy
industry. They have said that
offensive smells and likely ground
water pollution could drive them
and prospective buyers out of the
neighborhood.
Commissioner Putnal, in whose
district the Buckeye Mill and its
opponents are located, said,
"We've got to find a solution
somewhere, or we're going to lose
the commercial seafood industry."
TimSaunders, proprietor of Pirates
Landing Marina on Timber Island,
where hundreds of boatloads of
scallops were recently received and
transhipped by refrigerated trucks


Millender said that he and a partner
had spent $175,000 for scallop
processing equipment, and he had
28 local employees with a payroll
of from $6,800 to $10,400 weekly in
Carrabelle, and he said he could
continue to operate even if the big
companies from other states
discontinue scalloping here. Tom
Mitchell, owner of a nearby
alligator farm, was buying all of
Millender's by-catch, fish and
waste.
"The protesters have a legitimate
gripe,' said Millender, '"ut the
county needs a composting site.
Without one, its hard on the
seafood industry, restaurants, and
the people who come here to eat
seafood. The answer is to find a
cental; spot and build a site. I
steam-cleaned scallops, and there
was no smell."
"The big companies did not have
time to clean their boats and
product, because they were on a
tght schedule, but they employed
a ot of people here."
Saunders estimated that the recent
scallop catch brought $35,000 a
week to Carrabelle. "If we could
process here, the payroll would be
$65,000", he said. "We had 30
employees, and the big companies
Continued on page 5


" mmissioner Commissioner
Ed Tolliver Jimmy Mosconis


WRAP-UP OF
CARRABEJTF
ARTS AND
CRAFTS
By Alan Chase
"Great! Fantastic Such are the
words used by Betty Mason, of the
Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce,
to describe the results of the three-
day Arts and Crafts Festival, held
in Carrabelle on June 18-19-20.
Tired from the effort, she' s
enthusiastic over attendance
estimated at more than 8,000 for
the three day event. The
approximately 100 vendors,


craftspeople and artists on hand
all expressed themselves to her as
well satisfied by the public turnout
and participation.
Exhibitors ran the gamut of the
Arts and Crafts circuit, from
preserved alligator heads to sand
paintings, and from native-
American handicraft pieces to
jewelry aad belt-buckles as well as
conventional oilsand water colors.
Local musical artists furnished
accompaniment, and a good time
was had by all.
The folks at the Chamber plan to
repeat the festivities next year,
making it the fifth annual event in
the series, and serving to put
Carabelle "on the map" of
established Arts and Crafts
scheduling.


SESAM E PEP h parents d care givers build
on the natural curiosity of children
[T ThT 7 "'l-" T/"T\Th and become even more involved
W ORK SH OPxwith their children's educational
W ui' ~ -experiences through at-home
activities. These reinforce the major
The Franklin County Adult Sesame Street PEP objective: TO
Reading Program and the GET CHILDREN EXCITED
Nemours Children's Clinic are co- ABOUT AND INVOLVED IN
sponsoring a Sesame Street PEP LEARNING.
workshop for the parents, care
givers and child care providers of In order to register or if you have
childrenages two through five. The any questions or need
workshop which is beingprovided transportation, please call Jane
by WFSU will be held on Cox, Literacy Coordinator or Ada
Wednesday, July 21 at the Scott,Green ThumbattheFranklin
EastpointFirehouseonSixthStreet. County Library, Eastpoint670-
Itwill begin at 9:00 am and last 8151, Brian Goercke, VISTA at
until 12:30 pm. Apalachicola Municipal Library -
653-8436, or Carolyn Sparks, VISTA
Sesame Street PEP uses the Sesame or Kathleen Humphries, Green
Street television show, storybook Thumb, at the Franklin County
reading and related activities to Library, Carrabelle 697-2366.


ARCHAEOLOGISTS
NEARING THE END OF
THEIR 1993 FIELD
WORK IN THE LOWER
APALACHICOLA RIVER
VALLEY ,
Led by Dr. Nancy White, a team of Universit eo tlf- h i
graduate studentsand undergraduatenroledmafiekdeleets
since early June are now ending their explorations in the lower
ApalachicolaRiverValley. Since 1987,Dr. NancyWhite,Depa nint
of Anthropology, University of South Florida (Tampa), bas been
conducting test digs and explorations throughout theApalachic la
River Valley, extending from the north and the Jim Wodruff Dam
to the south and the Apalachicola Bay, identifying sites, conducting
test digs, and uncovering evidence of human occupation across
these lands going back thousands of years. Coordinated and
assisted by Woody Miley's staff at the Estuarine Reserve, Dr. White
and her team have been going deep into the river swamp and
returning each night, staying at the Sportsman Lodge (Eastpoint)
owned by Bob Allen.
The Chronicle has followed Dr. White's local explorations though
her interviews, and once ona field trip deep into the swamp in 198,
making a motion picture record of the digs. These interviews are
excerpted below.
Nancy White (W): I came here as a graduate studentin theearly 70s
with my professor from Ohio who was invited by an FSU faculty
member to spend some of the cold winter days in a supposedly
warmer spot and investigate to archeology of a different part of the
eastern United States. Actually, I came to Blountstown in 1973, in
January, asa rather dumbyankee thinkingthatit wouldbea Florida
climate vacation and it was the coldest I'd ever been in my life but
the archaeological materials in question were so interesting that
returned to do more graduate research and continuealong th same
kinds of lines now as a faculty member at the University of South
Florida.
Chronicle (C): What can we learn from them?
W: Because theApalachicola valley issobigand so long, originating
up there in the Apalachian mountains and comingall the way down
to the gulf coast it was a major communication and transportation
network throughout nearlyallofthe approximatelytwelveihousand
years of human occupation of the New World. Therefore it's
exceedingly rich in remains of all these different human cultures
that have-lived here... We think the first people arrived in the New
World somewhere around 15,000 years ago. The earliest evidence
that we have in northwest Florida seems to date to from at least 12
to 13 thousand years. It's very hard to find those earliest sites
because they are often buried... or they've often rotted away.
/C: Where's the evidence for this very early area?
W: Mostly we don't see much of it in the Apalachicola valley and
this in a very unusual research question. There seems to be more
Continued on page 2

NON-EXCLUSIVE

FRANCHISE


GRANTED


TO


PINE VIEW CABLE

At Tuesday's Board of County Commissioner's meeting, Franklin
County approved the granting of a non-exclusive franchise to Pine
View Cable, Inc. which will begin installation of their cable system in
the Plantation, St. George Island.
The date of the beginning of service is not definite but Pine View
expects ths to occur within 120 days. The Company's service to
subscribers shall consist of not less than 36 channels, with a system
capacity expandable to 60 channels in the future. The basic tier of
channels will number 27, with an additional premium (pay) services,
and five off-the-air channels (localnetwork and public broadcast
stations)
Continued on page 6










Page 2, 10 July 1993 *, The Franklin Count Chronicle

TENTATIVE CARRABELLE
CITY BUDGET ,4


The proposed operating budget expenditure of Carrabelle City are
17.77% more thin last years fotal operating expenditures. The city
commission reviewed the following bud'geTuesday evening, 6 July
1993 and voted in a tax rate up to ten mills. This may be revised later.
The proposed budget is as follows:
ESTIMATES OF RECEIPTS:
TAXES
Current Ad Valorem Taxes 146790
Franchise Fees -Electricity 1800
Franchise Fees Cable T.Y.
Utility Service .TAxes
Telephone Franchise 700


LICENSE & PERMITS
Professional & Occupational License
I INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUE
Cigarette TaXes
State Revenue Sharing -
Mobile Home License Taxes
Alcoholic Beverage Licenses
State Sales Tax

CHARGE FOR SERVICES
Sale of Maps
Copy .Services
Fire Protection (COUNTY ASBU FUNDS)
RECREATION DEPT.
Pantals
Misc. ( Insurance Re.imbursement)
FINES
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE


Interest Earnings
REnt & Royalties
Cemetery Lot Sales-
Other Misc. Revenue


Total Estimated Receipts-------
Less 5
95% Est Receipts
Balance Forward-------- ----
Total Est. Receipts & Balances----$


ESTIMATES OF EXPENSES
Mayor & Comissioners Fees
Clerks Salary (INc. meetings & as onus)-----
Accrued Vacation
OASI Taxes- ..---.
Retirement Contributions
Life & Health Insurance
Accounting & Audit


,Janitlrila


Iravlvo


Repairs & Maintenance
Other Cur. Charges & Obligations
Office Supplies -
Operating Supplies ------
Books, Publications & Memberships
Fireworks, Christmas Decorations
Animal Control Authority
Franklin County Senior Citizens
Other Organizations Donations
Legal Councel



10TAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT & NON CLASSIFIED--- $
tAV ENFORCEMENT
salaries (Inc. Xmas Bonus & Holiday Pay)----
Salaries (Partime pay when officers are off)--
Accrued Vacation-L..
OASI TAxes


FDCti ma


Life Heall Insurance


insurance
Repairs & Main
Capital Outlay


rGa.ia ma


operating Supplies
Debt Service. (Car Payment)


10TAL LAW


3,500

8.400
35.500
700
'800



50
100
8,000


600

5.000


1.260
10.600
*1,000
6,000


348,000
-17.400
330.600
96.000
426,60b'


4,540
1,000
200
850








3,360
.4 800
900








3,000
3.500
2.2000



3,3'60








5.00)


ENFORCEMENT $ 115.780


FIRE CONTROL
Firemens. Services (INc. Xmas bonus & County Fires)
Communications


(lb414,


Insurance
Repairs & Maintenance
Gasoline
Operating Supplies
Capital Outlay
Debt Service (Truck Payment)
TOTAL FIRE CONTROL (General Fund Receipts)----$
FIRE DEPT MSBU FUNDS (County Funds Capital Outlay
(Distribution 8,000 carry over, 00ooo
STREET AND ROAD DEPT


salaries
Accrued Vacatic
OASI Taxes
Retirement
Life & Health I
116414&4.J


surance


Repairs & Maintenance
Other Current chgs & Obligations
cmenl mm


Operating Supplies
Capital .Outlay
Debt Servia (Truck


Payment


10TAL STREET AND ROAD DEPT. $

RECREATION DEPT.. (COMMUNITY CENTER)


Insurance


Back


Retir emont


IOTAL RECREATION $

TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES---------$
RESERVE FUNDS
thmetery Reserve --$ 3,000
C.D. in Reserve--.. 34,330
Comphrenslve Plan- 3,700
Airport Timber Sales 10,990

TOTAL RESERVE FUNDS $
Reserve for Contingencies
I Reserve for Balance Forward

OTMLAl APPROPIATED EXPENDITURES AND RESERVES-------$


3.000
-.2,500
6,500
2,400
500
2.250.

