• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Foreword
 How to go green
 UF goes green
 Class time
 Get involved
 Green places
 How to
 Serve it up
 Ride green
 Back Cover






Group Title: UF green guide
Title: UF green guide : a gator's guide to sustainable living. 2nd edition
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089903/00001
 Material Information
Title: UF green guide : a gator's guide to sustainable living. 2nd edition
Series Title: UF green guide
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Office of Sustainability, University of Florida
Publisher: Office of Sustainability, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089903
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

PDF ( 7 MBs ) ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Foreword
        Page 1
    How to go green
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    UF goes green
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Class time
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Get involved
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Green places
        Page 16-17
        Page 18
    How to
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Serve it up
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Ride green
        Page 23
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text


:1


i1U iImll


I/


ffif ~t~:rt,


S N %,~IPI~~td~A


UF UNIVERSITY of
U FLORIDA


U
U





UnCdxiorVIuovn





WACHOVIA


Are
--a--I*



U HnResidence Education
LIMI\ LRSITY, j -LOKILA)4

1 ^.**RI *"*'IHA., Ssnble s




S:-, FOR A
SUSTAINABLE .. n
CAMPUS


GREEN GUIDE





Hey Green Gator! 0
This Green Guide was made by students, for students, to let you know all
about sustainable living at the University of Florida. But what does that
mean? Sustainability is commonly defined as meeting the needs of the
present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their
own needs. Simply put, sustainability means not using up our resources
faster than we replace them. We work toward it by integrating
environmental, economic, and social well-being.
And why are we reaching out to you? We already know some of UF and
Gainesville's secrets to sustainable living and we're happy to share. More
importantly, we've prepared this guide because everyone is affected by the
decisions each of us makes every day. And whether this guide encourages
you to change a few light bulbs in your house or inspires you to get involved
with the sustainability movement at UF, we want you to be informed.
This guide contains information that will be useful to you during your entire
stay at UF, so check it out and keep it handy. As a special treat, we've
included coupons in the back for you to use at some great local
businesses. Enjoy!

Green is good,
The Office of Sustainability Interns

SUSTAINABILITY IS MEETING THE NEEDS OF THE
PRESENT WITHOUT COMPROMISING THE ABILITY OF
FUTURE GENERATIONS TO MEET THEIR NEEDS.



The mission of the Office of Sustainability is to make
the University of Florida-in its operations, educa-
tion. research, and outreach-a model of sustainabil-
ity, integrating the goals of ecological restoration,
economic development, and social equity.

In pursuing this mandate, the Office of Sustainability
will encourage and facilitate the collaborative efforts
of faculty, students, and staff to generate knowl-
edge, acquire skills, develop values, and initiate
practices that contribute to a sustainable, high
quality of life on campus, in the state of Florida, and
across the globe.
GREEN GUIDE I 1



























i, CALCULATE
YOUR ECO-
f LOGICAL
FOOTPRINT
How many Earths would be
necessary if everyone lived
like you?
IIIIlu~nulaIN lllmlay y HNII


If everyone in the world used as many resources as the
average American, we would need FIVE planet Earths!
The problem is, we only have one. We must consume
fewer resources if future generations are to survive. Try
out some of the ideas listed below to reduce your
footprint on the Earth, and make your life more
sustainable. Every little action counts, so do your part!


By voting, everyone can have a voice in the
direction their university, city, state, and country is
headed, and elected officials can be held account-
able for the decisions they have made.

*
Register to vote in Alachua County at the Supervi-
sor of Elections Office, or pick up a registration form
at the Post Office, Public Library, or the Student
Government Office on the third floor of the Reitz
Union.


In Gainesville, we recycle all plastic with a #1 or #2
on the bottom, aluminum and tin cans, and glass jars
and bottles. Make sure to rinse out everything you
recycle and remove lids. You can also recycle junk
mail, office paper, newspaper, magazines, phone
books, and corrugated cardboard. Remember, do
not throw any non-recyclables into the bins.

CAMPUS WIDE: See the Sustainable Campus map
at campusmap.ufl.edu for on-campus recycling
locations. On campus, #1 and #2 plastics, aluminum
and tin cans, glass bottles, newspaper, office paper,
and corrugated cardboard are all recyclable. UF
even has places to recycle batteries, ink cartridges,
and styrofoam packaging peanuts! Checkout Do It
Reitz on the ground floor of the Union.


