• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Mission and guiding principles
 History
 Methodology
 Invitations to participate
 Campus perceptions
 How to read this report
 Session summaries
 Institutional commitment
 What's next
 Glossary of concepts
 Back Cover






Title: Vision for a sustainable UF
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Title: Vision for a sustainable UF
Series Title: Vision for a sustainable UF
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Language: English
Creator: Office of Sustainability, University of Florida
Publisher: Office of Sustainability, University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Introduction
        Page 2
    Mission and guiding principles
        Page 3
    History
        Page 4
    Methodology
        Page 5
    Invitations to participate
        Page 6
    Campus perceptions
        Page 7
    How to read this report
        Page 8
    Session summaries
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
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        Page 53
    Institutional commitment
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    What's next
        Page 57
    Glossary of concepts
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Table of Contents 1
Introduction 2
Mission and Guiding Principles 3
History 4
Methodology 5
Invitations to Participate 6
Campus Perceptions 7
How to Read This Report 8
Session Summaries 9
Teaching and Research 10
Service, Outreach, and Extension 14
Energy Conservation and Climate Change 18
Land and Resource Management 22
Agriculture 26
Built Environment 30
Waste Reduction 34
Procurement 38
Investment 40
Transportation 42
Health & Wellbeing 46
Equity 48
Cultural Climate 52
Stewardship 53
Institutional Commitment 54
What's Next 57
Glossary of concepts, terms and acronyms 58




Photography courtesy of UF News Bureau, IFAS Communication Services,
the Hinkley Center, and the Office of Sustainability.























human beings are a

part of an inter-
connected, living

web of species

and systems that

fit together in intricate and sometimes

mysterious ways. There are limits to how

much our human populations can grow
and how much we can alter our sur-

rounding environment, without causing

changes that will reverberate throughout
that web.

The shift to sustainability requires us
to consider the limits to growth and
the consequences of our personal and
institutional impacts on the systems that
support life. Rather than encouraging
dichotomies like "humans versus nature"
or "jobs versus the environment," we can
encourage integrated decision making
that supports the long-term wellbeing
of our society, including a healthy and
sustainable economy.

The University of Florida has an obliga-
tion to meet the challenges of sustain-
ability, integrating the goals of ecological
restoration, economic development, and
social equity into its operations, educa-
tion, research, and outreach. As an
institution of higher learning, we play
a leading role in training the scientific,
social, political and cultural leaders who


will make a difference in the world.
Whether the world is a better or worse
place for future generations is in no small
part a function of the knowledge and
skills we impart to our students and the
values they develop in their years here.

To achieve the goal of a sustainable UF,
we are committed to encouraging and
facilitating the collaborative efforts of
faculty, students, and staff to generate
knowledge, acquire skills, develop values,
and initiate practices that contribute to a


sustainable, high quality of life on cam-
pus, in the state of Florida, and across
the globe.

In keeping with this commitment, the
UF Office of Sustainability brought
together representatives of diverse
stakeholder groups across our campus to
develop a collaborative vision for campus
sustainability. Each group of representa-
tives focused on a different topic area, all
of which are represented individually and
collectively in the sections of this report.





















he mission of the Office of Sus-
tainability is to make the Univer-
sity of Florida in its operations,
education, research, and outreach a
model of sustainability, integrating the
goals of ecological restoration, economic
development, and social equity.

In pursuing this mandate, the Office of
Sustainability encourages and facilitates
the collaborative efforts of faculty, stu-
dents, and staff to generate knowledge,
acquire skills, develop values, and initiate
practices that contribute to a sustainable,
high quality of life on campus, in the
state of Florida, and across the globe.

The Office of Sustainability supports
faculty, students, and staff in assuming
leadership to transform the university's
practices, following these guiding
principles.

Teaching and Research -
Stimulate and facilitate curricular
development and research efforts in
sustainability-related areas, including
the promotion of service-learning
and the empowerment of faculty,
students, and staff to engage the
campus community, university
operations, and university lands as
living laboratories for sustainability.

Service, Outreach, and
Extension Facilitate the civic
engagement of faculty, students,
and staff and stimulate service,
outreach, and extension efforts
that promote sustainable practices
within community and economic
development.


Energy Conservation and Climate
Change Monitor and minimize
energy consumption, reduce and
offset greenhouse gas emissions, and
promote the development and use of
renewable energy sources.

Land and Resource Management
- Manage lands in a sustainable
manner to conserve, protect, and
restore natural systems, natural
resources, and biodiversity.

Agriculture Promote diverse and
sustainable agricultural practices that
encourage the protection of farmland
and the rural environment, establish
food security, and support a high
standard of nutrition on campus and
in the community.

Built Environment Construct
and renovate the built environment
to high standards of!, i .v,
water, and materials efficiency
with minimum impacts on local
ecosystems.

Waste Reduction Reduce waste
streams and promote closed-cycle
materials practices.

Procurement Subscribe to
procurement policies and practices
that support environmentally and
socially responsible products and
services.

Investment Explore and develop
opportunities to engage in socially
and environmentally responsible
investing.


Transportation Develop
incentives and infrastructure for
walking, cycling, ridesharing, and
public transportation.

Health & Wellbeing Ensure
a healthy working environment
for faculty, students, and staff and
work to ensure equitable access to
healthcare on campus and within the
broader community.

Equity Promote diversity among
faculty, students, and staff. Establish
policies that support living wages and
fair remuneration. Facilitate a shared
governance model for management
of university operations and the
sharing of perspectives and best
practices.

Cultural Climate Foster a
cultural climate that supports a
full range of creative expression,
artistic experience, and recreational
opportunity.

Stewardship Encourage all
members of the Gator Nation to take
responsibility for the interdependent
environmental, economic, and social
consequences of their actions.























he current phase of the greening
of the University of Florida began
in 1994 when President Lombardi
signed the Talloires Declaration, pledging
to make environmental education and
research a central goal in this institution.

After more than a decade of student,
faculty, and administrative commitment
to sustainability on campus, The
University of Florida (UF) inaugurated
its first fully funded Office of
Sustainability on February 1, 2006.
The university's ad hoc sustainability
task force officially evolved into a joint
standing committee of the faculty senate
on August 15, 2006. The president of the
university created and funded the office
following resolutions from both the
faculty and student senates.

Milestones that helped pave the way
for the current sustainability effort at
UF include:

* 1994: UF joined 310 universities
world-wide in signing the Talloires
Declaration, pledging support to
reduce environmental degradation
and natural resource depletion.
* OCTOBER 1997: The Greening UF
program was initiated as a grassroots
movement of students, faculty and
staff from across the campus for
environmental stewardship.
* SEPTEMBER 2000: An Office of
Sustainability was established within
the College of Design, Construction
and Planning (DCP) to facilitate,
among other things, sustainability
initiatives on campus.


* 2001: UF adopted Leadership in
Energy and Environmental Design
(LEED) criteria for design and
construction for all major new
construction and renovation projects
to deliver high performance and
sustainable building design to the
University of Florida.
* MARCH 2001: A Sustainability
Task Force was created jointly by
the President and Faculty Senate,
following a Faculty Senate proposal of
December 2000.
* AUGUST 2001: The DCP Office of
Sustainability released a sustainability
indicators report, based on the Global
Reporting Initiative guidelines.
* JULY 2002: The Sustainability Task
Force released its Final Report.
* OCTOBER 2002: The Faculty Senate
endorsed the Task Force Final Report.
* MARCH 2003: In response to a
request from President Young, the
Task Force identified high priority
recommendations from the Final
Report for implementation.
* APRIL 2004: A Student Senate
resolution (#1041) urged the creation
of a university office of sustainability
with "full administrative support."
* SEPTEMBER 2004: An ad hoc
Sustainability Committee was
established through appointments
from the Faculty Senate and President
Machen.


* SEPTEMBER 2005: UF opened the
search for a director of a new Office
of Sustainability to support cross-
campus efforts.
* OCTOBER 2005: President Machen
gave a speech on National Campus
Sustainability Day setting goals for
campus sustainability and pledging to
deliver an annual report card on the
university's efforts.
* FEBRUARY 2006: UF hired a director
for the campus-wide Office of
Sustainability.
* JUNE 2006: Provost Fouke
commissioned a report on
sustainability in the curriculum.
* OCTOBER 2006: UF hosted the first
Florida Campus & Community
Sustainability conference.
* OCTOBER 2006: President Machen
was the first university president to
commit to the American College
and University Presidents Climate
Commitment.
* SEPTEMBER 2007: UF embarked on
a six-month collaborative visioning
process for campus sustainability.
* NOVEMBER 2007: Provost Fouke
appointed a Provost Faculty Fellow
for Sustainability to develop, among
other things, a Minor in Sustainability
Studies.
* JUNE 2008: UF plans to publish the
Sustainable UF Envisioning Success
and Empowering Action report.


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3 nd administrative comm tMent to S.
u1stainability
............

on campus, UF inaugurated its first fully funded

Office of Sustainability.





















n 2006, the Association for the
Advancement of Sustainability in
Higher Education (AASHE) worked
with schools in the Puget Sound region
of Washington to develop the Sustain-
ability in Higher Education Assessment
Framework (SHEAF). SHEAF was
intended to be a tool for assessing and
benchmarking the sustainability perfor-
mance of multiple institutions. AASHE's
new Sustainability Tracking, Assessment,
and Rating System (STARS) grew out of
SHEAF (See also What's Next)

UF facilitators used SHEAF as a guiding
assessment framework during the vision-
ing process. The SHEAF assessment in-
dicators, which were sent to participants
ahead of time as pre-work, aided par-
ticipants in identifying strategies already
underway at UF and in imagining the
possibilities for campus sustainability.

SHEAF areas of assessment did not
align perfectly with UF's pre-existing
Guiding Principles for Sustainability, as
adopted by the university's Joint Stand-
ing Sustainability Committee. As a
consequence, the results of some sessions
are combined and other principles, like
Cultural Climate, are abbreviated. This
does not, in any way, reflect a weighting
of the importance among the principles.

Between September and December
2006, fourteen sessions were held, one
for each indicator area, as identified
above. In each facilitated four-hour ses-
sion, participants:


* were guided through a high level
overview of the case for sustainability
* had the opportunity to work in
pairs, small groups, and with the
whole group
* identified the most and least
sustainable aspects of campus
operations, generally (see below)
* crafted vision statements for the
given topic, and
* identified what actions UF would
need to put in place to realize some
of the visions.


In keeping wit
of Sustainabili

of diverse stak

to develop a c

sustainability.


The sessions were facilitated by members
of UF's Office of Human Resources -
Training and Organizational Develop-
ment team. We would like to extend our
gratitude to the members of this team
for their thoughtful and professional col-
laboration and facilitation.


Jodi Gentry
Bryan Garey
Bob Parks
Ruth Hernandez
Heather Adams


h this commitment, the UF Office

ty brought together representatives

:eholder groups across our campus

collaborative vision for campus


Members of UF's Office of Sustainability
attended every session; at least one
member of UF's Joint Standing
Sustainability Committee attended each
session and served as a liaison back to the
committee. Two Office of Sustainability
interns attended every session and
transcribed the notes that became the
foundation for this report. We would
like to thank interns Melissa DeSa and
Andrea Garcia for their tireless work
on this. Sustainability intern Stephanie
Sims organized the information into the
draft outline for the report, researched
benchmark programs, and helped to
draft many sections of the report.























n an effort to secure broad and inclusive stakeholder participation in the vision-
ing process, representatives from the following departments, units, and business
partnerships were invited to participate.


AcademicAffairs
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Americans with Disability Act Compliance
Office
ARAMARK (national)
Botany
Business Affairs
Business Services Division
Buy Local Florida
Center for Leadership and Service
S Center for Solid and Hazardous Waste
Management
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
College of Dentistry
College of Education
College of Engineering
College of Fine Arts
College of Health and Human Performance
College of Journalism and Communications
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
College of Medicine
College of Nursing
College of Pharmacy
College of Public Health and Health
Professions
College of Veterinary Medicine
Community Relations
Compensation Committee
Computer and Networking Services


Department of Recreation Sports
Division of Small Business and Vendor
Diversity Relations
Division of Student Affairs
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Entomology-Integrated Pest Management
Facilities Planning and Construction
Faculty Senate
Family, Youth, and Consumer Sciences
Finance and Accounting
Florida Institute for Sustainable Energy
Food and Resource Economics
Gainesville Harvest
Gator Dining Services
George A. Smathers Libraries
Graduate Assistants United
Hinkley Center for Solid/Hazardous Waste
Human Resource Services
Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences
Industrial and Systems Engineering
International Carbon Bank and Exchange
Landscape Architecture
Levin College of Law
LGBT Concerns Committee
M.E. Rinker, Sr. School of Building Construction
Materials Science and Engineering
Multicultural and Diversity Affairs
Nuclear and Radiological Engineering
Office of Information Technology


Office of Sorority and Fraternity Affairs
Office of Technology Licensing
Office of the Provost
Office of the Registrar
Pepsi Bottling
Physical Plant Division
Physics
Professional Relations and Tenure Committee
Progress Energy
Reitz Union Administration
Samuel P Harn Museum of Art
School of Forest Resources and Conservation
School of Natural Resources and Environment
Soil and Water Science
Stephen C. O'Connell Center
Student Government
Sustainability Committee
The Dean of Students Office
The Honors Program
Transportation and Parking Services
Tourism, Recreation, and Sports Management
Turf-grass Science
UF News Bureau
UF Office of Information Technology
University Athletic Association
University Relations
Veterinary Medical Center
Warrington College of Business Administration
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
Zoology




















during the fourteen sessions, participants had the chance to identify, from
their own perspective, the most and least sustainable aspects of UF's opera-
tions, academics, and governance structure. Following are the aspects identi-
fied by participants multiple times across the sessions. THIS LIST REVEALS PERCEPTIONS
HELD BY THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY.


MOST SUSTAINABLE
Irrigation
90% reclaimed water
Alternative transportation options
Biking
GreenRide and Flexcar
RTS
Gator Dining
Regionally sourced produce
LEED commitment
Student enthusiasm
Incentives for activating faculty and
staff interest
UF's commitment:
Office of the President
Office of Sustainability


LEAST SUSTAINABLE
Energy consumption and waste
Transportation
RTS pollution air and noise
Biking safety
Single occupancy vehicle travel
Decentralized campus
Dysfunctional bureaucratic structure
Sustainability lack of integration into
campus operations and culture
Inefficient use of space in the built
environment
Academics not enough sustainability-
related content
Opportunities for donors to contribute
to sustainability initiatives other than
new buildings




















This report is the result of a series of collaborative sessions, with over 100 members
of UF and the broader community, to develop a vision for sustainability at UE The
contents of this report represent their efforts to develop a comprehensive, yet distinct,
vision for each of UF's guiding principles for sustainability. Each principle topic is
comprised of several sections, as illustrated in the snapshot below:


Guiding Principle
/


Recent Accomplish-
ments offers important
examples of recent
progress in this area
/


Benchmark
Programs offers
brief descriptions
of related
examples from
peer or leading
institutions.
/


HEAI.M-4 AJD Wj [ IBj r %r j


/i


How Are We Doing? provides
an overview of UF's performance
and activities in this area.


Reaching the Vision offers I
the opportunities identified by
participants for achieving the
vision.


Framing the Vision provides
an overview of the vision,
generated from each
session.


Each section opens with a brief
Description of Importance and
Reason for Inclusion.




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I TEACHING AND RESEARCH


Description of Importance and
Reason for Inclusion
As a top-tier research and land grant
university, the University of Florida
is uniquely positioned to combine its
research capacity with its outreach and
extension mission to develop interdis-
ciplinary institutes and programs that
deliver important research to the public.
As we educate future leaders and active
members of our global community, UF
can integrate sustainability into teaching,
learning, and practice by increasing the
opportunity for comprehensive sustain-
ability-related studies. Sustainability-
10 related courses, which span a wide range
of disciplines, can provide our students
with the knowledge and tools necessary
for fostering our collective movement
toward sustainability.

Guiding Principle
Stimulate and facilitate curricular
development and research efforts in
sustainability-related areas, including
the promotion of service-learning
and the empowerment of faculty,
students, and staff to engage the campus
community, university operations, and
university lands as living laboratories for
sustainability.

How Are We Doing?
CENTERS AND INSTITUTES: A review of
the current programs at the university
reveals a large number of centers and
institutes that address one or more of the
dimensions of sustainability directly, of-
ten as the core of their mission. Examples
of some of the centers that address issues
of environmental, economic and social
sustainability include the McGuire
Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity,


the Center for Environmental Policy, and
the Powell Center for Construction and
Environment. Continuing education in
sustainability-related fields is available
through the Center for Training, Re-
search, and Education for Environmental
Occupations (TREEO).

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES: Beyond
research efforts, talented and commit-
ted undergraduate students are the great
strength and pride of the University of
Florida. Over the past decade, commit-
ted faculty members have introduced
students to sustainability in a variety of
ways, including semester-long lecture
series. The first several series, entitled
"Conversations in Sustainability" fos-
tered interest in and knowledge about
sustainability. In 2005, an interdisciplin-
ary undergraduate class was generated


program supports faculty who wish to
develop new service learning courses by
connecting them to community contacts
as well as current faculty teaching such
courses. (See also Community Service)

INTERDISCIPLINARY EFFORTS: UF also
hosts ad hoc interdisciplinary efforts that
are explicitly designed to foster sustain-
ability research and extension on campus.
One of these is a loosely affiliated group
of faculty, the UF "Roadies." The group
consists of faculty and students on cam-
pus with shared interests in the impacts
of infrastructure on the sustainability and
adaptability of linked social and ecologi-
cal systems. Included in the group are ex-
perts on ecology, sociology, anthropology,
land tenure, mathematics, geography
and remote sensing, and economics. The
goals of the group include interdisciplin-


.. .. .. .
...............a -
.........s.. s s
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .


under the auspices of the Sustainability
Committee entitled "Facets of Sustain-
ability." UF currently boasts more than
100 courses, 10 academic programs, and
23 centers that emphasize concepts of
sustainability.

SERVICE LEARNING: A program to support
service learning at UF exists within the
Center for Leadership and Service. The
program helps introduce students to the
value of community service and service
learning and provides information on
existing opportunities. Additionally, the


ary research and the development of a
strong, interdisciplinary field component
to test and refine ideas.

Recent Accomplishments
PROVOST FACULTY FELLOW: The uni-
versity provost has signaled support of
an academic focus on sustainability by
appointing a Provost Faculty Fellow for
Sustainability, to be funded through that
office. The fellow will work with the
provost to connect UF's rich and diverse
current course and research offerings
to create a dedicated course of study























in sustainability. (See also Institutional
Commitment)

SUSTAINABILITY MINI-GRANTS: The Of-
fice of the Provost supported a 2006-07
mini-grant program for faculty wishing
to incorporate sustainability into course
work. (See also Institutional Commit-
ment)

SUSTAINABILITY MINOR: An ad hoc
committee, including student leadership,
developed criteria for an undergraduate
Minor in Sustainability Studies, to
begin in fall 2008. Coursework will be
interdisciplinary and include a service
learning capstone option. (See also
Community Service)

SUSTAINABILITY MAJOR: The College of
Design, Construction and Planning has
developed an interdisciplinary under-
graduate Bachelor of Science in Sus-
tainability and the Built Environment,
intended to train UF students interested
in sustainability and the built environ-
ment through a series of interdisciplinary
and disciplinary lectures, studios, semi-
nars and internships. Courses will be
offered in conjunction with the college's
disciplinary units: architecture, building
construction, interior design, landscape
architecture, and urban and regional
planning. UF sophomores will be eli-
gible to apply for the program. Specific
additional courses from across campus
are recommended to the students as
electives, on an individual basis. (See also
Built Environment)

SUSTAINABILITY-RELATED RESEARCH: UF
has recently established two interdisci-
plinary hubs for sustainability-related
research on campus.


