• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Purpose of this guide
 Overview
 WID office services
 Access to WID funds
 USAID WID network
 Additional WID research and reference...
 WID office publication list














Title: Office of Women in Development user's guide
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Purpose of this guide
        Page 1
    Overview
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    WID office services
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Access to WID funds
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    USAID WID network
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Additional WID research and reference resources
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    WID office publication list
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
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Full Text
R, IIDG











OFFICE OF WOMEN IN DEVELOPMENT


USER'S GUIDE

BUREAU FOR GLOBAL PROGRAMS, FIELD SUPPORT & RESEARCH
UNITED STATES

AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT



"Property of
Tropical Research &
Development, Inc. Library"



USAID/G/WID
Room 714, SA-18
Washington, DC 20523-1816
Tel: (703) 875-4668 Fax: (703) 875-4633


June 1994












TABLE OF CONTENTS



I. Purpose of the Guide .................. ...........

II. Overview ................... ................... .


History and Objectives ...........
USAID's Approach to WID ........
USAID's WID Activities and Personnel


III. W ID Office Services ..............................


A. Training ...................... .. ... .....
B. Technical Assistance and Research ..............
C. Monitoring and Evaluation Managing for Results ....
D. Donor Coordination and NGO Liaison .............
E. Support for the U.N. World Conference and NGO Forum
F. Communication .................... ........


IV. Access to W ID Funds ............................


General Guidelines for WID-Funded Activities
WID Funding for USAID Missions and Bureaus
Unsolicited Proposals ...................
Selected WID Co-funded Project Descriptions .


. . . . . . . 5
. . . . . . . 6
. . . . . . . 6
. . . . . . 7
. . . . . . . 7
. . . . . . . 8
.~8


. . . . . . 9
. . . . . . 10
. . . . . . 1 1
. . . . . . 13


V. USAID W ID Network ......................................... 19


A. WID Office Staff Directory ................
B. WID Technical Advisors in Bureaus .........
C. WID Committees and Working Groups ......
D. WID Officers in USAID Field Missions .......


VI. Additional WID Research and Reference Resources


A. CDIE Research and Reference Service .......
B. CDIE Research Staff Contact List ...........
C. USAID Documents and Publications .........
D. Additional Reference Resources ............


VII. W ID Office Publications List ..................

A. WID Publications Order Form ..............


. . . . . . . . . 39

. . . . . . . . . 3 9
. . . . . . . . . 4 0
. . . . . . . . . 4 1
. . . . . . . . . 4 1


.42


.58


.










I. Purpose of the Guide


This User's Guide provides information about the services and resources
available from the Office of Women in Development, Bureau for Global
Programs, Field Support and Research to help the United States Agency for
International Development (USAID) foster empowerment of women as a part
of USAID's strategies for sustainable development.

The following sections give a brief overview of the Agency's WID policy and
describe the range of information and support services available through the
WID Office and how to access them.

This document is intended for use by USAID personnel, as well as contractors,
non-governmental organizations, and other international development
professionals.









II. Overview

A. History and Objectives

Through the provision of technical expertise and funds, the WID Office works to
ensure that women participate fully and benefit equally from USAID's development
efforts. As the crucial role played by women in national economies is increasingly
recognized and strengthened, this in turn improves the results achieved through
USAID's investment.

The Office of Women in Development was established in 1974 to guide USAID in the
integration of women and gender issues into all aspects of U.S. bilateral development
assistance.

In 1982 the Agency issued a Policy Paper on Women in Development which stated
that the constraints that women face are often different from those men face.
Analyzing and addressing these constraints, as well as realizing potentials and
building on opportunities, is the focus of USAID's Women in Development program.
The paper said:

"Research from the last decade portrays a fairly consistent pattern of findings
that, in most developing countries, females differ from men in their:

access to and control over productive resources;
stakes in development outcomes;
responses to incentives introduced to encourage development."

In March of 1994 USAID's commitment to Women in Development was reaffirmed and
further strengthened in a message from USAID Administrator Brian Atwood to all
Agency personnel, on the occasion of the United Nations' International Women's Day.
It said in part:

"On this occasion I want to reemphasize this Administration's and USAID's
commitment to breaking the cycle of gender-based discrimination and abuse
which still exists around the world, and to fully incorporating gender issues into
all of the Agency's policies, programs, and projects. Recognizing and addressing
women's roles in the development process is a decisive element in achieving
sustainable improvements in the economic and social well-being of individuals,
families, and nations.

Development which is not based on recognition of gender issues and does not
include the full and equal participation of women is not sustainable. As USAID
strives to promote peace, development, and democracy throughout the world,
women's equal participation, knowledge, expertise, and leadership will be










essential.


As Administrator of USAID, I am giving top priority to the empowerment of
women and the protection of the human rights of women and girls through all our
development efforts. I will expect all missions and bureaus to integrate gender
into their development strategies.

We must forge ahead in our efforts to institutionalize programs and policies
across all development sectors which address gender issues and to increase the
level of women's and men's participation in the development of their own
communities and countries."

As indicated in the Administrator's message, understanding of the importance of
providing sufficient attention to the differential roles, responsibilities, and resources of
men and women as they affect the development process continues to grow throughout
the Agency. Knowledgeable personnel in Bureaus and USAID Overseas Missions are
beginning to provide strong new leadership in addressing these gender issues at all
stages of the program and project cycles.

The WID Office works in partnership with USAID's Missions and Bureaus to
strengthen the strategic planning and monitoring process, to improve staff skills and
knowledge, and to evaluate program impact to ensure a focus on people and attention
to women's as well as men's issues in the development process.

B. USAID's Approach to Women in Development

USAID's approach to women in development has evolved and matured from the
original concentration on small, women-only projects which often tended to marginalize
women, to a more integrated approach that takes gender into account as a
fundamental socio-economic factor. Gender analysis is a necessary tool to assist in
empowering women, and seeks to mainstream women into the broad spectrum of
development initiatives. In measuring USAID's development results, we seek to
ensure that programs and projects produce measurable positive effects on women's
as well as men's lives.

In support of USAID, the WID Office provides expertise in, and focus on issues of:

o Economic Growth;
o Democracy and Governance;
o Population, Health and Nutrition;
o Environment;
o Human Capacity Development;








C. USAID's WID Activities and Personnel

The Office of Women in Development (WID) remains a separate Office in the Bureau
for Global Programs, Field Support, and Research, reflecting USAID's recognition of
the paramount importance of women's integration and participation in the development
process. The WID Office serves both as an advocacy and demand-driven service
office providing technical leadership, advice, and support to the Global Bureau Centers
of Excellence, the Bureau for Program and Policy Coordination, the regional bureaus,
and the field missions in all program and policy matters pertaining to women and
development and gender issues. The WID Office exercises an oversight role with
regard to Agency WID policy and its implementation. The WID Office also oversees
professional development, technical upgrading, recruitment and placement of all
technical WID personnel. Other major action areas for the WID Office include:

o Policy analysis and policy elaboration
o Training on gender issues
o USAID's WID research agenda
o Projects on global and interregional women's issues
o Efforts to increase numbers of women in training programs
o Technical coordination with other donors
o Liaison with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) concerned with women's
issues

The WID Office Staff offers regional and sectoral expertise related to gender in the
strategic areas specified in USAID's "Strategies for Sustainable Development" as well
as training, evaluation, communications, and donor and NGO coordination skills. (See
Section V, Part A for a detailed listing.)

Bureau Gender and Development Advisors and Committees also play important roles
because USAID's WID network extends well beyond the WID Office to the bureaus
and the field missions. The regional bureau advisers and committees provide support
for the integration of gender issues throughout the strategic planning, implementation
review, and monitoring and evaluation of programs in each region. They provide input
for regional bureau guidance for the field and provide support to the field in
collaboration with the WID Office. (See Section V, Part C for a complete listing.)

Field Mission WID Officers and Committees ensure that country strategies and
projects fully integrate women based on a careful analysis of gender issues. They
provide input for policy and program decisions at the Mission level and promote
participatory development, with support from their regional bureaus and the WID Office
as needed. They coordinate with other donors and local NGOs. (See Section V, Part
D for a complete listing.)










III. WID Office Services


A. Training

The WID Office conducts numerous training activities on the gender dimensions of
development. Training is conducted in Washington and in the field for USAID
Missions, Bureaus, contractors, and NGOs. While many workshops are periodically
scheduled, others are specially initiated at the request of USAID Missions for their own
staff and for host country counterparts in the public and private sectors.

The workshops provide an opportunity for program and project teams to examine their
activities and develop actions plans for increasing the effectiveness of the integration
of gender considerations in USAID development activities. Particular attention is given
to sustainability, participatory approaches, and monitoring and evaluation. The
workshops include country- specific contextual analysis of gender issues, examination
of social and economic equity issues of gender, and opportunities to revise program
and project logical frameworks, and development of implementation plans.

The WID Office has recently created and presented in Washington a series of
workshops addressing the gender dimensions of USAID's strategies for sustainable
development: building democracy, encouraging broad-based economic growth,
protecting the environment, and stabilizing world population growth and protecting
human health. These will likely be repeated, and others will be developed.

Workshops being offered currently are:

The Gender Dimensions of Development: A Workshop for USAID Staff. Host Country
Government and PVO/NGO Counterparts, and Contractors. The workshop provides
the opportunity to development personnel to examine their own programs and develop
the skills to support full integration of gender and WID.

AIDS and Gender: From Analysis to Action. Aimed at host country government and
NGO counterparts, the workshop focuses on developing strategies to lesson the
sharply increasing vulnerability of females to HIV infection.