28.290
16.000


$ .30.780
800
.oo
2.420


Dr. Nancy White, continued from 1


t~s P


I r


Dr. Nancy White
University of South Florida
evidence of the first people, who we call Paleo-Indians, in the
Chipola Valley..... We call the first culture, the first human cultures
in the New World, both north and south America, Paleo-Indian
culture which simply means "real old" and it's a term archaeologists
made up. We don t know what they called themselves, they didn't
leave any written records. The evidence of these people is diagnostic
forms of stone tools, long beautiful spear points, no bows and
arrows yet were invented. And lots of other stone tools that are less
diagnostic, sharp implements that people made all through pre-
history. So most of these Paleo-Indian projectile points, or spear
points, seem to come from the Chipola valley, there's some evidence
that perhaps they are not on the main valley of the Apalachicola
because either they're buried in thirty, fourty feet of alluvial sands,
or the Apalachicola used to flow in the channel of the Chipola and
that's where they wanted to live. And then it moved eastward
through time. We know the river did move eastward through time.
We just don't have it pinned down like on the Mississippi exactly
how long ago it was flowing in this channel or that channel.

C: How do you date this?

W: Well there's many ways of getting a date as an archaeologist and
one way is to use radio carbon dating where we take something that
was once alive, plant or animal materials, specially charcoal is a
very good substance, and we send it to the physics laboratory that
can do carbon-14 dating, and actually measure the amount of radio
active carbon left in it. We know how long the half life of radio
active carbon is, therefore we can calculate how old the material is.

C: Is that usually the most rigorous test?

W: That's very rigorous. But you need a lot of things for that, you
need about a cut of charcoal, and you need about $250. And you
need material, charcoal or whatever, that's from a very good
context. So you cannot date a pot or a spear point. You can date the
charcoal that is with it. That's one way.
Continued on page 5


LONG NIGHT
FOR
COMMISSIONERS
by Rene Toppihg

Carrabelle City commission
members were faced with a
lengthy sixteen item agenda at
their regular meeting held
Tuesday, July 6. Including their
second 1993/94 budget
workshop. There were two
additional requests for
expenditures. One was a request
from the City Recreation
Committee, presented by
Commissioner Marie Gray, for
$4,500 to repair equipment and
picnic tables at the kiddie park
and to build new stands at the old
ball park, repairs to restroom
facilities, and'repairs to tennis
courts, among other things.
Commissioner TommyLoftin said
that he hoped to get a new police
car as the presentone was starting
to cost more in repairs than a
payment on a new vehicle would
be. He added that the old car had
over almost 170,000 miles on it.
He is checking prices and at
present the lowest he can come
up with is just over $13,000.

Commissioners reluctantly
agreed that they would keep the
millage rate at 10 for the present.
This rate, based on the total
property value of $16,169,965,
would give the commissioners
$161,699 to work with. It was
agreed by all commissioners that
they would "do everything
possible" to lower that rate at the
next workshop, which is
scheduled for either September 8
or 15, depending on workshop
dates selected by the county
commission and the school board.


6 220 In other business:
4,500 Commissioners decided to keep
2.000 the R1 zoning on Blocks 23, and
1.000 27, Baxters Addition and change
1.500 the zoning in Block 24 back to
2,000 commercial. The decision was
1.000 made after a mail out was made
%.inn o to all owners in the three blocks
affected by the proposed change....
With the exception of Ms. Canon,
all those who responded in block
23 and 27, indicated that they
wished to remain residential. The
600 commission then voted to return
620 block 25 to commercial in response
to requests from Tom Sexton and
all others in that block.
The fire house will be getting a
330,220 new roof soon, after
commissioners accepted Fire
Chief Bonnie Kerr's
recommendation that they accept
the lone bid of $2,400 submitted
by Donald Lively on replacement.
Ms. Kerr explained that she would
be able to pay for the repair out of
her budget.
62,520
Commissioners decided to re-bid
Sthe janitorial services after
18.000 opening the four bids. Island
Services gave a flat bid of $180 a
426.600 month includingall supplies. The


other three bids, (which did not
include supplies,) were: Jackie
Stone, $150 per month, Woodrow
Judy, $200 per month and Irene
Murray, $125 per month. The city
decided to readvertise and be
more specifitt new bids will be
opened at the next meeting.

James Thurmond Roddenberry
was successful bidder on a bid of
$350 on the surveying of
Evergreen Cemetery after
commissioners rated all bids.
Edward Brown also bid $350 and
Baskerville and Donovan bid
$998.

David Kelley of Kelley-Riley
funeral home was appointed to
the un-paid position of sexton of
the Evergreen and Isle of Rest
cemeteries.

On the bids to type up city
minutes, Betty Neylon was
successful bidder with a bid of
$4.50 per hour, over Virginia Boyd
of Silent Partner, who bid $2.50
for the first page and $2.00 for
each succeeding page. Attorney
bill Webster complimented City
Clerk Charles Lee Daniels on the
Quality of his minutes as
compared to others in the area.

The payment of $20,400 to Timber
Island Marina for OAR/
Carrabelle on the building of the
artificial reef was tabled until the
August meeting in order that a
representative of OAR and Del
Scheider could both be present.

Commissioners refused a request
from Bert Worthy to replace a
single wide trailer on lot 9 with a
double wide on adjoining Lots 1-
2 in block 90 (CR4) Picketts
Addition. Although
commissioners sympathized with
Mr. Worthy the zoning is Rl and
his original home is non-
corforming. Commissioners
Phillips and Gray both said that
they had refused several such
requests in the past year and had
to refuse this one as a matter of
fairness.

Commissioners also disapproved
a roof over on an 8 by 24 camper
trailer owned by John Gibson on
First Street West between Aves G
and H. Planner Alan Pearce said
that he would issue the permit for
the work if city commissioners so
desired but the size of the home
was sub-standard and the request
would automatically be turned
down if the property were outside
the city.

Commissioners granted a request
by Joyce Purvis to place a mobile
home on Lot 3, block 85, Picketts
Addition which is in a C1 zoning
and permits mobile homes in
addition to businesses.

Commissioners tabled any
decision on combining city and
county builders occupational
licenses until they could get
further clarification.


S -


Published twice monthly on the 10th and 26

CITY OF CARRABtLLE, FLORIDA
SUMMARY BUDGET
HATER AND SEWER FUND-


Oct 1, 1993 thru Sept. 30, 1994
ESTIMATE OF RECEIPTS A
Water Sales
Water Tap Fees
Disconnects & REconnects
Miscellaneous
OPERATING INCOME SEWER
Sewer Service Charges $
Sewer Tap Fees Q
OTHER INCOME -1
Penalties--- $
Interest gl-
Total Revenues -- $
Less 5%
95% Est. Recei ts
Balance Forwardi'
TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND BALANCES---$


100 500




97,050
1.800


* 4,900
1'.100
210,600
200,070
62,000
262,070


ESTIMATES OF EXPENSES ^
Salaries Water $ 45,460
Salaries Sewer ;12,840
Accrued Vacation Water ---------- 800
Accrued Vacation Sewer 800
OASI Taxes Water 3.540
OASI Taxes Sewer 980
Retirement' Water x- 8,210
Retirement SeWer I' 2,300
Life & Health Insurance -Water-- 4,130
Life & Health Insurance Sewer--4 1380
Accounting & Audit 5,700
Communications -- -- 1,000
Truck Expense 5 2,200
stage & Freight 1,300
Utilities--- L
Insurance- Water 2.000
Insurance Sewer . .&. __.2tOD
Repairs & Maint Water (Renewal & Replacement)-------- 6.000
Repairs & Maint Sewer (Renewal &,Replacement) ---- 2 00
Office Supplies .. .200
Power Water 9,000
POwer Sewer .V 8,000
Materials & Supplies -'Water I 9,000
Materials & Supplies Sewer ---- 9,000
Miscellaneous Water ------- 900
Miscellaneous Sewer ------- 500
Lab Tests T -9
Capital Outlay 7,400
Southern Water Services (Sewer)---- 17,160
Truck Payment 2,280
Total Exp.end&1reas/Expenses--- 199,080
Reserve For .'.ntingencies:----.- .42,'950
Reserve. for -Balance Forward 20,000
all ...1 "
Total Estimated Expenditurem and Reserves $ 2B2,070
--


In a call to the audience from the
floor, Ms. Carole Adams, owner
of Harry's Bar, complained about
the way her garbage is being
handled and the cost, and said
that increases in the costs were
not being made fairly by the
contractor, who is supposed to
bring increases before the city
commission. The city clerk was


ordered to write a letter to Coast
Saptation and ask him to come to
thnext meeting.

Cliff Willis told commissioner
that there might be grant money
aWilable to move a derelict
shgmp boat sunk just off th
chpjnel near the west end of Do
Isl~nd.


h


BILBO'S B-B-Q
Now Featuring
Fresh Local"Seafood
Pizza, SuO"f, and
OUR FAMOUS B-B-Q
One mile west Open Tues. thru Sunday
of Carrabelle 11 a.m. 9 p.m.
Hwy. 98 at the beach 697-3226


Tues. Sat Family Hircuts
9 a.m. 6 p.m. Walk-ins hlcome
Saturday Modern &ylini terms Colors
9 a.m. 2 p.m. .,
Dedken Color Joico Products
Located in the Point Mail Island Drive Eastpoint



Your home is 0)ly as good
as its foundation

JOHN F. CULLEN COI STRUCTION, INC.
RG 0060474

Specializing in DNR, DE coastal Construction


r


7


s:i, ::


*" -r" ,
MM"ll


42 1


...........


