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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Disclaimer
 Table of Contents
 Statement from UF President Charles...
 Profile of the University...
 Executive summary and key...
 Vision and strategy
 Policies, organization, and management...
 Performance indicators
 Sources of data
 Back Cover






Title: University of Florida sustainability indicators
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Title: University of Florida sustainability indicators
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Creator: Greening UF Program, University of Florida
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Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: June 2000
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Disclaimer
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Statement from UF President Charles Young
        Page 4
    Profile of the University of Florida
        Page 5
    Executive summary and key indicators
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Vision and strategy
        Page 8
    Policies, organization, and management systems
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Performance indicators
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Sources of data
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Back Cover
        Page 48
Full Text




University
of Florida
Sustainability
Indicators
August 2001


L- UNIVERSITY OF
< FLORIDA


Published by
The Greening UF Program
M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction
College of Design, Construction and Planning


Compiled and Written by
Dave Newport
and Tom Chesnes


Published in Accord With
The Global Reporting Initiative
Sustainabilitv Reporting Guidelines.
June 2000


V~


e0jreening



























University of Florida
Sustainability Indicators
August 2001




Published by
The Greening UF Program
M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction
College of Design, Construction and Planning
University of Florida, Gainesville


Written and Compiled by
Dave Newport and Thomas C. Chesnes


Developed In Accordance With
The Global Reporting Initiative
Sustainability Reporting Guidelines, June 2000

UNIVERSITY OF
SFLORIDA










DISCLAIMER

This report was prepared in accordance with the Global Reporting Initiative's (GRI)
June 2000 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines. The mission of the GRI is to promote
international harmonization in the reporting of relevant and credible corporate
economic, environmental, and social performance information to enhance
responsible decision-making. GRI pursues this mission through a multi-stakeholder
process of open dialogue and collaboration in the design and implementation of
widely applicable sustainability reporting guidelines. GRI has not verified the
contents of this report, nor does it take a position on the reliability of information
reported herein. For further information about GRI, please visit
www.globalreporting.orq.










UF Sustainability Indicators, August 2001

Contents


SECTION 1


Statement from UF President Charles Young


SECTION 2 Profile of the University of Florida

SECTION 3 Executive Summary and Key Indicators


SECTION 4 Vision and Strategy


Page 4

Page 5

Page 6

Page 8


SECTION 5 Policies, Organization, and Management Systems Page 9


SECTION 6


Performance Indicators
Part 1- Environmental Indicators
Energy
Material
Water
Emissions, Effluents, and Waste
Waste Returned to Process (Recycling)
Waste to Land
Effluents to Water
Transport
Land Use / Biodiversity


Part 2- Economic Indicators
Revenues
Investments
Wage and Benefits
Community Development

Part 3- Societal Indicators
Workplace
Health and Safety
Wages and Benefits
Non-discrimination
Training / Education
Freedom of Association

Part 4- Education Indicators
Faculty
Undergraduate Education
Graduate Education
Campus Safety

APPENDIX 1 Sources of Data


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001


Page 11


Page 23


Page 30


Page 35


Page 45









UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA

Charles E. Young 226 Tigert Hall
President PO Box 113150
Gainesville, FL 32611-3150
(352) 392-1311
August 1, 2001



Dear Reader:

The University of Florida is a world-class institution with an expanding international
presence. With this presence comes a parallel responsibility.

UF's goal is to monitor and manage our impact on the global community and to set and
sustain accountability standards for higher education institutions. To that end, the
University of Florida has chosen to be the first university to disclose our social,
ecological, and financial metrics according to the international guidelines developed by
the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI). This program is the result of a visionary
collaboration between the United Nations and the international business community.

The key concept of the GRI is to think globally while emphasizing local initiatives. Using
these guidelines, major international industries and institutions have made a commitment
to become stewards to their local communities. Because future performance is measured
against baseline data on a number of interrelated social, ecological and financial factors,
organizations such as the University of Florida will have the tools to sustain its
commitment to global-spanning improvements. The first step is establishing that baseline,
and the attached report makes that initial move.

The standards established within the GRI program for social, ecological and economic
excellence include areas in which the University of Florida already takes justifiable pride.
On the other hand, there is much remaining to be done to elevate our level of
performance. To maintain the trends in areas where the University of Florida exceeds
GRI standards and to address areas of concern, the Faculty Senate and I have appointed a
12-person committee to make recommendations detailing the specific actions and
resources required to make UF a global leader in sustainability. Their report will be
expected in mid-2002.

In an ever-interactive global community, the impact of leading institutions becomes
immeasurable. The University of Florida is such an institution and through the efforts of
its faculty, staff and students, can establish new standards of excellence.



Charles E. Young
President


Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution
















SECTION 2: Profile of Reporting Organization


2.1 Name: University of Florida
2.2 Type of Organization: Educational Institution
2.3 Located: United States
2.4 Ownership: Government
2.5 Service: Domestic and International Operations
2.6 Contact person:
Dave Newport
Director, Greening UF
P.O. Box 115703
Gainesville, Florida 32606
Phone: 352-392-9209
E-mail: dnewport@ufl.edu
2.7 Scale of Activities
Number of employees, students

UF Population 1995-1999

60,000

40,000 - STUDENTS
DUSPS
30,000 A&P
MA&P
20,000- TOTAL FACULTY
10,000
0
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999


Number of graduates: 7,655 undergraduates; 2,113 Masters, 394 Ph.D.s in 99-2000
Growth in Campus Infrastructure

Total UF Building Gross Sq. Feet 1995-
1999

16,500,000
16,000,000
15,500,000
15,000,000
14,500,000
14,000,000
13,500,000
13,000,000
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999


2.12 Reporting period for information provided: 1995-2000
2.13 Date of most recent previous report: Fall 1999
2.14 Significant changes in size, structure, or ownership: Governance structure changed
from Board of Regents control to unified State Board of Education and a local Board of
Trustees as per legislation approved in 2001.
2.15 Public accessibility of information reported herein: Unless otherwise noted, all
information is a Public Record under Florida law.