NGO Program and Project Management. With the goal of developing stronger
institutional counterparts, the workshop seeks to strengthen the capacity of NGOs to
plan, implement, and monitor and evaluate their programs from a gender analysis
perspective.

Planning Workshops for Government Officers. This workshop targets government
policy makers and operational level staff to increase the engagement of women as
active partners in the development process. The workshop emphasizes the
importance of women as critical participants in all aspects of national development.









NGO Assessment and Evaluation. This training focuses on strengthening the role of
NGOs working in WID by facilitating a "stock taking" of what they have accomplished
and increasing their capacity to evaluate their performance.

The WID Office can also tailor training sessions for particular needs and a specific
audience. Training can be conducted in Washington or in the field. For further
information about workshops, schedules and special training requests, contact Dr.
Rosalie Huisinga Norem at the WID Office, tel: (703) 875-4668.

B. Technical Assistance and Research

The WID Office can assist all levels of USAID operating units in addressing gender
issues in:

o policy analysis
o strategic planning
o program performance measurement
o program and project review
o sectoral assessments
o project design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation
o data collection and analysis tools
o research guidance and design

The WID Office also helps operating units develop strategies for strengthening
institutional support for WID. In addition, the WID Office provides sector specific
guidelines for integration of gender issues into development activities. WID Office
staff collaborate with regional bureau WID Officers and committees to provide ongoing
assistance, best practices case materials, and guidance to WID Officers to WID
Officers in the field.

C. Monitoring and Evaluation Managing for Results

Collaboration with CDIE, regional bureaus and the Global Bureau Centers for
Excellence aims to increase the consideration of gender issues and gender
disaggregated indicators in Strategic Management Frameworks and impact
evaluations through guidance on monitoring and evaluation, improved monitoring and
evaluation tools, training and technical assistance. The WID Office provides assistance
to bureaus and missions in addressing gender issues in strategic planning, monitoring,
and evaluation. The WID Office is working closely with CDIE's Office of Evaluation,
the Office of Population Demographic and Health Survey Project, the International
Division of the U.S. Bureau of the Census, as well as other donors to provide
technical assistance to USAID staff and improve sex-disaggregated data collection.










D. Donor Coordination and NGO Liaison


In global forums the WID Office, representing USAID, collaborates with many key
donors and international aid agencies. The WID Office participates on the
Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the Organisation for Economic Co-
Operation and Development (OECD) as a member of the Expert Group on Women in
Development. The WID Office coordinates with other donors and NGOs to ensure
that key women's issues are addressed in the World Population Conference in Cairo
and the World Summit for Social Development in Copenhagen. And in collaboration
with the U.S. Bureau of the Census, USAID continues to host a donor coordination
group on gender disaggregated databases.

The WID Office is collaborating with FAO and UNDP to develop gender sensitive
participatory project design materials, and is working with the World Bank on gender
training issues. In addition, many of the USAID WID Officers in the field participate in
formal and informal donor coordination groups.

The WID Office has been active in supporting NGOs and fostering the development of
women's organizations. For example, USAID/WID is providing support to U.S. and
indigenous NGOs for activities such as assistance for civic organizations in Latin
America and the Caribbean, support and capacity building for women's networks in the
New Independent States, and the strengthening women's grass roots organizations in
Asia.

WID Officers in the field work closely with NGOs through meetings and information
sharing, institution building, support for projects, and the provision of information and
gender training.

E. Support for the United Nations World Conference & NGO Forum

The WID Office provides operational support in the coordination of worldwide
preparatory activities for the United Nations World Conference on Women and NGO
Forum '95 in Beijing, China in September, 1995. This activity focuses on:

o mobilizing government officials, NGOs, donors, academic institutions and
other key WID personnel at all levels in preparation for the regional NGO
forums and preparatory meetings, the World Conference, and NGO Forum
'95;

o acting as a catalyst for the exchange of information, ideas, and resources
and the discussion of strategies regarding preparation for the World
Conference and NGO Forum '95 among those groups and individuals listed
above; and,








o assisting in the identification and articulation of WID issues specifically for
the World Conference and NGO Forum '95 but also more generally for
follow-up activities after Beijing.

For further information on this activity, contact Joan Wolfe at (703) 875-4668.

F. Communication

Overview of WID communication services:

USAID possesses a wide range of WID information and resources, generated by the
Agency and from other sources, including donor organizations, PVOs, universities, and
commercial databases.

The WID Office responds to requests for WID and gender information in a variety of
ways, including provision of documents and reports, conducting briefings, and
arranging for additional resources and specialists within or outside USAID. Requests
pertaining to particular topic areas or geographic regions can be directed to the
appropriate WID Office staff (as listed in Section V, Part A).

Responses may be supplied from within the WID Office, or may be channeled through
the CDIE Research and Reference Service (RRS) or Development Information Center
(DIC). Requests which clearly require a CDIE response can be made directly to RRS,
by contacting Diane Russell, Research Manager at 703/875-4854, or DIC by
contacting John Butsch, DIC Coordinator, at 703/875-4818 (see also the CDIE contact
list included in Section VI).

Priority in responses is always given to requests from USAID staff at Missions and
Bureaus. Others involved in development, such as international organizations, NGOs,
contractors, and educators can receive assistance as well. Priority is also given to
requests which improve gender integration of policies, programs, and projects.

Reference Resources:

A WID Resource Collection is maintained in the USAID Development Information
Center (commonly known as the CDIE or USAID Library). This collection contains
both USAID and non-USAID documents gathered from Agency offices or received
from the World Bank, the United Nations, and other donor and private organizations
and individuals. Reference documents in the WID Collection cover all development
sectors, such as agriculture, education, employment and income-generation, energy
and natural resources, and health. Publications may be borrowed by USAID/W staff,
or used on the premises by the public.










The library is located at 1601 N. Kent St., Rosslyn Plaza, Room. 105, Arlington, VA,
and is open to USAID staff and the public from 10:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Tel: (703) 875-4818. Fax: (703) 875-5269. USAID staff can E-Mail at:
@CDIEINFO. Cables should be addressed: CDIE/DI.

WID Office Publications:

The WID Office publishes and disseminates documents either written by WID staff,
produced through WID funding, or received from other agencies for distribution.
These can be ordered, free of charge, by USAID staff and the public. (See the
Publication List and order form included in Section VII).


IV. Access to WID Funds

USAID Missions and Bureaus may request funding from the WID Office. Also, a very
limited amount of support is available for unsolicited proposals received from Private
Voluntary Organizations and Non-governmental Organizations. All funds requested
must be matched with funds from other USAID sources. Prior to submission of
proposals, as time permits, short concept papers may be first submitted to elicit WID
feedback.

A. General Guidelines For WID-Funded Activities

Activities proposed by Missions, as well as through unsolicited proposals must:

I. Support the overall goal to assist the Agency to develop, implement, monitor,
and evaluate policies, programs, and projects that facilitate women's full
participation in, contribution to, and benefit from the economies and societies
in which they live

2 Be categorized under one or more of the following sectors:

economic growth, including sustainable agricultural development
private enterprise, including both formal and informal small businesses
and micro-enterprises
human capacity development, education and literacy
environment, including natural resource management, urban programs,
energy, and technology
democratic initiatives, including human rights
population, health (particularly AIDS), and nutrition









3. Include one or more of the following types of services:


applied research and analysis
monitoring and evaluation
technical assistance
training
information dissemination

Proposed activities must be financially supported by USAID field Missions, Regional
Offices, and/or USAID/Washington Bureaus to meet the WID Office's match
requirements.

Requests will be evaluated on the basis of the following criteria:

1. Do they enhance integration of WID into Mission activities?

2. Will Missions, Regional Offices and/or USAID/Washington Bureaus assume
much of the management responsibility?

3. Will the activity be replicable, self-sustaining, and cost-effective?

4. Does the implementing organization have the institutional capacity and WID
expertise to carry out the proposed activity?

B. WID Funding for USAID Missions and Bureaus

Requests will be considered for activities that enhance the integration of WID into
USAID Mission and Bureau activities, train USAID Mission and Bureau staff, and meet
general technical assistance activities. Funds should be used to supplement and
encourage additional spending for women and expansion of development activities,
but not as a substitute for other USAID funds that benefit women's development.
Inquiries and requests should be addressed to the WID Office.

When considering WID assistance, Missions and Bureaus should keep in mind the
Agency's funding cycle. The timely provision of assistance also depends on the type
of Mission or Bureau funding: current year, bilateral, and non-bilateral. Non-bilateral,
current year funds are suggested when a quick response is required. The use of
bilateral funds necessitates cost negotiations that often result in a slower response
time and a delay in implementation of the scope of work.

Funding options for WID assistance range from partial funding provided by the Office
of Women in Development to full funding provided by the USAID Mission or Bureau.
Some possible funding approaches are described below. Please note that the funding
options and mechanisms are undergoing revision. Check with the WID Office for the










latest information regarding funding.


* USAID Missions and Bureaus may use work orders to request specific activities
and deliverables from existing WID Office projects. WID can provide a dollar-to-
dollar funding match.


For example, a field Mission requests WID Office collaboration
in conducting a needs assessment and in designing and
implementing a training workshop. It includes follow-on
technical assistance activity aimed at building skills and
capacity to address gender issues among technical staff and
Host Country Counterparts. The Mission provides $37,500 of
its Project Development and Support funds to cost-share the
total effort through a work order to a WID Office training
contract. The WID Office provides another $37,500 from its
matching funds in the project toward the total estimated cost of
$75,000.


S USAID Missions and Bureaus may participate in existing WID Office contracts
without a WID match. Such activities are 100% funded by the USAID Mission or
Bureau and benefit from the quick response time made possible through the use
of existing contracts and from the access to gender sector specialists.