TcI-uranl


i


c ,w-nlftions


r-T-----


asolmeine


.. I


-


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Ac 1. 1


-=, ?
, .


.........











Published twice monthly on the 10th and 26th


The Franklin County Chronicle, 10 July 1993 *, Page 3


ooeae (904) 653-8878
(iLdebrooks fune raS fomeI (904) 670-8670
A"PALACIBCOLA EASTPOINT


Excerpts of Dr. Ben Johnson's 1
May 1992 Letter Introducing Resort
Village plans to the St. George
Plantation Homeowner'sAssn., Inc.

(The highlights have been boxed by the Chronicle)

I appreciate thePBoard of Directors giving me this opportunity to
communicate directly with the membership about my plans for the
commercial property near the airport.
I have been a member of the Association for more than a decade. In
recent years I have become more active, attending the annual
meetings and many of the board of directors meetings, as well as
participating as a member of two committees: beautification and
architectural control.
I am a strong believer in St. George Island, and in the Plantation
specifically. As-a longtime resident of Florida, I have watched
helplessly as so many areas have been overbuilt and overwhelmed
by uncontrolled growth, with crowded beaches, endless high rises,
and clashing billboards screaming for attention.
I see the island as one of the few places in the state where we have
the chance to "do it right." I do not mean by that stopping all
growth anddevelopment.Ano-growthpolicyis simply notrealistic.
That option was-rejected years ago, when the bridge was built and
development was authorized.
As the rest of thestate fills up like a bottle overflowing with people,
the island is inevitably going to be "discovered" by more and more
visitors and homeowners. any of the newcomers will want to
"slam the door" behind them, but that will never happen. In fact,
most of our own membership, who have invested in land with a
dream ofbuilding a home in the future, willbe part of the inevitable
growth pressures yet to come.
Although nearly twice the area of MiamiBeach, St. George currently
has fewer than 900 houses and condominiums and fewer than 100
hotel/motel units. But thousands of vacant lots have been sold,
and several tracts have been designated for multifamily/
commercial development, including two in the Plantation.
As the island fills up, its character will inevitably change. Thus, the
real question isfiot whether there will be growth, but what kind of
growth there will be.
I would like tokee balanced growth that is carefully planned and
controlled, to irtain as much as possible of the island's natural
beauty and reldaed atmosphere.
I strongly believe in the importance of shaping the growth process.
We need to preserve for future generations the best of the island's
natural envirorlient, while recognizing that with careful planning
and design, man-made elements can e gently introduced that
enhance our pleasure, rather than detract from it (as is too often the
case in other pirts of the state). .,
Recently I hav ie directly involved in thoe owth process,
with the intentPf helping shape the direction in which the island
grows. Throug a series of purchases beginning in December 1990,
I have purcha4ti more than 70 acres within the Plantation which
have been designated for commercial development. This property,
with more thanl,600 feet of gulf-frontage south of the airport spans
the island, extending across Leisu-re Lane to Apalachicola Bay
immediately adjacent to (and east of) the airport.
Continued on page 4




Subscribe NOQWto the Franklin CountyChronide


q POST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
904-927-2186
904-385-4003 (TALLAHASSEE)
Facsimile 904-385-0830
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CHRONICLE. INC.


Vol.2, No. 12


26 June 1993


Publisher.......................................Tom W. Hofrer
Columnists....................................Anne James Estcs
(Captain Ernie).........................Er...E ie Rehder, Ph.D.
ContribiAtors Jack McDonald
S............ Rene Topping
.............Brian Goercke
............ Bob Evans
............ George Malone

............Alan Chase
.............Ann Morgan
............. Janyce Loughridge
............. Waync Childers
Survey Research Unit.....................Tom W. Hoffer, Ph.D.
............Eric Steinkuehler, M.S.
Sales Staff........................Chris Chrismon, Apalachicola;
Eastpbint; St. George Island (927-2908); John
McDonald, Carrabelle-Lanark (697-2782), Ann Morgan
(697-3891; 697-2734) Carrabelle-Lanark; Tom
Hoffer, Tallahassee (904-385-4003 or 927-2186)
Production Kathryn Seitz
.............Maxwell Stemple
Computer Systems and
Advertising Design........... .............Eric Steinkuehler
Video p.oduction............................David Creamer

iCitizen's Advisory Group
George Chapel................................Apalachicola
Grace ard Carlton Wathen..............Carrabelle
Rene Topping................. .................Carrabelle
Mary and John McDonald.... ...Lanark Village
Mary LIU Short................................St. George Island
Susan aOd Mike Cates.....................St. George Island
Pat Morrison...................................St. George Island
Elizabeth and Jim Sisung...............Eastpoint
Eugeniand Bedford Watkins..........Eastpoint

Back Issues
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price quoteNbove.
SAll contents Copyright 1993
SFranklin County Chronicle, Inc.


Developer
Dr. Ben Johnson


Editorial and Commentary


I ARBUCKLE REPORT

TO COMMISSION PUTS

DIFFERENT SLANT ON

_RIVER ROAD SITE FOR

l ^ COMPOSTING


Attorney
Mark Zilderberg


A Response to the Tom Royal letter
from Dr. Tom Adams
The Chronicle published most of Tom Royal's letter to the
Plantation Board of Directors in the last issue (260693). Dr. Tom
Adams has sent his response to the letter.
I am writing in response to a letter by Mr. Thomas Royal, former
POABoard president, to the Board of St. George Plantation Owners
Association, which was printed in the Franklin County Chronicle
on June 26,1993, and which discredits me and blurs the facts about
the Ben Johnson agreement with the POA, and its potential impact.
1 would like to present the facts.
Lynn Wilson Spohrer and I were singled out by Mr. Royal for
criticism, not on the basis of the issues introduced, but rather we are
maligned and characterized as a vocal minority, angry over that
was alleged to be our defeat at the September 1992 Annual Meeting.
The first matter of fact is that I have never met Lynn Wilson Spohrer,
nor have we been associated in any way.

It is also a fact that my proxy votes, along with hundreds of other
proxy votes, were cast min favor of this agreement, for which there
was no advance notice, and in fact, there wad not even the slightest
hint that such an agreement was to be on the agenda in the material
sent to members prior to the 1992 Annual Meeting to solicit proxy
votes. (This is an example of the abuse of proxies which brought
about recent changes in law that now prohibits this kind of a vote.)
It is also a fact that the terms of the B.J agreement were never made
available to the membership prior to the Sept. 1992 Annual Meeting.
It is also a fact that the minutes of the Sept. 1992 Annual Meeting
provide absolutely no details at all of the terms of the agreement.
Only if one looks at vote tallies in
the attached election results can one realize a vote was taken and it
passed.
In tight of these facts, Royal's claim that "The Adams and then--
Spohrer.s had ample time to gatbsr votes and defeat it
jiJ.Agreement) at the annual meeting if the majority of the .
membership was so inclined", is an obviously ludicrous assertion
because there was absolutely no indication that such an agreement
wss to be on the agenda! Furthermore, the proposal to which I am
objecting is the site plan which was not even seen by the present
board until May 4, 1993!
The only information about the agreement given to owners just
before a vote was taken was Mr. Royal's brief overview of "major
points" which only those members attending the meeting heard.
He states, "At the annual meeting I reviewed every major point of
the agreement." It is important to note two things:
1. On the tape of the meeting, following Mr. Royal's overview, there
is an objection from the floor: "If the board is going to bring these
proposals to us like the Gene Brown agreement and the Ben
Johnson agreement, then the very least you can do is to giv e us a
copy of these agreements so we can look at them and know what
we're voting about." This comment is followed by applause.
2. As Mr. Royal's coverage of "all major points in the agreement",
one must look at what was said, and equally important, what was
not said. Mr. Royal begins by stating: "our negotiations were
guided by two things, the 1977 Development Order" and he reads
one sentence from it but he failed to read the sentence,
"Condominiums and multifamily residential structures shall not
be allowed in any of the areas shown in Exhibit A without prior
consent of the Board. In the presentation and discussion that
Continued on page 5


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OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC.
120 GULF BEACH DRIVE WEST HCR BOX 108
ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328


4 21


APALACHICOLA COUNTYHOME: The Epitome of southern
living is found in this new 3 BR/2.5 B, 2600 SF home. Features
include fireplace, jacuzzi, cathedral ceilings, front and rear
porches, carport, sprinkler system, basketball court and
much more. $220,000.