* Florida Institute for
Sustainable Energy (FISE)
brings together research
capabilities necessary to
create a sustainable energy
future. FISE encompasses
more than 150 faculty
members and 22 energy
research centers at the
University of Florida. In
the last few years alone,
UF's Federal and State
funded energy research
exceeded $70 million.
The FISE Technology
Incubator includes a
Prototype Development &
Demonstration Laboratory
and a Biofuel Pilot Plant to
accelerate commercialization
of energy technologies and
processes. (See also Energy
Conservation and Climate
Change)


* UF Water Institute was
established in recognition of the
importance of water issues, and
the need to address them in an
interdisciplinary manner. Through the
Water Institute and IFAS extension
offices, UF is the hub for information
and best water practices in the State.
The Water Institute aims to improve
knowledge of the physical, chemical,
and biological processes in aquatic
systems; enhance understanding of
the interactions and interrelationships
between human attitudes/activities
and aquatic systems; and develop
as well as promote the adoption of
improved methodologies for water


management and policy based on
science, engineering, management,
and law. (See also Land & Resource
Management)


ONGOING FUNDING SUPPORT: A Legisla-
tive Budget Request (LBR) for a UF
Center for Sustainability and a Healthy
Environment was drafted by the Sustain-
ability Committee. This Center would
act as an academic clearinghouse for sus-
tainability efforts on campus, and would
support both internal faculty, as well as
affiliated faculty, from across campus in
their research and education efforts. The
LBR was vetted by interested parties at
several meetings, and submitted to the






















deans and vice presidents for approval.
The vice presidents selected it from
among a larger pool to be submitted
to the Florida Legislature. Although the
LBR has not been funded (the state LBR
process is on hold), it is on UF's federal list
of funding requests. (See also Institutional
Commitment)

COMMON READING PROGRAM: The
Common Reading Program is designed
to provide all first-year students with
a common intellectual experience to
stimulate discussion, promote criti-
cal thinking, and encourage a sense of
2 community among students, faculty and
staff. This program seeks to expose stu-
dents to issues relevant in today's global
community, provide students with a
shared experience upon which to engage
in dialogue with peers, faculty, and staff
at UF, and introduce students to the high
academic and intellectual expectations
at UF

The book was chosen by a 20-person
committee comprised of faculty, staff,
and students with the charge of selecting
a book that is interdisciplinary, global,
recently published, and relatable to
both first-year students and the campus
community. This year's text, When Riv-
ers Run Dry, is a groundbreaking book
following veteran science correspondent
Fred Pearce to more than thirty countries
to examine the current state of crucial
water sources.

Benchmark Programs
Northern Arizona University and Emory
University have implemented interdis-
ciplinary efforts to incorporate sustain-
ability issues into university courses. The


programs, Ponderosa Project and Pied-
mont Project respectively, seek faculty
members from various disciplines who
share a common vision of education for
sustainability. Participants in the projects
attend an intensive three-day training
workshop in which they learn about
sustainability-related issues and how to
incorporate such issues into course mate-
rials. After their training, participants re-
vise syllabi for selected courses to include
sustainability-oriented content, and meet
regularly throughout the academic year
in support of these "greening" of the cur-
riculum projects.

Arizona State University has established
a School of Sustainability and a
Global Institute of Sustainability,


providing innovative, interdisciplinary
education and research opportunities
for undergraduate, graduate, and
professional students. The degree
offerings are flexible, interdisciplinary,
problem solving-oriented programs in
which students explore the sustainability
of human societies and the natural
environment on which they depend.

Framing the Vision
In framing the vision for sustainability
in Teaching and Research, participants
envisioned the University of Florida
integrating sustainability into curriculum
and research to the degree that sustain-
ability would become second nature to
the university community. In this vision,
curricula would be developed through






















a sustainability lens. Graduates would
understand and value sustainability and
be able to apply critical thinking and
problem solving skills to the dilem-
mas humanity currently faces. Campus
institutes would foster interdisciplin-
ary research and form a repertoire of
best practices for a sustainable society.
Through the integration of operations,
teaching, research, and outreach, UF
would create a well developed culture of
sustainability that would yield a sense of
"empowered optimism" throughout the
Gator Nation.

Reaching the Vision
In order to reach this vision, participants
identified the following opportunities.

SUSTAINABILITY TRAINING: Create oppor-
tunities for all faculty, staff, and admin-
istrators to gain access to sustainability
resources and training.

FORMAL SUSTAINABILITY OFFERINGS:
Develop formalized, institutionalized,
interdisciplinary, academic programs
that support teaching and research for
sustainability including a minor, depart-
mental majors, Masters degrees, PhD
offerings, and post-doctoral training.

INTEGRATE SUSTAINABILITY IN ALL
DEPARTMENTS: Develop a core
sustainability requirement in every
college. Sustainability and service
learning would be integrated into courses
across the curriculum. All departments
would support sustainability initiatives as
a part of university culture; all graduates
would understand, respect, and value
sustainability.


INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH: Provide
support and incentives for students,
faculty, and staff to cross departmental
boundaries and approach problem
solving in a multifaceted way. This
includes creating and supporting
incubators on campus for sustainable
development research.

WALK THE TALK: UF would operate as a
living laboratory for sustainable practices
(i.e. paperless admissions).

STATE FUNDING SUPPORT: The Florida
Legislature would approve the Legisla-
tive Budget Request for the creation of
a Center for Sustainability that supports
focused, interdisciplinary, integrated
sustainability research.

FACULTY AND STAFF INVOLVEMENT:
Gather support for sustainability from all
deans, directors, department heads, and
other administrators. Job descriptions,
annual evaluations, promotions and
tenure decisions would include criteria
related to sustainability efforts for all
faculty and staff. A reward system would
be in place for faculty and researchers
promoting interdisciplinary sustainable
solutions. This would be apparent in
hiring, evaluations, promotions, funding,
and recognition processes.

FLEXIBLE ADMISSIONS POLICY: The ap-
plication and admittance process would
recognize different types of intelligence
in admissions, beyond test scores and
GPA. The admissions office would
consider a diverse class of applicants with
a variety of skills appropriate to each
college. College standards would include
those who think creatively, take logical


leaps, are artistic, and demonstrate social
awareness. Skills and interest in design,
planning, problem solving, decision
making, and leadership would be valued
alongside academic performance.

REPUTATION FOR SUSTAINABILITY: UF
graduates would become known for
their critical thinking skills. This could
be shown through an assessment or
indicators of cultural and generational
change in sustainability literacy for
students perhaps by pre-test for fresh-
man and post-test for seniors. Students,
faculty and staff would reach out into
the community to educate pre-collegiate
children about sustainability. UF would
receive market recognition for teaching,
research, and career placement related to
sustainability.

Participants:
Tom Ankersen, Levin C.. . ofLaw
Eva Czarnecka- Verner, Microbiology,
Sustainability Committee representative
Mindy Kraft, IA -...' C.. ofBusiness
Joe Peters, President's Office- ACE Fellow
Ana Portocarrero, T -... C. .0. of
Business
Kay \ Landscape Architecture
Christine -. -... C.' .. of
Business













SERVICE, OUTREACH, AND EXTENSION

b"MM1


14


Description of Importance and
Reason for Inclusion
Service learning opportunities and civic
engagement can be key components of
a university education, as they provide
students with the preparation they need
to become active, effective citizens in a
changing world. Opportunities for ser-
vice learning abound on campus, within
the local community, and throughout
the state.

Town-gown relationships are a significant
issue for many colleges and universities,
both public and private. Clear, open


communication
is the keystone of
local community
sustainability, and
supportive dialogue
is the foundation for
strong partnerships.
UF and its surround-
ing community have
a unique relation-
ship whose link-
ages are as diverse
and complex as the
university's own
internal structure.
In order to support
These linkages, UF
must foster a grow-
ing environment of
collaboration that
helps create synergy
between UF, the
City of Gainesville,
Alachua County, and
the State of Florida.

As a land grant uni-
versity, the University of Florida is com-
mitted to providing scientific knowledge
and expertise to the public. The mission
of the UF/IFAS Extension Service is to
provide Floridians with life-long learning
opportunities that respond to the local
needs of residents, schools, regulatory
agencies, community organizations and
industry. In cooperation with county
governments, the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, and Florida A &
M University, UF endeavors to deliver
research applications to local communi-
ties as they make the effort to become
sustainable.


Guiding Principle
Facilitate the civic engagement of faculty,
students, and staff and stimulate service,
outreach, and extension efforts that
promote sustainable practices within
community and economic development.

How Are We Doing?
SERVICE: The Dean of Students Office
- Center for Leadership and Service is
made up of several branches that serve
as avenues of involvement for particu-
lar community interests. These include
community outreach, volunteer develop-
ment, and civic engagement. One group,
Service Ambassadors, plans events that
educate citizens about prevalent issues
in order to remind individuals of their
civic responsibility and to inform them
of the opportunities available to those
who choose to make a difference. The
center also matches students with service
opportunities throughout the local com-
munity. It facilitates service learning
for UF faculty, and provides leadership
workshops and conferences for students
and the community. It offers our stu-
dents these opportunities nationally, and
internationally, through Florida Alterna-
tive Breaks. These trips expose students
to issues including: disaster relief,
homelessness and poverty, HIV/AIDS,
farm workers rights, global warming, and
sustainable development. Finally, it runs
the Community Advocates program to
teach students about community service,
personal safety, and civic engagement in
cooperation with the City of Gainesville.

OUTREACH: Like other elements of the
University of Florida's sustainability
efforts, community outreach is simulta-
neously widespread and focused. Three






















avenues for outreach have proved most
successful to date. First, websites, local
conferences, exhibits, performances, and
training are visible gateways through
which the larger local and state com-
munities can engage UF's sustainability
resources. Second, individual students
work within these communities, provid-
ing service as part of coursework or in
conjunction with extra-curricular activi-
ties. Third, academic programs provide
enrichment to underserved portions of
the local and state communities through
grants and state appropriations.

Community and intergovernmental
coordination is a cornerstone of the
university's planning efforts. Collabora-
tion occurs on many fronts including
transportation, infrastructure, commu-
nity redevelopment, community service
and volunteerism, transit service, and
economic development. The university
is a primary provider of community
economic growth, healthcare, and public
education. In recognition of these rela-
tionships, the campus master plan for-
malizes reciprocal community planning
processes between the university and its
host local governments.

The Community Relations Office at UF
also works to promote mutual under-
standing and supportive relationships in
the community. It serves as an informa-
tion resource and a point of contact for
all members of the community. It works
to help identify and resolve public policy
issues of concern to both the university
and the community, in collaboration
with UF and public officials. It imple-
ments the annual University of Florida
Community Campaign, a faculty/staff


charitable giving campaign, which raises
more than $1 million for a wide variety
of charitable organizations in the area.

EXTENSION: UF IFAS Solutions for
Your Life campaign and website share
lessons and research in sustainability
with Florida citizens. Extension faculty
and administration have helped bring
UF resources to communities seeking
assistance in developing more sustainable
practices and policies. IFAS/Extension
has many award winning programs that
facilitate sustainable living including the
Living Green series for television, Florida
Yards & Neighborhoods program,
Integrated Pest Management Florida,
and the Program for Resource Efficient
Communities.

Recent accomplishments
SUSTAINABILITY MINOR CAPSTONE:
Student leaders and the Provost Faculty
Fellow for Sustainability developed an


undergraduate Minor in Sustainability
Studies, including a service learning cap-
stone component. (See also Academics)

OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY INTERNSHIPS:
The Office of Sustainability offers intern-
ships to students to work on a variety of
projects related to implementing sustain-
ability in UF operations and sustainable
behavior change campaigns.


THE FLORIDA COMMUNITY DESIGN
CENTER: The Florida Community Design
Center (FCDC) strives to educate and
advocate for good design in the natural
and built environment. Run by UF
faculty and assisted by UF students,
the FCDC has worked with developers
and local officials on almost two dozen
projects in the community since
2000. From its downtown Gainesville
location, FCDC offers walking
tours, panel discussions, and public
workshops to inform the public and seek
input. Exhibits provide the public an
opportunity to view ongoing community
design work.

The Cotton Club Restoration: The
Cotton Club, as it is now known,
has been a landmark in southeast
Gainesville for half a century. It started
as a World War II Army PX at Camp
Blanding, near Starke, FL. After the
war, a Springhill neighborhood grocer


brought it to its current location in
Gainesville. The barnlike structure
debuted as the Perryman Theater but was
soon leased and became Sarah's Cotton
Club. It was then that the building
earned its fame as young acts like B.B.
King and James Brown came through
on the Chitlin' Circuit, heating up the
local hot spot. The site's rich history is
being preserved through a restoration
partnership between The Mt. Olive


UF IFAS Solutions for Your Life campaign and website

share lessons and research in sustainability with

Florida citizens.






















A.M.E. Church and the University of
Florida's Powell Center for Construction
& Environment's Historic Preservation
Program.

THE BUSHNELL CENTER FOR URBAN
SUSTAINABILITY: Operating through the
IFAS/Extension network and based in
Pinellas County, the Bushnell Center
seeks adoption of sustainable practices
in the larger community. It provides
education and outreach for organizations
undergoing a sustainability transfor-
mation and facilitates the creation of
public-private regional and statewide
partnerships.

Benchmark Programs
The University of North Carolina, Cha-
pel Hill (UNC) identifies community
participation and public service as one
of the key elements of its mission. To
acknowledge this formally in students'
official academic records, the university
awards students who perform at least 300
hours of public service work to the com-
munity a Distinction in Public Service
designation on their official transcripts.
Community-oriented partnerships are
the focus ofUNC's $16.5 million Active
Living by Design program, through
which up to $200,000 over five years will
be awarded to 25 interdisciplinary orga-
nizations that promote physical activity
by changes in local community design,
transportation and architecture.

Framing the Vision
In framing the vision for sustainability
in Service, Outreach and Extension,
participants envisioned the University of
Florida educating the next generation of
leaders and providing tools for solving


the problems faced by our communities.
In this vision, UF would be recognized
for outstanding student, faculty, and staff
community service/civic engagement. All
members of UF would see themselves as
part of a larger community and be ac-
tively engaged in service outside of their
work and studies; this would engender
respect for others and for the community
as a whole.
Further, the University of Florida would
become a resource, providing volunteer
experience, ideas, and sustainable solu-
tions to the public. We would encourage
students to explore their extracurricular


interests while attending UF, and provide
ways to gain experience in pursuing those
interests through service to the commu-
nity. Alumni would carry that ethic with


them as they moved into the workplace,
and remain involved in civic engagement
and service throughout their lives.

Reaching the Vision
In order to reach this vision, participants
identified the following opportunities.

RECOGNITION AND REWARDS: Establish
programs to recognize and reward faculty
for participating in service learning and
demonstrating sustainability practices.
Create incentive programs for all faculty
and staff to participate in community
service during regular business hours. Allow


for expansion of the UF Community Cam-
paign to include an option for volunteering
in addition to donating money.
























The University of Florida would become a resource,

providing volunteer experience, ideas, and sustainable

solutions to the public.


DEPARTMENTAL SUPPORT FOR SERVICE
LEARNING: Support would be provided
through dedicated staff and/or an office
to support faculty who incorporate ser-
vice learning. Ultimately, the university
would offer service learning programs in
every college on campus, with a service
learning/civic engagement liaison in each
department for communication of op-
portunities.

EDUCATE THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY:
Students, faculty, and staff would un-
derstand the difference between direct
service, civic engagement, and service
learning. In order to enhance student
experience, UF would provide faculty/
student mentorships for sustainability-
related internships.

ACCESS TO OPPORTUNITIES: Create an
online campus-wide resource guide,
with lists of community service and civic
engagement opportunities available at
UF that would be available to the com-
munity at large.

RECORD AND REPORT SERVICE ACTIVITIES:
Develop accurate reporting procedure
for community service hours and report
student community service hours on
UF transcripts. Use this data to create a
community service and civic engagement
annual report and incentive/recognition
programs. Such recognition will further


incentivize service while demonstrating
UF's commitment to the community.

SUPPORT THE COMMUNITY FINANCIALLY:
UF would make community re-invest-
ment an investment priority. Monies
would be invested locally by creating
micro-credit or other loan programs for
community development.

VISION FOR SUSTAINABILITY IN EXTEN-
SION: UF/IFAS Extension would develop
a collaborative vision to incorporate sus-
tainable living resources into their service
to Florida's unique communities.


Participants:
Robert Agrusa, 2007-08 Student Senate
President
Florida -'. -. r.. .Community
Relations
Fred Cantrell Business Alff'..
Sustainability Committee representative
Linda Crider, Urban and Regional
Pi.'i.'..g.u Sutainability Committee
representative
Nora Kilroy, Office of Of :,-.n.ipsi Life
Andrew Perrone, Center for Leadership and
Service Dean ofStudents Office
Dale Pracht, Family, Youth, and
Community Services
Tracey Reeves, Center for Leadership and
Service Dean ofStudents Office
Lynda Reinhart, O'Connell Center
Ruth Steiner, Urban and Regional P/.;. .'.g.
Sustainability Committee representative













ENERGY CONSERVATION AND CLIMATE CHANGE


Description of Importance and
Reason for Inclusion
The energy used by our institutions
yields ever-increasing environmental,
social, and economic repercussions. Cur-
rently, the University of Florida spends
an average of $3.3 million per month
for electricity alone. The university has
a powerful opportunity and ongoing
interest in reducing energy consumption,
saving money, and demonstrating leading
edge practices in energy management.

Emissions produced during the com-
bustion of fossil fuels for electricity
production and transportation enter the
atmosphere directly. These greenhouse
gas (GHG) emissions are linked to the
changing climate on this planet. The
overwhelming scientific consensus is
that climate change is among the most
pressing problems facing this genera-


tion and those to come. Some widely
agreed upon effects of a changing climate
include increased catastrophic weather
events such as drought and floods;
disrupted agricultural output; and rising
sea levels.

Some emissions also contribute to a wide
variety of health problems, including
heart and respiratory diseases. Due to
disproportionate exposure and the lack of
preventative health care, these problems
are often more pronounced in low-
income communities. The extraction,
production, and global distribution of
fuels for energy can damage environmen-
tally and/or culturally significant ecosys-
tems. A campus can dramatically reduce
these negative consequences by reducing
energy consumption and switching to
renewable energy sources.


Guiding Principle
Monitor and minimize energy consump-
tion, reduce and offset greenhouse gas
emissions, and promote the development
and use of renewable energy sources.

How Are We Doing?
Energy Office: UF's Office of Energy
Conservation monitors and works to
lower campus energy consumption by
incorporating new, efficient technologies
for use on campus. The office is engaged
in building evaluations and scheduling
in order to curb current consumption
trends. Future plans include an auto-
mated meter reading system, improved
building control systems, and research
into various building systems that lower
energy consumption. The Office of En-
ergy Conservation has established points
of contact throughout campus to assist
in lowering campus energy consump-
tion and fostering an awareness of energy
conservation issues on campus.