2 I GREEN G1UDE


b ~i~QT~e






RESIDENCE HALLS: Among other things, the Inter-Residence Hall Associa-
tion (IRHA) and the Department of Housing are placing blue recycling bins in
each room of the residence halls on campus. You can recycle office paper in
most residence hall lobby areas. During move-out at the end of the semester
look for collection boxes in the lobby areas to donate your old clothes,
nonperishable goods, and even furniture to local charities.

FRATERNITY OR SORORITY HOUSES: Greeks Going Green is a new
organization on campus dedicated to making it easier for Greeks to recycle and
become more sustainable. Become a representative for your Chapter!

HOUSES: Gainesville offers blue and orange bins for residents that are
collected every week along with regular trash. Visit this website for more
information: www.cityofgainesville.org/recycles/resi

APARTMENTS: Apartment buildings in Gainesville are required to have
recycling bins. Recycling bins are often around the back of complexes by the
dumpsters, but if your apartment does not provide them, call this number to
report it: (352) 334-2130




GREEKS GOING GREEN






$ You can compost anything that was ever a plant (no meat and no dairy!).
Regardless of where you live, there is a composting option for you. If you live
in a house, you can put your scraps in a backyard bin, provided free by the City
of Gainesville. If you live in an apartment, you can either have a small compost
bin on your balcony or use worm composting under your sink. For more
information, check out compostinfo.com or call (352) 334-2130.



Recyclemania is a nationwide recycling
competition among universities and
colleges in which UF is participating.
UF placed o1th for total pounds of
recycled materials in 2008.
www.recyclemania.com


GREEN GuIDE I 3























50% OF ALL
WATER USED BY
FLORIDA
RESIDENTS
IS FOR WATER-
ING LAWNS.


Th oenk
Before
You nk
wm\ ufn uirl edulink

sustainable
TIP

Save scrap
paper for
drafts &
notepaper!


* Get a filter and reusable water bottle so you can stop
buying bottled water-tap water is usually as clean or
cleaner than bottled water, and a filter will make it
taste great! Make sure your water bottle is
Polyvinylchloride (PVC) and Bisphenol (BP)
(chemicals found in some plastics) free.

* Take shorter showers.

* Turn off water when brushing teeth and shaving.

* Let rain water your yard, not sprinklers. If you must
water, follow all local watering restrictions; more info
on those can be found at www.sjrwmd.com

* Only wash full loads of laundry and dishes.

7A1i = WEI a:
* Reconsider whether you really need to print all of
your documents, and if you do, print double-sided.

* Recycle newspapers by returning them to the bin

* Use fewer paper towels; try a cloth napkin or dish
towel instead.

* Buy products made with recycled paper or card-
board to reduce your usage of trees. If you must use
virgin paper, you can look for the FSC label and try
chlorine free paper to cut down on pollution.

* Bring your own mug to the coffee shop to reduce
waste and get a discount! Gator Dining now offers
reusable cups and mugs.


4 I GREEN GUIDE






al a J P Ll q N unwanted, excessive catalogs.
Reduce junk mail by asking that your name
W AT and address be removed from mailing lists.
Check out Stop the Junk Mail Monster at
W A S Tecocyde.org/junkmail to find out how.


If you're not going to be using your computer for 1 hour or more, turn it off. Don't
forget to also turn off your printer and speakers when you're not using them. A
power strip makes this easy; plug all your electronics into one, and flip the
switch when they aren't needed!

If you have to buy new electronics, such as a laptop,
look for the Enernv Star label.


* Buy compact fluorescent light bulbs-they're the spiral shaped ones! They last
10 times longer than regular incandescent bulbs and use 75% less energy.

* Alachua County provides free flourescent and CFL recycling; for more
information contact the Alachua County Household Hazardous Waste
Coordinator at (352) 334-0440.

* Turn your lights off when you don't need them. During the day, try opening the
blinds for fresh natural light.

* Take shorter, cooler showers, and wash your clothes in cold water. You'll not
only save water, but also save the energy that heats up the water. Clothes
washed in cold water also last longer!

* Electronics draw energy even when they're not being used. Unplugging things
like cell phone chargers and laptops when they are not being used can really
make a difference in your power use.

* On nice days, try controlling the temperature in your room by opening and
closing windows instead of using the heater and A/C. If you do use your heater,
keep it on 68 degrees, and when it's time to turn on the A/C, set it on 78
degrees.