APALACHICOLA
Lot 8, Block 14, Gulf Colony, wooded 3/4 acre lot..................$13,000
Lots 9 and 11, Gulf Colony, private wooded location....both....$13,000
EASTPOINT
8 Turtle Cove, 100' frontage on Apalachicola Bay.......................$45,000
Lot 5, Block 19, 1/2 Acre lot with concrete block building........$15,000
COMMERCIAL
Formerly Eastpoint Diesel, HWY 98..............cash or terms........$80,000
Lots 6-9, Block 9, Unit 1E, across from beach.......... .............. $72,000
Lots 10 and 11, Block 4, Unit 1W, nice beach view $45,000
ST. GEORGE ISLAND
Lots 2 and 3, Tract 50, East End, 2 Wooded acres............both.....$57,500

(904) 927-2666 (800) 332-5196


Following a very considerable time devoted to the arguments of
attorney Mark Zilberberg, in behalf of Bob Allen, before the Franklin
County Commission in recent weeks, Mrs. Kaye Arbuckle presented
her report to the Commissioners at the last meeting, on Tuesday, 6 July
1993. Her.remarks included the following:
AS YOU ALL KNOW, THE WALLS OF THE COMMISSIONER'S MEETING ROOM
HAVE RUNG FOR A MONTH NOW WITH MARK ZILBERBERG'S CONSTANTLY
REPEATED STATEMENT THAT D.E.R HAS STATED THAT THE CARRABELLE
INDUSTRIAL PARK IS THE ONLY, PERFECT, IDEAL SITE FOR MARINE BY-
CATCH COMPOSTING AND LANDFILL DUMPING. THEREFORE AT THE JUNE
28 SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S MEETING, I STATED THAT I WOULD CONTACT
D.E.R. AND QUESTION THEM AS TO WHETHER ANY D.E.R. PERSONNEL HAD
EVER MADE ANY SUCH STATEMENT.
LATER THAT SAME DAY, JUNE 28, 1993, AT 2:53 P.M., E.S.T., I CALLED THE
PENSACOLA D.E.R. DIVISION, THE DISTRICT OFFICE WHICH THE
TALLAHASSEE DIVISION REPORTS TO, AND ASKED TO SPEAK TO BOBBY
COOLEY, DISTRICT DIRECTOR. -
I ASKED MR. COOLEY IF MR. ZILBERBERG, AS A FORMER D.E.R. ATrORNEY,
WASQUALIFIED TOSPEAK AU.THORITATIVELYON CURRENTD.E.R. POLICIES
AND REGULATIONS. MR. COOLEY SAID ABSOLUTELY NOT AND THAT HE
PERSONALLY WAS NOT FAMILIAR WITH.MR. ZILBERGERG AND THAT HE
MUST HAVE BEEN BEFORE MR. COOLEY'S TIME.
I THEN ASKED MR.COOLEY IF TO HIS KNOWLEDGE ANY D.E.R. PERSONNEL
AT EITHER DIVISION HAD EVER STATED THAT CARRABELLE INDUSTRIAL
PARK WAS THE IDEAL, PERFECT SITE FOR MARINE BY-CATCH COMPOSTING
AND LANDFILL DUMPING. MR. COOLEY STATED THAT AS ADMINISTRATIVE
PERSONNEL,DHEWASNOTFAMILIAR WITHDAYTODAYACTIVITIESOFD.E.R.
PERSONNEL AND REQUESTED THAT I TALK TO MR. MC NULTY AFTER OUR
CONVERSATIONFORMORECURRENTUP-TO-DATEINFORMATION,BUTTHAT
TO HIS KNOWLEDGE NO SUCH STATEMENT HAVE EVER BEEN MADE BY ANY
D.E.R. PERSONNEL .
I WAS THEN TRANSFERRED TO JACK MCNULTY, PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER
AT THE PENSACOLA D.E.R. LOCATION AND A SUPERIOR TO WHOM A LOT OF
LAURA COMER'S FIELD NOTES WERE SENT TO.
I ASKED MR. MC NULTY IF MR. ZILBERBERG, AS A FORMER D.E.R. ATTORNEY
COULD SPEAK AUTHORITATIVELY ON CURRENT D.E.R. POLICIES AND
REGULATIONS. MR. MC NULTY STATED THAT THE ONLY WAY HE WAS
FAMILIARWITHMR.ZILBERBERGWASASANATTORNEYFORROBERTALLEN
AND THAT HE CERTAINLY COULD NOT SPEAK AUTHORITATIVE ON D.E.R.
MATTERS.
I THEN INFORMED MR. MC NULTY THAT AT 3 SEPARATE COMMISSIONER'S
MEETINGS, IN FRONT OF LARGE CROWDS OF PEOPLE, MR. ZILBERBERG HAD
REPEATEDLY STATED THAT D.E.R. PERSONNEL SAID THAT CARRABELLE
INDUSTRIAL PARK ON RIVER ROAD WAS THE PERFECT, IDEAL LOCATION
FOR MARINE BY-CATCH LANDFILL DUMPING AND COMPOSTING. MR. MC
NULTY SAID THAT TO HIS KNOWLEDGE THAT THIS WAS NEVER STATED BY
ANY D.E.R..PERSONNEL. HE STATED THAT CARRABELLE INDUSTRIAL PARK
WAS A POSSIBLE SITE FOR CONSIDERATION BEING AS A CEMENT SLAB AND
A LARGE AMOUNT OF WOOD CHIPS WERE ALREADY ON THE GROUNDS OF
THE INDUSTRIAL PARK.
I THEN ADVISED MR. MC NULTY THAT ACCORDING TO A FORMER PROCTER
& GAMBLE PAPER COMPANY EMPLOYEE OF 30 PLUS YEARS THE CEMENT
SLABWASCRACKED ANDTHATTHEREARESEVERAL CONDUIT PIPES INTHE
CEMENT SLAB THAT COULD ALLOW LEAKAGE INTO THE GROUND WATERS.
I FURTHER-ADDED- HAITATHERE-ARE 3'DRAiNAGR DITCHES (2 OF WHICH
'WERE PERSONALLY A -BUIY SAID EMPLOYEEE AT PROCTER & GAMBLE'S
-DICTATES) OF WHICH *At-~ '3L H-IMATEL''-DRAIN-DIRECTLY INTO THE
.CARRABELLE RIVER . .. .....-" . .. .
MR. MC NULTY STATED THAT HE WAS NOT AWARdEOF THIS INFORMATION
AND THAT IT WOULD HAVE TO BE FULLY CHECKED OUT IF THE SITE WAS
CONSIDERED FOR A MARINE BY-CATCH LANDFILL AND COMPOSTING
FACILITY. MR. MC NULTY FURTHER STATED THAT AT ANY TIME A PERMIT
FACILITY WAS RECEIVED, ALL D.E.R. REQUIREMENTS AND REGULATIONS
WOULD HAVE TO BEMETAND THATALL REQUIRED TESTSWOULD HAVE TO
BE EXECUTED BEFORE ANY PERMIT COULD BE APPROVED AND ISSUED
UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES FOR ANYONE APPLYING.
UPON REVIEWING PAST COPIES OF D.E.R. FIELD NOTES, I DISCOVERED A
NOTE FROM LAURA COMER TO JACK MC NULTY IN WHICH MS. COMER
STATED THAT SCOTT ANDREE OF REMARKED THAT CARRABELLE
INDUSTRIAL PARK SEEMED TO BE AN IDEAL SITE FOR MARINE BY-CATCH
LANDFILL DUMPING AND COMPOSTING.
SO, MR. ZILBERBERG, WITH THE SEAFOOD WORKERS URGENT, IMMEDIATE
NEED FOR A QUALIFIED, APPROVED MARINE BY-CATCH LANDFILL SITE, I
MUST ASK WHY SO MUCH VALUABLE TIME WAS WASTED WITH INCORRECT,
UNVERIFIED REMARKS. REMARKS THAT WERE NEVER MADE BY D.E.R. THIS
VALUABLE, LOST TIME COULD HAVE BEEN MUCH BETTER SPENT WITH THE
SEAFOOD WORKERS, THE RIVER ROAD RESIDENTS AND THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WORKING TOGETHER TO ACQUIRE A PERFECT,
IDEAL SITE THAT COULD POSSIBLY HAVE ALREADY BEEN PROPERLY AND
TRUTHFULLY D.E.R: APPROVED, D.E.R. PERMITTED AND HAVE ALREADY
BEEN IN FULL OPERATION.


PEARCE


NO STHTIE0
* rSiU*J :RuIBETiis16
ITHE CHRONICLE


REMINDS From

COMMISSION Florida

THAT DE- TaxWat

DESIGNATION inc"
"tr~r' r' ' "j](


When a Cut Is
STATE D; Nota Cut


IN" I VIEi n

At last Tuesday's meeting of the
Franklin County Board ofCounty
Commissioners, County Planner
Alan Pearce reminded the board
and media that the process for de-
designating the County and city of
Carrabelle had just started, but was
far from over. The approval by the
Governor and Cabinet in late June
was merely the signal to start a
waiting period prior to a public
hearing, and official action by the
Governor and Cabinet, probably
sometime in August or September.
Then, a one year monitoring period
will begin before the de-
designation will be official. The
City of Apalachicola will remain
designated as an Area of Critical
State Concern for the foreseeable
future.


CORRECTION
Those persons collecting data on
sonic booms may want to report
some to Mr. Peter V. Amato who
is leading an effort to organize a
report. Please call him at 927-
2355


The US. Chamber of Commerce
provides this brief explanation of
federal budgeting that it believes
is overlooked by most Americans:
The federal government
universally practices "current
services" or "baseline" budgeting.
What that means is Congress may
budget $10 billion this year for a
program to eradicate the moofly
worm.Then Congress projects the
budget for that purpose will have
to increase to $15 billion in the next
year in order to maintain the
services that are required by the
program.
But, instead of being budgeted at
$15 billion, it is funded the next
year at $12 billion. Businessmen
would call that a 20 percent
increase. But under"current-
services" budgeting, that is a cut of
$3 billion.
The Chamber says that is why you
may hear that large "cuts" have
been made in numerous
government programs, even as
overall spending continues to
climb. Only in Washington D.C.
and in state capitals could such
logic prevail.