GOVERNANCE: The UF Sustainabil-
ity Committee's Energy and Climate
Change Task Force assesses the energy
systems of the university, including the
supply and consumption sides, for the
purpose of minimizing both energy costs
and environmental impacts. Recently,
this taskforce developed a working
group specifically to address the carbon
footprint of UF, and to develop a plan to
meet UF's carbon neutrality goal.

LEED COMMITMENT: In order to reduce
the energy needs of campus buildings,
the university adopted criteria for design
and construction for all major new
construction and renovation projects to
deliver high performance and sustain-














i~i I
... .. .. .
..........
..... ..... ...


able buildings. The LEED (Leadership
in Energy and Environmental Design)
building rating system was developed by
the U.S. Green Building Council as a
national standard for evaluating and cer-
tifying individual projects as green build-
ings. This commitment was renewed in
January 2006, when UF required that


all new campus construction and major
renovation projects approved as of July
1, 2004, meet a LEED Silver equivalent
certification standard, and again in 2007
when UF initiated a LEED Campus
Standards application for the whole main
university campus and started the LEED
Existing Building Pilot Program. (See
also Built Environment)


FUELS: Through a commitment to pur-
chasing only hybrid or alternative fuel ve-
hicles whenever possible, the university's
fleet now has more than 12 hybrids and
45 flex fuel vehicles. Additionally, the
university stocks E85 ethanol for use in
its fleet vehicles, and stocks B20 biodiesel
for trucks and mowers. It offers a suite
of alternative transportation options for
commuters and campus residents. (See
also Transportation)


Recent Accomplishments
AMERICAN COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY
PRESIDENTS CLIMATE COMMITMENT:
In 2007, UF President J. Bernard
Machen was the first to sign the


American College and University
President's Climate Commitment. UF
is one of more than 500 signatories to
the American College & University
Presidents Climate Commitment. The
commitment provides a framework and
support for colleges and universities to
go climate neutral. The commitment


recognizes the unique responsibility that
institutions of higher education have as
role models for their communities and
in training the people who will develop
the social, economic and technological
solutions to address the effects of global
climate change. Presidents signing
the commitment are pledging to


reduce and remediate their campuses'
greenhouse gas emissions over time.
This involves: completing an emissions
inventory, setting a target date and
interim milestones for becoming climate
neutral, taking immediate steps to reduce
greenhouse gas emissions, integrating
sustainability into the curriculum, and
making the action plan, inventory and
progress reports publicly available. (See
also Institutional Commitment)


GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY 2.0: The
UF Greenhouse Gas Inventory 2.0 will
feature emissions generated through
the use of electricity, natural gas, steam,
chilled water, liquid fuels, air transport,
commuting, fleet vehicle activities, as
well as emissions from refrigerants, lab
chemicals, fertilizers, live stock, waste
streams and carbon sinks, and is planned
to be operational July 1, 2008.


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ENERGY-RELATED RESEARCH: Florida
Institute for Sustainable Energy (FISE)
brings together research capabilities
necessary to create a sustainable energy
future. FISE encompasses more than 150
faculty members and 22 energy research
centers at the University of Florida. In
the last few years alone, UF's Federal and
State funded energy research exceeded
$70 million. The FISE Technology
Incubator includes a Prototype
Development & Demonstration
Laboratory and a Biofuel Pilot Plant to
accelerate commercialization of energy
technologies and processes. (See also
Teaching and Research)

Benchmark Programs
The College of the Atlantic was the first
school in the nation to make a multi-year
commitment to purchasing 100% of its
electricity through wind energy for the
next 20 years, eliminating its production
of CO2 and other pollutants.

Lewis & Clark College was the first
campus in the nation to reduce its GHG
emissions seven percent below its own
1990 levels, thereby achieving Kyoto
protocol compliance, partially through
the purchase of CO2e offset credits.

Several institutions, including The
Woods Hole Research Center, the Uni-
versity of British Columbia, and Oberlin
College have placed real-time energy
meters on the internet for easily acces-
sible energy consumption data.

Framing the Vision
The University of Florida set a visionary
goal of carbon neutrality by 2025. Meet-
ing this goal will require collaboration


among campus units and the develop-
ment of widespread partnerships within
the broader community.

In framing the vision for sustainability
in Energy Conservation and Climate
Change, participants envisioned that
monitoring energy use, keeping a GHG
inventory, and maximizing energy con-
servation across campus would be incor-
porated into daily operational manage-
ment goals. All UF units, departments,
auxiliaries, and Direct Support Organiza-
tion's (DSOs) would understand these
goals, and would work to reduce energy
use. Carbon neutrality goals and plans
would be incorporated into UF policies
and the UF Master Plan for long-term
management.

To the extent possible, we would
integrate renewable, distributed energy
production into buildings so that they
would produce the energy that they used.


on campus and in their personal lives. To
this end, we would conduct a compre-
hensive conservation campaign, based
on community based social marketing
principles, that considers and reaches all
of our stakeholders: students, faculty,
staff, administration, alumni, parents,
and community members.

Reaching the Vision
In order to reach this vision, participants
identified the following opportunities.

COMPREHENSIVE INVENTORY: UF would
have a thorough inventory that takes into
consideration our entire carbon foot-
print, including transportation, research,
campus operations, and IFAS Extension.
This inventory would help all campus
citizens identify and therefore reduce
their energy expenditures.

REDUCTION GOAL SETTING: We would
establish baselines for all areas in order


The University of Florida set a visionary goal of

carbon neutrality by 2025.


We would purchase renewable energy to
supplement these power needs. Finally,
UF would offset our remaining carbon
footprint through local efficiency and
sequestration partnerships.

Our campus would operate as a living
laboratory for sustainable energy genera-
tion, integrating research and operations.
UF faculty, staff, and students would set
an example for others on how to con-
serve energy and reduce GHG emissions


to set reduction goals. Our goals and
strategies would be in alignment with the
Florida Governor's June 2007 Executive
Orders and the most stringent regulatory
frameworks (federal, state or local) for
carbon planning.

BUILDINGS: We would capture the maxi-
mum energy efficiencies across campus in
new construction, setbacks, and retrofits
for existing building stocks. (See also
Built Environment)






















RENEWABLE ENERGY: We would encour-
age our energy provider to develop a
robust portfolio of renewable energy
options, including distributed energy
production on campus.

RESEARCH: The Florida Institute for Sus-
tainable Energy's Technology Incubator
would accelerate commercialization of
energy technologies throughout Florida
by developing and demonstrating renew-
able energy technologies on campus.

CARBON OFFSETS: Our offsets would
be met, to the greatest extent possible,
through efficiency, and through lo-
cal sequestration partnerships. Offset
purchases would only be made if local/
regional partnership opportunities had
been exhausted.

PROJECT FUNDING: We would work
with business and government partners
to receive grants and other funding to
help finance our efficiency goals. UF
would develop a revolving loan fund and
other internal funding mechanisms for
efficiency retrofits and renewable energy
innovations.

Participants
Canan Balaban, Florida Institute of
Sustainable Energy
Greg Burkett, Progress Energy
Eric Cochran, Physical Plant Division L.
Amelia Dempere, Materials Engineering,
Sustainability Committee representative
Gary Dockter, Progress Energy
John Lawson, Physical Plant Division,
Energy Department
fillLingard, .1 -."- School ofBusiness
David Lucier, O'Connell Center


Andy Olivenbaum, Computer and
Networking Services
Robert Ries, Rinker School of '
Construction
Eric Wachsman, Florida Institute of
Sustainable Energy
Ann ., '- A B.olg.l
Engineering
Mark van S.. -.. .', ICBE














LAND AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT


Description of Importance and
Reason for inclusion
While demands for ecosystem services
such as food and clean water are
growing, human actions are diminishing
the capacity of many ecosystems to
meet these demands. Sound policy
and management principles are critical
to maintaining ecosystem health, and
therefore, human well-being.


As a society, we are still learning to bal-
ance the convenience and short-term
effectiveness of chemical pesticides with
the long-term costs and impacts of their
use. Through the integration of ongoing
research and operations, UF can retain
healthy, aesthetically pleasing landscapes,
minimize pest-related property damage,
and prevent the spread of pest-transmit-
ted diseases, while minimizing the as-


Can serve as a model.:::.o..f..::.s.o.u:n:d:::a aptive protection
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and management....0unatural areas for....1the campus
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community and the comiffild.


The maintenance of sustainable urban
landscapes is a crucial part of maintain-
ing ecosystem health. As an institution
of higher learning, UF can serve as a
model of sound, adaptive protection
and management of natural areas for the
campus community and the community
at large.

In Florida, our water comes from the
Floridan Aquifer a massive under-
ground river. Our everyday activities can
drastically affect the quality of this water
and ultimately our health. The State of
Florida has the second highest rate of
water consumption in the US. In north-
central Florida, the average person uses
approximately 150 gallons of water per
day almost double the national average.
More than half of residential water use
is used for home irrigation. The Univer-
sity of Florida has the opportunity, and
responsibility, to be a model for efficient,
responsible water use and for the effective
management ofwastewater and stormwa-
ter through research and demonstration.


sociated negative impacts to the campus
community and the environment.


Guiding Principle
Manage lands in a sustainable manner to
conserve, protect, and restore natural sys-
tems, natural resources, and biodiversity.


How are we doing?
LAND MANAGEMENT: UF's main campus
features 31 conservation areas, including
The University of Florida Natural Area
Teaching Laboratory (NATL) which is
dedicated to teaching students and the
public about ecology and biotic diver-
sity. NATL consists of 60 acres in two
contiguous tracts in the southwest corner
of campus.

The university has set a number of goals
for the management of biodiversity on its
lands, which include:

* Managing lands so that there is no net
loss of biodiversity.


* Promoting indigenous species and
appropriately limiting the use of
inorganic pesticides, herbicides,
and fertilizers.

* Developing educational
interpretations to promote
biodiversity.
* Setting up a land management
committee to review and guide
sustainable management of UF lands.

* Conserving areas by designing the
university's built environment into a
denser urbanized center.


MASTER PLAN: The UF Master Plan out-
lines policies for responsible stewardship
of land resources and sustainable campus
development. The campus is managed as
a total human ecosystem balancing hu-
man and natural systems. Conservation
areas are identified and protected in the
Master Plan. These create what is often
described as a specific "sense of place" on
campus in settings where people connect
with one another and with the North
Central Florida environment. The Master
Plan encourages use of the campus as
a "living laboratory" to model sustain-
ability-related application, research and
teaching. The health of our ecosystems
is taken into account, and UF strives
for aesthetics that mimic and are in
balance with the ecology of our region.
Landscaping with native plants, Florida-
friendly practices, and butterfly gardens
supports a healthy campus ecosystem.
Reduction of ornamental plants, lawns,
and irrigation are within this landscape
management plan.

EXTENSION: Through IFAS, the univer-
sity has a number of programs where
research, application, and education






















about sustainable land and resource use
are available. A few examples include the
Florida Partnership for Water, Agricul-
ture & Community Sustainability; the
Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
Florida Program; and the Program
for Resource Efficient Communities
(PREC). The Florida Partnership for
Water, Agriculture & Community Sus-
tainability uses "living" displays to show
visitors alternatives to traditional prac-
tices in development, agriculture, land-
scaping, water quality and use, and land
management. These include low-impact
development (LID), Florida-Friendly
landscaping principles, and niche crops.
The Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
Florida program provides up-to-date in-


formation on IPM with special emphasis
on IPM practices of relevance to Florida.
PREC promotes the adoption of best
design, construction, and management
practices in new residential community
developments by working with both
government and the private sector.


Recent Accomplishments
AUDUBON COOPERATIVE SANCTUARY: In
2005 the Audubon Cooperative Sanctu-
ary System designated UF as a "Certified
Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary." UF is
the first university to achieve this status,
making it one of 607 such sanctuaries in
the world. To achieve the designation,
UF had to demonstrate that it was main-
taining a high degree of environmental
quality in five areas: environmental
planning, wildlife habitat management,
resource conservation, waste manage-
ment and outreach and education.

NATIVE FLORIDA-FRIENDLY LANDSCAPING:
Through Florida-friendly practices, UF
has shown it is possible to have beautiful


landscaping without daily irrigation or
excess chemical application. In addi-
tion, the implementation of native plant
landscaping has reduced the need for
irrigation and chemical applications in
some areas. Specifically, our butterfly
gardens bring color to the landscape,
attract beneficial insects, and create a


healthier, more diverse landscape. UF
is also beginning implementation of low
impact development techniques where
possible to help manage stormwater run-
off. Florida-friendly landscaping practices
are fully supported by a comprehensive
website for homeowners and landscape
professionals.

STUDENT GARDENS: UF offers a number
of opportunities for students to grow
their own food on campus. Both the
organic garden and the student garden
plots are available for a nominal fee. The
Erlin. .. .1. ..,- Society also maintains a
demonstration garden, which highlights
native and traditional food crops.

WATER RECLAMATION: UF's Water Rec-
lamation Facility processes up to three
million gallons of waste water a day.
With the exception of some sports/recre-
ation areas and distal areas, over 90% of
the university's irrigation needs are served
by the reclaimed water system thereby
greatly reducing campus use of potable
water for that purpose. Reclaimed water
is also used to cool the adjacent co-gener-
ation power plant.

RECLAIMED WATER STORAGE: The uni-
versity is building a new 1.5 million gal-
lon water storage tank. When reclaimed
water supply exceeds demand, reclaimed
water that meets drinking water stan-
dards can be stored in the tank, rather
than discharged. When reclaimed water
demand exceeds supply, the storage tank
can be accessed to reduce the need for
supplemental fresh water use.

UF WATER INSTITUTE: In recognition of
the importance of water issues, and the
need to address them in a new interdisci-
plinary manner, the University of Florida






















































established a campus-wide interdisci-
plinary Water Institute in May 2006.
Through the Water Institute and IFAS
Extension offices, UF is the hub for best
water practices information in the State.
(See also Teaching and Research)

CLEAN WATER CAMPAIGN: The UF Clean
Water Campaign aims to build aware-
ness of water quality issues and solutions
on the University of Florida campus.
It works together with administration,
students, faculty and staff to reduce pol-
lution in campus water bodies through
water quality monitoring, storm drain
marking, implementing pollution pre-
vention practices, and analyzing storm-
water effects on each campus water basin.


WATER RESOURCE EDUCATION:
The university's Common Read-
ing Program is designed to pro-
vide all first-year students with a
common intellectual experience
to stimulate discussion, critical
thinking, and encourage a sense
of community among students,
faculty and staff. In 2008-2009,
all incoming students will receive
a copy of the selected text, When
Rivers Run Dry. (See also Teach-
ing and Research)

Benchmark Programs
At Oberlin College, the Adam
Joseph Lewis Center for Envi-
ronmental Studies includes a
Living Machine(r) to treat its
wastewater to tertiary standards.
This solar-powered, microbe-
based ecosystem uses a diverse
assortment of bacteria, algae,
snails, fish, and flowers working
together to break down contami-
nants and purify the building's
wastewater. The system purifies
2000 gallons of water each day and the
resulting water is used for toilet flushing
and irrigation. The Living Machine not
only purifies the building's wastewater,
but also educates students, faculty, staff,
and visitors about natural wastewater
treatment processes and provides research
opportunities to students.

The University of British Columbia's
C.K. Choi Building (30,000 sq. feet)
features composting toilets that reduce
the amount of wastewater by 90%. The
aerobic composting system is continually
ventilated and produces an end product
used as a humus-like soil amendment
product. In addition, all irrigation de-


rives from rainwater stored in 8000-gal-
lon subsurface cisterns. UBC also posts
real-time water consumption and real-
time water savings information, showing
corresponding monetary savings, on its
campus sustainability website.

The University of North Carolina-
Chapel Hill now requires a site-specific
plan for erosion control for all construc-
tion. They have built a 70,000-gallon
underwater cistern for retaining storm-
water and irrigating the sports field
located directly above the tank. They also
purchased a vacuum truck for reducing
the pollutant load in stormwater runoff
and replaced pavement in two parking
lots with permeable concrete and asphalt,
decreasing associated surface runoff.

Framing the Vision
In framing the vision for sustainability
in Land and Resource Management,
participants envisioned the Univer-
sity of Florida adopting collaborative
and responsive processes for land and
water management. Both technologi-
cal improvements and behavior change
would play significant roles in sustain-
able resource management. In this
vision, decision makers would adhere
to the campus Master Plan and take a
proactive approach to sound manage-
ment principles rather than coping with
problems after implementation. Adaptive
management would allow for continuous
improvement and the ongoing develop-
ment of best practices.

To inspire behavior change in the cam-
pus community, UF would endeavor to
monitor and assess our land and resource
use and to educate the campus com-
munity about the effects of our collec-























tive practices. Effective feedback and
reporting would allow us to hold entities
accountable through incentives and/or
penalties.

Reaching the Vision
In order to reach this vision, participants
identified the following opportunities.

VIEW CAMPUS AS AN ECOSYSTEM: Use
the landscape as a teaching tool to study
the intersection of human and natural
systems as part of a healthy ecosystem.
Outdoor areas would be designed to be
energizing and therapeutic to the univer-
sity community, as well as restorative to
the environment.

COMPREHENSIVE LANDSCAPE DESIGN
AND MAINTENANCE: Develop a proactive
plan that emphasizes good landscape de-
sign and outlines maintenance practices.

MODEL SUSTAINABLE CAMPUS: Make UF
grounds a model of sustainable design
and management. Healthy and aes-
thetically pleasing environs would inspire
community members to spend time out-
doors. All students would leave UF with
an exposure to, if not understanding of,
sustainable landscaping and its effects on
the ecosystem.

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT: Develop an
adaptive management loop between the
Master Plan implementation, the Physi-
cal Plant Department/Grounds, and
researchers to develop and carry out best
practices.

RESOURCE CONSERVATION: Educate
the campus community on how to
decrease consumption and reduce our


environmental impact through resource
conservation.

INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT: Estab-
lish a transparent IPM plan with metrics
to evaluate performance. Effectively re-
duce the possibility of a pest-transmitted
disease outbreak and property damage
while minimizing negative impacts on
the campus community and environ-
ment.

WATER STANDARDS FOR SPECIFIC USES:
Create standards for water use, along
with criteria for water quality, that
include prescribed actions for use and
discharge, mitigation strategies, and con-
comitant policies. All departments, direct
support organizations and off-campus
facilities would adopt and comply with
water standards and policies that are set
by the university.

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT: Imple-
ment rainwater harvesting for water reuse
throughout campus. Design campus
sites to keep all stormwater onsite,
minimizing negative effects on campus
watersheds. Implement low impact de-
velopment techniques across campus for
effective stormwater management (both
water quality and quantity). Reduce the
impervious surfaces on campus.

LAKE ALICE AND CAMPUS CREEKS: Clas-
sify Lake Alice watershed as a living
laboratory, functioning as a trial water-
shed for best practices. No impervious
surface drainage would lead directly to
Lake Alice. In conjunction, the flow of
campus creeks would be naturalized to
help restore the watershed.


WATER CONSERVATION: The campus
community would treat water as a
valuable resource even if it is not priced
that way. Buildings would be individually
metered and departments would be held
accountable to conservation standards.
Incentive and rewards programs would
encourage water conservation toward a
target indoor per capital indoor water
use metric.