In 2008, UF saw residence halls reduce their energy usage by t
14,500 KWHs, or the equivalent of 340 tons of carbon. Be on the I
this yearly UF competition in the spring! However, you don't ha
until spring to start saving.


E HALLS
ITITION
nore than
ookoutfor
ve to wait


GREEN GUIE I 5


---Jr


I




























sustainable
TIP
Buy recycled
paper and
products
sold in bulk.


w A W.I 0 1DNB :LMJ 1:IV A
* Buy local food. The average meal travels 1500
miles from farm to fork. Look for groceries at:
Buy groceries at the Farmers Markets where
local farmers sell their goods. (see page 18)
Saturday at the intersection of 441 and 34th St.
Tuesday from 2:00p to dusk in Butler Plaza
(seasonally)
Other farmers markets in our area are listed
here: www.slowfoodgainesville.org/resources

Grow your own food. UF has garden plots on
campus and at the organic garden on 23rd Terrace.
For more information on how to rent a plot, contact
Ginny Campbell at (352) 378-6103.

Eat less meat. It takes 5000 gallons of water to
create a pound of meat. It takes 30 gallons to create
a pound of fruits, vegetables or grains. By consum-
ing less meat and more fruits and vegetables, you
will be using fewer resources and eating healthier.

Get vegetarian Krishna lunch for $4 every weekday
in the Plaza of the Americas from 11am to 2pm. You
can even save 25 cents if you bring your own plate,
cup, and utensils.

Buy organic products not only can your oranges be
organic, but your cotton t-shirts can too!

Bring your own bag to the grocery store or market.
Be sure to return used plastic bags and egg cartons
to the bins in front of Publix.

Look for the green leaf signs at Fresh Food
Company and Gator Corner dining halls on campus
for locally grown produce.


6 I GREEN GUIDE




Mel 1, 1:)::1a ; T.19M11 CA (11
Walk, ride a bike, take the bus, or carpool (for more information, see page 23)

Combine trips and errands, take it easy on the gas and brake pedals, and go
slower on the highway (you will improve your gas mileage!) Also, don't idle your
engine for more than ten seconds-it takes less gas to turn it off and back on.

Fly less; take the train or carpool instead.

If you have to fly or drive long distances, purchase carbon offsets. For not too
much money, you can reduce all the carbon your travel releases into the atmo-
sphere. Visit Live Neutral for more information: http://www.liveneutral.orgl

Buy a hybrid car or sign up to rent a Zipcar (for more information, see page 23)



$ Many cleaning products have all sorts of chemicals in them
that are not only dangerous for humans but that can also get SE4A
into and pollute the water system. However, there are
alternatives, and "green" cleaning products are usually A
made from non-toxic and biodegradable materials and/or
have recycled packaging. Just make sure you read the
label to confirm that they are not made with toxic or
petroleum-based products. Common brands include
Seventh Generation and Simply Clean. You can also look
for the GreenSeal label.


Don't throw away all your stuff when you move into and out of dorms or
apartments-sell or donate it. Also, get what you need from garage sales,
second-hand stores, Craigslist.com, freecycle.org, or Facebook marketplace.
Chances are, you can find it at those places instead of going to the store and
paying full price!

If you have to buy new, shop local. It helps support the local economy, and
can also mean shorter transport distances for your goods (which is less carbon
emissions). See page 18 for great local stores.

fel A A i a iErg-
Join a student organization; see page 14 for sustainability related groups

Get into the community by teaching students about solar energy and recycling
with Gators for a Sustainable Campus Outreach team. Email
sustainablegators@gmail.com

Round up some Air Potatoes every spring in Gainesville area parks at the
Great Air Potato Round-up. Visit plants.ifas.ufl.edu/roundup
GREEN GUIDE I 7





* Participate in a dumpster dive or a creek clean-up

* Join the Green Team-help TailGATORS at football games recycle their cans
and bottles-email gatorgreenteam@gmail.com or join the Green Team
Facebook group for more information.