1114 Thomasville Road P.O. Box
10209 Tallahassee, L 32302 Phone:
(904) 222-5052 Fax: (904) 222-7476


I F-- -


- ma-l-










Page 4, 10 July 1993 *, The Franklin County Chronicle


Published twice monthly on the 10th and 26th


m


second big question we're researching about human behavior is the
development of more complex society. With, especially, intensified
agriculture you need more management, more control. And we do
see, in late prehistoric times, the evolution of true chieftains, where
there were a few big wigs in charge. There were distinct social
classes haves and have nots. Where as with more simply organized
hunter-gathers supposedly you have a more an egalitarian society.
How do complex societies evolve? And, those are other kinds of
big, long range goal questions that we're asking.
W: Well, in western culture, we love dividing everything into large,
medium and small (or) early, middle and late... In the Apalachicola
River Valley, (this) actually works quite well, because it does seem
to divide into three segments. The Upper Valley is from the Jim
Woodruff Dam where the Flint and Chattahoochee once met in a
nice confluence... From there:untila point roughly aboutjust slightly
above the Blountstown-Bristol area... In the Upper Valley you have
on the east bank, the high ravines, the Torrie ravines, which continue
all the up on the Georgia side of the Flint River... and account for
the sharp bend in the southeast side of Lake Seminole....Those high
Continued on page 5


Dr. Ben Johnson Letter, trom page 3


Dr. Nancy White, from page 2
C; This means that when you find an object, you've got to take
something surrounding it as well.
W: That's right. Now there's a newer method of radio carbon
dating where they only need as much charcoal as a pencil point size,
butitcosts $600. t's called exceller mass spectrometry radio carbon
dating. There are other ways, however, once we get styles of
artifacts, whether stone tools or pots, or other artifacts, we can
compare them with similar styles of materials found elsewhere.
Elsewhere in the southeast for example the Paleo-Indian projectile
points are very similar all throughout not only the eastern United
States, but much of the continent. So if we find similar styles we
know that they only existed between this time period and this time
period. And we can roughly estimate how old they are.
W: Over the past several years I've been conducting what we call
archaeological surveys in the Apalachicola valley. Survey means
you are actually looking for archaeological sites so you can start
gathering data on which time periods are or different sorts of
environments occupied, and so on and so forth. To do survey we
haire several different techniques. One is to simply look at the map
and estimate high probability locations for human use, for example
high ground next to water is a very favorable kind of environment,
whether it's river bank, a gentle hill next to a pond, something of
this nature. Another technique we use on survey is simply talk to
the people who know the land, who've lived here for a long time
and who very often will collect artifacts. I must say that all of the
residents, of all the counties, along the river have been exceedingly
gracious in allowing us to photograph there collections, giving us
information on where they got them. In the old days archaeologist,
I hate to say this, often came out, got a look of people's artifact
collections and took them and said we're going to study these and
then they would never give them back. So I've faced a little a bit of
a problem and if peopldon't want to show me anything because
they think I'm going to take it away I have to explain I don't need
anymore stuff, we on't have anymore room in our laboratory in
Tampa for much more materials but if people will allow us to
photograph the items, measure them, if they will explain to us what
kid oTfenvironment they found them in. Some people, occasionally,
don't want to tell me where they found them, but I can at least get
information was ita river bank, was it a creek bank, was it a swamp,
you know; but for the most part, 99% of the people who we talk with
are extremely gracious in sharing their information and it's true
that professional archaeologists can only do so much, with out the
help of amateurs and collectors and interested citizens, we would
never be able to accomplish as much work.
C: We all flock to Sike's Cut and pick up some pottery fragments
and there's some aura of having something that's a thousand,
maybe six hundred years old.
W: Sure. It's exciting to think how people used these things on this
land, exactly where we're standing... But that also brings out
another point of our whole mission here in the past, as now, which
is public education because we have to make people realize that
they can do more harm than good by collecting things. Certainly if
it's something on the surface that's going to be washed away with
the next tide it's better to save it no matter who you are but
tunneling through an Indian mound is extremely destructive and
it's also illegal in man cases, certainly if itis on state or federal land.
I'm trying to get people to write down where they found stuff. And
if we can get, especially kids, who are learning in school how
important science is, we can, maybe, make it clear to them so they
are programmed as youngsters to simply write on abag or cigar box
'I got these in, at Joe Blows Marina on the 4th of July and they were
on the surface right at the water's edge'. That information makes
the difference between a totally worthless artifact and something
with extreme scientific value. Many of the collectors that we meet
will show us beautiful pieces that they've bought at flea markets
,,aj ,y e. have to explain that's very nice but they're worthless.
oG &upltof years ago you talked about a dig up in the
. [oiptstown area, and further north... Is that still going on?.
W: Well there's enough of an archaeological record in this valley to
keep thousands of archaeologists busy for thousands of years.
What I've been doing recently, having completed as much
archaeological surveys as possible, is to pick a couple of the sites out
of the hundreds that we've found and registered and explore them
more fully. We pick them on the basis of how important they are,
how undisturbed the materials are, cause we the archaeologists
also disturb and destroy sites. It's the only business where you are
destroying your evidence as you're going along. So we have to
realize we have an adverse impact on the record also and so we've
picked a few that were from interesting time periods, that could
answer some important questions about human behavior in the
past. And we are not excavating them. Excavation really means
massive digging and large crews and a lot more money than my
little research grant.... We are doing test excavation, or testing,
where we go in and dig a few small, but carefully controlled squares
or rectangles. And we have such control that we take only take ten
centimeters of dirt at a time, examine that and then map what the
square looks like, photograph it, measure it, and then we do another
ten centimeters. Down, usually the units are one or two meters
square. We then carefully screen all the soils, or sometimes process
them through water screens, sometimes we save all of the soil and
process it through a flotation machine, which is a giant barrel with
a shower head sticking up from the bottom and a hose going in that
will, andseries of graduated screens sizes in it, and this will allow
gradual plant andanimal materials to flout to the top, we could
scoop them off and analyze them under the microscope, or send
them out to an ethnobotonist or a zooarcheologist at a different
institution.. Well its not cheap either, and have them identify all the
species being used.
These are some of the questions that we're asking about people's
lifestyles here in the past. What were they eating? What parts of the
environment were they exploiting? Were they over-utilizing their
resources like we are in some cases? So subsistence is one question.
How are they making a living? And along those lines one of the
biggest research areas is the question of agriculture, in the old days,
maybe when we were in grade school, the idea was that the
agricultural revolution came along, everyone learned how to grow
crops and then "Binge" life was much easier, time for art, leisure
and all this stuff. Welltnow we know istjust wasn't that way. That
producing crops, producing food, it's much more work than
gathering it wild, especially in a rich area.....
So, the question is why would anybody want to work harder if
there's enough wild food to go around you can earn a living
working two three days a week as we see modern hunters and
collectors do, what few of them are left. Why bother to go to work
for all this food production? Or did people in the entire valley
always produce food? What it looks like now is that in the interior
where the rich alluvial soils, say in the middle valley, around
Blountstown, are excellent for corn, beans and squash agriculture.
People did develop an intensified agriculture. The kind of thing
that I'm asking about prehistoric culture remains in the coastal
esturine areas is, you grow corn here? Not many do nowadays
without all kinds of modern aids, but even if you can, did they? The
estuary is so rich with fish, shellfish, and birds and turtles... The


I REMEMBER

FRANKLIN

COUNTY

Part II

by George Pierre

Bradford
as told to Bill Greer and Tom W. Hoffer
Son of Ruben Pierre and Hannah Watkins Bradford, George
Bradford grew up in Franklin County and Carrabelle, graduating
from the high school there in 1918, the only member of his class. As
indicated in the previous segment of this interview, Mr. Bradford
has had a varied and interesting career in accounting and
management. Mr. Bill Greer of the Apalachicola Area Historical
Society and Tom W. Hoffer, publisher of the Chronicle, talked with
Mr. Bradford in March 1993. Portions of that interview are
continued here.
TC: What did Apalachicolans think about St. George Island at the
time? Was that just a place to have a couple of outings during the
holidays and maybe possibly have a cottage of there?
GB: The St. George Island people used it for a place to go swimming
and go and go goose hunting. W. Lee Popham, he was the first one
to file a plat on St. George Island.
TC: Did you know Popham?
GB: Briefly, yes. I was just a kid. Even I was a kid at one time. I rode
on a train with him from Carrabelle to Tallahassee. They put him
into the penitentiary... Of course what he was doing is what the state
does now, planting those shelves out there, but he came here and
was paying laborers a dollar and a half.... The fishing industry, the
oystering industry of course, was giving them fifty cents and they
oysteringg industry] didn't like it. They got after him and he wound
upin jail and lost what ever he had down here. He was doing a good
job here in Apalachicola. But anyway he was fifty years ahead of
time, that's all that was wrong with him.
.. The seafood industry didn't want St. George Island cause they
didn't want the boats over there. And they fought it all the way
through.' They didn't want the
development. -


TC: How did you start working
for the Gulf Beaches Incorporated
in 1957?
GB: I was with them nearly 30
years... I went to work for them in
April 1957 and I retired on
December 31 of 1982.
They were owned by a
corporation, there were five
stockholders on it... Bill Watson,
Clad Atkinson, Joe Mackery, and
the other was a doctor in Port St.
Joe, I don't know his name now.
(Those) were the original owners.
Then later when the bridge was
built, the bond would only come
up with $2,800,000. And the
lowestbid was 3.3 million dollars.
So we had to come up with an
extra $500,000. The county agreed
to put up $250,000. Secondary
road funds, and the corporation
agreed to put another $250,000
down. So there was five hundred
Continued on page 6


This property was designated by regulators in 1977 for future
commercial development, with "one or more high-quality resort
hotels or motels, restaurants, tourist shops, recreational amenities,
and similar activities." Condominiums may also be included, with
permission of the Board of County Commissioners.
The challenge in developing this site is to achieve its economic
potential while preserving its peaceful ambience and rare natural
beauty. Our response is an intimate seaside resort village, including
a variety of small resort hotels and inns, restaurants, nightclubs,
galleries, theaters, specialty shops and luxury villas, combined
with large expanses of open green space with secluded patios,
small pavilions, boardwalks, hammocks, and scenic overlooks.
Architectural controls will ensure that all development within the
village is consistent with unifying design parameters, while
encouraging creativity and diversity in individual structures.
The St. George Island Resort Village will include a variety of
businesses; while most will be oriented toward tourists, they will
also appeal to many homeowners and their guests, further
enhancing property values in the area. Village businesses will
eventually offer more than two dozen recreational activities.
Examples include:
* Beach equipment rentals
* Bicycle and moped rentals
* Canoe rentals and expeditions
* Day Care center and playground
* Fresh-water fishing ,
* Health and exercise facilities
* Salt-water fishing
* Scenic river tours
* SCUBA diving
* Tours and expeditions to historic sites
* Wind Surfer and sail board rentals

Retail space will be leased to specialty shops oilen r
offerings such as antiques, books, convenience items and -n .. es,
fresh Florida seafood and fruit (packed for take-home or shipping),
gifts, jewelry, resort clothing, and the like. A proposed scenic air
service would shuttle guests to and from the Tallahassee Regional
Airport. Storage and mini-warehouse space below the village will
be leased to local residents and homeowners as well as to the
village businesses.
The site has already been through the state's Development of
Regional Impact (DRI) process. Since further regulatory review
will be required, our plans have been carefully tailored to meet the
public policy goals established by the state and local government
agencies.