Participants:
Glen Acomb, Landscape Architecture
JeffC'.. . O'Connell Center
Mark Clark, Soil and Water Science
Joe Delfino, Environmental Engineering
Jennifer Gillett, E. -.*. .... JFS.
Sustainability Committee representative
Fred Gratto, Physical Plant Division
James Heaney, Environmental Engineering
Sciences
Chuck Hogan, Physical Plant Division
HalKnowles, Program for Resource E- .
Communities IFAS
John Lawson, Physical Plant Division,
Energy Department
Erik Lewis, Facilities Pl,.'i'..g. and
Construction
Kathleen McKee, Water Institute
Dale Morris, Physical Plant Division, Solid
Waste Management
JeffPeet, Progress Energy
Marty Werts, Physical Plant Division,
Grounds
Kay Landscape Architecture
Mark Yanchisin, Environmental Health
and Safety












.I AGRICULTURE


Description of importance and
reason for inclusion
Food systems consume resources at every
step in the value chain from farming to
distribution, consumption, and disposal
of food and food-related wastes. Fossil
fuels are currently used to produce, pro-
cess, transport and prepare food, contrib-
uting to greenhouse gas emissions and air
pollution. According to the University of
Wisconsin-Madison Center for Integrat-
ed Agricultural Systems, food production
accounts for 17.5% of all energy used in
the U.S. food system, while processing
accounts for 28.1%, transportation 11%,
and restaurants 15.8%.

Food production systems vary greatly,
however, in the efficiency with which
they use resources. For example, irriga-
tion is the leading use of freshwater in
the United States. In some parts of the
western U.S., water for agricultural use
far exceeds all other uses. Florida agricul-
ture uses a great deal of water, but actu-
ally uses less ground water than water
available for public consumption because
nearly half of the water used by Florida
agriculture comes from surface water.
This is important because ground water,
unlike surface water, is "fossil" water
that has accumulated over long periods
of time and is therefore, not a renewable
resource in the short term.

Just as the environmental effects of
food systems vary greatly from place to
place and within different sectors of the
food system, so do the economic and
social effects. Every choice regarding the
production and processing of our food,
its transportation to campus, and the
preparation and disposal of food wastes


involves trade-offs. As a result, UF's deci-
sions about the kinds of dining services
that we provide for students, faculty,
staff, and visitors have important poten-
tial repercussions.

Guiding Principle
Promote diverse and sustainable agri-
cultural practices that encourage the
protection of farmland and the rural
environment, establish food security, and
support a high standard of nutrition on
campus and in the community.

How are we doing?
UF/IFAS: UF's Institute of Food and Ag-
ricultural Sciences (IFAS) is responsible
for agricultural research and extension.
A major thrust of IFAS's work has been
enhancing the economic, environmental
and social sustainability of food pro-
duction in Florida. IFAS develops best
management practices that minimize
the impacts of agricultural activities on


the environment and natural resources.
Florida farmers and ranchers in the state
have systematically implemented many
of these practices to reduce unwanted
impacts from agriculture, resulting in
positive outcomes like more efficient
water use, reduced runoff from agricul-
ture and reduced energy use on farms. In
addition, UF/IFAS established the Cen-
ter for Organic Agriculture in 2001 to
provide statewide leadership in research,
extension and teaching focusing on
organic agriculture and IFAS conducts
research in organic agriculture on land
that is certified organic.

UF emphasizes providing sustainable,
healthy food options on campus that
contribute to the overall wellness of
students, faculty, staff, and visitors. One
outcome of UFs incorporation of the
principles of sustainability into its food
services is enhanced opportunities to
advance the sustainability of food pro-






















duction, processing, transportation and
preparation in Florida and nationally.

FOOD SERVICE PARTNERS: UF has worked
with ARAMARK's Gator Dining Ser-
vices (GDS) to develop an action plan
for implementing principles of sustain-
ability into food service operations,
including regional sourcing of food,
green catering, waste management and
diversion, energy conservation, transpor-
tation impacts, sustainable procurement,
communication and marketing. To date,
the two dining halls on campus, the
Fresh Food Company and Gator Corner
Dining Center, are now sourcing region-
ally grown food, including produce,
proteins, dairy, breads, coffee, and more.
They also offer vegan and vegetarian op-
tions at all meals. Gator Dining Services
has switched over most of its dispos-
able service items to biodegradable and
reduced-waste options. All convenience
stores on campus offer natural and
organic groceries and snacks. GDS offers
fair trade certified coffee throughout
campus, cage-free eggs in dining halls,
and seafood recommended by Monterey
Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program.
In addition to offering sustainable food
options, Gator Dining educates students
through nutritional kiosks in the dining
halls, and by labeling local and sustain-
able food choices.

Gator Dining Services is also becoming
a more sustainable operation through
efforts focused on conservation and
waste reduction. Currently, GDS recycles
more than 250 tons of cardboard and
paper annually, collects waste cooking
oil for biodiesel production on campus,
and distributes used coffee grounds to


campus gardens and the community
for reuse in farming. GDS has also
transitioned to using eco-friendly
cleaning supplies at all locations,
purchased two flex-fuel vehicles for
catering, and implemented an Energy
Star procurement policy for all new
dining appliances. (See also Purchasing)

Recent Accomplishments
DINING SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR:
GDS hired a Sustainability Coordinator
who works to oversee sustainable food
purchasing and operations. This per-
son also serves as a liaison between key
individuals, groups, and departments on
campus, and in the community, to work
on collaborative sustainability initiatives.

CAMPUS KITCHENS PROJECT: Through
Campus Kitchens, our dining halls
donate un-served food from campus
to people in the community who need
nourishing meals. The student-run pro-
gram "recycles" food from the cafeterias;
turning donations into nourishing meals,
and delivers those meals (along with a
friendly visit) to those who need it most
in the community.


Chef-style competition at the Fresh Food
Company, challenging local chefs to pre-
pare a meal featuring local and regional
ingredients. And, in 2008, on Earth Day,
the local food cook-off was held again,
this time featuring Gator Dining chefs
on the competing teams. Student volun-
teers interacted with customers asking
them eco-trivia questions for sustainable
prizes; the event also featured a campus
and community tabling fair.


UF was named one of the Top 10 Best Vegetarian-Friendly

Colleges in the United States by People for the Ethical

Treatment of Animals (PETA) in 2006 and 2007.


LOCAL AND REGIONAL FOOD EVENTS: In
2006, UF and GDS hosted a local/re-
gional food fair with a majority of menu
items purchased locally or regionally.
In 2007, UF and GDS hosted an Iron


VEGETARIAN OPTIONS: UF was named
one of the Top 10 Best Vegetarian-
Friendly Colleges in the United States
by People for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals (PETA) in 2006 and 2007.






















EDUCATION:
In 2006, UF
launched an
undergraduate
degree track
in sustainable
and organic
agriculture in
the Horticul-
tural Sciences
Department,
making it one
of the first U.S.
institutions to
offer this major. UF is one of three land
28 grant institutions to offer a major in
organic and sustainable agriculture.

Benchmark Programs
Stanford University hosts an organic
farmers' market every week, serves some
organic produce in its residential dining
halls, does business with local farmers,
and serves some produce from their own
organic farm on campus.

Yale's Sustainable Food Project's premise
is that their food choices have an ethi-
cal and ecological impact, and that the
best tasting food is local, seasonal, and
sustainable. Each college now a fully
sustainable meal at Sunday brunches,
Thursday lunches, and Wednesday and
Thursday dinners; a sustainable entree
and side at every lunch and dinner; and
organic milk, coffee, yogurt, tea, ba-
nanas, granola, and tomato sauce at every
meal. Yale has developed sustainability
guidelines for fruits, vegetables, meat
and poultry. They aim for each of the
1.8 million meals Yale's dining halls serve
each year to feature entirely local, sea-
sonal, and sustainable food. The Sustain-


able Food Project is an integral part of
the academic experience at Yale. Since its
founding, there has been a proliferation
of classes related to food and agriculture
at Yale.

Framing the Vision
In framing the vision for sustainability in
Agriculture, participants envisioned UF
offering a full range of dining choices,
with equally convenient and attractive
sustainable options. UF would work in
complete cooperation with our corporate
food service partners. Our partner brands
would lead the way in their national
efforts to integrate sustainability into
operations and service, just as UF would
lead the way among universities. All
stakeholders, including farmers and
community organizations, would be
involved and feel represented in campus
decision making.

UF would recognize our responsibility as
a university to educate students, faculty,
staff, and the community on sustainable
agriculture and healthy living. The cam-
pus would function as a living laboratory
to develop, demonstrate, and teach best
practices. Individuals would learn from
institutional commitments and feel em-
powered to implement changes in their
own lives.

Reaching the Vision
In order to reach this vision, participants
identified the following opportunities.

COOPERATION WITH CORPORATE
PARTNERS: All corporate partners would
share in our mission and goals for
sustainability at UF. Our dining services
partner would continue to advance


sustainability practices both on campus
and nationally, and work collaboratively
within the campus community.

MODEL FOR OTHER CAMPUSES: Other
universities and colleges would bench-
mark sustainability metrics for agricul-
ture and campus dining against UF's
performance and accomplishments.

LIVING LABORATORY: UF research and
dining services would be part of the
campus living laboratory, developing
best practices and providing educational
opportunities. Dining services would
demonstrate sustainable business models
on campus and illustrate sustainability
in action within a large corporation.
The dining facilities on campus would
act as change agents, educating the UF
community about sustainable dietary
decisions. UF/IFAS would continue to
work to develop research and extension
programs to support and demonstrate
the implementation of sustainable agri-
culture in our state.

COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT SYSTEMS:
UF would develop and use transpar-
ent assessment systems and metrics to
measure the effects of our dining supply
chain, products, energy, waste, employee
retention and wellbeing, health and nu-
trition. The operational goals of dining
would be aligned with UF's sustainability
goals, including Zero Waste by 2015 and
Carbon Neutrality by 2025.

EXAMPLE FOR THE COMMUNITY: All food
served on campus would be sustainably
produced, with a preference for local and
regional sources. We would create and
strengthen local, regional, and national























markets for sustainable products through
our purchasing decisions. The university
would lead by example and drive change
in the local business community by
creating a new consumer class.

EDUCATION: Education on campus and
through IFAS Extension would create
a demand for sustainable agricultural
products and responsible business in the
surrounding area. Students would learn
lessons on campus and use the three E's
(environment, economy, and equity)
as a framework to make food decisions
throughout their lives.


sources, use, and eventual recycling, in
conjunction with the rest of campus.
The life cycle of products would be taken
into account prior to their purchase,
for minimal negative impact. (See also
Purchasing)

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT LOOP: Stu-
dents, staff, faculty, administration, and
corporate partners would regularly com-
municate with one another and utilize an
adaptive management loop.

Participants:
Kathy Caccida, Aramark


Steven Guenther, Aramark
Michael Leone, Aramark
Susanne Lewis, Gator Dining Services
Jill Rodriguez, Gator Dining Services
Mike Schelke, Aramark
Robin Snyder, A' '- 'B.o
Engineering
Christopher Stemen, Aramark
Mickie Swisher, Family, Youth and
Community S . 4 -.' 5. Sustainability
Committee representative Ann .,
Ag''e it'ri..dB.oge.i.Engineering
BillZemba, Gator Dining Services


Jeremy Cynkar, O'Connell Center
CRADLE-TO-CRADLE SYSTEMS: Dining LionelDubay, Business Services Division
Services would use cradle-to-cradle sys-
tems and processes, conNorbertDunke Housing
teams and processes, considering products













BUILT ENVIRONMENT


Description of Importance and
Reason for Inclusion
In dramatic contrast to its opening in
1906 with two unfinished buildings
and 102 students, the University of
Florida entered the 21st century with a
population of nearly 70,000 students,
faculty and support personnel occupying
over 18 million square feet in 950
campus buildings.


Long-range campus planning is of vital
importance for universities, where de-
velopment choices can last for centuries.
Successful long-range planning can work
to preserve and enhance the character of
a campus through thoughtful design and
maintenance of public spaces, circulation
patterns, natural amenities, and new and
existing buildings.

Our buildings, in particular, play a
significant role in our lives on campus.
We work, study, and live in them every


day. At UF, buildings account for 80%
of electricity consumption and 60% of
greenhouse gas emissions. It is, however,
possible to construct buildings with sig-
nificantly smaller environmental impacts.
Examples of buildings that incorporate
more sustainable design and maintenance
practices are becoming increasingly
common. Buildings designed with the
health and safety of their occupants and
the environment in mind can produce


their own energy, reuse their own water,
provide healthy indoor air quality, and
increase employee productivity.

Operations and maintenance of the built
environment also significantly contrib-
ute to a building's impact. The use of
low-toxicity paints, carpets, and furnish-
ings, as well as "green" cleaning products,
contributes to a healthier indoor envi-
ronment for university employees and
students, and lessens the negative effects
on our ecosystems as well.


Guiding Principle
Construct and renovate the built envi-
ronment to high standards of energy,
water, and materials efficiency with mini-
mum impacts on local ecosystems.

How Are We Doing?
MASTER PLAN: The campus master plan
for 2005-2015, lays the groundwork
for University of Florida facilities and
land resources for the next seven years
and beyond. For the 2005-2015 campus
master plan, the university employed an
inclusive and comprehensive approach to
engaging the campus community, host
community, and governmental agencies
in the plan development process.

LEED: In 2001, the university adopted
Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED) criteria for design
and construction for all major new
construction and renovation projects.
The LEED building rating system was
developed by the U.S. Green Building
Council as a national standard for
evaluating and certifying individual
projects. Our commitment was renewed
in January 2006, when UF pledged
that all new campus construction and
major renovation projects approved as
of July 1, 2004 would meet a LEED-
Silver equivalent certification standard.
In 2007, UF initiated a LEED Campus
Standards application for the whole main
university campus and started the LEED
Existing Building pilot program.

"GREEN" CLEANING: Sustainability and
"green" cleaning has become a focus for
UF's Building Services department, the
custodial branch of the Physical Plant
Division. In addition to cleaning prac-






















tices, the Building Services department
also covers recycling, energy conservation,
and other sustainability tips in its training.
Building Services partners with the UF
Sustainability Office and product vendors
in the continuing conversion to "green."
They have been testing and implement-
ing a number of ergonomically designed
cleaning tools and environmentally safe
cleaning products and supplies. (See also
Health and Wellbeing)

Recent accomplishments
LEED COMMITMENT: UF's Facilities Plan-
ning and Construction Department is
the first in the state of Florida to require
a LEED-accredited professional on staff
to ensure LEED criteria are incorporated
in design and construction on all major
projects. The LEED accredited profession-
al works with the project design teams to
obtain the highest level of LEED certifica-
tion for all projects, with a minimum goal
of LEED Silver.

GETTING TO GOLD: Thus far, UF boasts
eight LEED-certified buildings and two
Gold-certified buildings. UF's Rinker
Hall was the first LEED Gold-certified
building in the State of Florida. The lat-
est building to be certified LEED Gold
was Library West, a 177,000 square foot
building and renovation project that was
completed in 2006. In addition, there
have been 6 buildings submitted for certi-
fication and 9 registered buildings on the
UF campus.

LEED EB PORTFOLIO: Not only is the Uni-
versity of Florida implementing LEED in
new construction, but we are also renovat-
ing existing buildings to LEED-certified
standards. Thirty-two buildings across


campus are a part of the UF Portfolio
Pilot Program for LEED Existing Build-
ings (EB), the first such portfolio on a
college campus.

NATIONAL HISTORIC DISTRICT: The Uni-
versity of Florida Historic District com-
prises nineteen academic buildings and
dormitories all constructed before 1939,
representing nearly 70 years of embodied
carbon. The Collegiate Gothic style of
these buildings, rooted in the ideal of
medieval English universities, was meant
to suggest ancient traditions of learning
and the permanence of the institution. In
1989 the central campus area was placed
on the National Register, adding eight
more buildings to the register listing.
Landscaping for the campus began in
1905 with a row of oak trees and a sensi-
tive use of live oak, dogwood and holly
helped integrate the various buildings
into a unified visual scheme. When the


central green of the campus was dedi-
cated as the Plaza of the Americas in the
1930s, the university was noted for its
towering pines, stately oaks, palms and
shrubs of all types.

STUDENT AND STAFF EDUCATION: The
Facilities Planning and Construction
(FPC) Department has offered numer-
ous training opportunities in sustainable
design and LEED construction through
case studies and tours. In addition, the
FPC website allows users to monitor


the performance of the LEED buildings
on campus and see first-hand how they
are performing. Courses in sustainable
design principles are also offered at UF,
especially in the College of Design, Con-
struction and Planning, and Civil and
Environmental Engineering. The Powell
Center for Construction and Environ-
ment hosts the annual international
conference, Rethinking Sustainable
Construction.

SUSTAINABILITY MAJOR: The College of
Design, Construction and Planning has
developed an interdisciplinary under-
graduate Bachelor of Science in Sus-
tainability and the Built Environment,
intended to train UF students interested
in sustainability and the built environ-
ment through a series of interdisciplinary
and disciplinary lectures, studios, semi-
nars and internships. Courses will be
offered in conjunction with the college's


disciplinary units: architecture, building
construction, interior design, landscape
architecture, and urban and regional
planning. UF sophomores will be eli-
gible to apply for the program. Specific
additional courses from across campus
are recommended to the students as
electives, on an individual basis. (See also
Teaching and Research)

Benchmark Programs
Harvard's new four-building, 589,000
square-foot Allston Science Complex is


La


SAt UF, buildings account for 80% of electricity

consumption and 60%' of greenhouse gas emissions.






















designed to meet LEED Gold standards
and produce only half the greenhouse gas
emissions of a typical laboratory build-
ing. The voluntary agreement with Har-
vard is the first in the nation to legally
bind a developer to reducing greenhouse
gases beyond the current standards.

The University of Colorado at Boulder
has mandated that all new buildings be
certified LEED Gold or higher.

Vassar College and Cornell University
have implemented a variety of indoor
air quality measures including upgrading
HVAC standards in new and existing
buildings, performing regular main-
tenance testing for contaminants, and
purchasing low-volatile organic com-
pound (VOC) building materials, paints
and cleaning products. Cornell also has
an Integrated Pest Management Program
to reduce the volume of pesticides used
in buildings.

Framing the Vision
In framing the vision for sustainability
in the Built Environment, participants
envisioned a campus with buildings that
would be designed to last 100 years,
and to provide a healthy, productive
environment for the university
community, with a minimal impact on
the environment. As we build on our
historic traditions, our vision would
include constructing buildings that
would stand the test of time to join
existing historic buildings on campus.

The full impacts of design and material
selection would be considered in the
decision-making process. A life cycle
analysis, from raw materials through


production and disposal, would be
considered in planning and purchasing
phases. The university would continue
to follow the campus Master Plan,
which encompasses many facets of
campus planning including physical
development, environmental preservation
and management, infrastructure,
design standards, intergovernmental
coordination and neighborhood/
community partnerships. Since
planning is an ongoing and collaborative
undertaking, a wide array of committees,
task teams, and open forums would be
employed to bring together stakeholders
and develop consensus about the future
of the University of Florida campus
community.

Reaching the Vision
In order to reach this vision, participants
identified the following opportunities.


ESTABLISH UNIFIED POLICIES: Establish
clear, consistent policies concerning
facilities construction and maintenance,
with support from the administration.
Establish accountability for building
performance and maintenance from
design through operation. Provide
guidelines and training for project
managers, vendors and contractors to
operate sustainably.

IMPLEMENT LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS
POLICIES: Establish policies to analyze the
full life-cycle costs/benefits of our energy,
water, lighting, landscaping, ventilation,
material use, and transit proximity
to help guide the decisions we make
about the development of our campus.
Incorporate life-cycle cost analysis into
the budgeting, design, engineering, and
approval process of all new buildings
and major renovations. (See also
Procurement)






















DESIGN SMART BUILDINGS: Construct
and renovate buildings to adjust to
occupancy needs. All campus buildings
would meet high performance criteria
and include flexible use areas. The value
of resource and energy efficiencies would
be preserved through the design-to-build
process. Buildings would maximize
LEED energy points, and all projects
would be designed to meet LEED
Platinum standards. UF would strive
to improve the sustainability of each
new building.