A a iP. "M


* UF has a Graduation Pledge that all students are encouraged to take. When
you graduate, you can sign the pledge, which states:
"I pledge to explore and take into account the social and ecological
consequences of my decisions. Furthermore, I pledge to use the
knowledge I gain at UF to improve the sustainability of the
communities in which I live, learn, and work."
Look for the pledge table at the UF Bookstore during graduation gown pick up.
You can also choose to join the Sustainable Alumni Network.
'4illl'i Ii'Ail:M 1k::R(
* Volunteer with the Office of Sustainability. Applications are available at
sustainable.ufl.edulpositions
UF Office of Sustainability
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA
8 I GREENGUIDE































































GREEN GUIDE 9







w WHAT

UF
IS


-a
0
G)
0
aII


10 I GREEN GUIDE


SOCIAL EQUITY:


BUSINESS PARTNERS:


CLOSED SOLID WASTE LOOP:



PURCHASING:





HEALTH AND SAFETY:




GRELN TEAM NETWORK:
























ALL ABOUT IT
BOOKS WITH A SUSTAINABLE MESSAGE
Natural Capitalism: Creating the Next Industrial Revolution,
Paul Hawken, Amory Lovins, and L. Hunter Lovins
The Sustainability Revolution, Andres R. Edwards
Plan B 2.0: Rescuing a Planet, Lester Brown
Ishmael, Daniel Quinn
Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, William
McDonough, Michael Braungart I
Living Green: A Practical Guide to Simple Sustainability, Greg
Horn
Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed, Jared
Diamond
The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals,
Michael Pollan
The Sustainability Advantage, Bob Willard
The Lazy Environmentalist, Josh Dorfman
It's Easy Being Green: A Handbook for Earlh Friendly Living,
Crissy Trask
The Live Earth Global Warming Survival Handbook, David De
Rothschild
The Green Book, Elizabeth Rogers
Stirring It Up: How to Make Money and Save the World, Gary
Hirshberg
SL ta Check out the Office of Sustainability
web page for more information on campus sustainability.
GREENGUIDE I 11






,classtime


SUSTAINABILITY RELATED COURSES
ARE AVAILABLE IN HISTORY, EDUCATION, ECO-
NOMICS, ANTHROPOLOGY AND OTHER MAJORS.
HERE ARE A FEW:

IDS 2935 Facets of Sustainabil y: (core course of
sustainability minor) Features a wide array of faculty and
community experts on diverse topics relating to sustain-
ability.
IDH 3931 Suslainiability and the integrated Bottc.n Line
Honors course that exposes students to the global
trends towards sustainability seen among governments,
businesses, and other institutions; how personal lifestyle
choices can contribute to or detract from sustainability
goals; and how successful businesses and governments
are implementing sustainability.
ANT 4403 Environment and Cu'tural Behavior: The
interaction of people and their environment as mediated
by cultural institutions. Levels of socioeconomic adapta-
tion in hunting and gathering, pastoral and agricultural
societies. Warfare and ritual as ecological mechanisms.
BCN 1582 International Sustainable Development:
Provides an overview of international trends in reducing
the environmental impacts of land development and
construction. Surveys best practices in a dozen
countries around the world. (S, N)
ECP 3302 Environmental Economics and Resource
Policy: The relations between environmental quality,
resource utilization, and economic institutions and
policy. An examination of alternative strategies and
policies in solving the problems of environmental quality
and resource scarcity. (S)
EML 4416 Solar Energy: Nature and availability,
collection and storage, solar properties of materials,
conversion to heat, power and electricity for domestic
and industrial consumption including transportation.
SCE 4342 Environmental Educa'ion Methods and
Materials: This course provides an introduction to the
history, philosophy, and status of environmental educa-
tion as well as exposure to current environmental
education teaching approaches, activities, programs
and curricula in both school and non-school settings.
12 I GREEN GUIDE


S .i:',3 .:,I i and the
Built Environment
q ,::...::.. i and Lite
Sciences
Environmental
Science
S.1 .' rOn, r- ent,.- l
,V ineeri-.g Studies
O ca- and Sus-
tainable .r .v: r.. e
SI:". and Resource
Economics
es' Resources
and Conservation
Horticultural
Sciences
Soil and Water
Science
School of Natural
=e O:te and the
Environment
Wildlife E-. :,,
and Conservation
An Inconvenient Truth
Affluenza
Who Killed the
Electric Car?
Happy Feet
Over the Hedge
Go Further
Sicko
Black Gold
Planet in Peril
S The 11th Hour
Gimme Green