Requests from Missions and Bureaus need not be in the form of a formal proposal.
They can send E-mail memorandum which descriptively satisfy the general guidelines
stated above. They should include a proposed budget and scope-of-work.

C. Unsolicited Proposals

Each year the WID Office funds a very limited number of activities proposed by
organizations that do not have a current grant or contract with USAID. Note however,
that organizations requesting funds must be currently registered with USAID in
Washington or in country field Missions. Proposals are also accepted to amend
existing grants or contracts.

Funding from the WID Office requires that funds be matched (co-funded) in equal
amount by another funding source within USAID (such as a field mission or a regional
bureau). It is the responsibility of the contractor or grantee to identify and obtain the
agreement of that co-funding source. However, proposals may be submitted prior to
securing co-funding arrangements if specific opportunities have been identified and
matching is likely.









Proposals should Include the following components:

1. Purpose and goals -- what is/are the basic purposes) of the activity(ies)
being proposed? What is/are the overall goals) of the project?

2. Objectives -- what are the specific objectives to be achieved?

3. Project description -- key elements of the project. How will it work?

4. Rationale -- how does/do the proposed activity(ies) relate to the policies and
programs of your institution and USAID and the WID office strategic
priorities? What is the potential for project activities to contribute to the
knowledge base about gender issues? What are the potential contributions
to policy dialogue guidelines and/or policy reform? How will the project
contribute to the development of training materials for WID? Does the work
contemplated involve women in all phases of the activity? Does it strengthen
women's organizations? Does it promote sustainable development?

NOTE: Some projects may not relate to all of the issues identified under
"Rationale" (4) above, but proposals should respond carefully to the
questions which are relevant. The rationale should also show linkages of
project activities to one or more WID priority areas as noted above.

5. Background -- this should briefly summarize existing studies and/or project
and program experience showing that the activity(ies) is/are an important
area of study, training, information/communication, and/or technical
assistance.

6. Institutional capacity -- this should demonstrate the institutional capacity and
the WID expertise of the implementing organization to carry out the proposed
activity(ies).

7. Deliverables to the WID Office -- specifically which products, such as reports,
training materials, state-of-the-art papers, etc. will be delivered to WID? If
the major output of the activity is research or information, how will or could
the information be communicated in a practical way to effect change? What
is the dissemination strategy for materials produced?

8. Projected time line -- this should include all phases of the proposed project,
with dates for completion of all deliverables.

9. Budget -- the budget should be a 2-column budget showing how funds will
be allocated, both for WID matching funds and funds from a project, mission,
or bureau which will "trigger" the matching funds. A sample piece of co-










funding budget is shown below. Note that it is only intended to provide an
example of structure, and is not meant to indicate particular budget
categories or funding levels.

SAMPLE CO-FUNDING BUDGET

Item Request from WID Matching Portion

Technical Personnel $75,000 $75,000
Support Personnel 12,000 12,000
Travel 8,000 8,000
Operational Research 50,000 50,000
Communications 3,000 3.000

Total $148,000 $148,000

Deadlines for submittal process:

Early submission ensures adequate time for consideration and improves the chances
that funds are still available. Proposals should be received by mid-July to be
considered for funding in the following Fiscal Year. Fiscal years begin October 1 and
end September 30.

Proposals should be submitted to:

Director,
Women in Development Office
Agency for International Development
Room 714 SA-18
Washington, D.C. 20523-1816
(Tel: 703/875-4668)

D. Selected WID Co-Funded Project and Activity Descriptions

Following are example descriptions of match-funded WID activities.








TITLE OF ACTIVITY:

Citizen Participation Project--Partners of the Americas

SECTOR: Democracy and Governance

PURPOSE: The project promotes democratic skills and increases citizen participation
in civic organizations and agencies that promote open and free societies. The WID
funds will provide resources to strengthen work with women's groups and gender
issues in all programs, increase the number of civic projects awarded seed grants,
expand the size and scope of planned workshops, and enable partnerships to assist
more civic organizations at the local level.

CONTRIBUTION TO WID PROGRAM: Linkages to NGOs throughout the LAC region
and with U.S. based chapters of Partners of the Americas. Models for community
based research and training which can be used in other settings.


FUNDING:


WID: $713,673
MATCH: $713,673


SAID MATCHING SOURCE:


LAC Bureau


DURATION: 3 years


TYPE OF ACTION:

HOW INITIATED:


Grant to Partners of the Americas

LAC Bureau request










TITLE OF ACTIVITY:

The Environmental Education and Communication Project
(GREENCOM)

SECTOR: Environment

PURPOSE: To integrate WID issues, analyses, studies and information into
GREENCOM activities. Gender differences and the role of women in environmental
education and communication (EE&C) play an important part in the impact of EE&C
activities and in GREENCOM operations research and information exchange activities.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE WID OFFICE: GREENCOM intends to provide the WID
Office with a model of how to address WID/gender issues throughout all project
activities, rather than as a remedial set of activities. It also represents collaboration
among three offices.

FUNDING: WID: $588,000
MATCH: $672,000

USAID MATCHING FUND SOURCE: G/E/Environment and Natural Resources and
G/H CD/Education

DURATION OF ACTIVITY: Five years

TYPE OF ACTION: Contract

HOW INITIATED: G/HCD/Education Office request









TITLE OF ACTIVITY:


Demographic Health Survey (DHS)

SECTOR: Health and Population

PURPOSE: To provide a DHS/WID analyst to undertake comparative research on
women's status and employment worldwide.

First year: comparative analysis of women's employment and other indicators
of women's position in DHS/II countries.
Second year (currently): WID analyst is developing a women's status
and employment module to be undertaken in one DHS/III country.
Third year: Statistical analysis of new module and male surveys and
develop comparative reports and regional summaries.

CONTRIBUTION TO WID OFFICE: Will provide baseline information on women's
status and education worldwide, with linkages to women's fertility preferences a key
WID Office research effort.

FUNDING: WID: $492,500
MATCH: $492,500

SAID MATCHING FUND SOURCE: G/R&D/POP

DURATION OF ACTIVITY: 5/19/92 9/30/96

TYPE OF ACTION: Contract

HOW INITIATED: WID Office Initiative










TITLE OF ACTIVITY:


African Women: Community Development and Combined
Technologies (CODEL)

SECTOR: Economic Growth/Environment & Natural Resources/ Democracy

PURPOSE: The objectives of this three year project are to develop three combined
technology community projects in east Africa (Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania) and one
case study project focused on women in development. The objective of the
combined technology projects is to identify women's traditional wisdom about
sustainable management of natural resources and fuse this knowledge with modern
technologies for improved environmental and agricultural management. The objective
of the women in development case study is to break new ground in understanding the
factors that lead to success in community development.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE WID OFFICE: CODEL will present a case study of
women in development within the NGO forum at the Beijing conference. In addition,
this project contributes to other efforts funded by the WID office in democracy,
participatory development, environment, and sustainable development.

FUNDING: $850,000

SAID MATCHING FUND SOURCE: BHR/PVC (Bureau for Humanitarian
Response/Office of Private and Voluntary Cooperation)

DURATION OF ACTIVITY: FY93-95

TYPE OF ACTION: Add-on to the Cooperative Agreement entitled, "African Women:
Community Development and Combined Technologies" awarded to CODEL under the
FHA/PVC's umbrella "Matching Grant Project (938-158)".

HOW INITIATED: BHR/PVC and WID Office collaboration









TITLE OF ACTIVITY:

LAC Regional Municipal Development/Regional
Government Project

SECTOR: Democracy and Governance

PURPOSE: To promote gender equity in the structures, procedures and policies of
local governments in Spanish-speaking Latin American. The program will coincide
with movements for government reform and the consolidation of democracy in all of
the countries of the region, understood to imply an amplification of municipal
responsibilities in local economic development. Its specific objectives lie in the
production and circulation of knowledge and validation of strategies for promoting
gender equity. The project will interface with the LAC Regional Municipal
Development/Regional Government Project and provide a synergism to enhance both
efforts. The projects will operate under combined project management in RHUDO/SA.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE WID PROGRAM: This builds on phase one of the Women
and Local Government Project which has produced models now of interest across the
region and in other regions as well. Phase 2 will focus on specific strategies for
promoting gender equity which can be used across the world.

FUNDING: WID: $500,000
MATCH: $500,000

SAID MATCHING SOURCE: RHUDO/SA field mission.

DURATION: 1 year with possible subsequent years

TYPE OF ACTION: Transfer of funds to RHUDO/SA field mission.

HOW INITIATED: RHUDO/SA field mission request.










V. SAID WID NETWORK

A. WID Office Staff Directory


OFFICE OF WOMEN IN DEVELOPMENT
Bureau for Global Programs, Field Support & Research
Agency for International Development
Room 714, SA-18
Washington DC, 20523-1816
Fax: 703-875-4633

OFFICE MANAGEMENT
Telephone (703)


ACTING DIRECTOR
Katherine M. Blakeslee


875-4668


875-4979


DEPUTY DIRECTOR
Martin J. Hewitt
PVOs, CTO Contract Mgmt, ENI

OFFICE STAFF

PROGRAM ANALYST
Pat Allen
Program s/Contracts
Procurement/Buy-Ins

PROGRAM ANALYST
John Chao
Statistical Analysis

SECRETARY
Donna P. Sediqi

TECHNICAL PERSONNEL


875-4668




875-4617



875-4668


PROJECT MANAGEMENT


WID STRATEGIES & RESOURCES (WIDSR)
PROJECT MANAGER
Rosalie Huisinga Norem, Ph.D.
Human Capacity Development
University Center, Training


875-4684








WIDSR DEPUTY MANAGER
Adam Koons, Ph.D.
Communications
Humanitarian Assistance

SUPPORT FOR U.N. CONFERENCE ON WOMEN
PROJECT MANAGER
Joan M. Wolfe

SECTOR SPECIALISTS

DEMOCRATIC INITIATIVES ADVISOR
Jenna Luche

ECONOMIC GROWTH ADVISOR
W. Philip Boyle, Ph.D.