CREATE FLEXIBLE BUILDING SPACE:
Design buildings with flexible space for
shared use. Optimize usable square foot-
age in the design stage of new buildings,
before they are built. Implement and
support telecommuting and distance
learning to conserve building space and
resources. (See also Health & Wellbeing
and Transportation)

BUILD HEALTHY, USER-FRIENDLY
BUILDINGS: Indoor environments would
be designed to be healthy, beautiful, and
user friendly for community wellbeing
and productivity. Campus design
elements would be uniform for aesthetics
and ease-of-use. Collaborative groups
would meet to make building decisions
to best fit user needs. (See also Health
& Wellbeing)

EMPLOY CLOSED LOOP SYSTEMS: Incor-
porate alternative, distributed energy
technology wherever possible, includ-
ing waste-to-energy processes. Develop
off-peak storage for utilities thermal
storage, chilled storage, hydrogen, etc.
- to reduce peak load. (See also Energy
Conservation and Climate Change)


ENCOURAGE PREVENTATIVE MAINTE-
NANCE: Develop a proactive process to
improve efficiency in existing buildings
through ongoing maintenance of existing
systems. Develop policies to identify,
repair, and upgrade inefficient equipment
that uses excess energy and/or water.
Preventative maintenance would improve
system reliability, decrease the cost of
replacement equipment, and decrease
system downtime. Employ accessible user
feedback tools that help users and build-
ing maintenance staff to ensure build-
ings are working as efficiently as possible
throughout their lifecycles.

RECYCLING AND REUSE OF
CONSTRUCTION WASTE: Establish
deconstruction and construction
waste policies that mandate recycling,
preferably through local re-use vendors.
Negotiate lower costs to reuse/recycle
materials than the cost to dispose at a
landfill. (See also Waste)

RE-ALIGN UNIVERSITY DONATIONS: En-
courage donors to fund operations and
optimization of existing systems. Only
construct new buildings when necessary.
(See also Institutional Commitment)


Participants:
BaharArmaghani, Facilities Pl'bi'..ig and
Construction, Sustainability Committee
representative
Harold Barrand, Physical Plant Division
Gene Brandner, Facilities Plbi:I'..:g and
Construction
Jennifer Gillett, Entemology- IFAS
Glenn Ketcham, EnvironmentalHealth and
Safety
John Lawson, Physical Plant Division,
Energy Department
John Madey, Computer and Networking
Services
Amanda Moore, Human Resource Services
,.r Peet, Progress Energy
Lynda Reinhart, O'Connell Center
Mark van Soi.tb'gi.:, ICBE













WASTE REDUCTION


Description of importance and
reason for inclusion
As our global population grows, we
are faced with the reality that many of
the resources on our planet are finite.
Institutions moving towards zero waste
by reducing, reusing, recycling, and com-
posting help to mitigate the need to ex-
tract virgin materials and resources from
the earth. It generally takes less energy
to make a product with recycled mate-
rial than with virgin resources. Reducing
waste generation also reduces the flow
of waste to incinerators and landfills,
thereby reducing greenhouse gas emis-
sions and minimizing contamination of


air and groundwater supplies. Reducing
waste is largely a matter of reducing con-
sumption, procuring durable products,
and repurposing useful items.

Electronics and appliances are the fastest
growing portion of the waste stream
today. The EPA predicts that in the next
five years, approximately 250 million
computers will become obsolete. Elec-
tronic waste, in particular, contains toxic
components, such as lead or mercury
that can contaminate soil and groundwa-
ter, and have detrimental human health
impacts if handled improperly. The EPA
has further determined that computers


and other electronic equipment contain
heavy metals in their circuit boards and
batteries, which also can pose a hazard to
the environment. This hazardous waste
must be disposed of properly.

Guiding Principle
Reduce waste streams and promote
closed-cycle materials practices.

How are we doing?
WASTE MANAGEMENT: The university
Physical Plant Department's (PPD) Solid
Waste Management Office manages the
collection and disposal of all solid waste
generated through university operations,
including medical waste. It also manages
the university's recycling program and
provides collection and recycling services
for paper, corrugated cardboard contain-
ers, beverage containers, scrap metal,
pallets, masonry, yard waste and other
widely used materials. Environmental
regulations and recycling opportunities
preclude us from carelessly disposing
of waste. Environmentally hazardous
materials, bio-medical waste, construc-
tion materials, yard waste and many
other materials require special handling
and separate disposal channels. Members
of UF's Environmental Health & Safety
department (EH&S) ensure compliance
with federal and state disposal regula-
tions. They identify and evaluate vendors
that can handle disposal and/or recycling,
and maintain hazardous disposal records.

UE through waste reduction and recy-
cling initiatives, achieves a waste recovery
rate of nearly 35%. Using a mixture of
in-house and contracted resources, the
university recycles over 6,500 tons of ma-
terial annually. Additionally, UF strives






















to recycle at least 60% of its deconstruc-
tion debris. Throughout campus, divi-
sions are doing their part to divert waste
streams. For example, all yard waste
generated on campus is taken to a local
mulching/composting facility, all waste-
water treatment plant sludge is applied


locally as a soil amendment, and Gator
Dining Services collects used cooking oil
for conversion to biodiesel. To reduce
waste further, EH&S hosts a chemical
exchange program. This opportunity
allows researchers to share unwanted,
unopened chemicals with other labs, free
of charge. Even the used animal bedding
from UF's veterinary school is being
decontaminated and composted for com-
mercial forestry.

ELECTRONIC WASTE: To assure that
electronic equipment with the potential
to create environmental contamination
is properly managed, UF established an
Electronics Reuse/Recycling Policy. The
accompanying step-by-step guide for
disposal and recycling are administered
by UF's Asset Management department.
Surplus Property staff working with the
campus community play an important
role in this mission by ensuring that
electronic equipment is re-used and/or
properly recycled. Through this effort,
the university reduces the unneces-
sary purchase of electronic equipment
and encourages the re-use of available
equipment suitable for other purposes.


UF administers a program to sell or
de-manufacture the monitors, CPUs and
electronic waste that are no longer useful
to the university. Recyclers/de-manufac-
turers or purchasers under UF contract
must meet strict standards for proper use
or recycling of each unit. EH&S audits


university-contracted recycling facilities
to ensure that health and safety condi-
tions meet their standards.
Housing: University Housing provides
recycling in the residence halls on
campus. Housing also hosts a move-out
program that works with local area chari-
ties to collect and distribute re-usable
furniture and supplies. The goals of the
program are three-fold: to assist local
charitable agencies, to reduce the amount
of usable items deposited in the local
landfill during this period, and to support
residents moving from residence halls.

LANDFILL: The
University of
Florida operates a
full-scale 28-acre
bio-reactor in
Alachua County
in partnership
with Gainesville
Regional Utility
and Progress En-
ergy. The internal
conditions of the
landfill are closely
controlled to ac-


celebrate the natural decomposition of the
waste and produce a useful by-product:
energy rich landfill gas. The gas is col-
lected, fed to turbines, and generates
"green" energy without contributing to
the increase of global greenhouse gases.

Recent Accomplishments
RECYCLING BINS: The UF Office of
Sustainability and PPD are working
together to implement comprehensive
recycling programs for plastic, glass and
aluminum across campus. In 2008-
2009, indoor co-mingled can and bottle
recycling bins are being placed in faculty,
staff, and graduate student work areas.
Pilots are also underway for new outdoor
recycling bins, including outdoor paper
collection, and indoor bins for student
and public areas.

GAMEDAY RECYCLING: UF's TailGa-
tor Game Day Recycling Program was
launched in 2006. The Office of Sustain-
ability, Solid Waste Management, PPD
Grounds staff, and student groups work
together to collect home-game recycla-
bles. In 2007, this volunteer-driven effort























diverted over 26,500 lbs of recyclable
material from the landfill.

RECYCLEMANIA: UF participates in
RecycleMania a friendly competition
among college and university recycling
programs in the United States. The
competition promotes a fun, proactive
approach to waste reduction.
Over a 10-week period, campuses
compete in different contests to
see which institution can collect a
the largest amount of recyclables
per capital, the largest amount of
total recyclables, the least amount
of trash per capital, or achieve the
highest recycling rate. The main
goal of this event is to increase
student awareness of campus
recycling and waste minimization .
goals. All participating schools '
are required to report measure-
ments on a weekly basis in
pounds. This year, UF achieved
11.8 lbs of recyclables per person '
over the 10-week period, and
finished 10th out of 200 schools
in the total amount of recyclables
collected with 770,988 lbs.

PURCHASING DIRECTIVE: UF's sustainable
purchasing directive supports campus
sustainability and provides guidelines,
information, and resources in procuring
products that will minimize negative im-
pacts on society and the environment to
the greatest extent practicable. The direc-
tive suggests best practices and strategies
for waste reduction through purchasing,
leasing, renting, as well as product take-
back strategies. (See also Purchasing)


Benchmark Programs
UF is on par with many institutional
leaders for waste diversion. The Univer-
sity of Oregon consistently diverts over
40% of its waste stream, and the Univer-
sity of Massachusetts, Amherst exceeds
50% waste diversion.


Framing the Vision
UF has set a visionary goal of Zero Waste
by 2015. In framing the vision for sus-
tainability in Waste Reduction, partici-
pants envisioned all users, auxiliary units,
and business partners striving for Zero
Waste. UF would sort all waste for the
most productive re-use, recycling or con-


a


Penn State hosts a number of special
event recycling projects, including a
Trash-to-Treasure collection and sale,
which last year diverted 75 tons of waste
from the landfill and raised $50,000 for
the United Way. Penn State's Organic
Materials Processing and Education
Center saves over 1.6 tons of waste daily
from the landfill and closes the waste
loop, turning waste into free compost
used to enrich the campus grounds.


version to energy (i.e., pyrolitic conver-
sion or biodigestion) transporting the
absolute minimum amount of waste to
the landfill. The full life cycle of products
would be considered before purchasing
and durable goods would be preferable to
disposable options. The campus commu-
nity would proactively consider eventual
product disposal when making everyday
purchasing decisions.






















Reaching the Vision
In order to reach this vision, participants
identified the following opportunities.

MANAGING WASTE STREAMS: UF would
sort all waste for the most productive
re-use, recycling or conversion to
energy (i.e., pyrolitic conversion or
biodigestion).

* Construction and Deconstruction
Waste: Our first priority would be to
reduce and eliminate waste, followed
by recycling materials on campus, and
finally recycling materials off campus.
We would build a network for re-use
and recycling of building materials to
minimize waste.
* Biomedical Waste: Our bio-medical
waste presents a unique challenge.
We would explore the possibility
of pyrolitic conversion of waste
into energy, but may be limited by
regulations constraining medical waste
disposal.


* Hazardous Waste: Compliance with
federal and state disposal regulations
for hazardous waste is managed by
Environmental Health & Safety. The
department identifies and evaluates
vendors that can handle disposal and/
or recycling, and maintain hazardous


EDUCATION AND RESEARCH: We would
demonstrate research innovations when-
ever possible. Campus would act as a liv-
ing laboratory for sustainability, allowing
students to learn from and develop waste
diversion strategies for campus.


I UF has set a visionary goal of Zero Waste by 2015.


disposal records. In this vision, the UF
community would be well informed
and would collect and dispose of
hazardous and electronic waste
appropriately in their work and home
life.
* Organic Waste: The campus would
gather food waste, vegetation, and
bio-solids from wastewater treatment
for conversion into bio-gas in an
anaerobic digester.


Participants:
Justin .',. O'Connell Center
Bill Coughlin, Environmental Health &
Safety
Charles Kibert, Rinker School ojf
Construction
Dale Morris, PhysicalPlant
Division, Recycling and Solid Waste
Coordinator
Jillian Peters, Student Senate Environmental
Abff.i Cabinet chair
Bill Properzio, Environmental Health &
Safety
John Schert, Hinkley Center for Solid/
Hazardous Waste
Ann '., A and B.olog..l
Engineering














.:**. PROCUREMENT
66:0 *


Description of importance and
reason for inclusion
Colleges and universities purchase a va-
riety of materials and goods that all have
environmental, social, and economic
impacts. As individual entities, and as an
aggregate collection, universities pur-
chase great volumes of paper, computers,
printers, copiers, office supplies, research
supplies, cleaning supplies, building
materials, furniture, paint, carpet, food
and more.

Labor inputs, pollution, waste genera-
tion, energy consumption, extraction of
38 natural resources, and impacts on users'
health and environment are all impacts
of purchasing decisions. An analysis of


University of Florida can influence and
drive the type, availability and price of
products offered in the market. Through
our purchasing practices, we can educate
our students, improve human health
conditions on campus, and lead the way
as stewards of the earth's resources.

Guiding Principle
Subscribe to procurement policies and
practices that support environmentally
and socially responsible products and
services.

How are we doing?
Purchasing and Disbursement Services
has made great strides in the past few
years to ensure that the vendors con-
tracted by the university are aligned with


Purchasing and Disbursement Services has made great

strides in the past few years to ensure that the vendors

contracted by the university are aligned with UF's

sustainability goals.


total costs, including energy consump-
tion, parts replacement, and disposal, is
critical to determining the best value in
procurement decisions.

Purchasing on the UF campus is highly
decentralized. Thousands of people are
involved in low-value purchasing (up to
$1000 per item) throughout the campus.
Over 1,600 people make requisitions,
and there are over 5,000 active Purchas-
ing Cards (Pcards) in the hands of cam-
pus purchasers. High-value purchasing is
handled by campus buyers in the central
Purchasing department. As an institution
with large purchasing requirements, the


UF's sustainability goals. In 2003 the
department drafted purchasing guide-
lines put in place to lessen UF's environ-
mental impact by directing purchasers
to environmentally preferable products
whenever they performed satisfactorily
and were available at a reasonable price.
These guidelines were enhanced and re-
vised in 2007 as the Sustainable Purchas-
ing Directive.

Recent accomplishments
SUSTAINABLE PURCHASING DIRECTIVE:
The purpose of this directive is to sup-
port campus sustainability at the Univer-
sity of Florida and to provide guidelines,


information, and resources in procuring
products that will minimize negative im-
pacts on society and the environment to
the greatest extent practicable. The direc-
tive includes responsibilities of depart-
ments for educating purchasers within
their department and best practices and
strategies for socially and environmen-
tally preferable purchasing on campus.

UNIQUE PARTNERSHIPS: UF leveraged
its purchasing power to negotiate a new
relationship between Mister Paper, a local
minority-owned office supply company,
and Office Depot. This relationship
creates the best value for the university
by matching competitive pricing with
a very high level of customer service. In
addition, the Purchasing department has
created a green designation on the list of
commonly purchased office supplies to
help customers make informed choices.

SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS TRADE SHOW:
This year, the Purchasing department
hosted the third annual Sustainable
Products Trade Show. It has grown each
year in both vendors and participants.
The goal of the show is to educate stu-
dents, staff and faculty about sustainable
products purchased by UF, and options
for green products for personal use.

VENDOR RELATIONS: The Purchasing De-
partment has incorporated sustainability-
related questions into large contract
vendor negotiations. They are also request-
ing that vendors report sustainable product
data/certifications, such as Energy Star,
Green Seal certification, EPEAT, and FSC.

GREEN CLEANING: Sustainability and
"green cleaning" has become a focus for
the UF Building Services department.
They test and implement a number of er-






















gonomically designed cleaning tools and
environmentally safe cleaning products
and supplies, including: recycled content
paper products, Green Seal certified
chemicals, and Green Label vacuum
cleaners. (See also Health & Wellbeing)
Fleet Purchasing/Biofuels: The university
has committed to purchasing high fuel
efficiency vehicles; these vehicles may be
hybrid or alternative fuel vehicles, when
possible. The purchasing department
maintains a listing of available vehicles
to assist departments with choosing
a vehicle for purchase. (See also
Transportation)

WORKERS RIGHTS: Through the Fair
Labor Association, the UF Athletic As-
sociation and UF's bookstore partner,
Follett, work with factories to ensure
that no child or sweatshop labor is used
to manufacture merchandise bearing
the university's logos. In addition, they
review reports from human rights organi-
zations, labor groups, and other organi-
zations and governments that provide
data on this issue.

Benchmark Programs
Indiana University implemented a
selective purchasing policy that prohibits
buying products derived from old-
growth forests.

The University of California at Santa
Barbara (UCSB) has adopted a recycling
program and policy which includes the
purchasing of recycled paper. UCSB's
policy requires that the university
purchase paper products of the highest
recycled content available within five per-
cent of the price of non-recycled paper.

Framing the Vision
In framing the vision for sustainability in


Procurement, participants envisioned all
employees integrating analyses of social
and environmental value, including life
cycle costing, into purchasing decisions.
Sustainable products and services would
be given preference in evaluations of the
best value for the university.

UF departments would be account-
able for their expenditures, considering
UF's purchases with the same care and
attention as their own purchases and
respecting UF's money as they would
their own. Purchases would only be
made when absolutely necessary; options
such as renting, borrowing, or sharing
would also be examined. The university
would leverage our purchasing power to
motivate vendors to act more sustainably.
Our success would serve as an inspiration
to other businesses and institutions.

Realizing the Vision
In order to reach this vision, participants
identified the following opportunities.

SUSTAINABLE OPTIONS FOR ALL PUR-
CHASES: Develop a web-based, user-
friendly interface to identify sustainable
options for purchasing decisions.

FULL-COST ACCOUNTING: Integrate
analysis of total cost of ownership and
full-cost accounting into purchasing
decisions.

EDUCATE THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY: De-
velop materials to support campus-wide
and department level understanding and
compliance. Include information about
the benefits of sustainable purchasing
and the progress being made on campus.
Set an example for students, faculty, and
staff so they might make sustainable
purchasing decisions on campus and in
their personal lives.


ENCOURAGE TAKE-BACK: Negotiate "ex-
tended producer responsibility" clauses
with contract vendors, holding them
accountable for the full lifecycle of the
products they manufacture.

REPORTING: Develop "report cards" to
track sustainable purchasing on campus
and the performance of campus suppli-
ers/vendors.

INCLUDE SUSTAINABILITY GOALS: Those
responsible for purchasing would be eval-
uated on their ability to find innovative
ways to reduce waste through purchasing
and to incorporate full cost accounting
into purchasing decisions. Sustainable
purchasing training would be offered to
all purchasers.

Participants:
Eugene Brandner, Facilities Pli:I'.i:g and
Construction
Kimberly Browne, Coligc ofLiberalArts
and Sciences
Kathy Carnes, C.. .. oj .'
Bill Coughlin, Environmental Health c
Safety
Lisa Deal Purchasing, Sustainability
Committee representative
Greg DuBois, Finance and Accounting
Miriam Fletcher, Dentistry
Linda Hon, Journalism and
Communications
Bob ohnson, Chemistry
Lucida Lavelli, Dean, College ofFine Arts
Jim Lennon, Chemistry
Victoria Masters, C.. .. of Fine Arts
Mike McKee, Finance and Accounting
Renee Musson, O'Connell Center
DavidPederson, Student Government
John Plummer, Levin C. . ofLaw
Faylene Welcome, Small and Minority
Business A.ff.