GEO 3372 Conservation of
Resources: A survey of natural
resources and a study of wise
and wasteful practices of these
resources. Course satisfies
resource certification for social
studies teachers.
EUH 36583 The Hisiory of Con-
sumption: This course, which
combines economic, social, and
political history, studies the rise of consumer culture from the eighteenth century to
the present. Primarily focused on Europe, it expands to include the United States in
the twentieth century.
FRC 1010 Growing Fruit for Fun and Profit: (1 Credit) For students, especially non-
majors, desiring a concise mini-course in fruit growing and marketing. Fruit crops
include citrus, pecan, blueberry, strawberry, peach, grape, apple, mango and
avocado.
PHM 3032 Ethics and Ecology: A normative study of the relationships between
human beings and the environment, with an emphasis on land and resources. (H)
POT 3503 Environmental Ethics and Politics: An intensive investigation into the
history and theory of environmental ethical and political thought.
LEI 4833 Ecotourism: A study of the components, history, practice and current
issues of nature based tourism. Explores principles and problems of ecotourism for
natural resources and host populations. Includes rural tourism, economic impacts,
tourism life cycle and case studies.
URP 4715 Bikeways Planning and Design: Planning and design of bicycle paths,
greenways and facilities that form a network for non-motorized transportation.
Oriented toward systems approach.
WS T 3349 Ecofeminism: This course provides a holistic framework for understand-
ing the connections between environmental, feminist, and social justice issues. This
course will critically analyze positions within ecofeminist theory. (WR)
HOS 3281C Organic and SLusTainable Crop Production: Concepts/techniques of
organic and sustainable production of horticultural crops, including soillwater
management, pest control, harvest, handling and marketing.








GREEN GUIDE I 13






STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Gators for a Sustainable Campus increases
awareness of sustainable development on
campus and encourages students to lead
more sustainable lives. GSC is affiliated with
the UF Office of Sustainability and is the
leader of the Renewable Energy Fee initia-
tive. www.sustainablegators.org
Bioenergy and Sustainable Technology
Society provides a forum within which to
discuss and educate the members and the
public at-large about the technological reali-
ties, politics and economics of bioenergy and
renewable resources, energy conversion and
distribution and sustainable technologies.
grove.ufl.edur/bests
EnVeg is a group that encourages people to
reduce their industrial-raised meat, dairy and
egg consumption in order to help slow
climate change. By promoting and increasing
the ease of cooking without meat, enVeg
shows people that you don't have to sacrifice
the environment to eat well. www.enveg.org
Society for Conservation Biology is an
international professional organization dedi-
cated to promoting the scientific study of the
phenomena that affect the maintenance,
loss, and restoration of biological diversity.
www.geocities.com/florida_scb/about
UF Greeks Going Green is a campaign
started to help promote environmental
awareness and eco-friendliness within the
Greek community at the University of Florida.
ufgreeksgoinggreen.wordpress.com
The Student Chapter of the Wildlife Society is
affiliated with The Wildlife Society, which is
part of the network for the professional
society for wildlife biologists.
grove.ufl.edu/rtws
U.S. Green Building Council, UF Student
Chapter works to raise awareness of green
building principles and practices among the
design, construction, planning, engineering
and real estate communities.
grove.ufl.edu/rusgbc





Human Rights Awareness on Campus tries to promote awareness and activism
concerning human rights abuses around the world, particularly in cases of genocide.
grove.ufl.edu/"hra
Change the World: Student Social Entrepreneurs at UF's mission is to educate
students to think innovatively about social problems in the local community and
around the world and empower them to create positive social change.
www.changetheworlduf.org
UF Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) facilitates student teams to take what they are
learning in the classroom and use that knowledge to create and implement
educational outreach projects in their community. www.ufslfe.com
Roots and Shoots shares ideas and inspirations to create positive changes happen
for the community, animals, and the environment, implements community service
projects and special events, and promote awareness about social, political, and
economic issues as they relate to environmental issues, www.rootsandshoots.org
Children Beyond Our Borders primary purpose is to provide support for
impoverished children in Latin American countries and the world through social
projects that stress, above all, education. www.chbob.org
United World Organization aims to enable young people to become responsible
citizens-politically and environmentally aware, and committed to the ideals of peace,
justice, understanding, and cooperation-through international education, experi-
ence and community service.
F.A.C.E. (Feminist Activists Creating Equality) helps create an environment where
feminists, those who believe in and are committed to seeing equality between all
people regardless of gender, race, class, sexual orientation, or nation, can come
together to create change. They seek to make the personal political through
activism, service, and awareness raising on campus and in the community.





