Shell Wind Chimes Beach Floats & Toys
Hwy. 98 / P.O. Box 561
Carrabelle, FL 32322 9


14-697-2547


GULF COAST MARINE CONSULTANTS
* Outboard & 1/0 Repairs
* Electrical Repairs & Rigging
* Installations
* Fiberglass Repairs
Located at Bridge Mari
Hwy. 98 & River Road 00497-4040
Carrabelle 497-3502
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Taco's
Auto Body
Rep air and
Painting
"You Bend "'m...We Mend 'em"
Boats, RVs,, Trailers, too
Own e,*d D.L ORDONIA
Carrabelle 697-3253


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P.O.BOX 988 CARRABELLE, FL 32 22

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SLORENZO'S
BY THE SEA
The Italian Restaurant
by the sea

Seafood and Pasta
Call For Reservations (904) 697-3222
Tallahassee 681-3622


Although the exact mix may vary as we adjust tomarket conditions
over the build-out period, we anticipate that upon completion
(estimated for the year 2010), the Village will include no more than
120 residential units and 575 hotel units. q.
This equates to an overall density of just 3.9 residential units and
15 hotel units per acre. Both of these figures are substantially lower
than the norm established elsewhere on the island, where densities
of up to 9.6 residential units and 30 hotel/motelihnitsper acre have
generally been established. Q
19:
There is one aspect or our pians for the viliaee Which we anticipate
will be quite controversial. By ordinance, building heights in the
county are generally limited to 35 feet above ,the first habitable
floor. However, this 3-story limitation was waived for the other
commercial tract in the Plantation, where a 7-stody "mid rise" hotel
has been approved ~on the beach near Bob Sikes Cut).
I n
Since the County was willing to accept mid-rise construction at the
other commercial area in the Plantation, we considered the tradeoffs,
and concluded that on balance it was desirable to include a few
mid-rise buildings in our plan. >v

Publisher's Note: Since this letter was written, Dr.
Johnson has revised his plans to limitcthe "mid-rise"
structures, to three stories or about 43 feet in height


Our plan has an extraordinarily small construction "footprint,"
with most of the structures built on a system. of elevated pre-
stressed concrete pilings and girders, with out-of-sight placement
of support functions below (including parking, waste management
and storage, utilities, housekeeping, and maintenance).
This design minimizes the physical impact on the site, and reduces
the visual impact from the bach and adjacent property. But it also
entails substantial costs that would not typically be incurred.
? ;7
Our plan calls for buildings covering less than 50% of the shoreline
within 500 feet of the primary dunes. This compares very favorably
with other parts of the island (including the restrof the Plantation)
where buildings will cover more than 80% (andjin some instances
nearly 100%) of the shoreline within 500 feet of the primary dunes.
We are proposing a balanced mix of low-rise and midrisebuildings,
clustered in a compact village atmosphere, allowing us to preserve
the only expanse of beach front open space on the entire western
end of the island. v
1
We recognize the visual tradeoffs, but we believe that it makes
sense to have a few buildings--far back from thebeach-which are
taller than the norm, rising somewhat above the tree line.
'i
This cluster design allows us to preserve more of the natural beauty
of the site, while still providing gulf and bay views. The universal
desire for a water view drives the economics of alldevelopment on
the island. This is clearly evident in the residentiiareas, which will
eventually be filled with an unbroken line of buildings for miles
along the beach. -'
We intend to be good neighbors, working closely with the
Association in resolving issues of common concern, including
architectural controls, cost sharing, security procedures, and the
like.
di
Like the commercial tract at Sikes Cut, this property is not subject
to the Plantation Property Owners' Association covenants. To
serve its special needs, the resort will have a nonprofit Village
-'AssdclatioTi, which will function both as a coordinating body and
as a service organization. 7 '"
I have already had preliminary discussions with members of the
board of directors concerning security and other sues, and further
meetings are planned. I anticipate a good wor1i g relationship.
In conclusion, I recognize that not everyone welcomes change-no
matter how well planned it may be. However, I believe the St.
George Island Resort Village will be a tremendous asset for the
island and the Plantation,raisingproperty values,creatinghundreds
of jobs, and enhancing the overall quality of the man-made
environment, while preserving the natural beauty of the area.


Mary's Jewelry
Nancy Nelson, Owner '/(904) 653-8882
85 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320


LINDA'S
TRADING POST
WE PRINT T-SHIRTS & CAPS TOO
OVER 1000 DESIGNS TO CHOOSE FROM TO
SOUVENIRS SHELLS JEWELRY


I









Published twice monthly on the 10th and 26th


Thi Franklin County Chronicle, 10 July 1993 *, Page 5


Dr. TomAdams, from page 3
follows, there is absolutely no mention of condominium or multi-
family structures.,
He lists some things the Plantation gives up, such as bike paths,
access ways, and providing services like collecting parking fees
from commercial oastormers, an easement to dispose of effluent on
our airport, assuming he can get all proper permits. Among terms
he failed to mention was a provision that Owners of residences
within the RV wil have access to all POA common areas and
amenities, including the swimming pool, club house and tennis
courts." Did owners realize that now the pool, which they have
paid for twice, hadby this agreement been opened to all residents
of the Resort Village? Was everyone made aware that the Master
Plan of the agree ent, filed at the County Courthouse is a blank
map of the proper showing only 1. Leisure Lane with a traffic
circle and 2. dott areas indicating the removal of 85% of the
natural vegetatiolt-now existing on this property, except for the
dunes and marshland? Did anyone realize that most of the trees are
to be cut down, anl much of the acreage will be bulldozed? Since
the covenants hat always stressed blending development with
existing natural vegtationinmaharmonious, non-destructivefashion,
owners should have been made aware of this. Can anyone now say
that Mr. Royal's oral presentation "covered all the major points" of
the agreement? -
Mr. Royal mentions the "editorial" printed in the Soundings
publication (Spriqg 1992) after we learned of Mr. Johnson's plan for
seven story hotels at the April 1992 board meeting. Thisis another
gross distortion in Mr. Royal's letter. He states "Tom and Shirley
Adams ran an editorial opposing the proposed development and
solicited the membership to join them.' The fact is that if you read
ourletter you will sorely see thatwe were notopposingdevelopment,
Sbut merely protesting the three high-rise buildings, and we aid not
Solicit the membership to join us. We believe that if people are
informed, they are capable of making wise decisions.
I did not raise objections until the developer presented his site plan
on May 4 1993, arid it was after this that I learned the terms of the
BJ agreement, and how this agreement was passed at the Annual
Meeting without most owners having any knowledge of its terms!
It is this May 4 ?ite plan that includes the obviously massive
condominium structures which literally create a wall, 45 feet high
and approximately 500 feet long directly along the beach access line
of Sea Palm Village, and concentrates 36 residences in the space of
one gulf front acid; that I am objecting to!
Mr. Royal cites aI legal opinion that the Board of Directors is
empowered to enter agreements without consultation with the
membership as tdithe contents, or impact. While this may be legal
under our by-laws, it certainly is an unwise, inappropriate, and
arrogant attitude for a governing board to maintain when an issue
such as this profoundly affects all of the people who bought
property in the l'lantaion. Despite the illusion of information
sharing, in my toinion, the record shows therehas been much
distortion, as well as incomplete disclosure of facts.
I have not engaged in character assassination over this difference of
opinion. I ask yditto review the record as presented and decide if
I am indeed a "litiious, bellicose, NIMBY" going against the will of
the majority whoidoted for this agreement and who are now alleged
to favor this high-density condominium development, or whether
I am a voice that reflects the frustrations and objections of a great
number of property owners whose proxy votes were cast with no
knowledge abouithe agreement. The only way to accurately assess
the true feeling f the property owners in the Plantation is to poll
them and let the chips fall where they may. This would certainly
provide clear guidelines for the Board's actions and negotiating
posture regarding any site plan proposed under the terms of this
agreement. 10
No I heTmeT


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Tel. 697-3204


SEA-BREEZE RESTAURANT
Diane Tuckr an 'Debbie 'Murray invite you and your family to
experience the cooing expertise of the Sea Breeze Restaurant. 9wlyy
opened, thefSea Bfeze estaurantspecializesinfresh, localseafood and
steaks. For the early bird, homemade biscuits another homemade items
await you. Choose a salad for lunch or from our extensive line of
sandwiches. (Con& in or cafdfor specials 670-8362) The Sea Breeze
PRestaurant the ultimate dining experience.
Open Mon. thru-Thurs., 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Open all day Fri., Sat., and Sun.
Hwy. 98 East just before the Apalachicola Bridge


Compost, from page 1
from the East Coast spent $20,000
a week for diesel fuel alone. Thirty-
five boats were coming to my
Marina and Poteet's across the
river, and they had crews of five
men each. That meant lots of
business for the local restaurants,
bars and motels."
Millender said that the restaurants
and otherbusinesses would donate
to finance the county's cost of
$8,000 to obtain a state composting
permit. He is helping to pay bills
for some of his 20 employees who
were laid off when he stopped
processing scallops. '-My
obligation is to the people who
need jobs to feed their kids," he
says. "This town won't have any
industry if we continue to get
stepped on."
Millender said Sam Neel, who has
offered to provide a site for
composting, is "a tremendous help;
he is interested in employing
people.