INVESTMENT


Description of importance and
reason for inclusion
The primary goal of university invest-
ment advisors is optimizing financial
return on investment. Some universities
are also including sustainability-related
priorities in investment decisions in an
effort to keep investments in alignment
with stated university values. As inves-
tors, universities also have an opportuni-
ty to actively consider, as well as vote on,
sustainability-related shareholder resolu-
tions. Forming a shareholder responsi-
bility committee to advise the board of
S trustees allows universities to include
40
students, faculty, and alumni in research
and discussion of important corporate
policies on sustainability. In addition,
such committees offer exceptional educa-
tional opportunities at the intersection of
policy, business, and sustainability.

Institutions may investigate and invest
in renewable energy funds, commu-
nity development financial institutions,
or similar investment vehicles. Such
portfolio diversification at the local level
strengthens communities that surround
universities and contributes to their
sustainability.

In accordance with the academic tradi-
tion of fostering a free flow of informa-
tion, universities are being encouraged
to apply similar openness to endowment
investments, including shareholder proxy
voting records. Access to participation in
endowment investment policies can fos-
ter constructive dialogue about opportu-
nities for clean energy investment, as well
as shareholder voting priorities.


Guiding Principle
Explore and develop opportunities to
engage in socially and environmentally
responsible investing.

How are we doing?
The University of Florida board of
trustees adopted the following policy on
September 14, 2007:

Trustees of the University of Florida have
a primary responsibility to ensure that
investing and managing endowment
securities maximizes the financial return
on those resources, while taking into
account the amount of risk appropriate
for university investment policy. The
Board of Trustees utilizes UFICO as its
investment arm and reviews performance
quarterly and annually.

When the board adjudges the policies or
practices of a corporation in which the


university invests could cause substantial
social injury, as responsible and ethical
investors, it will give independent weight
to this factor in determining investment
responsibility policies.

The Sustainable Endowments Institute
issues an annual College Sustainability
Report Card, which is a review of cam-
pus and endowment policies at leading
institutions. The Report Card assesses the
200 public and private universities with
the largest endowments, ranging from
$230 million to nearly $35 billion.

While schools are earning higher marks
for green initiatives in campus opera-
tions, a majority of the wealthiest institu-
tions continue to lag in applying sustain-
ability practices to their endowment
investments. The categories with the
lowest overall grades were Shareholder
Engagement with 66% "Fs" and Endow-
ment Transparency with 58% "Fs."

























While UF earned "As" and "Bs" in the
categories of Administration, Climate
Change & Energy, Food & Recycling,
Green Building, and Transportation, it
earned failing marks in the Shareholder
Engagement and Endowment Transpar-
ency categories.


Benchmark Programs
Dartmouth College's Advisory Com-
mittee on Investor Responsibility makes
its annual report available to the college
community and any interested outside
party on the college's website. Any Dart-
mouth community member can view a
hard-copy listing of all publicly traded
shares that the college directly owns by
visiting the college's investment office.


Duke University is currently invested in
renewable energy and community devel-
opment loan funds. In 2006, the univer-
sity announced a $5 million investment
in the Latino Community Credit Union
based in Durham, North Carolina. This
investment is in addition to an initial
investment of $400,000, which made
Duke one of the credit union's first and
largest investors.


Washington University in St. Louis is
invested with managers whose mandates
include renewable energy, and has also
invested in and loaned funds to others in
order to invest in real estate for neighbor-
hood revitalization in several local areas.


Students, faculty, and alumni serve on
Columbia University's Advisory Com-
mittee on Socially Responsible Investing,
which makes proxy voting recommenda-
tions to the board. The committee also
hosts an annual town hall meeting at


which the school community can voice
its opinion on issues facing the com-
mittee or on issues that the committee
should address.


Harvard University has two committees
to assist the university in addressing its
ethical responsibilities as a large institu-
tional investor: the Corporation Com-
mittee on Shareholder Responsibility
(CCSR) and the Advisory Committee
on Shareholder Responsibility (ACSR),
which includes faculty, students, and
alumni. The CCSR publishes an annual
report that provides details on the work
of the two committees.


Framing the Vision
The University of Florida board of trust-
ees believes that the policy it adopted in
September 2007 provides the necessary
framework to invest in a socially respon-
sible manner. Any consideration of an
investment advisory committee or other
investment-related priorities would be at
the sole discretion of the board.


Florida's investment arm, to establish
a list of prohibited investments for the
state's pension fund, based on companies
doing certain types of business in certain
locations. The SBA has identified 57
companies for inclusion in its list of
prohibited
investments.
The Uni-
versity of
S Florida is
o reviewing
the SBA's list
SI ga6 m-a to of prohibited
investments
..... to use as a
guideline
as it considers direct investments.
The university will also monitor and
consider any future changes that the
SBA may make to the list of prohibited
investments.


Accesiiito oarticir)ation in endowment investment
...............
...............
...............
...............
..a u
pofi-cies....can....foster constructive dialOgue bo t
........................ ................. ............ ............
.............................................. ...... ...................................
.............................................. ...............................................
.............................................. ...............................................
................ ...............................................................................................................
............... ........................................................
opportunities for clean energy in.yestmentilliag. ... ........
well as
............... ...........................................................
......................................... .. ......
............... .................................................................................
shareholder voting priorities.


Realizing the Vision
The board of trustees has expressed a
willingness to look into the Florida law
regarding the state's pension program.
That law, the Protecting Florida's
Investments Act, requires the State board
of Administration (SBA), the State of












TRANSPORTATION

k1dL'ff`


Description of Importance and
Reason for Inclusion
Conventional modes of transportation
contribute to traffic congestion, deterio-
ration of roadways, and local air pollu-
tion. In response, strategies have been
developed to promote more efficient
modes of transportation. These strategies,
referred to as transportation demand
management (TDM) initiatives, can
include improved transportation options,
incentive programs for using alternative


transportation, strategic placement and
regulation of parking, and other policy
and institutional reforms.

The modal split is the most fundamental
measure for tracking the performance
of a transportation system. Modal split
refers to the proportion of transporta-
tion modes used by commuters travel-
ing to and from campus. Each mode of
transportation carries different costs for
the user, as well as for the surrounding


community and environment. Single
occupancy vehicle (SOV) trips can be
thought of as particularly costly due
to their proportionately higher per
capital emissions, as well as the related
infrastructure costs, traffic, and parking
demand that they generate.

Fossil-based fuels used by commuters,
and for campus operations, are declining
resources and their combustion impacts
the quality of the air we breathe.


Increasing costs of fossil fuels and
growing concern over the effects of
climate change are driving the transition
to alternative fuels. The ongoing
challenge for campus operations is
minimizing fuel consumption without
compromising necessary services.

Guiding Principle
Develop incentives and infrastructure for
walking, cycling, ridesharing, and public
transportation.


How Are We Doing?
ALTERNATIVES: UF Transportation and
Parking Services and the UF Office of
Sustainability provide details on alterna-
tive transportation options through an
interactive website and through bro-
chures and events.

BICYCLING: The University Police Depart-
ment offers bicycle registration in order
to aid recovery in the case of bicycle
theft. Student Government offers free
bike repair outside the Reitz Union.
Regional Transit System (RTS) buses are
equipped with bike racks, allowing riders
to bring bicycles on board for the transi-
tion from transit to final destination.

TRANSIT: Since 1997, UF has contributed
increasing funding to RTS through the
implementation of a student transporta-
tion fee. Funding increases have cre-
ated growth in service and ridership for
students and the general public, allowing
RTS to serve more riders than any other
transit system in Florida. Last year, RTS
provided nearly 9 million rides. This suc-
cessful partnership helped the university
earn recognition from the US Environ-
mental Protection Agency as one of the
nation's "Best Workplaces for Commut-
ers." UF support allows for universal
pre-paid access to bus rides for students,
faculty and staff, 7 days a week, through-
out the Gainesville area. RTS also offers
extended bus services such as the "Gator
Aider" for football games, and the "Later
Gator" on weekend nights.

Recent Accomplishments
ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION
EDUCATION: An extensive alternative
transportation campaign is planned for


va






















the 2008-2009 academic year. Materials
and programs will educate students,
faculty, and staff of the transportation
options available, and will encourage
university community members
to reduce use of automobiles, and
encourage efficient use of transportation.

BICYCLE SAFETY EDUCATION: UF's
Department of Health and Human
Performance is the new home of Florida
Department of Transportation Traffic
and Bicycle Safety Education Program
(previously housed in Urban and Re-
gional Planning). Under a grant from the
Florida Department of Transportation
Safety Office, this project promotes safe
walking and bicycling in educational set-
tings in Gainesville and throughout the
State of Florida. UF also offers Bicycle
Traffic Safety School that allows bicyclists
who violate traffic laws on campus the
opportunity to attend the course in lieu
of paying traffic fines. This program is
the first in its kind in the state and it
represents the university's commitment
to recognizing bicycles as a serious means
of transportation.

CARPOOL/GREENRIDE: For students
and employees who do not live within
walking or biking distance to campus,
and don't live in an area served by
RTS, UF offer a comprehensive
carpool program. The carpool program
encourages eligible University of Florida
and Shands faculty and staff members
to share the ride to and from campus.
Registered carpool members purchase
their own annual carpool decals and
enjoy a guaranteed number of parking
spaces across campus. UF also offers
GreenRide, a rideshare matching service.


Commuters can search for ridesharing
partners among the other employees and
students registered with GreenRide who
live near them and have similar schedules
and lifestyle preferences.

ZIPCAR: For members of the UF com-
munity who need a vehicle for errands
or trips, UF has partnered with Zipcar,
a national car-sharing program. Zipcar
offers 8 low-emission vehicles (within
their class) to choose from on campus,
including 3 hybrids. Currently, more
than 300 members are taking advantage
of this service. The hourly rental fee
includes gas, insurance, maintenance, a
reserved parking space, 180 free miles
per trip, roadside assistance, and 24-hour
customer service.

UF CAMPUS CAB: PPD provides point-to-
point transportation for UF faculty and
staff, on the main campus, east cam-
pus, and some UF facilities in Alachua


County. The taxi service is available at
no cost to users during posted hours of
university operation.

FLEET MANAGEMENT STUDIES: UF is
conducting studies to determine the
"right sized" fleet for campus. The goal is
to reduce the number of state vehicles on
campus, many of which are parked for
extended periods of time. By reducing
individual department needs, charging


a fee to departments for the privilege of
having a vehicle on campus, and increas-
ing the use of Zipcar and other rental/
carsharing programs, we can reduce the
number of vehicles on campus.

FLEET PURCHASING/BIOFUELS: The uni-
versity has committed to purchasing the
highest fuel efficiency vehicles available,
which may be hybrid or alternative fuel
vehicles, whenever possible. The purchas-
ing department maintains a listing of
available vehicles to assist departments
with choosing a vehicle for purchase.
UF's fleet currently includes 8 electric
cars, 18 hybrids, and 83 flex-fuel ve-
hicles. Additionally, the university stocks
biodiesel and E85 ethanol for use in its
fleet vehicles. (See also Procurement

Benchmark Programs
In response to a 23% increase in fuel
usage between 1989 and 1998, Michi-
gan State University now has over 400


vehicles operating on alternative fuels
and a reuse system for various fluids and
components.

The University of Vermont is collecting
data on the number of trip-miles made
on alternative fuels and has a long-term
goal of converting a large portion of its
fleet to low or zero-emissions vehicles.


The carpool program encourages eligible University of

Florida and Shands faculty and staff members to share

the ride to and from campus.














































Framing the Vision
As the largest institutional member of
the Gainesville community, the Universi-
ty of Florida has a responsibility to meet
the transportation needs of our students,
faculty, and staff, while maintaining the
health of both the environment and our
relationships with the broader commu-
nity. The campus Master Plan supports
continued coordination with RTS,
increased walking and bicycling, and
innovative parking and fleet manage-
ment strategies. In framing the vision for
sustainability in Transportation, partici-
pants envisioned that the Master Plan
would be viewed as an active document
that would be used regularly by campus
leaders and UF staff in decision making
and operations.

As a part of its educational mission,
the university would show, by example,
that sustainable transportation makes
sense, on both personal and institutional


scales. Alternative transportation is one
of the many areas that could be related
to overall efficiency and budgeting goals.
Infrastructure decisions would include
considerations of return on investment,
life cycle costing, and externalized costs
to society.

Reaching the Vision
In order to reach this vision, participants
identified the following opportunities.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT: Partner with
community groups to offer alternative
transportation resources and education.

ALTERNATIVES TO SINGLE OCCUPANCY
VEHICLES: Provide alternative trans-
portation options for everyone coming
to campus, including van pools and
regional transit opportunities for those
not currently served. Provide incentives
for regular users of alternative transpor-
tation. Expand current car-sharing and


carpooling programs. Develop on and
off-campus bike and pedestrian cor-
ridors, known as greenway systems, for
bike-friendly campus access. Provide sup-
port facilities for faculty, students, and
staff riding bicycles and other alternative
modes of transportation to campus.

SAFETY LEADERSHIP: UF would lead the
way for transportation safety regulations
and would participate in writing state-
wide rules and regulations.

AUTO-FREE CAMPUS CORE: Through part
nership with RTS, and an ongoing tran-
sition to alternative transportation, UF
would eliminate private cars on campus
and achieve a car-free or car-minimized
campus core, with exceptions for police,
repairs, etc.

EFFICIENT CAMPUS CIRCULATOR: In addi-
tion to, or in partnership with, RTS ser-
vice, develop a reliable campus circulator
or "People Mover" to transport people
around campus more efficiently.

FOSSIL FUEL-FREE FLEET: Campus fleet
vehicles would be run exclusively on
renewable fuels and alternative tech-























nologies with maximum utilization of
vehicles to limit the size of the fleet.
Implement electric or human-powered
bike taxis for mail delivery and courier
deliveries around campus from central
receiving points.

SUPPORT ELECTRIC: UF would install so-
lar charging stations to charge electric ve-
hicles without tapping into the electricity
grid. (See also Energy Conservation and
Climate Change)

TELECOMMUTING: Provide training for
all managers on flexible scheduling and
telecommuting for employees, including
topics such as how to manage remotely.
Allow employees flexibility to work from
home to reduce commuting, when ap-
propriate. (See also Equity)

Participants:
Ricardo Lopez, PhD candidate, C. of
Design, Construction, and Plbi'.,:.'
Jeremy Cynkas, O'Connell Center
Lisa Deal, Purchasing
Linda Dixon, Facilities, PlM, i.'., and
Construction
Mackenzie Ezell Student Senator and
Student Sustainability Committee chair
Scott Fox, Transportation and Parking
Services
Julie Frey, C. of Design, Construction,
andPli:...g
Ron Fuller, Transportation and Parking
Services
JeffHolcomb, UFPD


Erik Lewis, Facilities, Pll,.i:' ..g. and
Construction
Nate Mitten, Graduate Student, President of
UFAmerican Solar Energy Society
Allan Preston, Physical Plant Division,
Sustainability Committee representative
Jon Priest, Physical Plant Division,Motor
Pool
Pratap Pullammanappallil, A_. '- 'and
B.'il.'oI Engineering
David Stopka, Recreation Sports
Mark van S... 7.. ..', ICBE













HEALTH AND WELLBEING


Description of Importance and
Reason for Inclusion
The university is a living community,
and the health and wellbeing of all its
members is a fundamental component
of the community's success, and even
excellence. Among the most important
responsibilities an institution has to its
employees is to ensure equitable access to
services and benefits, the prevention of
accidents and injury at work, and to the
active promotion of good health. Con-
cern for employee wellbeing includes re-
sponsibilities to maintain healthy indoor
environments and to increase employees'

46 access to good nutrition, exercise, and
overall wellbeing.


Guiding Principle
Ensure a healthy working environment
for faculty, students, and staff and work
to ensure equitable access to healthcare
on campus and within the broader
community.


How Are We Doing?
The University of Florida seeks to
provide a safe work environment for its
employees, including consideration of
training accessibility on ergonomic safety
and monitoring of progress. The Uni-
versity of Florida also seeks to provide
healthy indoor air for all members of
the university community. Additionally,
smoking is prohibited within 50 feet of
campus buildings.

The university's commitment to LEED
standards for new construction and
renovations includes commitments to
health and safety, and occupant comfort
and health. Low-VOC finishes, furnish-
ing, and maintenance products are all
part of the commitment. (See also Built
Environment)

The university has identified a growing
number of "green" cleaning products that
rival the effectiveness of their traditional
competitors. The use of green clean-
ing products contributes to a healthier
indoor environment for university
employees and students. (See also Built
Environment and Procurement)

Shands HealthCare, affiliated with the
University of Florida Health Science
Center and located on the main campus,
is one of the Southeast's premier
health systems. With multi-specialty
group practices based in Gainesville
and Jacksonville, approximately 1,000
University of Florida faculty physicians
provide care in Shands facilities and more
than 80 outpatient practices throughout
the region.


Recent Accomplishments
HEALTHY GATORS 2010: A coalition of
students, faculty and staff from over 40
University of Florida departments and
organizations are working together to
create a healthier campus. Their mission
is to promote a campus environment
supportive of the development and main-
tenance of a healthy body, mind and
spirit for all members of the University of
Florida community.

SMOKING CESSATION PROGRAMS: The
Student Health Care Center, the Uni-
versity's Employee Assistance Program,
the Florida Department of Health, and
the University of Florida Area Health






















Education Centers run programs for UF
students and employees interested in
quitting smoking. The program consists
of three components: education, group
support and medical oversight with phar-
maceutical smoking cessation medica-
tions and nicotine replacement patches.
Discounted medications are available
under the prescription and management
of a skilled medical provider. There is no
cost for attending the smoking cessation
classes and medications prescribed to as-
sist with cessation attempts are signifi-
cantly discounted.

WALKING GATORS: Faculty, staff and stu-
dents of all fitness levels can participate
during the work day, meet new people
and get some fresh air and exercise. The
program includes six routes conveniently
located around campus each walking
route is approximately 20 minutes long
and is led at scheduled times throughout
the week. Maps of routes are available
online for the university community to
use to plan their own walks on campus.
Student Recreation Center: The De-
partment of Recreational Sports at the
University of Florida provides an op-
portunity for every student to participate
in an athletic or recreational activity on
a voluntary basis. Through participation,
it is hoped that each individual will de-
velop an appreciation of the worthy use
of leisure time and a wholesome attitude
toward physical activity both while in
college and in the future years. (See also
Cultural Climate)

Benchmark Programs
The University of California at Berkeley
has an ergonomics program for fac-
ulty and staff that provides a variety of


services and helps departments prevent
repetitive motion injuries. This program
established campus ergonomic guidelines
for computer users, offers computer
ergonomics and back care training, and
provides ergonomic interventions in
campus work environments.

Framing the Vision
In framing the vision for sustainability
in Health & Wellbeing, participants
envisioned UF striving to create an
environment that supports employees
in balancing work and family responsi-
bilities while staying healthy. In order
to monitor progress, UF would track
indicators of wellbeing such as student
and employee access to health care
benefits, student and employee access to
child care, job satisfaction, retention, and
motivation/determination.

Reaching the Vision
In order to reach this vision, participants
identified the following opportunities.

WELLNESS: Develop
a fully coordinated
wellness effort on
campus. The program
would cross faculty,
staff, and student
lines.

FAMILY CARE:
Provide an integrated
and accessible child
care/family support
system. The system
would be accessible
to faculty, staff, and
students. (See also Equity)


CONFLICT RESOLUTION: Increase acces-
sibility to conflict resolution assistance.
Those seeking assistance with conflict
resolution in the workplace would be safe
and free from retaliation.