GREEN GUIDE I 15







eatgatgreen






A FEW RESTAURANTS IN GAINESVILLE THAT SERVE ORGANIC.
LOCALLY GROWN FOODS, HAVE GREAT VEGETARIAN AND VEGAN
OPTIONS, PAY LIVING WAGES. AND/OR USE RECYCLED MATERIALS.



(352. 371-4839 3303 W University Ave. I

(352) 378-0532 3437 W University Ave I

(352) 371-4418 3445 W University AveI iW th AV
ni eFOr i A -- - \
(352) 371-1711 3445 W University Ave 'I /
O -- Wj tniversi A ve- *
(352) 377-5828 407 NW 13th St. I .- r


FARMER MARKETS
OFFER A GREEN
WAY TO GROCERY
SHOP. CHECK OUT
PG 6 FOR WAYS TO
EAT AND SHOP
GREEN.


Y _LS. S - 317
(352)271-1011 3117 SW 34th Street

;52) 374-9920 1614 NW 1st Ave. I
& MUSIC AND MORE
i352) 373-3786 1417 NW 1st Ave
IC- -- -- -- p
;352) 376-2233 1643 NW 1st Ave.

16 I GREEN GUIDE


By paroizn th S utiaiiymne buiese yo can build stone ma-Srket*~
fo repnil buins groth -upr our loca ecno y an fin -om prtt tasty S
trat alon th way.


i _s
(352) 373-6777 401 NE 23rd Ave.
SA S
(352) 335-7272 1800 NE 23rd Ave.

- (352) 377-1700 2020 NW 13th St.

(352) 505-5039 1151 NW 2nd Street
L( C
S(352) 384-0090 505 NW 13th Street
-1 _TA C/
I (352) 271-4361 48 SW 2nd St.
- T1
S(352) 337-1188 30 N Main Street

I (352) 384-9497 2 W University Ave

1 (352) 375-7381 7 SE 1st Ave.
A-- A(- _YS^HN ) 'S - E: C:
S(352)371-3359 201 SE2ndAve.
I- fPi Ti
(352) 378-3398 12 SW 1st Ave
- I AM(
S(352) 373-6307 12 SE 2nd Ave
- MA .
(352) 336-9646 101 SE 2nd Place
-1 'A o Gc L
I(352) 372-8342 1331 S. Main St.
- L ': O'S
(352) 378-2001 706 W University Ave.
_. i C#. CP _
(352) 377-5464 619 W. University

I (352) 377-0287 25 NW 16th Avenue


1352) 376-0000 1245 W University Ave
__| .. L S. T '
(352) 378-5948 1402 W University Ave.

1 352) 372 5330 1432 W. University Ave


GREEN GUIDE I 17







G U I D E1


Whether you want sweatshop-free shirts,
gently-used jeans, or organic tomatoes, this is
the place to find them.


* Alachua County Farmers Market
Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., year-
round on the corner of U.S. Highway 441
and County Road 121
* Downtown Farmer's Market
Wednesday, 4:00pm to 7:00 pm
(352) 462-3192
Downtown Community Plaza
Ward's Supermarket
(352) 372-1741
515 NW 23rd Ave., 32609
* Haile Plantation Farmer's Market
Saturday, 8:30 am 12 pm (seasonal)
SW 91st Terrace
* Mother Earth Market
(352) 378-5224
521 NW 13th Street, 32601


* American Apparel
(352) 372-2262
15 S.W. 1st Ave.
www.americanapparel.net
* Flashback's Recycled Fashions
(352)375-3752
509 NW 10th Ave.
* Humane Society Thrift Shop
(352) 373-9522; 2029 NW 6 Street
www.alachuahumane.org
* Indigo Green Home Products
(352) 378-2285
322 SW 4th Avenue


* Peaceful Paths Thrift Shop
(352) 379-3133
608 N Main Street
* The Second Hand Rose
(352) 371-1455
710 N Main St.
* Waldo Flea Market
Saturday and Sundays
(352) 468-2255
Highway 301, Waldo
* Play It Again Sports
(352) 377-7666
3425 W. University Ave
* Plato's Closet
(352) 374-4402
3333 SW 34th St.