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001











SECTION 3: Executive Summary and Key Indicators


Overview
The 70-plus parameters describing the University of Florida's degree of sustainability
reported herein are proscribed by the Global Reporting Initiative's publication,
Sustainability Reporting Guidelines, June 2000 with which this report seeks to be compliant.

The data generally show the organization's continuous improvement although some key
social indicators show negative trends. Environmental and economic performance indicators
are generally positive. Of the indicators reported, 12 were ranked by the report's reviewers
as most illustrative of UF's state of sustainability. They are:


RANK INDICATOR NUMBER AND TITLE STI'
1 6. l(b) Total Energy/Square Foot +3
2 6.1(c) Total Energy/Capita +3
3 6.12(b) Water Use/Capita +1
4 6.12(a) Total Water Use +1
5 6.17 Quantity returned to process (Recycling) +2
6 6.19(b) Quantity of waste by material type -1
7 6.98(f) Undergraduate Graduation Rate +3
8 6.100(a) Campus Crime Rates +3
9 6.45(c) Sustainability Related Research Awards -2
10 6.97(d) Ethnicity of Faculty -1
11 6.99 Graduate Program Female Enrollment +3
12 6.98 Student Diversity -1


Indicators ranked 1-9 above all generally show positive trends. The social indicators ranked
10-12 generally show problem areas. The remaining 58 indicators show mixed trends.
Indicators relevant to Transportation (6.24) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions (6.14) were
added at the request of reviewers and have not been ranked.

Environmental indicators
Of the environmental indicators, energy-related indicators are likely the most positive.
Total energy, energy per square foot, and energy per capital all showed significant
five-year declines despite increases in all university population groups and new
buildings.
Transportation data also were very positive, with bus service increasing dramatically
the number of student transit miles.
Accordingly, the combination of significant energy reductions and strong transit
gains had positive affects on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions data.
An increasing trend in hazardous chemical and materials use is environmentally troublesome
and an economic burden but may be the result of the increasing research awards during the
period.



1 A Sustainability Trend Index (STI) was calculated for each relevant indicator based on the opinions
of the reviewers. Reviewers were asked to evaluate the trends of each indicator as positive, negative,
or neutral. Their responses were averaged and expressed as an index score. The Index ranges from -3
to 3, unsustainable to sustainable. An index of zero indicates a neutral trend.











Social indicators
In contrast to environmental indicators, social indicators relating to faculty and student
diversity are quite problematic. While the University of Florida has no monopoly on this
issue, recent changes in the State of Florida's statutes governing Affirmative Action in
higher education will likely aggravate the problem despite active interventions by UF
recruiters. However, several in-house, more controllable trends, such as percentage of
women in senior executive and senior and middle management ranks (6.72) and faculty
diversity (6.97d) are also alarmingly skewed. Social indicators relative to assessing
community outreach are significantly under represented given that no central clearinghouse
for off-campus activity exists. It is noted anecdotally that the University performs a myriad
of off-campus community service--but that is very difficult to track. Finally, social
indicators relating to the quality of the educational experience at UF show strong gains
despite significant increases in the number of students over the reporting period.

Economic indicators
Economic indicators all appear strong, with significant gains in Total Income, Research
Awards and Private Support. Sustainability-related research is the least definitive research
indicator given the inability to precisely evaluate research projects' degree of contribution to
sustainability. With respect to investments, it was reported the University of Florida
Foundation does not apply any social or sustainability screens to its portfolio.

Reporting format, limitations
This report is designed only to baseline the University of Florida's important systems. As
other universities develop comparable sustainability metrics, benchmarking may become
possible. Accordingly, no comparisons with other organizations have been developed. No
in-house numerical targets for any indicator have been identified; hence, no comparison with
targeted goals is possible. No composite or integrated sustainable-performance indicators
were identified as appropriate to a university setting.

Modifications to the GRI Reporting Guidelines were made when necessary within the
flexibility encouraged by the GRI. The guidelines presented by the GRI were oriented
towards business organizations. Therefore, irrelevant indicators were omitted and additional
indicators were added to address educational aspects.

Contributors, reviewers
Dave Newport and Thomas Chesnes of the Greening UF Program authored this report. The
initial draft of this report was submitted to over eighty reviewers on and off-campus. Their
rankings, ideas and comments were incorporated in further drafts.

The authors wish special thanks to Fred Cantrell, UF's Assistant Vice President of
Administrative Affairs who was instrumental in data collection.


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001











SECTION 4: Vision and Strategy


In March 2001, UF President Charles Young and Chairman Joe Layon of the Faculty Senate
jointly announced the formation of a 12-person Sustainability Task Force that was given one
year to complete the following mandate:

1) To review UF's assets and deficits relative to advancing sustainability in the areas of
research, education, campus operations, and community outreach;
2) Facilitate communication of UF's sustainability initiatives and their benefits to the
campus and community;
3) To survey global institutional trends towards sustainability and identify UF's best
niche(s) or role(s) in that movement, and;
4) To make recommendations to the President and the Faculty detailing specific actions
and resources required to make the University of Florida a global leader in the field
of sustainability.

Since that time the appointed UF and community members of the Task Force have begun to
meet to discharge that mandate. Recommendations for review and implementation by the
President are expected by mid year 2002.