ENVIRONMENT ADVISOR
Nancy K. Diamond, Ph.D.

EVALUATION ADVISOR
Mari H. Clark, Ph.D.

HEALTH AND POPULATION ADVISOR
Debra Schumann, Ph.D.

REGIONAL SPECIALISTS

AFRICA ADVISOR
Sylvie Morel-Seytoux

LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ADVISOR
Anne-Marie S. Urban

NEAR EAST AND ASIA ADVISOR
Rebecca M. Jennings

TECHNICAL SUPPORT STAFF

DATABASE AND PUBLICATIONS MANAGER
Jeff Franklin
MIS, Info/Dissemination
Publications Mgmt


875-4668





875-4662




875-4485


875-4984


875-4737


875-4699


875-4670




875-5508


875-4668


875-4668




875-4668










PROGRAM ASSISTANT
Jacinta M. McDonald
PMIS/MIS support
Computer tracking
Administrative (WIDSR)

SUPPORT FOR U.N. CONFERENCE ON WOMEN

U.N. CONFERENCE SENIOR TECHNICAL ADVISOR
Maria del Rio Rumbaitis, Ph.D.

U.N. CONFERENCE PROGRAM ASSISTANT
Lil diVittorio


B. WID Technical Advisors in Regional/Central Bureaus and Centers


NEAR EAST (NE)
Nagat EI-Sanabary
NE/DR/HR
Room 200, SA-2
Washington, DC 20523-0225
Tel: (202) 663-2484
Fax: (202) 663-2494


LATIN AMERICA & THE CARIBBEAN (LAC)
Patricia Martin
LAC/DPP/SDPP
Room 2246 NS
Washington, DC 20523-0048
Tel: (202) 647-8047
Fax: (202) 647-8098/8151

EUROPE & NEW INDEPENDENT STATES (ENI)
Lynellyn Long
ENI/HR/EHA
Room 4440 NS
Washington, D.C. 20523-0053
Tel: (202) 647-7626
Fax: (202) 736-7288


ASIA
Gretchen Bloom
ASIA/DRITR/SASI
Room 3214 NS
Washington, DC 20523-0021
Tel: (202) 647-3805
Fax: (202) 647-1805


ECONOMIC GROWTH CENTER
Lynn Hill
G/EG/SMIE
Room 300 SA-2
Washington, DC 20523-0230
Tel: (202) 663-2405
Fax: (202) 663-2708


875-4668


875-4104


875-4737









C. WID Committees and Working Groups at USAID/Washington

Note that mail addressed to all of the following people should include the office and
room number listed below, in addition to:

US Agency for International Development
Washington DC 20523.