The county employees, Mahan and
Johnson, were instructed to inspect
the property owned by Mr. Neel,
as well as the space and pine bark
offeredby Bob Allen at the Buckeye
Mill. It was on the latter property
thatill-smelling seafood waste was
dumped several weeks ago,
without proper composting, and
this prompted nearby residents to
file suits to halt it. Ken and Kay
Arbuckle are new residents who,
with other neighbors, have
threatened to sell their homes and
move if Allenis given composting
permit at Buckeye.
Allen took a newspaper
advertisement to invite neighbors
to visit his project July 4, but none
showed up. Ms. Arbuckle said
that the offensive smell had all but
disappeared at that time because
"they haven't dumped anything
there for six to eight weeks.
Residents say that they fear that
run-off from the site will leak into
the drinking wells. They charge
that there are cracks in the concrete
on which the waste is to be
processed.
Braxton asked that ownership of
the property be ascertained for a
certainty. Several court suits are
under way in relation to it. County
planner Alan Pierce told the
Chronicle thatAllen "has the mulch
(pine bark), but he has no
monitoring wells as the county
does."
At the board meeting, Pierce rdad
part of a letter from the Florida
Department of Environmental
Regulation (DER): "The
department chose to enter into a
Consent Order with Mr. Allen
because there was no apparent
mechanism in place in Franklin
County to handle by-catch being
produced from this season's
scallop harvest. We understood
the commercial harvesting of
scallops has terminated for this
season and no additional by-catch
is being hauled to Mr. Allen's
composting facility. Nevertheless,
the County must proceed with
appropriate plans to provide
adequate solid waste management
services for this county industry."
Commissioner Saunders said that
he offered his unsuccessful motion
because, "If we don't give the
seafood industry an opportunity
to use the landfill, it will either go
out of business or dump illegally."
Tolliver said people will not beput
out of work. '.The heads (-of
shrimp) are dropped overboard."
It is said to be true that some
processors push shrimp heads,
etc.,"back into the water where
they came from." Regulations
prohibit the dumping of seafood
waste within 25 miles of the shore.


WAYNE
GLEASMAN
APPOINTED
HOMEOWNER
ASSOCIATION
MANAGER
AT ST. GEORGE

Thirty-year old Wayne M.
Gleasman, of Tallahassee, is the
new St. George Plantation
Homeowner Association
Manager, assuming his duties at
mid-July on the island. Gleasman
is a high school graduate of
Jefferson County High School,
Monticello, Florida, and holds a
B. S. degree in biology from
Florida State University,
graduating in August 1983. He
also holds a Florida real estate
license (1984).

Mr. Gleasmanhasbeen operations
manager for Independent Dental
Cooperative (Tallahassee) since
February 1993. Before that, he was
area property manager for
Investors Real Estate
Management, Inc., March 1992-
February 1993). He worked for R.
J. Hulbert Dental Company
(Tallahassee June 1990- February
1992). His background also
includes experience in retail
management, and apartment
resident management.

APALACHICOLA
CITY
COMMISSION
By George H. Malone
The July monthly meeting of the
Apalachicola City Commission
was called to order by Mayor
Robert Howell at 6:00 p.m. on
Tuesday the 6th, the first Monday
having been a holiday. Present
were Commissioners Jimmy Elliot,
Jack Frye and Rose McCoy.
Having disposed of the matters of
the minutes if the June meeting
and outstanding city bills,
including a short discussion about
certain items in the attorney's bill,
two representatives of Baskerville-
Donovan Engineers, James Wadell
and Bill McCartney, submitted
their monthly report on the
progress of the improvements to
the city's water treatment facility,
which was accepted.
The next order of business was
that of appointing seven persons
to be members of the Nuisance
Ordinance Enforcement Board,
who were; Carol Bowden, Charles
Watson Clark, Bryout Hand, Sandy
Howze, John Lee and Rickie
Lichedello, and two alternates;
Dick McCoy and Mitchell BArtley.
Continued on page 6


ravines which look unlike anything that people would associate
with Florida, form the east bank of the Uppr Valley. Then, they
start to level off in the section called the Middle Valley, where you
have river banks only 20 feet high, but none of these steep ravines
on the east side....We get to the Lower Valley, it would be hard to put
an exact point on it... Somewhere not too far above Weewahitchka,
because you start getting really flat banks. The Chippola River
comes in and forms a cutoff island. It's a very low, swampy area. No
exposed river bank to find artifacts falling out... So, there is a three-
fold division. From Wewa southward.

W: Our goals in 1988 and also in 1991 and this year (1993) ... were
to go beyond survey and do some of the excavations at some of the
sites to get more information than we could get from small shovel
test. So, we dug larger units, one by one meters; one by two meters.
This summer (1993) we did even larger excavation units in our
1987 and 1988 got us maybe a meter and a half into the shen and
then water seeped in. This year, (with a) grant from the state (of
Florida) through the division of historicafresources,an historical
preservation grant, to support using some fancier technology tode-
water the sites below the water table. So, we dug well points and
brought in a big diesel pump to pump out out one shell midden. I'm
still new to the engineering technology of this...We had two squares
open and the wel points along one side, trying to suck out the water
like soda straws but it wasn't enough. It just de-watered (the site)

pump from one site and take it over to the other. There's no wayyou
can haul that through the swamp, with the cypress knees andthe
boat, etc. We were gonna have to drag it on some kind of board, or
litter, but I didn't want to lose any crew members. If I take a team
of a dozen students from the University (of South Florida) and only
show up with 10 or 11, they frown upon that. We were very lucky
that Woody Miley and the people over at the Reserve were able to
arrange this.
...The pump is out there. ...It's very complex engineering. When I
applied for this grant, I got wonderful[ letters support from the
Historical Society, the Chamber of Commerce, the County
Commissioners, The Reserve here... the people we had worked for
in Blountstown in 1990. So, there was enormous support from the
people all over this region... And, this is one of the reasons for the
Archaeological Day program...to return some of that attention and
show people what we're doing with their tax dollars. It's the public
aspect of the project.
pm fmoon s
ca alta hog tesap ihtecyrs ne n h


Dr. Nancy White with
her graduate Supervisor
In 1990, we were working out of Blountstown. We were doing a
project in the Middle Valley. That was supported by the Florida
Endowment for the Humanities. In 1991, did a small dig for the
Forest Service in the National Forest and then just for a week we
investigated one site...a small shell mound in East Bay.. Ii 1992l I
went to Italy to teach. In 1993, we're here.

In 1988 we discovered a human burial that was washing out of
the side of a partially submerged shell midden... It was being
ground up byboats pulling in there, and campers and everyone
else. So, the State Board that is setup for questions relating to Native
American issues, especially burial remains, said that a State
Archaeologist would have to salvage that burial so that it wouldn't
be in further danger. Either the state archaeologist or we could do
it, so we decided to do itbecause it added to the research information
on the project area also. ...Talk about logistical nightmares. We
planned to take that burial out at the lowest tide of the autumn,
when the water would be down and this would be exposed on the
dry land. Digging a burial is very painstaking scientific work. You
have to document every single bone. It was hard to see them in the
shell and so forth. And, it.was flexed on its side...in a fetal position,
on its right side. It just so happened, according to the tide tables, the
low tide was going to follow over Labor Day weekend, which was
perfect because I could drive up from Tampa with some students
and do this job. The low tide was to be at noon. We could spend all
day digging this out and documenting it carefully. I got a photo of
the burial at low tide and blew it up so we could take the bones out
and mark on the photo... Well, the rains came in late August and
early September, and totally threw off ...high water schedules. So,
we got out there, and the water was higher than it had been in the
summer....Wehad brought some sandbags. We made a little coffer
dam.
And, we started pumping the water out. Finally, the tide got low
enough, and with two little bildge pumps, we got enough water
out, so we exposed the skeleton. ...We took the last few bones out by
lantern light... By then, about 10:30 PM. the tide was way out, and
the boat was way out there... I was not going to forget this because
Continued on page 6


CULTURAL CHRONOLOGY OF THE APALACHICOLA VALLEY

DATE CULTURAL CULTURAL MATERIAL OLD WORLD
STAGE ADAPTATIONS EVIDENCE NEW WORLD
Missis- Temple mounds. Fort Walton EUROPEAN CONTACT. Age of exploration.
1000 sippian. Intensive maize ceramics. Rise of Inca and Aztec l
1500 A.D. (corn) farming. Empires
Late Some agriculture. Late Weeden High-point & collapse of Development of mathematics in India invention of
Woodland Island-Wakulla Mayan civilization in Central decimal system. Holy Roman Empire. 1st printing
500 ceramics. America. Large civilized states (China). Rise of Islam. Arabs develop algebra &
1000 A.D. in Mexico & South America. trigonometry. Bubonic plague ravages Europe.

Middle Intensive shellfish Swift Creek- Rise of Hopewell culture in Rise & fall of Roman Empire. Crucifixion of Jesus.
Woodland gathering. Weeden Island North, Maya in Central Rise of Christianity. 1st use of paper (China).
1 500 A.D. ceramics. Copper. America, & Moche in Peru. Rise & fall of several dynasties in China & India.
Exotics.
Early Horticulture. Burial Early Swift Creek Writing in Mexico. Adena 1st Olympic Game in Greece. Rise & fall of Nineveh &
Woodland mounds, ceramics. Exotics. mound building culture in Babylon. 1st Emperor of Japan. Iron-working in Near
northeastern & midwestern East & China. Buddha, Confucius, & Alexander the
1000 B.C. Deptford ceramics. US. Chavin culture in South Great. First coins. Classical Greek civilization.
A.D. 1 America. Founding of Roman Republic. Julius Caesar,
Antony, & Cleopatra. Birth of Jesus.

Late Archaic Hunting, fishing, Fiber- tempered Agriculture. Pottery (Ecuador Wheel, plough, & sail invented. Bronze-working.
& gathering, pottery. Steatite & Columbia). Metal-working Several writing systems invented. Major cities built
3500- Shellfish vessels. (Peru). Start of Olmec in Near East & Egypt. Great Pyramid. Stonehenge.
3500 gathering. Small culture in Central America. Rise & fall of Shang Dynasty in China, Mycenae in
1000 B.C. semi-permanent Greece, & Hittite Empire in Anatolia. Jewish exodus
campsites. from Egypt.


Territorial hunting
& gathering. Base
campsites.