SECTION 5: Policies, Organization, and Management Systems


Policies and Organization
5.1 Publicly available mission and values statementss, codes of conduct, statements of
economic, environmental, and social policy, and other policies with economic,
environmental, or social provisions.
The University of Florida initiated a Comprehensive Master Plan process in 1995.
An update to that plan is being finalized in 2001. The plan contains 17 discrete elements,
each with its corresponding mission and values statement. Environmental, economic and
social issues are contained in many elements including: Academic Mission, Academic
Program, Urban Design, Future Land Use, Academic Facilities, Housing, Recreation and
Open Space, General Infrastructure, Utilities, Transportation, Intergovernmental
Coordination, Conservation, Capital Improvements, and Facilities Maintenance.

5.2 Explanation of whether and how the precautionary principle is addressed by the
organization's policies.
The "Precautionary Principle" is a European-based concept of environmental and
health regulation policy that addresses scientific uncertainty in risk assessment and risk
management. To our knowledge, this concept is not addressed.

5.3 Economic, environmental, and social, or similar, charters, codes, or voluntary
initiatives (e.g., regarding labor issues, human rights, discrimination, security) to which
the organization subscribes or which it endorses, including date of adoption and
countries of applicability.
In 1990, UF's former president John Lombardi signed the Talloires Declaration
stating that UF has as obligation to the people of Florida, the US, and the world (UF has
more than 1,800 international students from 110 countries) to graduate environmentally
literate students and reduce its own environmental impact. By doing so he joined 254 other
universities from around the world in a commitment to support global sustainability goals
through realignment of education, research, policy information, operations and information
exchange.

5.4 Organizational structure and responsibilities (e.g., board of directors, senior
management, special staff, operating staff, committees, and councils) for oversight and
implementation of economic, environmental, social, and related policies.
The following hierarchy will apply to the University of Florida, especially in dealing
with sustainability issues: Florida Board of Education The University of Florida Board
of Trustees The University President The Sustainability Task Force.

5.5 Status and date, by country, of economic, environmental, and social, or similar
standards, including those that require external certification.
Not applicable for the University.

5.6 Principal industry and business association memberships, including those that
advocate public policy positions.
Not applicable for the University.

Management Systems
5.7 Programs and procedures pertaining to economic, environmental, and social
performance (such as those aimed at employee orientation and awareness, social


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001










auditing and reporting, environmental risk assessment, environmental accounting and
auditing, performance evaluation, internal communications, linkages between
management compensation and economic, environmental, and social performance),
with areas of applicability (e.g., countries, business units).
The University's Environmental Health and Safety and Personnel Departments
address these issues.

5.8 Approaches to measuring and improving management quality, including
development and execution of strategy, product/service innovation, and alliance
building and retention. Status of certification pertaining to economic, environmental,
and social management systems.
See Indicator 3.1.4 in Section 6.

5.9 Programs and procedures for supply chain/outsourcing, including supplier
selection criteria, assessment, training, monitoring, and areas of applicability (e.g.,
countries, business units).
Not applicable for the University.

5.10 Programs and procedures for decisions regarding the location of operations,
including facility or plant openings, closings, expansions, and contractions.
Not applicable for the University.

Stakeholder Relationships
5.11 Basis for definition and selection of major stakeholders (e.g., employees, investors,
suppliers, managers, customers, local authorities, public interest groups, non-
governmental organizations).
Stakeholders of the University of Florida include students, faculty, Alumni, the
Public and Government of the State of Florida, Employers, Corporations, Industry, and the
International Academic Community.

5.12 Approaches to stakeholder consultation (e.g., surveys, focus groups, community
panels, corporate advisory panels, written communications).
The University uses surveys, focus groups, panels, written communications, and
public hearings as approaches to stakeholder consultation.


Frequency of such consultations by type
5.13 Type of information generated by such consultations.
Reports and opinions are generated, for example.

5.14 Use of such information (e.g., performance benchmarks and indicators), including
use for selecting specific-specific performance indicators in Section 6.
Most notable use of the information collected was the formation of the
Sustainability Task Force, which will use the information in Section 6 of this Report.










SECTION 6: Part I- Environmental Indicators


Energy


6.1-Total Energy Use

6.1 (a) Total Energy Use


1400

1200

1000

800
Thousand
GJ 600


400

200

0


400

-350

300

-250
Million
- 200
KWH
-150

-100

50

0


95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00


6.1 (b) Total Energy per Square Foot Building Space


0.18

0.16

0.14

0.12

0.1
0.08

0.06

0.04

0.02

0


1995


1996


1997


1998


1999


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001


STI: 3


I I












6.1 (c) Total Energy per Capita


1995


1996


6.1 (d) Energy use by type

Electricity Use (in GigaJoules)

1,400,000
1,200,000
1,000,000
800,000
600,000
400,000
200,000

95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00


Chilled Water Use (in GigaJoules)


700,000
600,000
500,000
400,000
300,000
200,000
100,000
0


Natural Gas Use (in GigaJoules)

200,000
180,000
160,000
140,000 0 0
120,000
100,000
80,000
60,000
40,000
20,000
0 -
95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00


l'ean, Use nn ingaJJul sI


95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00





The overall savings in electrical consumption are attributed to building lighting
retrofits performing by Johnson Control, Inc. (JCI) in 1997 through a
performance contract. JCI replaced old and inefficient lighting ballasts, motors,


14000


12000


10000


8000 *


6000


4000


2000


0


1997


1998


1999


l. l. l.l.l... .
I l ..l l ..l ..










etc. with energy efficient models. The HVAC operation schedules were also
modified based on occupancy and function of the buildings. These contributed
to the savings. In 1998, the University Construction Standards required
installation of energy efficient motors and chillers. Also, a lighting retrofit
contract in 1998 with A&K Electric decreased electrical consumption on
campus.