HEALTHY FOOD CHOICES: UF would cre-
ate easy campus-wide access for employ-
ees to healthy food choices at affordable
prices. (See also Agriculture)

Participants:
Phil '" Student Health Care Center
Kim Czaplewski, Human Resource Services
Bryan Garey, Human Resource Services
Marc Heft, Dentistry
Glenn Ketcham, EnvironmentalHealth
&Safety
Brook Mercier, Human Resources
Henk Monkhurst, Physics, Sustainability
Committee representative
Lynda Reinhart, O'Connell Center













EQUITY


Description of Importance and
Reason for Inclusion
Access to meeting basic needs has be-
come more tenuous for many families in
Florida; communities are experiencing
more division, creating more stress for
those struggling to get by. An equitable
institution increases access to fair wages
and benefits, fosters collaborative partici-
pation among diverse stakeholders, and
enjoys shared outcomes. Individuals who
have access to meeting basic needs are
more likely to participate in collabora-
tive community efforts. The principles
of shared governance at UF include colle-

48 giality and collaboration; transparency;
representative participation; and mutual
accountability.

Diversity within the university com-
munity enriches the professional and
educational experience for staff, faculty,
and students. We learn from those whose
experiences, beliefs, and perspectives
are different from our own, and these
opportunities are most accessible in
a richly diverse intellectual and social
environment. Education within a diverse
setting prepares students to become
good citizens in an increasingly complex,
pluralistic society.

Guiding Principle
Promote diversity among faculty, stu-
dents, and staff. Establish policies that
support living wages and fair remu-
neration. Facilitate a shared governance
model for management of university
operations and the sharing of perspec-
tives and best practices.


How Are We
Doing?
MULTICULTURAL-
ISM AND DIVER-
SITY: As a charter
member of the
National Associa-
tion of Diversity
Officers in Higher
Ed, UF recognizes
equity as an im-
portant issue for
higher education.
Diversity is refer-
enced in both the
2007 Strategic Work Plan for UF and the
provost's proposal for the development of
a Diversity Council.

Currently, the Dean of Students Office
hosts a division on Multicultural and
Diversity Affairs. The office seeks to
promote awareness, understanding of
differences, collaboration between cross-
cultural groups, and to foster a sense of
mutual respect among all students. The
Dean of Students Office also assists stu-
dents in their personal development by
providing programs and initiatives that
educate, motivate, and challenge them as
members of University of Florida.
UF's Small Business & Vendor Diversity
Relations Division is responsible for
overseeing the university's Supplier
Diversity Program which focuses on
ensuring equal access for Small/HUB,
Zone/Minority/Small, Disadvantaged/
Veteran/Service-Disabled Veteran/&
Women-Owned businesses, by providing
them equal opportunity to compete
for procurement and contracting
opportunities at the university. (See also
Purchasing)


The university offers myriad programs,
support services, and institutes that sup-
port and promote multicultural learning
experiences.

* The Institute of Hispanic/Latino
Cultures (La Casita) serves as the
central station for more than 50
Hispanic-Latino student organizations
on campus. The Hispanic Student
Association, with more than 1,000
members, actively advocates Hispanic
participation in collegiate activities
and programs and is the largest
minority organization at UE
* The Institute of Black Culture presents
programs that provide educational
awareness and information on
issues that relate to black culture.
For 33 years, the IBC has provided
educational, social and cultural
programs to share the history and
culture of those of African descent.
Today it serves as an umbrella to
the more than 50 African-American
student organizations, as well as a
meeting place for African-American
students.






















* The National Pan-Hellenic Council
serves all of UF's historically black
Greek fraternities and sororities.
The Multicultural Greek Council
is the governing body uniting the
multicultural Greek organizations.
* The Asian American Student Union
(AASU) is dedicated to educating the
student body about Asian American
issues, history, and culture, and strives
to be the premier source of student,
social, and political advocacy. On
behalf of its constituents, the South
Asian American Student Alliance
(SAASA) educates UF students
about political, social, and cultural
issues that pertain to South Asian
Americans. There are 11 Asian
American student groups on campus.
* LGBT Affairs, in the Dean of
Students Office, provides education,
advocacy, and support to students,
staff, and faculty across campus, serves
as a clearinghouse for activities related
to gender and sexuality. It houses the
FRIENDS ally program; Out and
About, a group for graduate students
and new (or new-ish) professionals;
Alphabet Soup; Subtext, the queer
arts magazine, and much more.


As part of the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences effort to enhance the aware-
ness and appreciation of diversity among
students, faculty and administrators at
the University of Florida, the Office for
Academic Support and Institutional Ser-
vices (OASIS) coordinates the college's
support services for first generation and/
or underrepresented (including Hispanic,
African American, Asian American, and
Native American) students and under-
represented faculty.


The First-Year Florida program supports
first-year students at the University of
Florida, including, but not limited to,
first generation students. Class discus-
sions and projects focus on student skills,
social diversity, career decisions, and
financial management. The course also
familiarizes students with the abundant
resources and services available at UF,
including over 400 campus organiza-
tions. A university professional and an
undergraduate peer leader team up in
this personal setting to help students
develop the practical, social, emotional,
and intellectual skills that are essential to
a fulfilling four years at UF

WAGES AND BENEFITS: The University
of Florida has set aggressive hiring and
retention goals to ensure the university


SHARED GOVERNANCE: As the legislative
branch of student government, the Stu-
dent Senate closely represents the views
and ideas of the 50,000+ students at the
University of Florida. The Student Senate
performs tasks ranging from confirming
Executive and Judicial appointments to
passing Student Body Laws, Authoriza-
tions, and Resolutions. The Senate is also
responsible for allocating the activity and
service fees each year, which is currently
well over 13 million dollars.

As the legislative body of the University
of Florida, the Faculty Senate is directed
by the University Constitution to take
cognizance of matters which concern
more than one college, school, or other
major academic unit, or which are other-
wise of general university interest; and it


Eduatio wihi a dies setting prprs I-:s, et
I S ~ S *............... S
.. .. .. .. ..


reflects society's racial, ethnic and gender
diversity. UF also strives to ensure that all
personnel are rewarded with fair wages
and benefits, including benefit pack-
ages for spouses and domestic partners
of university employees. The university
minimum wage exceeds the state mini-
mum wage by more than $2/hour. The
university seeks to ensure that contrac-
tors affiliated with the university meet
or exceed the wage policy established for
university employees. Since 2006, the
university's fulltime graduate student
teaching and research assistants have
been offered health insurance.


is empowered by the University Consti-
tution to legislate with respect to such
matters, subject to the approval of the
President and in appropriate instances
the Board of Trustees and subject to the
rule-making procedures of the Florida
Administrative Act, if applicable.

The Academic and Professional Assembly
consists of administrative employees
classified as TEAMS employees and
all career faculty who are not members
of the University of Florida Faculty
Senate. The purpose of the APA is to
promote representation, recognition,






















professional networking, and university
and community service opportunities for
its members.

Recent Accomplishments
GATORSHIP: This unique leadership ex-
perience for both emerging and experi-
enced student leaders is designed to be an
intense and thought-provoking weekend
retreat where over 60 participants and
student staff have the opportunity to
interact through team building activi-
ties and group discussions. The focus is
to identify current leadership issues in
a multicultural society both at the Uni-
versity of Florida and in the community.
50 Participants engage in educational ses-
sions and serve as peer educators through
the sharing of personal experience.

FACES OF SUSTAINABILITY: The Office
of Sustainability has launched a Faces
of Sustainability video campaign that
features employees and graduate stu-
dents who implement sustainability in
their work. The goal of the campaign is
to highlight the diversity of staff engaged
in translating UF's sustainability goals
into action.

SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE: In 2006,
the ad hoc Sustainability Committee
became a Joint Standing Committee of
the Faculty Senate, the highest level of
permanence that can be delegated to
a committee. As a joint committee, it
is comprised of faculty elected by the
Senate, staff and faculty appointed by
the President's designee, and students
selected by the Dean of Students Office.
This structure reflects the university's
commitment to shared governance the
involvement of individuals who represent
the whole campus in real decision-mak-
ing. The committee meets monthly with


the director of the Office of Sustain-
ability and the Provost Faculty Fellow
for Sustainability. (See also Institutional
Commitment)

Benchmark Programs
Ohio State University (OSU) has numer-
ous diversity councils at the college and/
or departmental level throughout the
university. Deans and department chairs
are held accountable for diversity within
their departments. The OSU Diversity
Action Plan provides an assessment,
recommendation, and action steps at the
university-wide and individual college
and department levels. They maintain
a diversity newsletter and calendar of
events, and publish a diversity report that
tracks programs and progress on campus.

Framing the Vision
In framing the vision for sustainability in
Equity, participants envisioned a campus
community in which all members, in-
cluding students, faculty, and staff from
underrepresented groups, felt like valued
members of the Gator Nation. In this
vision, definitions of multiculturalism
would include a full range of diversity
including race, gender, cultural heritage,
and economic backgrounds. Members of
the Gator Nation would understand how
and why diversity is an essential element
of a sustainable community. Students
from underrepresented groups would
feel not just included, but reached out
to. All jobs would be respected for their
contribution to the successful operation
of the university. Employees would have
equal access to training and professional
development.

Reaching the Vision
In order to reach this vision, participants
identified the following opportunities.


EXPAND MULTICULTURAL LIVING/LEARN-
ING OPPORTUNITIES: Programs like
Gatorship would include more students
in multicultural training.

PROVIDE AN INTEGRATED AND ACCES-
SIBLE CHILD CARE/FAMILY SUPPORT
SYSTEM: The system would be accessible
for faculty, staff, and students. (See also
Health and Wellbeing)

EXPORT THE CELEBRATION OF INCLU-
SION: UF would serve as an incubator for
multicultural programs and celebrations.


Through IFAS/Extension, UF would
export ideas of cultural celebration and
inclusion to Florida's communities by
demonstrating opportunities for outreach
and creative ways to integrate personal
values into work.

EMPHASIZE DIVERSITY IN THE GATOR
NATION CAMPAIGN: the campaign would
reflect the sentiment that "members of
the Gator Nation are everywhere and
we reflect and celebrate a full range of
diversity". Multiculturalism would be an
important and celebrated identifier for UF
in the domestic and global community.

REFLECT DIVERSITY OF POPULATIONS:
Through active recruitment, hiring,
and retention, UF's populations would
reflect the population as a whole. Faculty
population would mirror the national























demographics of a top-10 university,
and the student population would reflect
the State of Florida's racial, ethnic and
gender diversity. Leadership would reflect
the diversity of both populations.

COMMUNICATE VALUE: Communicate
and demonstrate how all employees,
positions, and contributions are valued as
a part of UF's mission.

INCREASE TRAINING: Increase the levels of
investment in gender and equity training
of all personnel working at or hired by
the University of Florida.

CREATE A CAMPUS ENTITY FOR
DIVERSITY: Create an office, council,
or committee that facilitates expanded
opportunities and outreach for UF
faculty, staff, and students. This would
be a center where people would come to
learn, celebrate, and discuss diversity. The
role of this physical and/or virtual center
would include:

* Partnering with the Community
Relations Office to facilitate
opportunities for UF faculty, staff,
and students to get involved in
multicultural celebrations
* Offering opportunities for real
dialogue about race, class, gender,
sexual orientation the breadth and
depth of diversity
* Supporting First Year Florida in
introducing and supporting students
in a full range of multicultural
opportunities on campus
* Developing an institutional plan to
help the UF community embrace
diversity and social justice
* Facilitating the development of
equitable institution policies and
practices


* Establishing an expanded definition of
diversity that includes a full expression
and celebration of differences
* Establishing an educational program
that illustrates the value of social
justice/diversity in a sustainable
campus community
* Providing opportunities for service
learning and civic engagement in the
local community
* Establishing benchmarks and
promoting diversity in representative
leadership


MAKE FAIR REMUNERATION: Create wage
and benefit goals that allow employees
to subsist on wages earned from one job
and set a minimum threshold for wages
above eligibility for food stamps. When
employees' financial ability to meet their
basic needs is secure, they will be more
able to engage in important sustainable
behaviors.

CREATE WAGE PARITY ACROSS CAMPUS
DEPARTMENTS: Wages would be consis-
tent for like jobs between colleges and
departments.

NARROW THE GAP: Establish a trend of
decreasing disparity between highest and
lowest paid employees.

SUPPORT TELECOMMUTING: Provide
training for all managers for flexible
scheduling and telecommuting for
employees, including topics such as how
to manage remotely. Allow employees
flexibility to work from home to reduce
commuting when appropriate. (See also
Transportation)


INCREASE ACCESSIBILITY TO CONFLICT
RESOLUTION ASSISTANCE: Those seeking
assistance with conflict resolution in the
workplace would be safe and free from
retaliation. (See also Health and Wellbeing)

POWER: Strive for a workplace that
distributes power and decision-making
more evenly and transparently across all
sectors of the university

AIM FOR TOP 10 STATUS: UF would be
recognized as being in the Top 10 state
universities in the country for employee
well-being and would be featured on lists
of the best places to work for parents,
women, etc. (See also Health & Wellbeing)

Participants:
Tamara Cohen, Dean of Students Office -
MulticulturalAl f:...
Linda Crider, Urban and Regional
Prl,.'.';.g. Sustainability Committee
representative
Shelton Davis, Equal Opportunity
Employment Office
Larry Ellis, Human Resource Services
Chris Machen, President's Office,
Sustainability Committee representative
Brook Mercier, Human Resource Services
Kelly Moosbrugger, Sustainability
Committee student member
NoraSpencer, MuhicuturalandDiversiity_ ft;.
Florence Turcotte, LGBT Concerns
Committee, Smathers Libraries













CULTURAL CLIMATE


5 Guiding Principle
Foster a cultural climate that supports a
full range of creative expression, artistic
experience, and recreational opportunity.
LU
S How We Are Doing?
UF strives to provide cultural opportuni-
U ties that enhance the quality of life for
< the local community and visitors to the
S university. There are a number of cul-
S tural destinations on campus, and many
u organizations and departments that are
working to develop unique and diverse
cultural opportunities.

The Florida Museum of Natural History
is Florida's state museum of natural histo-
ry, dedicated to understanding, preserv-
ing and interpreting biological diversity
and cultural heritage. With more than 20
million specimens, the Florida Museum
is the largest natural history museum in
the Southeast.

The Harn Museum of Art is one of
the largest university art museums in
the southeast with 86,800 square feet


consisting of five permanent collection
galleries and three temporary exhibition
galleries. Its collections focus on Asian,
African, modern and contemporary art
and photography.

University of Florida Performing Arts
is in the top 10 among the country's
public universities, presenting the very
best established and emerging national
and international artists on the Phillips


Center main stage. The Phillips Center
consists of a 1,700-seat proscenium hall
and a 200-seat Black Box Theatre.

ACCENT Speaker's Bureau is the larg-
est, student-run, speaker's bureau in the
nation. Created in 1967, ACCENT
is celebrating 40 continuous years of
bringing prominent, controversial, and
influential speakers to the University of
Florida. ACCENT strives to bring world
class programming to educate, enlighten,
engage, and entertain the student body.

The Department of Recreational Sports
provides an opportunity for students
to participate in athletic or recreational
activities on a voluntary basis. Through
participation, it is hoped that each indi-
vidual will develop an appreciation of the
worthy use of leisure time and a whole-
some attitude toward physical activity
both while in college and in the future
years. (See also Health and Wellbeing)

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS: UF hosts over
600 student organizations. These groups
range broadly in their focus, from social
to service.


LL

jH .i


Ed






















Throughout all the sessions covered by
this report, reoccurring themes related
the need for a culture shift and the
creation of common/collective norms
that support sustainability. Every group
revisited the need for sustainability to be-
come part of everyday life and operations
for the UF community for the campus
to be a living laboratory for sustainable
practices and behaviors. Participants
expressed that evolving a culture of
sustainability at UF would require effec-
tive leadership at all levels and a shared
governance system for all at UF to feel
the shared responsibility and benefits of
our collective actions.

A session on Campus Culture revealed
that an overall shift in UF's culture
would be necessary to implement the
visions developed by all of the groups.
UF's guiding principle for Stewardship
- encourage all members of the Gator
Nation to take responsibility for the
interdependent environmental, eco-
nomic, and social consequences of their
actions captures the tone of the visions
articulated across the sessions.

The University of Florida has an obliga-
tion to meet the challenges of sustain-
ability because as educators we play a
leading role in training the scientific, so-
cial, political and cultural leaders, as well
as the professionals and policy-makers,
who will make a difference in the world.
Whether the world will be a better or
worse place when our students become
its citizens, parents, and leaders will be,
in no small part, a function of the values,
knowledge and skills they receive here.

How Are We Doing?
PREVIEW: In an effort to integrate sus-
tainability into the student experience,


the Office of Sustainability is working
with Preview staff to incorporate infor-
mation and tools for sustainable living
into the programs that support new
families in their transition to UF.

COMMENCEMENT: 350 graduating Gators
signed the Green Graduation Pledge
in 2008, vowing to take sustainable
practices with them into their careers
and communities.

SUSTAINABILITY BOOK CLUB: The
Sustainability Book Club offers faculty
and staff an opportunity to explore
topics related to sustainability, and to
develop friendships with peers from
across campus.

GREEN TEAM: In Spring 2007, the Office
of Sustainability launched the Green
Team network. Members of this network
act as ambassadors for campus sustain-
ability. This endeavor is fostered by the
individual efforts of the team members
within their affiliated areas, as well as in
campus-wide group efforts.

NEWSLETTER: The Office of Sustainability
publishes a monthly electronic newsletter
to communicate stories about campus
sustainability, including IFAS/Extension,
operations, education, student efforts,
sustainable living tips, and a frequently
asked question forum.

STUDENT SUPPORT: Sustainability is sup-
ported by at least fifteen student groups
across campus, student government,
and student senate. The senate passed
a resolution honoring the office and its
commitment to promoting sustainability
in 2007. The fraternities and sororities
support sustainability through the Greeks
Going Green campaign. The students


passed a Renewable Energy Fee ballot
referendum in 2006 with 78% voting
in favor of the $.50/credit hour fee. The
student group, Gators for a Sustainable
Campus, has nearly 500 members; 240
members signed their Sustainable Gator
Pledge in the first month it was offered.

SUSTAINABILITY CONFERENCE: UF
hosted the inaugural Florida Campus
and Community Sustainability
conference in 2006, which was hosted
by FSU in 2007, and will be hosted by
UCF in 2008.

Visions developed during the Campus
Culture session have been integrated
throughout this report. We would like
to acknowledge the participants in this
unique session.

Participants:
Bonnie Bernau, Harn Museum
Fred Cantrell Business Aiff.
Mary Kay Carodire, Dean ofStudents Office
Kevin Clarke, Human Resource Services
Shelton Davis, Equal Opportunity
Employment Office
Paula Fussell Human Resource Services
John Ingram, Libraries
Susanne Lewis, ARAMARK/Gator Dining
Chris Machen, President's Office,
Sustainability Committee representative
Brook Mercier, Human Resource Services
Kim Pace, Office of the President
Andrew Perrone, Dean ofStudents Office-
Center for Leadership and Service
Lucida Poudrier-Aaronson, Housing and
Residence Life
Duke Roman, Harn Museum
Wayne Wallace, UF Career Resource Center















INSTITUTION COMTMN


Description of Importance and
Reason for Inclusion
The integration of sustainability into
operations, education, research, and
outreach ultimately requires grassroots
support, leadership from top level
administrators, and full support by
deans, directors, and department
chairs. An institution's commitment
to sustainability must be acted on
and communicated at all levels of the
institution, and reinforced in its outreach
and marketing efforts.