18 I GREEN GUIDE














Fu ro eceu atst ke-ee denue

Thr/r m n ra


plc s righ on ca ps, lik Lak Aice

the ~ ~ Ba osadntretal oejy

SF own it wnlk




Hiha 44 (8 ml s suho a ps



A 12 t ikhl ed
dow to a iitr an frst
(32 S5520. 472Mlhpes Rod
*2 5 w~ So i Sst -e ars






riig (32 46-37 340 SE 1t


- 4flI.hR...~rtrntI


GINNIE SPRINGS: Springs for
tubing, swimming, and camping.
(386) 454-7188. 7300 NE Ginnie
Springs Road High Springs, FL.
www.ginniespringsoutdoors.com

KANAPAHA BOTANICAL GARD-
ENS: 62 diverse acres of plants
and flowers make up this year
round garden (352) 372-4981
4700 SW 58th Drive

ICHETUCKNEE SPRINGS STATE
PARK: A six mile river that flows
through shaded hammocks and
wetlands great for tubing, canoe-
ing, swimming, and hiking.
(386) 497-2511. 12087 S.W. US
Hwy 27, Fort White, 32038
www.floridastateparks.
org/ichetuckneesprings

PAYNE'S PRAIRIE PRESERVE
STATE PARK: Opportunities for
hiking, horseback riding, bicycling,
and viewing wildlife. (352) 466-
3397; 100 Savannah Blvd.
Micanopy 32667
www.floridastateparks.
org/ p a y n esp ra irie

ALFRED A. RING PARK: A system
of nature trails and boardwalks
leads visitors along Hogtown
Creek and through Upland Mixed
Forest.
www.cityofga inesville.
org/no/facilities/aa rp


s//www.bsd.ute.eaulowool k tot
Thi ne *ebit *low stdet So sel
-~k *b c *lrt :ros the.* - Uni-
i it





GREEN GUiDE I 19


m





ENTERTAINMENT AND CULTURE






5-ETE IRC Y





TH HIPDRM SAUE P. 6 N
STT THAR -J MUEU OFAR
B- I S





FLORIDAMUM OF!P^H3ILIPSICENTER FOR
B~iiliiaaBB~^^^^^KBM~~flf!6 !^^^


NATURE HISTRY J; HE PEFORMIG ART

















I^^ 'IN ^^^^^^^^


20 I GREEN GUIDE






VOLUNTEER


There are Ihousands of ways to volunteer during your lime here at UF. Find something you
like and go for it. We've listed a few places to get you started.
You can also scan over the "Gator Times" in your email. Different ways to get involved are
listed each week.
Visit the Center for Student Involvement on the 3rd floor of the Reitz Union; they are there to
help you find something right for you.
Check the Gainesville listing for volunteers needed here:
http:/lwww.volunteermatch.org/bymsa/m2900/cloppl.html


n GAINESVILLE PET RESCUE
There are many ways to help our furry friends, www.gainesvillepetrescue.org
ALACHUA COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY
From dog walking, dog bathing, cat grooming, cleaning, delivery drivers, to
administrative help and photographers, they need you.
I hiu www.alachuahumane.org


CULTURAL ARTS COALITION
Work with at-risk youth and volunteer to assist with the annual 5th Ave. Arts
Festival. http://culturalartscoalition.org/
USHERS FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PERFORMING ARTS
Contribute to the arts and see shows for free. Call 352-392-1900, ext. 315
performingarts.ufl.edulgiving/volunteer
FLORIDA MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
Whether they're with a curator behind-the-scenes or with youngsters in the But-
-[ r tterfly Rainforest, volunteers are a vital part of the mission of the Florida
Museum of Natural History. For more information, contact Julie Crosby, at
i352) 846-2000, ext. 210 or email volunteers@flmnh.ufl.edu
CIVIC MEDIA CENTER
Non-profit alternative media venue. Call (352) 373-0010 Email: grace4@ufl.
edu. www.civicmediacenter.org


STUDENT ADJUNCT FOR CITY ADVISORY BOARD
0 The city offers a spot specifically to a student on 18 of its advisory boards. To
be eligible to apply, a student must attend a meeting of the board of his or her
choice in August or September. See www.cityofgainesville orglorganiz/clerk/
meetings or contact SG's Community Political Affairs Cabinet at
politicalaff@sg.ufl.edu
WOMEN FOR WISE GROWTH
An organization of women dedicated to preserving a quality of life in Alachua
County that enhances the social and environmental fabric of our community.
treecity.net/wwg/ GREEN GUIDE 21
GREEN GUIDE I 21









LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS (not just for ladies!) ylr
A nonpartisan political organization, LWV encourages
the informed and active participation of citizens in
government, works to increase understanding of major
public policy issues, and influences public policy
through education and advocacy, www.lwv-alachua.org