6.3 Initiatives to move towards renewable energy sources and energy
efficiencySTI: 1

The University of Florida Energy Management Office is currently taking steps to
move towards greater energy efficiency. Currently, the Office is 1) maintaining
the performance contract with Johnson Controls, Inc., 2) researching a lighting
retrofit project to boost efficiency, 3) and is resurrecting a viable energy
awareness program on campus.


6.4 Total Fuel Use. Vehicle and non-vehicle fuel, by type


STI: -1


Vehicle Fuel Use by Type


1995- 1996- 1997-
1996 1997 1998
FY


O Diesel
* Gasoline


1998- 1999-
1999 2000


6.5 Other Energy Use STI: 0
Generators on campus use an additional 600 gallons of diesel fuel annually. In
addition, forklifts, pumps, and blowers consumed approximately 350 gallons of
gasoline.


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001


450,000
400,000
350,000
, 300,000
o 250,000
5 200,000
0 150,000-
100,000-
50,000
0










+ Material
6.9 Use of hazardous chemicals / materials


STI: -2


There is no complete direct tracking system of the use of hazardous chemicals
and materials. However an estimate can be made through a back calculation
based on the amount of hazardous waste collected and disposed. The assumption
was made that 75% of the hazardous materials were collected as hazardous
waste.

Estimated Hazardous Chemical and Material Use per
Capita (in Kg / capital)


1.6
1.4
1.2
1
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2 -
-


U


1995 1996 1997 1998 1999


Actual Hazardous Waste Disposed (in thousands Kg)


1997 1998 1999


1995


1996












6.10 Objectives, programs, and targets for materials replacement STI:
In compliance with RCRA waste minimization objectives, the University of
Florida targets a 10% reduction objective.

+ Water
6.12 (a) Total Water Use STI:
Water is reported in liters consumed. Dollar amounts spent on water are given
below the corresponding fiscal year.


Water Use (in Billions of Units)


4- I .Z
3.5 1
1
3
2.5 0.8
-





0 0
95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00
$557K $519K $822K $482K $511K



6.12 (b) Water Use per Capita


Water Consumed per University Capita per Year


80,000

70,000

60,000

50,000
-

S40,000
30,000

20,000

10,000

0


20,000
18,000
-16,000
14,000
12,000
10,000 I
8,000
6,000
-4,000
2,000
0


1995 1996 1997 1998 1999


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001










.1 Emissions, Effluents, and Waste


6.14 Greenhouse gas emissions STI: 2
The greenhouse emission estimates were calculated using conversion factors
obtained from the United Kingdom Department of Environment, Transport,
and Regions. Energy data were obtained from this report. Transportation
data were obtained from the North Central Florida Regional Planning
Council. Emissions from refrigerants and air conditioning systems were not
included as data were not available.


Greenhouse Emissions excluding Cooling
Process Emissions (millions kg C02)

530
525
520
515
510
505
500
495 -
490
485
480
475
1996 1997 1998 1999 2000



6.16 Total Waste (for Disposal). Provide definition, destination, and
estimation method

Solid waste generated by the University is disposed of according to the
nature of the materials. Class I Waste (also called Municipal Solid Waste,
General Solid Waste, or garbage) is disposed in a lined landfill operated for
Alachua County. Until 1999, Class I Waste went to a local in-county landfill
near Archer, Florida. Currently the garbage goes through a county transfer
station to a regional landfill near Raiford, Florida. Bio-medical waste is
incinerated in an approved regional waste-to-energy facility operated by
Ogden Corporation in Okahumpka, Florida. Various approved contractors,
according to the type of material, dispose of hazardous waste. Incineration,
neutralization, recycling, reprocessing, and long-term containment measures
are employed as appropriate.














+* Waste Returned to Process (Recvclina)


6.17 Quantity of waste returned to process or market (i.e. through
recycling, reuse) by type STI: 2


Seven categories of recycled solid waste were reported: paper, cans, glass,
scrap metal, masonry, yard waste, and sludge. All values are reported in
short tons (2000 lbs/ton). Over 30% of all solid waste generated by the
University was recovered on campus and recycled through various local or
regional brokers and processing firms. Weights were determined primarily
from actual scale tickets, though the weights of some components (i.e. yard
waste) were based on projections from sampled loads. The amount of waste
(such as furnishings and equipment) reused internally or sold or donated to
other agencies could not be assessed.


Percent Solid Waste Recycled
(all categories included)


4u
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001


Paper Recycled (in short tons)


2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0
95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00















6.17 continued: Quantity of waste returned to process or market (i.e. through

recycling, reuse) by type


Glass Collected for Recycling (in short tons)



70

60

50 -

40

30

20

10

9
95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00


Yard Waste Recycled (in short tons)


Cans Recycled (in short tons)


95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99



Sludge Recycled (in short tons)


3500


3000 300

2500 250

2000 200

1500 150

1000 100

500 50


95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00



Scrap Metal Recycled (in short tons)


600


500


400


300


200


100


0
95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00


95-96 96-97


97-98 98-99 99-00


99-00


Masonry Recycled (in short tons)


1400


1200

1000

800

600

400

200



95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00





1' 1


~ ~ ~I ~I ~








+ Waste to Land


6.19 (a) Quantity of waste to land by material type


STI: -1


Weights for solid waste materials were determined primarily from actual
scale tickets. Precise weights are not available for medical waste prior to
1999 because such statistics were not maintained.