Many stemmed &
notched points.
Ground stone tools.


Horticulture.


Farming spreads. Copper-working.


8000 Early Territorial hunting
6000 B.C. Archaic & gathering.


Bolen Beveled
points.


Ice Age ends. Warmer &
wetter. Megafauna extinct.


Permanent settlements. Rice cultivation (Thailand).
Pottery. Textiles.


EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED


Paleo- Wide-ranging
10,000 Indian hunting &
8000 B.C. gathering.


Clovis &
Suwannee points.


Paleo-lndian.


Middle & New Stone ages (Mesolithic & Neolithic).
Domestication of plants & animals.


Middle
Archaic


6000-
3500 B.C.










Page 6, 10 July 1993 *, The Franklin County Chronicle


Published twice monthly on the 10th and 26th


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Pine View Cable, from page 1
The Company agrees in the franchise contract to add a minimum of
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During the first 30 days of full service, Pine View shall
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Monthly service charge (basic) $20.00
Premium channels (pay, such as HBO) each $11.00


Mr. Bradford, from page 4
shares and we reorganized.... St.
George Island Gulf Beaches
Incorporated... The intent was
that this bridge, they had to build
another one to Dog Island... They
planned this for the future... So
it'd be a complete circle... Another
down in Gulf County across to
that end down there...
...Wilson and Atkinson [pushed
the plan] generally... the bridge to
St. George Island. Brian Patten,
who was this Representative, his
wife was one of the shareholders
incidentally, I didn't mention her
name in there. I believe she came
in when the Doctor went out. Not
shebuthe....he had the idea of the
circle. But we wereonly interested
in the one, we, the St. George
Island Gulf Beaches Inc., I was
with them at the time... and the
sole representative of the
Corporation. Of course the
records that I maintained down
here were transferred to
Tallahassee in 1982. The owners
of the properties at that time
Leisure Properties.... John Stocks
and Gene Brown at that time...
TC: In 1971,that's when the name
changed?
GB: See, whenJohnStocks bought
itheboughtSt. George Island and
operated it as St. George Island
Gulf Beaches for two or three
years. Then he formed this Leisure
Properties. ....I not too sure he
[Gene Brown] came in at that
particular time [formation of
Leisure Properties] or not. John
Stocks bought me along with the
rest of it. I mean I just continued
the same thing. In fact John, he
was a promoter from way back,
he didn't spend much time down


here, he went down to, around
Gainesville someplace. And had


a development down there.
TC: How would you characterize
the relationship between the
corporation,Gulf Beaches, and the
rest of the county?
GB: That was John Stocks
principally and Gene Brown. I
read it in the papers. All that took
place after 1982. ...There was a
certain resentment [before 1982],
by the seafood people of the
development because the Bay
pollution came into the picture
and St. George Island always got
blamed for it. And they didn't
have any more to do with it than
you did. I mean there's more
pollution every day going out of
Apalachicola in the Bay, as there
is.... from St. George Island.
TC: Well, looking back on your
life in the county, from the time
you left high school through the
wvar years, both wars, has there
been anything that's really
changed a lot since that time?
Since the time you left here as a
young man in search of a career.


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Have you really noticed much
difference when you'd come
home?
GB: Yes, this was a large logging
and lumbering area back in the
1900s and on into 1940. You had
the Cypress Lumbering Company
here, you had the Coombs
Lumbering Company here..... You
didn't have the tourism back
then.... The environmentalists are
almost making it 1 almost
impossible to do anything in the
way of industry or development.
Whatever you do, if you cut a tree
down, you've done something to
the environment and so on, and if
you change this it changes the
waytheriver flows.... Mythinking
and my attitude is in favor of
development. Gene and John and
Bill Wilson and Clyde Atkinson,
I've always felt that the salvation
of this county would be the
development of St. George and
Dog Island. And it's incompatible,
apparently, with the seafood
industry. It does some damage.
In other words a sawmill does
too, it's like the trouble they're
having with the Snail Darter, up
in the Tennessee River right now,
they'll shutdown the whole world
because of one little and you
know what the trouble they're
having in the northwest.
TC: What advice would you give
a young person coming out of the
Apalachicola or Carrabelle High
School who wants to make a living
of course, and I guess it means go
to the big city and get your career
started and maybe you can come
back.
GB: Well the first place he can get
a good education, believe itor not
in the Franklin County School
System. But today you ve got to
have a college education.
Whatever it takes, I thought that
true in my family and everybody
I'mcoming incontactwith. Don t
drop out of school. Go to college.
'I ain'tgotno money', thatdoesn't
make any difference, you still can
go to college. I couldn't back in
1917-18, or I would have. And I
missed it, in more ways than one.
Train yourself, get an education,
for a profession of some kind, and
I did it for my daughter, I did it for
my grandchildren, and I'm
making plans to see that my great
grandchildren all do it. hen if
you want to come back to Franklin
County it's a wonderful place to
live. I wouldn't want to live any
place else. Then you can go into
business, find something to do, or
you got that educational
background to fall back on if
you're an engineer or mechanic,
or whatever it is, you can spend
half your time in Jacksonville and
spend half your time, or work in
Atlanta, or even work in New
York and spend every weekend
in Apalachicola, Carrabelle if you
want to. So that would be my
advice to them. First they can get
that complete education. My
oldest grandson is a graduate of
the Naval Academy, he has a
degree in mechanical engineering,
he has a degree in civil
engineering, and he has a degree,
a license to practice.

In November 1993, Mr. George P.
Bradford will be 93 years old.


Apalachicola Cityfrom
page 5
This was followed by a call for a
single member for the CATV
advisory Committee,prompted by
a request from CATV.
Commissioner Jack Frye appointed
himself to the position, saying that
a he had a few things he wanted to
tell them himself.
Henry Martin was appointed to
the Recreation Board. Next
followed what generated probably
the most protracted discussion of
the evening, the question of
reducing the speed limit in park
areas, which had been requested
by some citizens. The mayor
quickly made his feelings known
that he thought that such a change
was unnecessary. There then
ensued a discussion amongst the
commissioners about the fact that
the city presently has only one
police officer qualified to monitor
speed zones with radar, and that
there ought to be at least one more.
A question of sending another
officer to radar training was raised,
and Mayor Howell instructed the
chief of police who was present to
look into this matter. The mayor
then asked if anyone on the
commission was in favor of
reducing the speed limit around
the parks, and hearing no positive
responses he had the question
withdrawn without making a
formal vote on it.
The next two minor items were
routinely disposed of and then
followed by a discussion of the
question o the sale of the Dixie
Theater. In preparation for a
potential sale, Mayor Howell said
that he wanted a crew to be sent
into the building to clean up the
back wall, the stage area and the
floor infront of it, making sure that
they all stayed away from the
balcony area, He then called for
such a motion, which was made,
seconded and passed.


Bill Gwynn as Cebe Tate

AND MARCIE SHAFFER*BRUCE LAKSeTIM NEWELL
LESA SOLAND*JOAN BOYD,*DAVID MORTON
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V


ine nextitem on the city attorney's
agenda pertained to a $10,000 fine
levied against the city by the EPA
for the failure to operate properly
the city's water treatment facility.
The attorney assured the
commission that it was much
cheaper in the long run to pay the
fine than to contest it-which, he
said, EPA was well aware of.

Commissioner Frye next brought
up a matter to bring the
commission up to date, as he said,
of a water line run to the home of
Phil Dunnaway in 1990 or 1991 on
which $390 was still owed, which
Mr. Dunnaway was threatening to
contest. No resolution of this
matter was offered.
Mr. Frye then put forward a request
thatacrewbe sentoutto straighten
up the stop signs around the city
which needed it and to clear them
of vegetation and overgrowth.
Finally, Mr. Frye said that he had
one final question about where
things stood on resurfacing the
street intersections. He was told
by the clerk that she had been
assured by the contractor that the
work would be completed in about
two months and that a schedule
would be forthcoming.



F-S-
mm S H TM


Dr. Nancy White, from page 5
I was over five months pregnant, Icouldn'tgetback upinto theboat
(laughing). They had to haul me over the side like a slab of beef... So,
we got it out.
We have done some analysis. Some more is underway. It was an
adult male; maybe 30s. About five foot, two. The only sigg of
trauma on the bones was on the left radius, ihich is the forearm
bone, there wasa sortofa crookin the bone, which could indicate...a
break that healed. It could also have been a syphilis lesson. So, we
don'tknow if itwere trauma ordisease. And, that'sas faras wehave
gotten....We haven't dated it, and there werg no accompanying
artifacts which makes it even harder to date...
C: Being buried in a garbage dump without artifacts, that might
rule out the corpse was a high part of the social order?
W: Well, you would think so, being stuck in the side of a garbage
pile...But, maybeit was from a time when there were no distinctions
such as that. When everybody was kind of equal. The leader was
just somebody who had thebestluck hunting that year so everybody
would follow him to where the herds were... Or maybe the leader
was someone who found the best stand of acorns or hickory nuts
and everybody followed her...If it were an Archiac burial, which I
suspect it was, because it was flexed, and theyzdid that in that time
period, anytime from 8000 to say 5000 years ago...if that's what it
was this was a time period where we did not have hereditary
leaders, we think we don't see any signs of it- we did not have
major heirarchial societies. Sort of egualitarian. ...Sounds like a
dream, doesn't it? (smiling).
C: How would these peoples maintain such continuity, returning
again and again to the same shell middens to eagand discard shells?
There were no road maps, no AAA, no way to find these locations
except through an oral tradition...
W: Exactly. We don't know that they didn't have maps. We don't
know that. Wood, they could have carved lines, whatever. Or they
memorized them as kids... "Now, here's where you go. You get in
the boat and you always go towards the sun..." The lifespan is 30
or 40. But, the oral tradition is so strong. Do you remember the
phone number you first had as a Kid ?Or your social security
number...? Think about a time when there was no writing, you
would be much better at remembering lots more of that stuff...
The interview with Dr. White will be continued in the next issue of
the Chronicle, 26-07-93


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A TALE FROM,







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