How Are We Doing?

54 HISTORY: As is reflected in the History
section of this report, the University of
Florida has a long-standing commitment
to sustainability beginning with signature
of the Talloires Declaration in 1994. The
2006 opening of a campus-wide office to
facilitate the integration of sustainability
signaled the university's commitment to
institutionalizing the effort.


CAMPUS MASTER PLAN: The univer-
sity's campus master plan demonstrates
UF's commitment to sustainability and
environmental stewardship. The success-
ful implementation of the master plan
garnered the university designation as a
"Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctu-
ary" in 2005. UF is the first university to
achieve this status, making it one of 607
such sanctuaries in the world. To achieve
the designation, UF had to demonstrate
that it was maintaining a high degree
of environmental quality in five areas:
environmental planning, wildlife habitat
management, resource conservation,
waste management and outreach and
education. (See also Land and Resource
Management)


SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE: The Sus-
tainability Committee is a Joint Standing
Committee of the Faculty Senate, the
highest level of permanence that can
be delegated to a committee. As a joint
committee, it is comprised of faculty
elected by the Senate, staff and faculty
appointed by the President's designee,
and students selected by the Dean of
Students Office. This structure reflects
the university's commitment to shared
governance the involvement of indi-
viduals who represent the whole campus
in real decision-making. The committee
meets monthly with the director of the


PROVOST FACULTY FELLOW FOR SUS-
TAINABILITY: The Office of the Provost
instituted a faculty fellow position to
coordinate university-wide academic
efforts in sustainability in January 2008.
The fellow, together with representa-
tives of the Sustainability Committee
and student leaders from several campus
sustainability organizations, helped
shepherd through the system an under-
graduate minor in sustainability studies.
The minor was approved by the univer-
sity curriculum committee in April 2008.
(See also Teaching and Research)


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support sustam .1. t


Office of Sustainability and the Provost
Faculty Fellow for Sustainability. (See
also Equity)


Recent Accomplishments
PRESIDENTS CLIMATE COMMITMENT:
President J. Bernard Machen signed
the American College & University
Presidents Climate Commitment in
October 2006, indicating his support
for the Sustainability Committee's
institutional work to address climate
change. (See also Energy Conservation
and Climate Change)


SUSTAINABILITY MINI-GRANTS: The Of-
fice of the Provost supported a 2006-07
mini-grant program for faculty wishing
to incorporate sustainability into course
work. (See also Teaching and Research)


ANNUAL REPORT: The theme of the
university's 2007 Annual Report was
sustainability. This report reflects the
university's commitment to and
progress toward measuring its inte-
grated bottom line.


ONGOING FUNDING SUPPORT: A Legisla-
tive Budget Request (LBR) for a UF
Center for Sustainability and a Healthy
Environment was drafted by the Sustain-
ability Committee. This Center would
act as an academic clearinghouse for
sustainability efforts on campus, and
would support both internal faculty
as well as affiliated faculty from across
campus in their research and education
efforts. The LBR was vetted by interested
parties at several meetings, and submit-






















ted to the deans and vice presidents for
approval. The vice presidents selected it
from among a larger pool to be submit-
ted to the Florida Legislature. Although
the LBR has not been funded (the state
LBR process is on hold), it is on UF's
federal list of funding requests. (See also
Institutional Commitment)

Benchmark Programs
The University of British Columbia
signifies its commitment to sustainability
through its institutional mission: UBC
aspires to be one of the world's best uni-
versities, preparing students to become
exceptional global citizens, promoting
the values of a civil and sustainable soci-
ety, and conducting outstanding research
to serve the people of British Columbia,
Canada, and the world. UBC has also
adopted a guiding document that unites
all of its departments under one sustain-
ability strategy for the entire university.

Arizona State University's Global Insti-
tute of Sustainability facilitate research,
education, and problem-solving related
to sustainability. Its mission is to nurture
work on issues of sustainability across
many departments on the four campuses
of ASU, and collaborates with other aca-
demic institutions, governments, busi-
nesses and industries, and community
groups locally, nationally, and globally.

Framing the Vision
At the conclusion of the first thirteen
sessions, eight threads emerged from
nearly every group that convened.
Facilitators culled these common
threads and asked senior level leaders
to rank the impact of these visions
and the probability that they would be


implemented at UF. This feedback will
inform the timing and development of
strategic implementation plans.

Those threads and their ranking
included:

High Impact and High
Probability
* UF's commitment to sustainability
would be reflected in the Mission,
Strategic Plan, and all major UF
communications, and would be
enforced in all policies.


High Impact and Moderate
Probability
* UF would encourage collaborative
research and look for opportunities
to demonstrate research on campus
(living laboratory model).


* The UF Foundation and development
staff members would diversify options
for donors to include sustainability
projects and would actively solicit
donors for these projects.
* Life-cycle costs and long-range
resource use would be considered in
all new campus development plans
and communicated to all stakeholders.
* UF would develop a re-investment
program or loan fund for campus
sustainability projects.
* University departments would be
aware of their resource use and have
some accountability for managing
them wisely.










































r J" .




High Impact and Low
Probability
m All job descriptions and job
performance evaluations would
include assessments of employees'
integration of sustainability, service,
and collaborative innovation into
their work.


Moderate Impact and Very
Low Probability
* Tenure track and promotion processes
would balance a commitment
to research and publishing with
a commitment to service and
collaboration.


Reaching the Vision
MISSION: UF would incorporate its
commitment to sustainability and the
wellbeing of future generations into its
mission statement.


STRATEGIC WORK PLAN: The Office of
the President would incorporate campus
sustainability priorities into the univer-
sity's Strategic Work Plan.

INTERNAL SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS
PROGRAM: UF would offer an award
program for faculty, staff, or students
who show dedication to furthering
sustainability and/or who demonstrate an
innovative best practice for sustainability
on campus.

Funding
* DEDICATED SUSTAINABILITY FUNDING:
UF would have in place a revolving
loan fund or similar internal
mechanism to fund sustainability
projects (not including faculty
research). This may take the form of a
grant program that provides funding
for internal sustainability projects.


* ALUMNI/FRIENDS SUSTAINABILITY
FUND: UF would offer an opportunity
for alumni and friends of the
university to financially support
campus sustainability efforts.


* PAYROLL DEDUCTION OPTION FOR
SUSTAINABILITY: UF would offer
faculty and staff an opportunity to
donate a portion of their salary to
a fund for campus sustainability
projects.


Participants:
JeffBurkhardt, UF Sustainability
Committee Chair
Kyle Cavanaugh, UF Senior Vice President
Jamie Keith, General Council
J Bernard Machen, UFPresident
Greg McGarity, UAA Senior Associate
Athletic Director
Devesh Nirmul UF/IFAS Extension
Win P/i./ip, Senior Vice President of
Research
Ed Poppell Vice President ofBusiness .;'. ,i;
Paul Robell Vice president for Alumni and
Development Apf;:..
Patricia Telles-Irvin, Vice President for
StudentAIfft..'
Rick Yost, Faculty Senate Chair, 2007-08





















n 2001, UF completed a
sustainability assessment using
the Global Reporting Initiative as
a guide. Since that time, the higher
education sustainability community
has been working to develop a similar
assessment framework that specifically
addresses the unique indicators of
sustainability in higher education.

AASHE STARS
The Association for the Advancement
of Sustainability in Higher Education
(AASHE) has developed the Sustain-
ability Tracking, Assessment, and Rating
System (STARS). STARS is a voluntary,
self-reporting framework for gauging
relative progress toward sustainability for
colleges and universities.

STARS is designed to:
1. Provide a guide for advancing
sustainability in all sectors of higher
education.
2. Enable meaningful comparisons
over time and across institutions by
establishing a common standard of
measurement for sustainability in
higher education.
3. Create incentives for continual
improvement toward sustainability.
4. Facilitate information sharing about
higher education sustainability
practices and performance.
5. Build a stronger, more diverse campus
sustainability community.


With the expanded vision report in hand, the Office

of Sustainability and the Sustainability Committee are

prepared to engage members of the UF community in

a collaborative process of sharing these visions and

facilitating the development of action plans for their

implementation.


Over ninety colleges and universities are
participating in the STARS pilot project.
Schools were selected to represent diverse
institution types, geographic regions,
and sizes. The STARS pilot project is
taking place from February to December
2008. Institutions participating in the
pilot are testing the system and providing
feedback to AASHE to help shape future
iterations of STARS. UF is a
pilot campus.

Strategic Implementation
Plan Development
With the expanded vision report in
hand, the Office of Sustainability and the
Sustainability Committee are prepared to
engage members of the UF community
in a collaborative process of sharing these
visions and facilitating the development
of action plans for their implementation.


As a result of the mere opportunity to
collaborate during these sessions, some
stakeholders began to implement new
strategies with newly found campus
partners immediately.






















Concepts (in popular usage across the
country and beyond)

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT LOOP: A
feedback loop which ensures that policies
and practices are continually improved
by learning from the outcomes of
previous work.

BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE (BMP):
A technique, method, process, activity,
incentive or reward that is agreed to be
more efficient or effective at delivering
a particular outcome than any other
practice.

CARBON OFFSET: A financial instrument
representing a reduction in greenhouse
gas emissions. One carbon offset repre-
sents the reduction of one metric ton of
carbon dioxide, or its equiva-
lent in other greenhouse
gases, through the planting
of trees to absorb carbon
dioxide, investment in
renewable energy to replace
fossil-based fuels, or other
reduction project. i

CLOSED-CYCLE: A process in:.
which no wastes or by-prod-
ucts are created.

CLOSED LOOP: Collecting
used products or by-products
from a process such as manu-
facturing and then reusing
or recycling all collected
products and components.


CRADLE-TO-CRADLE: A process in which
all material inputs and outputs are seen
either as technical or biological nutrients.
Technical nutrients can be recycled or re-
used with no loss of quality and biologi-
cal nutrients composted or consumed.

DOWNCYCLE: The disassembly and
breakdown of products and materials
into component parts and materials for
re-use and recycling. Compared to recy-
cling in which products and materials are
remade directly into the same products
and materials.

EXTERNALIZED COSTS: Indirect costs
and or negative effects of a process
that are passed on to others and not
accounted for by the entity engaged in


process, such as the negative costs of
pollution to society.

FIRST GENERATION STUDENTS: Students
who are the first in their families to
attend college neither parents nor
grandparents have attended college.

FULL-COST ACCOUNTING (FCA): The
process of collecting and presenting costs
over the entire lifetime of a product or
activity, including environmental, social,
and economic costs.

GREENHOUSE GAS: The gases present in
the atmosphere which reduce the loss of
heat into space and therefore contribute
to rising global temperatures through the
greenhouse effect.








f .























INDOOR AIR QUALITY: The status of the
air inside a building what gases and
particulates it contains and how it affects
the health of the building occupants.

INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT: The
use of pest and environmental informa-
tion in conjunction with available pest
control technologies to prevent unaccept-
able levels of pest damage by the most
economical means and with the least
possible hazard to persons, property and
the environment.

LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT: A land
planning and engineering design
approach that emphasizes conservation
and protection of natural resources.
LIVING LABORATORY: A functional
building, mechanical or electrical
system, or outdoor area that provides an
opportunity for experiential research and
education.

NONPOINT SOURCE (POLLUTION): Water
or air pollution that cannot be traced to
a single source, such as emissions from
vehicles or stormwater runoff, as opposed to
pollution from a factory or power plant.

OFF-PEAK: Off-peak refers to times when
power plants are not operating at capac-
ity because the demand for energy is
lower. Off-peak hours occur at different
times in different climates, but generally
occur overnight in all areas.

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS: Plants that are
grown for their decorative qualities rather
than for agriculture or forestry.


RETURN ON INVESTMENT: The ratio
of money gained or lost on an invest-
ment relative to the amount of money
invested.

SINGLE OCCUPANCY VEHICLE: A privately
operated vehicle whose only occupant is
the driver. The drivers of SOVs use their
vehicles primarily for personal travel, dai-
ly commuting and for running errands.
SOVs create traffic and greenhouse gas
emissions, which could be reduced by
riding instead in high occupancy ve-
hicles, or vehicles with multiple persons,
or taking public transportation.

THREE ES: Environment, Economy, and
Equity are the three Es, which represent the
three integrated areas ofsustainability.

TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGE-
MENT: The application of strategies and
policies to influence traveler behavior
with the aim of reducing automobile
travel demand, or redistributing this
demand in space or over time.

VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC):
An organic or chemical compound that has
high vapor pressures and low water solubil-
ity. VOCs are often components of petro-
leum fuels, hydraulic fluids, paint thinners,
and dry cleaning agents. VOCs are com-
mon ground-water contaminants and often
produce greenhouse gas emissions.

WASTE-TO-ENERGY: A process of creating
energy from waste products through heat
recovery, incineration, thermal gasifica-
tion, or anaerobic digestion.


Terms (local, UF terms, terms and
proper names in local usage)
ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT
OF SUSTAINABILITY IN HIGHER EDUCA-
TION (AASHE) SUPPORT ORGANIZATION:
A member organization of AASHE (usu-
ally a university) that works with other
members and universities to promote
sustainability in all sectors of higher edu-
cation from governance and operations
to curriculum and outreach through
education, communication, research and
professional development.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY:
Division of UF that helps to maintain a
safe working environment for the Uni-
versity community, including compliance
with local, state, and federal regulations.
Areas of service include Laboratory Safe-
ty, Biological Safety, Hazardous Materials
Management, Radiation Control and the
Occupational Medicine program.























FACILITIES PLANNING AND CONSTRUC-
TION: UF division responsible for the
planning and construction of all physical
facilities of the University of Florida and
the management of its space and physical
resources.

FOREST STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL: An
organization created to coordinate
the development of sustainable forest
management standards throughout the
different regions of the U.S., to provide
public information about certification
and FSC, and to work with certification
organizations to promote FSC certifica-
tion in the U.S.

GATOR DINING SERVICES: The contract
food service provider to the University
of Florida.

GREENRIDE: A web-based application
that promotes the use ofridesharing
within the UF and Shands community.
Commuters can search for ridesharing
partners among the other employees and
students registered with GreenRide who
live near them and have similar schedules
and lifestyle preferences.

INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL
SCIENCES: A federal-state-county
partnership dedicated to developing
knowledge in agriculture, human and
natural resources, and the life sciences,
and to enhancing and sustaining the
quality of human life by making that
information accessible.

LEADERSHIP IN ENERGY AND ENVIRON-
MENTAL DESIGN: A nationally accepted
third party certification standard for the
design, construction and operation of
high performance green buildings.


PROGRAM FOR RESOURCE EFFICIENT
COMMUNITIES: A program of UF/IFAS
that integrates and applies the University
of Florida's educational and analytical
assets to promote the adoption of best
design, construction, and management
practices that measurably reduce energy
and water consumption and environ-
mental degradation in new residential
community developments.

REGIONAL TRANSIT SYSTEM: The transit
(bus) system in Gainesville, FL that also
serves the UF campus.

SUSTAINABILITY TRACKING, ASSESS-
MENT, AND RATING SYSTEM: A voluntary,
self-reporting framework developed by
AASHE for gauging relative progress
toward sustainability for colleges and
universities.

ZIPCAR: A membership-based carsharing
company that offers hourly and/or daily
rental of cars and trucks to students,
faculty, and staff. Vehicles are available at
several locations across the UF campus.

Acronyms (see Concepts or Terms,
above, for descriptions)
AASHE-ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCE-
MENT OF SUSTAINABILITY IN HIGHER
EDUCATION: An association of colleges,
universities, NGOs, and business part-
ners in the U.S. and Canada working to
create a sustainable future.

BMP-BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: A
technique, method, process, activity,
incentive or reward that is more efficient
or effective at delivering a particular
outcome than any other practice.


DSO-DIRECT SUPPORT ORGANIZATION:
A separate legal operating entity that di-
rectly supports the University of Florida
(i.e., The University Athletic Association
or the University of Florida Foundation).

EH&S-ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND
SAFETY: Division of UF that helps to
maintain a safe working environment
for the University community, including
compliance with local, state, and federal
regulations.

EPEAT- ELECTRONIC PRODUCT ENVIRON-
MENTAL ASSESSMENT TOOL: An on-line
tool helping institutional purchasers
select and compare computer desktops,
laptops and monitors based on their
environmental attributes.

FPC-FACILITIES PLANNING AND
CONSTRUCTION: UF division responsible
for the planning and construction of
the major project ($1 million dollars
or more) facilities, of the University of
Florida and the management of its space
and physical resources.

FSC-FOREST STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL: An
organization created to develop third
party certification standards for sustain-
able forest management.

GDS-GATOR DINING SERVICES: The
official food service provider of the
University of Florida.

GHG-GREENHOUSE GAS: The gases
present in the atmosphere that reflect
heat back onto the earth and therefore
contribute to rising global temperatures
through the greenhouse effect.























IAQ-INDOOR AIR QUALITY: The status of
the air inside a building what gases and
particulates it contains and how it affects
the health of the building occupants.

IFAS-INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICUL-
TURAL SCIENCES: A federal-state-county
partnership dedicated to developing
knowledge in agriculture, human and
natural resources, and the life sciences.

IPM-INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT:
The use of pest and environmental
information in conjunction with avail-
able pest control technologies to prevent
unacceptable levels of pest damage by
the most economical means and with the


least possible hazard to persons, property
and the environment.

LGBT: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans-
gendered

LEEDTM-LEADERSHIP IN ENERGY AND
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN: A third party
certification program for high perfor-
mance buildings.

LID-LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT: A land
planning and engineering design ap-
proach that emphasizes conservation and
protection of natural resources.

NPS-NONPOINT SOURCE (POLLUTION):
Water or air pollution that cannot be
traced to a single source,
Such as emissions from ve-
Shides or stormwater runoff.

PPD-UF PHYSICAL PLANT
DIVISION: PPD manages the
university's physical plant,
including utilities and all
building projects less than
$1 million dollars.

PREC-PROGRAM FOR RE-
SOURCE EFFICIENT COM-
MUNITIES: A program of
UF/IFAS that integrates
and applies the University
of Florida's educational and
analytical assets to pro-
mote the adoption of best
design, construction, and
management practices that
measurably reduce energy
and water consumption


and environmental degradation in new
residential community developments.

ROI-RETURN ON INVESTMENT: The
ratio of money gained or lost on an
investment relative to the amount of
money invested.

RTS-REGIONAL TRANSIT SYSTEM: The
transit (bus) system in Gainesville, FL
that also serves the UF campus.

SHEAF-SUSTAINABILITY IN HIGHER EDU-
CATION ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK: A
tool developed by AASHE for assessing
and benchmarking the sustainability
performance of multiple institutions.

SOV-SINGLE OCCUPANCY VEHICLE: A
privately operated vehicle whose only
occupant is the driver.

STARS-SUSTAINABILITY TRACKING, AS-
SESSMENT, AND RATING SYSTEM: A
voluntary, self-reporting framework de-
veloped by AASHE for gauging relative
progress toward sustainability for colleges
and universities.

TDM-TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MAN-
AGEMENT: The application of strategies
and policies to influence traveler behav-
ior with the aim of reducing automobile
travel demand, or redistributing this
demand in space or in time.

VOC-VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND:
An organic or chemical compound that
has high vapor pressures and low water
solubility.























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