Total Waste Disposed to Land by Material Type (in short
tons)


12,000
10,000
8,000
6,000
4,000
2,000
0


95-96


96-97


97-98


98-99


* G.?r1'.?g


99-00


6.19 (b) Waste disposed versus Recycled
Total Solid Waste Disposed versus Recycled
per Capita (in pounds per person)


O Recycled


* Solid
Waste
Disposed


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001


95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00


VUU







+ Effluents to Water
6.22 Discharges to water, by type and nature


STI: 3


The following is the quantity of effluent injected to the ground water into the
Lake Alice Well from the University of Florida Water Reclamation Facility.
The recent decrease in discharge is due to using reclaimed water in campus
irrigation.

Effluent Discharged to Lake Alice Well
(in millions of units)


1996


1997


1998


1999


2000


6.23 Profile of water bodies into which discharges flow


The Lake Alice watershed is a closed hydrologic system with no surface
outlet. In historic times, the area now occupied by the lake was a wetland
drained by sinkholes. Damming the sinkhole drain at the east end of the
basin created the lake. The discharge was replaced with two regulated
recharge wells. A recently installed weir plate helps to control the normal
lake elevation.
The drainage area consists of the 87-acre lake and 971 acres of tributary land,
totaling 1058 acres or 1.65 square miles. Land use consists primarily of the
UF campus and associated structures. The total area is slightly more than 40
percent impervious from development. Total impervious area is over 44
percent when the lake water surface area is included in the total. The 40
percent impervious area is an increase of slightly more than six percent since
completion of the initial stormwater master plan.


/iF='rr











The tributary channels to Lake Alice are fairly steep when compared to other
Florida systems. The maximum land surface elevations are about 165 feet
NGVD2, while the control elevation for Lake Alice is just over 68 feet.
These elevations result in a fall of almost 100 feet within some subbasins and
may lead to channel erosion over time.

Most of Lake Alice has a littoral shelf extending about 100 feet out to a point
two feet below the water surface. The littoral shelf is completely covered by
lush aquatic vegetation. Less than one percent of the total lake volume is
below ten feet of depth, the maximum depth is twelve feet.


+ 'Transport


6.24 (a) Student and Faculty Transportation


STI: 1


The number of total parking decals sold is used as an index of the number of
potential vehicles on campus. The number of spaces physically available
limits the number of vehicles on campus.


Decals Sold/ Spaces Available

35000
30000
25000
20000 decals
15000 1 i spaces
10000
5000
0
1998/1999 1999/2000


Although decal sales increased, the number of passengers on public
transportation increased as well (next page).




2 National Geodetic Vertical Datum -(NGVD) A fixed reference adopted as a standard geodetic datum for
elevations determined by leveling. Established in 1929. Also referred to as National Geodetic Vertical Datum of
1929 and Sea Level Datum of 1929. The NGVD is usually preferred as the primary datum for engineering
design.


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001










RTS Passenger Trips (in thousands)


6000

5000

4000


3000-

2000

1000

0
1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000





+ Land Use I Biodiversity
6.32 Amount of land owned, leased, managed, or otherwise affected by
the University. How much is impermeable surface?

The University owns, manages, leases and affects approximately 1,965 acres
of which approximately 30% is impermeable surface.

6.33 Amount of habitat protected or restored.

345 acres of University property are designated as Conservation Areas.











SECTION 6: Part 2- Economic Indicators



: Revenues


6.37 (a) Total Income STI: 3

The total income of the university was over $1.2 billion for the 1998-1999 fiscal
year. The revenue source designated as "Other" in the following chart includes
grants, contracts, and gifts, federal appropriations, sales, service, and rentals, and
other miscellaneous sources.


University Revenue (values expressed in thousands of dollars)

1,400,000

1,200,000-

1,000,000

800,000 I ip n aI i l -- In

600,000

400,000

200,000

0
1990- 1991- 1992- 1993- 1994- 1995- 1996- 1997- 1998-
91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001









6.37 (b) Private Money by Source

Private Support for the University (values in millions of dollars)


MAlumni
ONonalumni Parents
* Corporations
* Foundations
0 Other Individuals
0 Other


160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0


+ Investments

6.45 Research and Development

6.45 (a) Total Research Awards
Includes both nonfederal and federal sponsorship of research.
Total Sponsored Research Awards
(in millions of dollars)


95-96


STI: 3


1991-92 1992-93 1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99


El'


STI: 3


400
350
300
250
200 -
150
100 -
50
0


C


tl


91-92


93-94


97-98


99-00


I











6.45 (b) Technology transfer income STI: 3
Royalty and licensing income totaled $21.7 million in fiscal year 1999. The
income generated came primarily from TrusoptTM, a glaucoma drug licensed
to Merck Pharmaceuticals, which accounted for 60 percent. Gatorade TM,
licensed to Quaker Oats, accounted for 28 percent of the years total. The
remainder of the revenue was generated from license fees, option payments
and royalties from other technologies. The University of Florida is ranked 7th
among all U.S. universities in licensing income.


Technology Transfer Income (in millions of dollars)


0 --


91-92 93-94 95-96 97-98 99-00


6.45 (c) Sustainability Related Awards STI: -2
An estimate of sustainability related research was made by searching for
specific keywords in a database of research compiled by the University of
Florida. The keywords were: sustainable, sustainability, affordable housing,
brownfield, biodiversity, climate change, conservation, and solar.


Estimated Sustainable Research Awards in
Dollars by Year


2,500,000

2,000,000

1,500,000

1,000,000

500,000

0


Sustainability Research as Percent of Total
Research

1
0.9-
0.8
0.7
0.6
0.5-
0.4
0.3-
0.2-
0.1
0
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001


1995 1996 1997 1998 1999












6.46 Other Capital Investments


The following data were collected from the University of Florida Annual
Financial Report under the heading "Investment Income". No details of the
nature of the investments were given. There is no policy for screening
investments for social or environmental equity.