GAINESVILLE'S NATURE OPERATIONS DIVISION
As a volunteer you might fini youi self roaming the trails assisting biologists with a variety of environ-
mental projects. Apply online. www.cityofgainesville.org/no/prog/vd
WATERSHED ACTION VOLUNTEERS
Clean up a creek or help teach kids about water conservation. www.sjrwmd.comleducatior/wav
UF CLEAN WATER CAMPAIGN
Work with UF students passionate about clean water ways.
campuswaterquality.ifas.ufl.edu/help/help_volunteer
FRIENDS OF PAYNE'S PRAIRIE
Provide support through fund raising, outreach, and education. For additional information, please
contact JulieAnne Tabone, at (352) 466-4944 or JulieAnne.Tabone@dep.state.fl.us.
KEEP ALACHUA COUNTY BEAUTIFUL
Beautify, conserve resources, recycle, educate and preserve Alachua County's environmental legacy
through beautification activities, environmental action, small and large restoration projects, and by pro-
moting recycling and reducing waste products. www.kacb.org/



ALACHUA COUNTY CRISIS CENTER
24-hour telephone crisis intervention and counseling service offered by trained volunteers under the
supervision of the Crisis Center Staff. To volunteer call (352) 264-6785 or visit
crisiscenter.alach ua.fl.us/
UF HABITAT FOR HUMANITY
UF students coming together with residents of Gainesville to build homes in the Gainesville community.
Visit www.ufhabitat.org for more information.
REBUILD GAINESVILLE
There are many ways to get involved with Rebuild's home repair efforts year round.
www.rebuildgainesville.org
HANDS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Assist with patient and visitor escort, patient transportation, childcare, adult visitation, tours, and patient
mail service. They provide pet therapy visits and raise funds that support patient services and provide
scholarships. Call (352) 265-0360.
www.shands.org
ST. FRANCIS HOME
A homeless shelter and soup kitchen, volunteer with individuals, work in the kitchen or volunteer in their
library. Call (352) 378-1883
www.stfrancishousegnv.org
GAINESVILLE HARVEST
This organization is an innovative solution to hunger in Gainesville that gives food companies a conve-
nient, reliable and safe way to channel surplus food to hungry people, www.gainesvilleharvest.com

v 0 '. IStudent Government along with the Student Traffic Court and
B the Department of Parking and Transportation Services has
implemented GPS systems on our Region Transit System
busses. Busses enabled with the GPS system can be tracked
by real-time data online through your computer or web-enabled
22 I GREEN GUIDE







save money, avoid tiamc and paring nassles, and prevent pollution
by leaving your car at home. With all the modes of transportation UF and
Gainesville have to offer, traveling alone by car may soon be a thing of the past.


The main part campus is not that large, so walking is always an option! Many restaurants and
shops on University Ave. are within walking distance from campus.

Bicycling is an excellent way to minimize car use and get exercise at the same time. It will also
get you to class faster than walking! Because more people at UF are turning to bicycles as a
transportation alternative to cars, changes have been made on campus to facilitate bicycle traffic.
Bike lanes have been designated for bicyclists on campus roads that get the most traffic.
Register it!
Worried.. about. bike theft or maintenance? UPD offers bicycle regtration inorder..toaid in








Il7'ere can I get a bike?
Graduating students sell their bikes all the time on Facebook Marketplace and Craigslist.com.
Gainesville has a lot of used and new bike shops as well.
Chain Reaction Bicycles 1630 W. University Ave.
Swamp Cycle 534 SW 4th Ave.
Gator Cycle 3321 SW Archer Rd.
Spin Cycle 424 W. University Ave.
Bike Route NW 43rd St. and Hwy. 441
Mr. Goodbike 425 NW 13th St.


Riding the bus is great for listening to an ipod, people watching, and reducing pollution and traffic.
Regional Transit System (RTS)
UF students, faculty, and staff enjoy unlimited access to all RTS services anytime. Its FREE with
o,,,ur.,:ator ..1ID card. RTS has routes throughout the UF camous and Gainesville. For your


.UIuE I 23



























M 1 urn ao computers, agns, ana omner equipment,
and unplug electronics.. 0


**The ultimate test of a moral society is
the kind of world it leaves to its children.
Dietrich Bonhoeffer


Greening the Gator Nation




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs