Title: Stakeholders and situational analysis : course session plan, 3 Sept. 1996
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Title: Stakeholders and situational analysis : course session plan, 3 Sept. 1996
Series Title: Stakeholders and situational analysis : course session plan, 3 Sept. 1996
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Language: English
Creator: Schmink, Marianne
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MERGE TOT: STAKEHOLDERS AND SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS
Course session plan
Instructor: Marianne Schmink

3 Sept., 1996

RATIONALE: Effective resource management for conservation requires
negotiation among multiple, often conflicting, groups differentiated by their
relations to the resources in question by gender, wealth, ethnicity, race, social
origins, and other variables. The concept of "stakeholder" helps to identify
the groups and individuals and their distinct "stakes" or interests in specific
resources or habitats, their relationships to one another, and relative power.
"Stakeholder analysis" refers to different ways of systematically analyzing
these relationships, and "situational analysis" reminds us of the need to
consider the complex, dynamic setting of any project. These issues are
explored in this session by focusing on the Tambopata-Candamo region of
Peru.

MATERIALS:
Handouts: maps of Tambopata, Avecita Chicchon page, Mobil alert
flyer
Flipcharts: objectives; definition of stakeholder, sketch maps of
Tambopata (3), small group questions
Blank flipcharts, markers, differently colored and sized circles
VCR, video "Return to Tambopata"

I. HOUSEKEEPING: (10 mins.)

II. INTRODUCTION TO TAMBOPATA CASE STUDY (5 min.)

Explain that the Tambopata-Candamo region, and the proposal for creation of a
Reserved Zone there, will serve as the case study focus for the projects in this
class. This is a complex, real case with which MERGE has first-hand
experience. It presents most of the issues that will be present in any site in a
developing country context where participatory conservation is proposed. UF
graduate, Avecita Chicch6n, now Director of Programs for Conservation
International-Peru, has been working to facilitate a participatory planning
process there for the past several years. This shows how close the students in
the class are to a situation like this.

Class participants will be asked to "role play" during the semester. They have
been hired, as a team, by CI-Peru to carry out a comprehensive training
program that will support the participatory planning and implementation of
the TCRZ and other protected areas in the region. What will they do?

The first step, which we will begin today, is to familiarize themselves with the
site, the different groups and interests at stake, and the overall situation. Hand
out maps.

III. INTRODUCTION TO STAKEHOLDERS, SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS (10 min.)

5 MIN Introduction. Introduce the topic of stakeholder analysis and
state the objectives of the session.









LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of the session the participants will be able
to:

(1) Define and use the concept of stakeholder to analyze a NRM situation
(2) Use ven diagrams to represent stakeholders, their relative power,
and their relationships
(3) Discuss different ways and purposes of doing stakeholder analysis.

5 MIN What is a Stakeholder? Ask the group to define the term
"stakeholder" and the concept of "stake" (or "interest"). After ideas have
been contributed by the group and briefly discussed, post the definition on a
piece of flip chart paper: "Stakeholders are all those who have the power to
affect, or are in a position to be affected by, the situation in question." Can be
individuals, communities, social groups, institutions.

Why is Stakeholder Analysis important for natural resource
management projects? (based on readings from Grimble and Chan: helps to
draw attention to, and to articulate, interests of less powerful groups; helps to
focus on cross-boundary issues, institutional differences, temporal trade-offs
and multiple uses typical of NRM.

IV. STAKEHOLDER/SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS OF TAMBOPATA Part 1 (45 min.)

Video Listening assignment: Listen and watch carefully, and note down
all the groups you see/hear in the video who have some stake in the TCRZ.

Video: "Return to Tambopata" (30 min.)

Discussion (15 min.): What stakeholders are shown? (List on flip
charts). What stakeholders are missing from this video? (Brainstorm and
record with question marks)

BREAK/Ice breaker (15 min.)

IV. STAKEHOLDER/SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS OF TAMBOPATA Part 2 (60 min.)

Small groups assignment (5 min.): Count off by 3 and divide into three
groups. Each group will have 15 minutes to select most important stakeholders
in different ways. These groups will be represented by circles of different
sizes, chosen to reflect relative POWER. The circles will be placed on the flip
charts with the sketch map of Tambopata, roughly showing their relationship
to one another and to the Reserved Zone. You will have 15 minutes to finish
this task.

Small group questions:
Group 1: Which are the (up to 10) groups that WILL MOST AFFECT the
TCRZ?
Group 2: Which are the (up to 10) groups that WILL BE MOST HURT BY
the TCRZ?
Group 3: Which are the (up to 10) groups that WILL BENEFIT MOST from
the TCRZ?

Small group work (15 min.)

Small groups report back and discussion (15 min.): Focus on the
different dimensions that distinguish groups (gender, ethnicity,
inside/outside, POWER). Comment on how different questions lead to different
V rA










SA as a process in the field by Charo Lanao (15 min.) Mobil flyer.

Discussion (10 min.): Purpose of SA; changing conditions; changes in
stakeholders, and in their relations, over time.

V. SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS AND THE TRAINING PROCESS by Jon Dain (25 min.)

VI. EVALUATION (10 min.)

VII. ASSIGNMENTS (5 min.)




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