Investment Income per Fiscal Year (in millions of dollars)


140

120

100

80

60

40

20

0


1994


1995


1996


1997


1998


1999


S.1 Wances and Benefits


6.48 Total Wage Expense


Accrued Salaries and Wages Payable per Fiscal
Year (in dollars)

80,000,000
70,000,000
60,000,000
50,000,000
40,000,000
30,000,000
20,000,000
10,000,000
0
1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999


tT-m


STI: 3





ISTL:2


-

-

-

-


-











+ Community Development


6.52 Jobs, by type, absolute and net change


ISTI: 2


University of Florida Employment

12,000

10,000- -

8,000
SUSPS
6,000 A&P
4,000 TOTAL FACULTY

2,000


1995 1996 1997 1998 1999


Net Change 95/96 96/97 97/98 98/99
TOTAL FACULTY -11 -15 -30 +88
A&P _+94 +52 +60 +99
USPS +29 -81 -388 +9

TOTAL UNIVERSITY +112 -44 -358 +196



6.53 Philanthropy/ Charitable Donations

6.53 (a) Student community services
During the 1999/2000 Academic Year, 175 student organizations reported doing
community work. During the course of the year, they completed over 85,000
hours of community service. In addition, student organizations donated over
$210,000 to local, state, and national charities.


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001










6.53 (b) Shands-UF Hospital indigent care


Indigent Care by Shands (in Millions of Dollars)


1997


1998 1999


2000


STI: 1


The Center for Precollegiate Education and Training (CPET) coordinates on-
campus and outreach programs for secondary students and teachers across
Florida.

All CPET Programs
Program Participation
1996 -2000
800-
700
600
500
40C
300
200
100
0 _.2000
1998
) H G "-- t 1996


Year


6.53 (c) Community Education/outreach


ISTL:3












Participation Hours I By Program


00ooo
-------------- 1') ----------






c i SSEF 1996
TRUE
JSEHS
Gator Lab






CPET programs include:
The Student Science Training Program (SSTP)
The State Science and Engineering Fair of Florida (SSEF)
The NSF Teacher Research Update Experience (TRUE)
The Junior Science, Engineering and Humanities Symposium (JSEHS)
Gator Lab- summer camps to promote advanced educational experiences
for motivated middle school students.


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001











SECTION 6: Part 3- Societal Indicators


+ Workplace


6.60 Employee retention rates


STI: 1


These values were determined by comparing the number of employees on payroll
at the beginning of the fiscal year with those at the end. Movement among
colleges and departments was not considered. Faculty, A & P (Administrative
and Professional), and USPS (University Support Personnel System) positions
were included in the calculations.


Percent of Employees Retained

.100. .., "
90
80
70
60-
50
40-
30
20
10
0
95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00


6.61 Ratio of jobs offered to jobs accepted

This information was not available.

6.62 Evidence of employee orientation to University mission

New employee orientation is given weekly at two locations for USPS and A&P
positions. Centralized faculty orientation is given each fall, as well as ongoing
orientations by individual colleges.










6.63 Evidence of employee engagement in shaping management decision-
making

The University has numerous programs and awards in place to encourage
employees to take part in shaping management decision-making. Two examples
are the Davis Productivity Award and the Incentive Efficiency Program. The
Davis Productivity Award honors individuals or work units for significantly
increased productivity in delivering services and products. The program
provides recognition as well as cash awards.

The purpose of the Incentive Efficiency Program (IEP) is to improve the quality
of the State University System through the reallocation of existing resources or
the realization of improved or new revenue opportunities. Employees of the
University of Florida are eligible to submit proposals for cost savings or revenue
enhancements.

6.64 Ranking of University as an employer in internal and external surveys

This information was not available.

6.65 Job Satisfaction Levels

Not available University wide. Some individual departments may have
programs in place.

. Health and Safety


6.66 Reportable cases (including subcontracted workers) STI: -3

The University maintains a report of injury inventory. The reporting system
does not account for subcontractors. Federal OSHA requirements set specific
criteria on what a reportable injury is.


Reported Injuries per Calendar Year

1600
1400
1200 10
1000
800
600 44;
400
200
0
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001













6.67 Standard Injury, lost day, and absentee rates (including
subcontracted workers)


STI: -2


The University maintains a report of lost workdays. Information is not
maintained for subcontracted workers.


Lost Workdays per Calendar Year


3000 -

2500 -

2000

1500

1000

500

0


1997


N/A

1995


1998


*** Data were not available for the 1995 calendar year. Reporting criteria
were changed after calendar year 1997. Data are not available to correct
information reported prior to calendar year 1997 to align it with the current
reporting criteria.

6.68 Investment per worker in illness and injury prevention. STI: 2


These calculations are based on approximately 12,000
(faculty and staff) of the University.


benefit employees


Investment per Benefit Employee


95-96 96-97 97-98
Fiscal Year


98-99 99-00


1996


1999









+ Wages and Benefits


6.69 Ratio of lowest wage to national legal minimum

The ratio of university lowest wage to the national minimum is 1.36:1. The
lowest University employee wage is $7.00 per hour versus the federal
minimum wage of $5.15 per hour.

6.70 Ratio of lowest wage to local cost of living

No local cost of living data available.

6.71 Health and pension benefits provided to employees

A significant portion of a benefit-employee's overall compensation is
provided by the University's wide variety of benefits. The University
finances a large percentage of the overall cost of insurances offered, resulting
in lower premiums. Detailed information is available on the University
Personnel Services website http://www.ups.ufl.edu/benefits.