AFRICA WID COMMITTEE


NAME

Joan Atherton


Carol Carolus


Dick Day


Kristan Drzewiecki


Sherry Grossman


Linda Howey


Phil Jones


Kathy Keel


Mike Magahuey


Carmelita E. Maness


ADDRESS

AFR/DP
Room 2495-NS

AFR/ARTS
Room 2744-NS

AFR/DP
Room 2495-NS

AFR/ONI
Room 301 SA-2

AFR/DP
Room 2495-NS

AFR/AA/DRCO
Room 2744-NS

AFR/ARTS
Room 2744-NS

AFR/DP
Room 2495-NS

AFR/ARTS
Room 2744-NS

AFR/EA
Room 3909-NS


TELEPHONE/FAX

202/647-2964
202/647-3364

202/647-8503
202/647-2993

202/647-3305
202/647-3364

202/663-2730
202/663-2797

202/647-2975
202/647-3364

202/647-9780
202/647-3804

202/647-9352
202/736-7130

202/647-3009
202/647-3364

202/647-9352
202/647-7130

202/647-5579
202/647-9805











Don Muncy


Rebecca Niec


Betty Williams


AFR/ONI
Room 301 SA-2

AFR/SWA
Room 3491-NS

AFR/DP
Room 2495-NS


202/663-2714
202/663-2797

202/647-9206
202/647-6032

202/647-3189
202/647-3364













NAME

Tracy Atwood


Jon Breslar


Nancy Hardy


Kerri-Ann Jones


Linda Morse
Chairperson

Carol Rice


Arthur Silver


Chuck Strickland


Charlotte Suggs


George Taylor


Richard Whitaker


Leslie Vinjamuri-Wright


ASIA WID COMMITTEE


ADDRESS

ANE/ASIA/TR
Room 3214 NS

ANE/ASIA/EA
Room 3310A NS

ANE/ASIA/SA
Room 3318 NS

ANE/ASIA/TR
Room 3214 NS

ANE/ASIA/AA
Room 3212 NS

ANE/ASIA/TR
Room 3214 NS

ANE/ASIA/FPM
Room 3313A-NS

ANE/ASIA/PD
Room 3208 NS

ANE/ASIA/ORA/O
Room 3208 NS

ANE/ASIA/TR
Room 3214 NS

ANE/ASIA/TR
Room 3214 NS

ANE/ASIA/FPM (CDIE)
Room 3313A NS


TELEPHONE/FAX

202/647-2860
202/647-9843

202/647-4519
202/647-3517

202/647-9668
202/647-7368

202/647-2694
202/647-9843

202/647-8298
202/647-9601

202/647-0916
202/647-9843

202/647-9639
202-736-4921

202/647-7477
202/647-1805

202/647-7475
202/647-1805

202/736-7460
202/647-9843

202/647-2876
202/647-9843

202/647-5624
202/736-4921










NEAR EAST WID COMMITTEE


NAME

Cherie Bellamy


Beatrice Beyer


Lynn Carter


Linda LeDuc


Pamela Mandel


Kenneth Prussner
Committee Chair

Diane Putman


Dwight Walker


Dorothy Young


ADDRESS

ANE/NE/DR
Room 208 SA-2

ANE/NE/ENA
Room 102 SA-2

ANE/DP
Room 3208 NS

ANE/NE/DP
Room 3313A NS

ANE/NE/ENA
Room 103 SA-2

ANE/NE/DR
Room 200 SA-2

ANE/NE/DR/MENA
Room 208 SA-2

ANE/NE/DR
Room 200 SA-2

ANE/N/ME/WB/G
Room 102 SA-2


TELEPHONE/FAX

202/663-2483
202/663-2494

202/663-2651
202/663-2643

202/647-5807
202/647-1805

202/647-5279
202/736-4921

202/663-2622
202/663-2643

202/663-2499
202/663-2494

202/663-2476
202/663-2494

202/663-2493
202/663-2494

202/663-2614
202/663-2643


_









EUROPE AND NEW INDEPENDENT STATES WOMEN'S ISSUES COMMITTEE


NAME

Paige Alexander


Valary Alston


Paul Ashin


Pamela Baldwin


John Batelle


Patricia Bekele


Aleksandra Braginski


Paula Bryan


Aida Cipriani


Catherine Cleland


Regina Coleman


Deborah Crane


Ellen Czaplewski


ADDRESS

ENI/EUR/RME/ER/NT
Room 6668 NS

ENI/EUR/PDP/PD
Room 6723 NS

ENI/NIS/PAC
Room 3327A NS

ENI/NIS/FA
Room 5665 NS

ENI/EUR/DR
Room 4440 NS

G/R&D/OIT
Room 205 SA-16

ENI/EUR/RME/ER/BLA
Room 4725 NS

ENI/NIS/DIHHR
Room 2637 NS

ENI/PCS/DAC
Room 6644 NS

ENI/EUR/DR/HS
Room 4720 NS

ENI/NIS/DIHHR
Room 2638 NS

ENI/EUR/RME/ECA/ST
Room 6851 NS

ENl/EUR/RME/ECA/FYR
Room 6851 NS


TELEPHONE/FAX

202/647-6091
202/647-5560

202/736-4107
202/647-6791

202/647-9970
202/736-7650

202/736-4627
202/647-9103

202/647-6982
202/647-6962

703/875-4174
703/875-4346

202/647-8674
202/647-8237

202/647-4536
202/736-7750

202/647-9139
202/647-6791

202/647-8725
202/647-8439

202/647-5876
202/647-6962

202/646-4073
202/647-5560

202/647-9700
202/647-5560










Odelphis Davis


Thelma Furlong


Steve Giddings


Keith Henderson


Jerry Hyman


Leroy Jackson


Denise Lee


Lynellyn Long


John McEnaney


Mary Mclntyre


Evelyn McLeod


Molly Mort


Maria Rendon


Patricia Shapiro


Norm Sheldon


ENI/EUR/RME/PD/PDB
Room 6668 NS

ENI/EUR/PDP/PA
Room 6644 NS

ENI/EEUD/UDH
Room 4440 NS

ENI/NIS/DIHHR
Room 2638 NS

ENI/EUR/DR/DPI
Room 4440 NS

ENI/PD/PSB
Room 3320A NS

ENI/NCA/C
Room 6644 NS

ENI/HR/EHA
Room 4440 NS

ENI/EUR/DR/DPI
Room 4440 NS

ENI/HR/EHA
Room 4440 NS

ENI/NIS/FA
Room 5665 NS

ENI/HR/HP
Room 2645 NS

ENI/RME/PD/PDB
Room 6663-NS

ENI/EUR/RME/ER/BLA
Room 4725-NS

ENI/EUR/DR/FS
Room 4440 NS


202/736-4766
202/647-5560

202/736-4078
202/647-6791

202/736-4487
202/647-6962

202/736-4812
202/736-7750

202/647-8262
202/647-6962

202/736-7045
202/736-7664

202/647-8231
202/647-6791

202/647-7626
202/736-7288

202/647-7307
202/647-6962

202/647-7153
202/647-6962

202/647-7646
202/647-9103

202/736-7758
202/736-7750

202/736-4818
202/736-7650

202/647-7427
202/647-8237

202/647-7201
202/647-6962










Jim Snell


Steve Sposato


Kathy Stermer


Dianne Tsitsos


Annette Tuebner


Nancy Tumavick


Barry Veret


Cynthia Wade


Mary Anne Walker


ENI/ED/AG
Room 4440 NS

ENI/ED/AG
Room 4440 NS

ENI/DG/PSP
Room 2638 NS

G/ENV/DP
Room 401 SA-2

ENI/NIS/PAC
Room 3327A NS

ENI/EEUD
Room 4441 NS

ENI/EUR/DR
Room 400 SA-2

ENI/ECA
Room 6754 NS

ENI/EUR/DR
Room 4440 NS


202/647-7687
202/647-6962

202/647-7217
202/647-6962

202/736-4266
202/736-7750

202/663-2534
202/663-2553

202/647-6964
202/736-7650

202/647-9134
202/736-7498

202/466-7410
202/466-7414

202/647-9256
202/647-5560

202/647-9586
202/736-7650










LATIN AMERICA AND


NAME

Robin Brinkley


Bernadette Bundy


Sharon Isralow


Anne Langhaug


Cecil McFarland


Jean Meadowroft


Erhardt Rupprecht


THE CARIBBEAN WID WORKING GROUP


ADDRESS TELEPHONE/FAX

LAC/TI 202/647-9133
Room 3253 NS

LAC/SAM 202/647-4410
Room 2251 NS 202/647-4533

LAC/DI 202/647-3096
Room 3253 NS 202/647-4533

LAC/DPP 202/674-5267
Room 2253 NS 202/647-8098

LAC/CEN 202/647-9540
Room 5258 NS 202/647-0102

LAC/DPP 202/647-5175
Room 2246 NS 202/647-8098

LAC/DPP 202/647-5597
Room 2246 NS 202/647-8098









GLOBAL BUREAU ECONOMIC GROWTH CENTER WID COMMITTEE


ADDRESS


TELEPHONE/FAX


Russell Anderson


Lynn Hill
Committee Chair

Harvey Hortik


David T. Johnston


Michael G. Kitay


Monica McKnight


Elisabeth Rhyne


Dale Sarro


John Wilkinson


G/PRE/EM
Room 500 SA-2

G/EG/SMIE
Room 300 SA-2

G/R&D/AGR/AP
Room 409F SA-18

G/R&D/EID
Room 608 SA-18

GC/G
Room 223 SA-2

G/EG/EIR
Room 500 SA-2

G/PRE/SMIE
Room 302 SA-2

G/EG
Room 501 SA-2

G/EG
Room 501E SA-2


202/663-2304
202/663-2149

202/663-2405
202/663-2708

703/875-4168
703/875-4379

703/875-4502
703/875-4949

202-663-2773
202/663-2772

202/663-2384
202/663-2149

202/663-2360
202/663-2708

202/663-2280
202/663-2149

202/663-2288
202/663-2373


NAME










D. WID Officers in USAID Field Missions


Please note that WID Officers change periodically, as do overseas phone numbers. If
you identify any mistakes or changes, please notify Jeffrey Franklin by E-Mail, at the
WID Office. Also, it is advisable that any correspondence addressed to people listed
here also indicate that the WID Officer is the intended recipient, so that it will be
forwarded to newly assigned Officers.

AFRICA REGION


For some African Missions the names of WID Coordinators
the names of WID Officers.


have been included after


COUNTRY/NAME

Benin
USAID/Cotonou
S. Suggs


Botswana
USAID/Gaborone
Kgalalelo Chetete


Burkina Faso
USAID/Ouagadougou
Jeanne Marie Zongo

Burundi
USAID/Bujumbura
Martin Schulman
Maria Bwarkira,
WID Coordinator

Cameroon
USAID/Yaounde
Theodor Bratrud

Cape Verde
USAID/Praia
Antero Veiga


LOCAL ADDRESS

Rue Caporal Anani
Bernard
B.P. 2021
Cotonou, Benin

IGI House, The Mall
Queens Road Corner
of Independence
Gaborone, Botswana

B.P. 35
Ouagadougou,
Burkina Faso

B.P. 1720
Avenue Du Zaire
Bujumbura, Burundi



Rue Nachtigal
B.P. 817
Yaounde, Cameroon

Rua Hoji Ya Yenna 81
C.P. 201
Praia, Cape Verde


TELEPHONE/FAX

(229) 300500
Fax: 301260



(267) 353982
Fax: 313072



(226) 335452
Fax: 308903


(257)(2) 23454
Fax: 22986




(237) 234014
Fax: 221890


(238) 614363
Fax: 611355









Chad
USAID/N'Djamena
Anita Mackie

Cote D'lvoire
REDSO/WCA-Abidjan
USAID/Abidjan
Fatou Rigoulot,
AFWID Advisor

Djibouti
USAID/Djibouti
John Lundgren

Eritrea
USAID/Asmara
Pamela Delargy

Ethiopia
USAID/Addis Ababa
Carla Barbiero

Gambia
USAID/Banjul
Barbara Jenson

Ghana
USAID/Accra
Denise Rollins

Guinea
USAID/Conakry
Sally Sharp
Dominique Jenkins
WID Coordinator

Guinea Bissau
USAID/Bissau
Mike Lukomski


Ave. Felix Eboue
B.P. 413
N'Djamena, Chad

5 Rue Jesse Owens
01 B.P. 1712
Abidjan, Cote D'lvoire



Plateau du Sepent Blvd.
Marechal Joffre, B.P. 185
Djibouti, Djibouti

34 Zera Yacob Street
Asmara, Eritrea


Bole Amice Rd.
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia


Fajara Kairaba Avenue
P.M.B. No. 19
Banjul, Gambia

Ring Road East
Accra, Ghana


B.P. 603,
American Embassy
1 E Etage Imm. Archeveche
Conakry, Guinea


Avenida Domingos Ramos
C.P. 297
Bissau, Guinea Bissau


(235) 513269
Fax: 515002


(225) 320979
Fax: 413544




(253) 353849
Fax: 352420


(291)(1) 123093
Fax: 117584


(251)(1) 610666
Fax: 613801


(220) 228533
Fax: 228066


(233)(21) 774315
Fax: 773465


(224) 4412163
Fax: 411985




(245) 212816/17
Fax: 201185










Kenya
USAID/Nairobi
Elizabeth Martella
Nimo All, Deputy
WID Officer

Kenya
REDSO/ESA-Nairobi
Wanjiku Muhato,
AFWID Advisor

Lesotho
USAID/Maseru
Candace Buzzard

Madagascar
USAID/Antananarivo
Josoa Razafindretsa

Malawi
USAID/Lilongwe
Stephanie Funk

Mali
USAID/Bamako
Cheryl Jennings
Maimouna Dienapo-
Sidibe, WID Coordinator

Mozambique
USAID/Maputo
Sidney Bliss

Namibia
USAID/Windhoek
Barbara Belding

Niger
USAID/Niamey
Keith Simmons
Felicia Lightfoot,
WID Coordinator


Sonalux House
Moi Avenue
P.O. Box 30261
Nairobi, Kenya


Sonalux House
Moi Avenue
P.O. Box 30261
Nairobi, Kenya

Kingsway
Maseru, Lesotho


14 & 16 Rue Raintovo
Antsahavola B.P. 620
Antananarivo, Madagascar

Nico Building
Lilongwe, Malawi


Rue Rochester NY &
Rue Mohamed V
B.P. 34
Bamako, Mali


35 Rua Mesquita
3rd Fl.
Maputo, Mozambique

Private Bag 12028
Ausspannplatz Lossen Str
Windhoek, 9000, Namibia

B.P. 11201
Niamey, Niger


(254)(2) 334141
Fax: 413549




(254)(2) 334141
Fax: 413549



(266) 312666
Fax: 310116


(261)(2) 21257
Fax: 34883


(265) 730166
Fax: 783181


(223) 265663
Fax: 223933




(258)(1) 26051
Fax: 490114


(264)(61) 225935
Fax: 227006


(227) 722661
Fax: 723918


33









Nigeria
USAID/Lagos
Bunmi Dosumu

Rwanda
USAID/Kigali
Claudia Cantell

Senegal
USAID/Dakar
Madiodio Niasse


South Africa
USAID/Pretoria
Maria Beebe


Swaziland
USAID/Mbabane
Jack Royer

Tanzania
USAID/Dar es Salaam
Hedwiga Mbuya


Togo
USAID/Lome
vacant

Uganda
USAID/Kampala
to be announced

Zambia
USAID/Lusaka
Pamela Straley

Zimbabwe
USAID/Harare
Margo Ellis


1601 Adeola Hopewell
Victoria Island
Lagos, Nigeria

Blvd. de la Revolution
B.P. 28
Kigali, Rwand

S.D.I.H. Building
Place de
I'lndependence
Dakar, Senegal

524 Church Street
Sancardia Building
Arcadia, 0007
Pretoria, South Africa

Central Bank Bldg.
Warner St.
Mbabane, Swaziland

3rd Floor, ATC House
Ohio Street
Dar es Salaam,
United Republic of Tanzania

Rue Pelletier Caventou
and Rue Vouban, B.P. 852
Lome, Togo

British High Commission
Obote Avenue
Kampala, Uganda

Plot No 2365
Katunjila Rd
Lusaka, Zambia

172 Rhodes Avenue
Harare, Zimbabwe


(234)(1)610097
Fax: 612815


(250) 5601/2
Fax: 74735


(221) 236680
Fax: 232965



(27)(12) 3238869
Fax: 3236443



(268) 22281
Fax: 44770


(255)(51) 30937
Fax: 46431



(228) 212992
Fax: 218856


(256)(41) 259791
Fax: 233417


(260)(1) 214911
Fax: 225741


(263)(4) 794521
Fax: 722418










LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN REGION


COUNTRY/NAME

Argentina
USAID/Buenos Aires
Juliana Abella

Barbados
USAID/Bridgetown
Michael Taylor

Belize
USAID/Belize City
Patrick McDuffie

Bolivia
USAID/LA Paz
Hector Diez De Medina

Brazil
USAID/Brasilia
Jennifer Adams

Chile
USAID Representative
Joan Carlos Diaz

Colombia
USAID/Bogota
Patricia Fisher Hurtado

Costa Rica
USAID/San Jose
Flora Ruiz

Dominican Republic
USAID/Santo Domingo
to be decided


Ecuador
USAID/Quito
to be decided


LOCAL ADDRESS

4300 Colombia,1425
Buenos Aires, Argentina


Canadian Imperial Bank
Broad Street
Bridgetown, Barbados

Gabourel Lane
Queen Street
Belize City,

Banco Popular Del Peru
Calles Mercado & Colo
La Paz, Bolivia

Avenida Das Nooes
Lote 3
Brasilia, Brazil

Codina Bldg
1343 Agustinas
Santiago, Chile

Calle 38, No. 8-61
Bogota, Colombia


1 KM. Al Norte De La
Embajada Americana
San Jose, Costa Rica

Calle Cesar
Nicolas Penson, #12
Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic

Avenida 12 de Octubre y
Avenida Patria
Quito, Ecuador


TELEPHONE/FAX

(54)(1) 7747611
FAX: 3253288


Bldg(8)(809) 4364950
Fax: 4294438


(501)(2) 30166/7
Fax: 30215


Bldg. (591)(2) 350120
326858
Fax: 391552

(55)(61) 2258607
Fax: 2259136


(56)(2) 6325211
Fax: 6380931


(57)(1) 2859921
Fax: 2885687


(506) 204545
Fax: 203434


(8)(809) 6859066
5412171
Fax: 6851539


(593)(2)521100
Fax: 561228









El Salvador
USAID/San Salvador
Carrie Thompson

Guatemala
USAID/ROCAP
Margaret Kromhout

Haiti
USAID/Port Au Prince
Gail Spence

Honduras
USAID/Tegucigalpa
Carmen Zambrana

Jamaica
USAID/Kingston
Kirk Dahlgren

Mexico
USAID/Mexico City
Nancy Sweeney

Nicaragua
USAID/Managua
Lawrence Odle

Panama
USAID/Panama City
Nilka de Varela

Paraguay
USAID/Asuncion
Claire Sorenson


Peru
USAID/Uma
William Egan


Uruguay
USAID/Montevideo
Juliana Abella


25 Avenida Norte
No. 1230
San Salvador, El Salvador

2 Calle 15-65 Zone 13
01013 Guatemala City
Guatemala

Harry Truman Blvd
Port Au Prince, Haiti


Avenida La Paz Frente
Embajada Americana
Tegucigalpa, Honduras

Jamaica Mutual Life
Center 2, 68 Oxford Rd
Kingston 5, Jamaica

Paseo de la Reforma 305
Mexico City 5, D.F.
Mexico

c/o Amer Embassy
Managua, Nicaragua


Apartado 6959
Panama City 5
Panama

1776 Lopez Avenue
Casilla Postal 402
Asuncion, Paraguay

Avenidas Inca Garcilaso
de la Vega and Espana
Lima, Peru

Lauro Miller 1776
Montevideo, Uruguay


(503) 981666
Fax: 980885


(502)(2) 320322
Fax: 320495


(509) 225500
225789
Fax: 239603

(504) 323120
Fax: 312776


(809)9263645
Fax: 9293752


(52)(5) 2110042
Fax: 5119980


(505)(2) 670502/4
Fax: 75711


(507) 636011
636740
Fax: 640104

(595)(21) 213715
Fax: 213728


(51)(14)
Fax:


333200
337034


(598)(2) 236061
405200
Fax: 400022










ASIA REGION


COUNTRY/NAME

Bangladesh
USAID/Dhaka
Rakha Rashid

Fiji
USAID/Suva
Linda Petersen

India
USAID/New Delhi
Heather Goldman

Indonesia
USAID/Jakarta
Cecily Mango

Nepal
USAID/Kathmandu
Sally Patton

Pakistan
USAID/Islamabad
Fatima Kassim

Philippines
USAID/Manila
Fatima Verzosa



Sri Lanka
USAID/Colombo
Kamalini Fernando

Thailand, Cambodia,
Mongolia
USAID/Bangkok
Susan Palmer


LOCAL ADDRESS


American Embassy Bldg.
Madani Avenue, Baridhara
Dhaka, Bangladesh

31 Loftus St.
Suva, Fiji


Shanti Path
Chanakyapuri 110021
New Delhi, India

Medan Merdeka
Selatan 5
Jakarta, Indonesia

Pani Pokhari
Kathmandu, Nepal


Diplomatic Enclave
Rama 5
Islamabad, Pakistan

Accelerando Bldg. (TJCC)
395 Sen. Gill J. Puyat
Avenue (Buendia Ext.),
Makati Metro
Manila, Philippines

210 Galle Rd.
Colombo 3
Colombo, Sri Lanka

SAID
37 Petchburi Soi 15
Petchburi Road
Bangkok, Thailand


TELEPHONE/FAX

(880)(2) 883531
Fax: 883648


(679) 311399
Fax: 300075


(91)(11) 6865301
Fax: 6868594


(62)(21) 360360
Fax: 3806694


(977)(1) 272424
Fax: 272357


(92)(51) 824071/9
Fax: 824086


(63)(2) 5217116
Fax: 5215241




(94)(1) 574333
Fax: 574264


(66)(2) 2553650
Fax: 2553730









NEAR EAST


COUNTRY/NAME


Egypt
USAID/Cairo
Aziza Helmy


Israel
USAID Rep/Jerusalem
Karen Turner

Israel (Tel Aviv)
USAID Affairs Officer
Harry Birnholz

Jordan
USAID/Amman
Pe Balikrishnan

Morocco
USAID/Rabat
Wafa Moussa Ouichou

Oman
USAID/Muscat
Michael Gould


Tunisia
USAID/Tunis
Mohamad Ali-Hassarri

Yemen
USAID/Sanaa
Joyce Davidson


LOCAL ADDRESS

8 Kasa El-Din
Salah St, Garden City
Cairo, Egypt

American Consulate
18 Agron Road
Jerusalem, Israel

American Embassy
71 Hayarkan Street
Tel Aviv, Israel

American Embassy
P.O. Box 354
Amman, Jordan

2 Ave. de Marrakech
B.P. 120
Rabat, Morocco

American Embassy
#968 Mumtaz-Mutrah,
AI-Jilai, Ruwi-Muscat,
Oman

144 Ave. de la Liberte
Tunis, Tunisia


Amran Road
Sanaa, Yemen


TELEPHONE/FAX

(20)(2) 3548211
Fax: 3562932


(972)(2) 253288
Fax: 259484


(972)(3) 654338
Fax: 663449


(962)(6) 820101
Fax: 820143


(212)(7) 62265
Fax: 707930


(968) 703000
Fax: 797778



(216)(1) 784300
Fax: 782464


(967)(2) 231213
Fax: 251578










VI. ADDITIONAL WID RESEARCH AND REFERENCE RESOURCES

In addition to the WID Office, there are other readily available sources for Women in
Development, and Gender Issues information and resources within, and outside of
USAID. The following resources do not comprise a comprehensive list but will serve
to assist in locating information.

A. USAID Center for Development Information and Evaluation (CDIE)

CDIE Library Bibliographies and Literature Search. In addition to the WID Collection
maintained on the shelves of the library (described in Section III, Part D), there are
extensive gender-related documents and reports listed in the USAID library computer
database. USAID documents alone pertaining to WID issues number in the
thousands. Many of them have not been widely circulated. They represent a very
valuable resource. In addition, many non-USAID references are listed. Numerous
outside databases can be accessed, including university and institutional libraries and
commercial sources.

Upon the request of USAID Washington and Mission staff, CDIE will perform literature
searches and develop bibliographies on given gender-related subjects, or by particular
authors or organizations. Topical citations are most easily identified in a search by
providing one or more keywords.

The public, as well as USAID staff are welcome to come in to the CDIE library and
use computer terminals to conduct their own literature searches. The terminals are
easy to use and library staff will assist in using them.

The library is located at 1601 N. Kent St., Rosslyn Plaza, Room. 105, Arlington, VA,
and is open to USAID staff and the public from 10:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Tel: (703) 875-4818. Fax: (703) 875-5269. USAID staff can E-Mail
requests for bibliographies or literature searches to: @CDIEINFO. Cables should be
addressed: CDIE/DI.

Tailored Information Packages. USAID staff may request that CDIE research
personnel identify, analyze, and select a group of documents, publications, excerpts,
and unpublished papers to meet requirements for a particular WID-related task.
These are packaged and sent to USAID Mission staff via pouch or APO with a cover
memo explaining the selection and summarizing important points. For Washington
staff, a package of citations and references are provided which can either be a broad
sweep of the development literature or a narrowly targeted selection, depending on
the requester's information needs. Contact CDIE as listed above. For more
information or to discuss special requests contact John Butsch, CDIE/Development
Information Center Coordinator: (703) 875-4818; or Diane Russell, Research Manager
of CDIE/Research and Reference Service: (703) 875-4854.


_









B. CDIE Research Staff Contact List

USAID personnel can contact research staff of CDIE's Research and Reference
Service directly, according to the particular type of information needed. The main
telephone number is 703/875-4807.

Democracy, Governance, and Education:

Michele Wozniak-Schimpp
Healther McHugh
Rachel Patterson
Michael Cacich

Health and Population:

Lane Vanderslice
Jim Esselman

Environment and Natural Resources:

Roberto Martin
Molly Davis

Economic Growth:

Janice Stallard
Dana Wichterman
Jeff Bland
John Coakley

Africa Bureau Information Center:

Patricia Mantey, Manager
Kim Mahling Clark
Monika Talwar

Regional Bureau Liaisons:

Anne Langhaug: LAC
Naydu Yaniz: LAC
Cheryl Simmons: AFR
Rebecca Latorraca: ANE (NE)
Leslie Vinjamuri Wright: ANE (ASIA)










C. USAID Documents and Publications


USAID documents identified through a bibliography request or literature search should
be ordered directly from the Development Information Services Clearinghouse (DISC).
Many of the documents are stored on microfiche and must be printed to order. (Each
document has an identification number which must be used when ordering. The
number can be found by CDIE Library staff or by using a CDIE reference computer
terminal.) Orders are free to USAID staff. Others will be charged a fee listed with the
document in the database. Contact DISC at: Tel (703) 351-4006, Fax (703) 351-4039.
Written orders should be addressed to the DISC Document Distribution Unit, 1500
Wilson Blvd, #1010, Arlington, Virginia, 22209, or through the pouch to AID/DISC SA-
18, Room 303. Orders should include the title, document identification number (and
payment, if applicable).

D. Additional Reference Resources

University of Maryland WID Collection. The McKeldin Library at the University of
Maryland, in College Park MD, maintains a WID collection, It was initiated during the
UN Decade for Women and contains considerable historic references from that period,
including hundreds of government and institutional research reports and publications.
The library includes a large part of the WID Office collection which was moved there
to provide greater public access. The WID holdings are updated periodically and
maintained by the Women's Studies Program. The catalog of holdings can be
accessed by computer through Internet as part of the national university library catalog
system. WID references are coded as such within the general catalog. Materials may
be used on-site, and some may be obtained through interlibrary loan. Library hours
are 8:00 am to 10:00 pm weekdays, and varying weekend and holiday hours. Further
information is available from Betty Day, Women's Studies Bibliographer, at Tel:(301)
405-9117.

USDA/OFDA. The USDA/OFDA Famine Mitigation Activity Project maintains a library
which includes gender literature, particularly with respect to food security and
emergency assistance. A search for particular topics, and copies of documents can
be requested. Further information is available from Eileen Runcy at 202-690-0920.

Interlibrary Loan Services. For USAID staff the CDIE Library can borrow books and
acquire photocopies of journal articles from a large network of libraries in the United
States. Books cannot be sent to overseas Missions. However, some materials, such
as photocopies of article or book chapters can be faxed or mailed, as appropriate to
overseas and U.S. locations. Make requests directly through the CDIE Library using
the contact information given above.










VII. WID OFFICE PUBLICATIONS LIST (June 1994)


The WID Office offers the documents on this list free of charge to USAID staff and the
public. Please note that the WID office can only respond to requests from this list.
Other sources of WID references and documents are discussed in the "Information"
section of this guide.

Please use the order form at the back of this list to indicate the documents you are
requesting. Documents to be ordered are identified by title and by the number in
parenthesis following the title. Send your order to:

Publications Manager
Office of Women in Development
Agency for International Development
Room 714, SA-18
Washington, D.C. 20523-1816

NOTE: preceding a title indicates a new listing since the last publication of this list.

This list is divided into the following topic sections:

WID Office Policies and Activities
Training and Gender Integration Guidelines
Environment/Natural Resources/Agriculture
Education
Microenterprise/Labor/Employment
Economic Change/Structural Adjustment
Democracy
General

WID OFFICE POLICIES AND ACTIVITIES

* WID Publications List (WID-021)
USAID/WID
June 1994 update, 10 pp.

* Offiice of Women in Development User's Guide (WID-001)
USAID/WID. Spring 1994, 47 pp.

Intended for use by both USAID and others seeking information about the USAID WID
mandate and the resources available to operationalize it. Includes sections on
funding, services, USAID/WID personnel, and publications list.











* Women in Development Report, FYs 1991 and 1992 (PN-ABP-733)
USAID/RD/WID, 1993, 75 pp.

Report to Congress presents WID highlights for 1991/92. Reports on progress in
strengthening the gender focus throughout USAID in each bureau. Describes the
application of lessons learned to the private sector, education, environment and
natural resources, democracy and governance, health and nutrition, population, and
participant training.

Women in Development: The First Decade 1975-1984, A Report to Congress
(PN-AAS-673)
USAID/WID. 1985, 59 pp.

Report updates information submitted to Congress on a biennial basis and charts the
progress made by USAID during the United Nations Decade for Women.

Women in Development: A Report to Congress by USAID, FY 1989 and 1990
(PN-ABH-695)
1991, 93 pp.

Describes progress made by USAID in FY 1989 and FY 1990 in fulfilling the WID
congressional mandate.

USAID Action Items for Women in Development (WID-003)
Article in USAID's Front Lines Monthly, August 1988. 1p.

Reports on the Administrator's five basic requirements for Bureaus and Missions to
address gender issues by developing and implementing WID Action Plans, collecting
gender-disaggregated data, etc.

USAID Policy Paper, Women in Development (PN-AAL-777)
October 1982, 12 pp.

Document delineates and explains the Agency's WID policy as it evolved over the nine
years from the initial congressional WID mandate stated in the well-known 1973 Percy
Amendment.









TRAINING and GENDER INTEGRATION GUIDELINES


* Guidelines for Integrating Issues of Women in Development into University
International Development Activities (PN-ABN-962)
Mary Hill Rojas and Barbara Thomas-Slayter.
USAID/WID, 1991, 31 pp.

Presents a model to incorporate gender issues into university/USAID activities and
institutionalize gender perspective into university structure. Universities can benefit
from the expanding body of gender literature and gender analysis. Included is an
implementation case study of SARSA at Virginia Polytechnic Institute.

Gender Information Framework (PN-ABM-009)
Virginia Hubbs, Al Rollins, The MayaTech Corp., Ron Grosz.
USAID/WID. June, 1991, 90 pp.

Presents guidelines for incorporating gender considerations into the development
programming cycle of USAID

Gender Information Framework Executive Summary (PN-ABM-008)
Virginia Hubbs, Al Rollins, The MayaTech Corp. and Ron Grosz.
USAID/WID. June 1991, 18 pp.

Summarizes process of incorporating gender into USAID development programming
cycle.

Gender Information Framework Pocket Guide (PN-ABC-451)
USAID/WID, 1989

A very brief, 3.5" X 8.5" brochure with inserts covering USAID's CDSS, AP, PID, and
PP. Intended for those who have attended a GIF training or who are involved in
gender and/or WID activities and may wish to have a brief reminder of the GIF
process.

A Trainer's Manual Volume I -- How to Conduct a Workshop to Integrate Gender
Considerations into Development Programming (PN-ABM-010)
Al Rollins, Virginia Hubbs, The MayaTech Corp, Ron Grosz
USAID/WID, October 1992, 147 pp.

A guide for training specialists to assist USAID personnel to better integrate gender
considerations in development activities. Includes workshop logistics and preparation,
individual sessions, flip charts, etc., for three days of training.










A Trainer's Manual Volume II -- Opportunities for Creative Solutions: Integrating
Gender Concerns into Development Projects (PN-ABM-011)
Al Rollins, Virginia Hubbs, The MayaTech Corp. and Ron Grosz
USAID/WID, October 1992, 123 pp.

A companion to Volume I, this document is intended to assist development
professionals to provide effective training in the incorporation of gender considerations
into their development programs and projects. Includes information for WID specialists
with little training background as well as for expert trainers seeking help in gender
issues.

Guidelines for Increasing Female Participation in USAID Training Programs for Asia
and the Near East (PN-ABG-704)
Laurel Elmer. USAID/WID, September 1990, 21 pp.

Covers policy considerations, project design, and implementation strategies.

Institutional Strategies for Successfully Incorporating Gender Analysis and Strategy
Design: The USAID Experience, A Focus on Training (PN-ABJ-679)
Ron Grosz. USAID/WID, May 1991, 14 pp.

Examines efforts of the WID Office to create an institutional demand in USAID for
training in gender issues in development.

EVALUATIONS

* USAID Evaluation News: Focus on Women in Development (WID-40)
USAID Center for Development Information and Evaluation
Vol. 3, No. 3, 1991, 24 pp.

Collection of articles which include a WID overview, discussion of the economic and
social impacts of girls' primary education, gender in development communications,
women in microenterprise, and gender-oriented project design and evaluation
methods.

Women in Development: USAID's Experience, 1973-1985, Vol. I (PN-AAL-087)
Program Evaluation Report No. 18
Alice Steward Carloni. USAID, April 1987, 94 pp.

Synthesizes information from 102 USAID projects covering a 12-year time span.
Documents how USAID has interpreted its women in development mandate over the
years and how policy is being implemented.








9


Women In Development: USAID's Experience, 1973-1985, Vol. II: Ten Field Studies
(PN-ABF-235)
USAID Working Paper No. 131. Paula 0. Goddard, ed.
USAID/CDIE, December 1989, 207 pp.