+ Non-Discrimination

6.72 Percentage of women in senior executive and senior and middle
management ranks

In the University, this group is defined to include administrative roles within
the faculty plan (vice president, associated vice president, assistant vice
president, deans, directors, and all administrative and professional groups).
7.49 % of University line employees are female in these positions.

6.73 Discrimination related litigation- frequency and type

Data not available.

6.74 Mentoring programs for minorities

There are no programs centrally; individual colleges orchestrate these
programs.


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001













+ Training and Education


6.75 Ratio of training budget to annual operation costs

The ratio is 1:8,895. The University budget for Training and Development,
including salaries and operating expenses is $200,000. The UF operating
budget for fiscal year 2000-01 is $1,779,066,366.

6.76 Programs to foster worker participation in decision-making

See GRI Indicator 6.63

6.77 Changes in average years of education of workforce.

This information is not known.


+ Freedom of Association

6.82 Staff forums and grievance procedures in place

Formal grievance and complaint procedures are established and active. The
University encourages informal resolutions to grievances and complaints by
having employees contact their immediate supervisor to assist in resolution.
If this informal resolution is not successful, formal grievances and complaints
may be initiated. Detailed information is available on the University
Personnel Services website http://www.ups.ufl.edu/emprelations.

6.83 Number and types of legal actions concerning anti-union practices

None reported.

6.84 University responses to organizing at non-union facilities

Not applicable.











SECTION 6: Part 4- Education Indicators


Faculty


6.97 (a) Quality of Faculty
91 % of the faculty of the University of Florida have a terminal degree.

6.97 (b) Diversity of Faculty
The University of Florida's ranked faculty consists of 2,886 members, which
includes 1,359 Full professors, 808 Associate professors, 770 Assistant
professors, and 141 instructors.


Diversity of Ranked Faculty 1999-2000


3% 3%


White
*Asian
* Hispanic
O African-American


6.97 (b) Gender of Ranked Faculty


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001


Gender of Ranked Faculty 1999-2000




23%


* male
* female









6.97 (d) Ethnicity of Faculty


Total Faculty by Ethnicity

4,000
3,500
3,000
2,500- MWhite
2,000 DHisp.
ED Afr-Am
1,500 Asian
1,000
500 I=
0
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999


The numbers of Native Americanfaculty cannot be seen on the above chart due to scale. There was
one Native American faculty member in 1995, two in 1996 and 1997, three in 1998, andfive in 1999.


6.97 (e) Gender of Total Faculty STI: 0



Total Faculty by Gender


4,000
3,500
3,000
2,500
2,000
1,500
1,000
500
0


F]


H


HRF


0 Female
mMale


1996


1995


1997


1998


1999


STI: -1











+ UndergraduatelGeneral Education


6.98(a) Incoming Freshman GPA and SAT Scores STI: 3

The middle 50% of the University of Florida's incoming freshman class had an
average weighted high school grade point averages ranging from 3.7 4.1. In
addition, 176 National Merit Scholars enrolled in the University of Florida in
1999.


Upper Level of Middle 50% SAT Verbal Scores
Between UF Freshman and National College Bound
High School Seniors

800

600 -----------

400
O National
200 l UF


Upper Level of Middle 50% SAT Math Scores Between
UF Freshman and National College Bound High School
Seniors

800

600

400
O National
200 / UF


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001












6.98 (b) Student Diversity
Approximately 45,000 students currently attend the University of Florida,
including 32,680 undergraduates and 12,434 graduate and professional students.
They come from every county in Florida, every state in the United States, and
over 100 foreign countries.


Diversity of Students 1999-2000


MWhite
SHispanic
DAfrican-American
MAsian
mOther


6.98 (c) Diversity Trends


Undergraduate Enrollment by Ethnic Group


35,000

30,000


25,000

20,000

15,000


10,000

5,000

0


* Other
DHisp
o Afr-Am
D White


1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999


STI: -1


innIIIIIBB












6.98 (d) Gender Trends


Total Enrollment by Gender


50,000

45,000

40,000

35,000

30,000

25,000

20,000

15,000

10,000

5,000

0


female
*male


1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999


6.98 (e) Undergraduate enrollment by family income
This information was not available.


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001


ISTL:3












6.98 (f) Undergraduate graduation rateSTI: 3
This indicator was determined by the percent of graduates six years after a class's
initial enrollment. The years on the chart correspond to year of the classes' first
year of enrollment.



Percent Graduated by Sixth year following Freshman
Year

75%

70%

65%

60%- - - -

55%- - - -

50%
1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992












+ Graduate Education


6.99 (a) Graduate Program Applicants



Graduate Applications


16000
14000
12000
10000
8000
6000
4000
2000
0


94-95 95-96


96-97


97-98 98-99


6.99 (b) Graduate Program Enrollment


Graduate Enrollment


94-95


95-96


96-97


97-98


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001


ISTI: 3


99-00


STI: 3


9000
8000
7000
6000
5000
4000
3000
2000
1000
0


98-99


99-00


111












6.99 (c) Total graduate program minority enrollment


Percent Minority Enrollment in Graduate Programs

9n .


94-95


95-96


96-97


97-98


98-99


6.99 (d) Total graduate program female enrollment


Percent Enrollment of Women in Graduate Programs


99-00


STI: 3


95-96


94-95


96-97


97-98


98-99


99-00


ISTL:3













+ Campus Safety


6.100 (a) Campus Crime Rates STI: 3

The following statistics reflect only those reported to the University of Florida
Police Department per calendar year.


Total Crimes Reported

1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0


1994 1995


1996 1997


6.100 (b) Crime by violation type


STI: 3


Violation 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
Murder 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sex Offenses 5 2 1 7 6 2
Robbery 4 4 12 4 7 5
Aggravated Assault 24 23 22 18 12 16
Burglary 52 56 53 52 45 45
Larceny 1293 1168 1168 1014 1002 920
Motor Vehicle Theft 66 77 59 44 39 21
Totals 1444 1330 1315 1139 1111 1009


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001


1998 1999











6.100 (c) Crime Prevention


Resources for the university community in the areas of crime prevention and
personal safety education are available from a variety of sources, including the
Office of Student Services, The Student Health Care Center, and the University
Police Department. Programs and services include: a crime prevention resource
center, nighttime building security program, numerous alcohol and drug abuse
prevention programs, personal safety and rape prevention programs, spring break
safety fairs, and free bicycle registration.










Appendix 1: Sources of Information


Part I- Environmental Indicators

Energy
All per capital and square foot data was obtained from the UF Fact Book, located
online at http://nersp.nerdc.ufl.edu/-ufdata/factbook/. Energy information for
sections 6.1 and 6.2 was obtained from the University Energy Management Office.
Information for section 6.4 and 6.5 were from the University Physical Plant Division.

Material
All information for this section was obtained from Environmental Health and Safety.

Water
Water consumption data were from the University Energy Management Office.

Emissions, Effluents and Waste
The Physical Plant Division's Solid Waste Coordinator provided this information.
Greenhouse gas calculations were made from information provided by the North
Central Florida Regional Planning Council.

Waste Returned to Process
The Physical Plant Division's Solid Waste Coordinator provided this information.

Waste to Land
The Physical Plant Division's Solid Waste Coordinator provided this information.

Effluents to Water
The University Physical Plant provided this information.

Transportation
Decal and space information was obtained from the University of Florida
Transportation and Parking Services. Maria Savoia, RTS Chief Transit Planner,
provided bus transportation information.

Land Use/ Biodiversity
The University Physical Plant provided this information.

Part II- Economic Indicators

Revenues
Information in this section was found in the UF Fact Book.

Investments
Information used in 6.45 was found in the University of Florida Research and
Graduate Programs Annual Reports. The searchable database can be found online at


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001









http://rgp.ufl.edu/research/search/. Information for section 6.46 was found in the
University of Florida Annual Financial Reports 1994-2000.

Wages and Benefits
Information for this section was found in the University of Florida Annual Financial
Reports 1994-2000.

Community Development
Information for section 2.4.1 was found in the UF Fact Book. Information for section
6.53(a) was obtained from a speech delivered by UF President Charles Young on
August 16, 2000. Marilyn Tubb, VP of Community Affairs for Shands, provided
information for section 6.53(b). Information for section 6.53(c) was provided by the
Center for Precollegiate Education and Training.

Part III- Societal Indicators

Workplace
Health and Safety
Wages and Benefits
Non-Discrimination
Training and Education
Freedom of Association

The University of Florida Division of Personnel Services provided all information in
the above sections.

Part IV- Educational Indicators

Faculty
All information was found in the UF Fact Book.

Undergraduate Education
Most information was found in the UF Fact Book. Incoming GPA information
obtained from a speech delivered by UF President Charles Young on August 16,
2000.

Graduate Education
Information for this section was obtained from the University of Florida Research
and Graduate Programs Annual Reports.

Campus Safety
The Coordinator of Educational/Media Communications of the University Police
Department provided all information in this section.










About the authors


Dave Newport is the Director of the University of Florida's Greening UF Program, and
also the Director of UF's Office of Sustainability. Mr. Newport's background is in
environmental research, teaching and publishing. Mr. Newport published environmental
periodicals including Florida Environments Magazine, and Environment 21. His
publications won many awards including the Florida Audubon Society Environmental
Journalist of the Year Award, the United Nations Environmental Programme Global 500
Award, and the Al Burt Award for Outstanding Environmental Journalism. Mr. Newport is a
Fellow of the American Hospital Association's Healthy Community Institute. He holds a
Bachelor of Arts Degree from Syracuse University with concentrations in Management and
Communications and an Associate of Science Degree from Santa Fe Community College in
Environmental Science Technology. Mr. Newport is also an elected official who currently
serves as Chairman of the Alachua County Commission to which he was elected
Commissioner in 1998.

Thomas C. Chesnes is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Environmental
Engineering Sciences at the University of Florida. His area of expertise is systems ecology.
The majority of his research is in estuarine systems, working with fish, invertebrates,
seagrass, and the anthropogenic influences on salinity. He has authored numerous research
reports and has presented his work at several scientific meetings. This is his first report for
the Greening UF organization.



About Greening UF

Greening the University of Florida (GUF) is a grassroots movement of students, faculty, and
staff from a wide variety of academic and administrative units that was initiated in October
1997 to integrate sound economic analysis, equitable social policy, and environmental
literacy throughout the campus community, and assist other Florida universities in
establishing parallel sustainability efforts.
Current activities include:
Research and publication of the UF Sustainability Indicators Report
Staffing the UF Sustainability Task Force
Office Greening Awards
Environmental Literacy Education
Office of Sustainability assistance
Community, student outreach
Internship programs
Healthy Community programs involvement

The University of Florida has over 43,000 students, 4,000 faculty and 10,000 staff, making it
one of the ten largest universities in the United States. UF offers over 100 undergraduate
degree programs and 200 graduate programs in its 21 colleges and schools and hosts over
100 interdisciplinary research and education centers. This places the University of Florida
among the top three institutions in the USA in terms of academic programs offered on a
single campus.


University of Florida Sustainability Indicators, August 2001




















































Greening UF UF Office of Sustainability
College of Design Construction and Planning
M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction
www.sustainable.ufl.edu




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