Contains edited case studies that form a companion to the synthesis paper presented
above as Volume I. Includes projects in Botswana, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Dominican
Republic, Guatemala, Kenya, Nepal, Morocco; one with the Inter-American
Commission of Women of the OAS, and the Caribbean Agricultural Extension Project.

ENVIRONMENTINATURAL RESOURCES/AGRICULTURE

* Gender and the Environment: Crosscutting Issues in Sustainable Development
(PN-ABN-589)
USAID/WID, June 1993, 11 pp.

With the idea that women must be included in every sector of development activities
for those activities to succeed, the roles of women are examined to better incorporate
them into all phases of development projects. In particular, women's roles as natural
resource managers, community-based organizers, and social and cultural educators
are explored.

* Gender in Community Development and Resource Management: An Overview
(PN-ABP-468)
Rekha Mehra. World Wildlife Fund and International Center for Research on Women.
USAID/WID, March 1993, 30 pp.

Rapid environmental degradation and resource depletion, combined with poverty and
limited access to technical information have constrained women's ability to manage
resources. Report examines socio-economic, institutional, policy and program-related
constraints and presents case studies from India, Kenya, Nepal, and the Philippines
which provide useful lessons.

* Gender and Agriculture & Natural Resource Management in Latin America and the
Caribbean: An Overview of the Literature (PN-ABL-599)
GENESYS Special Studies No. 7
The Futures Group for USAID/WID, June 1992, 28 pp.

This literature review examines data on respective roles, responsibilities, interactions,
and impacts of women and men in A&NRM across Latin America. Report focuses on
sustainable development, prevention/reduction of deforestation, conservation of
biodiversity, and water conservation/quality. For each sub-region it describes research
gaps, discusses implications of these gaps, and recommends where further research
is needed.










* Women's Participation in the Cogtong Bay Mangrove Management Project: A Case
Study (PN-ABP-569)
Rekha Mehra, Margaret Alcott, and Nilda S. Baling
World Wildlife Fund and International Center for Research on Women, USAID/WID,
March 1993, 55 pp.

Project in Philippines sought to provide incentives for increased community
management of coastal resources. This case study recommends how to improve the
integration of women into the project and identifies short-term low-cost technical
assistance to increase women's participation.

The Role of Women in Evolving Agricultural Economies of Asia and the Near East:
Implications for USAID's Strategic Planning (PN-ABH-730)
Inji Islam and Ruth Dixon-Mueller. May 1991, 105 pp.

Examines the dynamic characteristics of economic growth within Asian and Near
Eastern countries in five strategic areas: agribusiness development, natural resources
management, agricultural planning and analysis, infrastructure management, and trade
and market development. Concludes that investing specifically in women is more likely
to achieve greater positive benefits than similar investments in men. Offers
recommendations for field missions.

Gender Issues in Agriculture and Natural Resources Management (PN-ABC-450)
S. Russo and J. Bremer-Fox. April 1989, 80 pp.

Provides methods, guidelines, and examples that facilitate the integration of women
into agriculture and natural resource development projects.

Gender Issues in Farming Systems Research and Extension: A Survey of Current
Projects (Executive Summary) (PN-ABC-452)
S. Poats, J. Gearing, S. Russo. August 1989, 9 pp.

Analysis of the mechanisms that have led to either successes or failures in integrating
gender analysis and issues into a selected group of agricultural research and
extension projects that are using the Farming Systems Research and Extension
approach.

Gender and Food Aid (PN-ABJ-794)
Judy Bryson, Emily C. Moore, The MayaTech Corp., Martin J. Hewitt.
USAID/WID, October 1992, 49 pp.

Reviews food aid issues, including impact on women of policy issues. Discusses
program food aid concessionall sales and bilateral food grants) and various types of
project food aid.









Women's Roles and Gender Differences in Development: The Nemow Case
(WID-025)
Ingrid Palmer. Kumarian Press, 1985, 53 pp.

An agricultural case study to assist development planners in designing development
projects which consider the impact on class and gender groupings.

Women's Roles and Gender Differences in Development: The Impact of Agrarian
Reform on Women (WID-028)
Ingrid Palmer. Kumarian Press, 1985, 52 pp.

Examines case studies in land distribution between households, adjudication of
traditional land systems, settlement schemes, collectives and producer cooperatives,
and women's cooperative farms.

Women's Roles and Gender Differences in Development: The Kano River Irrigation
Project (WID-029)
Cecile Jackson. Kumarian Press, 1985, 65 pp.

Examines the consequences for women of the Kano River Project in Northern Nigeria,
in terms of economic contributions and overall impact. Includes an analysis of how
local cultural differences led to very different impacts on two groups of women.

Women's Roles and Gender Differences in Development: Sex Roles in the Nigerian
TIV Farm Household (WID-026)
Mary E. Burfisher and Nadine R. Horenstein
Kumarian Press, 1985, 40 pp.

This case study provides a planning methodology that accounts for sex roles in the
farming household, with a focus on division of labor, income, and financial obligations.

Women's Roles and Gender Differences in Development: The Ilora Farm Settlement in
Nigeria (WID-027)
Heather Spiro. Kumarian Press, 1985, 48 pp.

This case study examines women's roles in settlement schemes, including positive
and negative outcomes, and provides insights for planners.

Women's Roles and Gender Differences in Development: Agricultural Policy
Implementation: A Case Study from Wester Kenya (WID-030)
Kathleen Staudt. Kumarian Press, 1985, 65 pp.

This study examines the impact of agricultural policy on women in the Kakamega
District in Western Kenya in the 1970s.










Women's Roles and Gender Differences in Development: The Impact of Male Out-
Migration on Women in Farming (WID-031)
Ingrid Palmer. Kumarian Press, 1985, 78 pp.

This monograph examines the lives of women who remain behind in rural areas when
men of the household migrate to seek employment elsewhere.

EDUCATION

* Lessons Leamed In Basic Education in the Developing World: A USAID Workshop
(PN-ABQ-959)
Office of Education, Bureau for Science and Technology,
USAID, 1990, 58 pp.

Consolidation of lessons from research and experience during the past decade.
Presented are major conclusions in four key areas: girls' education, strategic planning
and management improvement, instructional technologies, and teacher training.
Intended as a catalyst for designing new interventions.

Educating Girls and Women: Investing in Development (WID-020),
Elizabeth King. World Bank, 1990, 17 pp.

Examines the importance of family, school, and communal factors and of education
policy in increasing the education of girls and women in different developing regions.
Outlines the benefits of female education.

Investing in Female Education for Development: Women in Development Strategy for
the 1990s in Asia and the Near East (Summary Paper) (PN-ABH-728)
Jere R. Behrman. The Futures Group. USAID/WID, May 1991, 36 pp.

Reviews the current state of female education and development in Asia and the Near
East as a basis for Women in Development strategies in the 1990s. Includes
implications for policy.

Female Education and Socio-Economic Indicators Bibliography (WID-022)
Faith Knutsen, ABEL Project,
Creative Associates, February 1990, 8 pp.









Educating Girls: Strategies to Increase Access, Persistence, and Achievement
(PN-ABK-950)
Karen Tietjen and Cynthia Prater, ed.
Advanced Basic Education and Literacy Project AED,
USAID: WID and Education Office, December 1991, 120 pp.

Reviews the policies, programs, and projects implemented by governments, donors,
and other institutions to increase girls' access and achievement at the primary school
level. Examines both formal and alternative approaches in an effort to identify those
strategies that have had measurable impact.

Women's Education: Findings from Demographic and Health Surveys (WID-023)
IRD/Macrosystems, Inc., March 1990, 17 pp.

Results from 28 national level surveys, carried out under the Demographic and Health
Surveys Program, show the relationships between women's education and fertility and
family planning, and women's education and maternal and child health.

Female Education: Summary of Research Findings of BRIDGES and ABEL Projects
(WID-024)
Research Triangle Institute.
USAID:WID and Education Office, February 1990, 4 pp.

These are individual summaries of the cross-cutting relationships of female education
and infant mortality, life expectancy, fertility, and labor force participation.

The Economic and Social Impacts of Girls' Primary Education in Developing Countries
(PN-ABJ-598)
Maria Floro, Joyce M. Wolf,
USAID ABEL Project, Creative Associates, December 1990, 105 pp.
(Specify English, French, or Spanish).

Worldwide literature review focuses on the impact of education. Explores the existing
evidence on the impact of girls' education, particularly primary education.

Investing in Female Education for Development (PN-ABH-731)
Jere R. Behrman. May 1991, 27 pp.

Examines the extent of the gender gap in education in the countries of Asia and the
Near East. Outlines analytical frameworks for measuring determinants and impacts of
female schooling. Evaluates policy options.










Gender Issues in Basic Education and Vocational Training (PN-AAW-364)
Mary Anderson. USAID/WID, February 1986, 31 pp.

This manual is for designers, implementors, and evaluators of basic education and
vocational training projects. Presents ideas on when and how to integrate girls and
women into projects so that the likelihood of achieving project objectives and purposes
is improved.

Educating Girls: Achieving the Development of Guatemala -- First National Conference
(PN-ABK-452)
USAID/Guatemala, January 1991, 62 pp.

Summary of Guatemala's first national conference on the role that the education of
girls plays in the country's social and economic development. Includes recent data on
girl's education and the principal conclusions and recommendations made at the
conference.

Educating Girls: Achieving Guatemala's Development -- Planning and Implementing a
National Conference for Policy Makers: A Development Model (PN-ABL-229)
Suzanne A. Clay. USAID/Office of Health and Education, 1991, 28 pp.

Companion to PN-ABK-452, described immediately above. Report is a "how to
manual" for initiating public and private sector cooperative activities to promote girls'
education. Includes procedures, processes, and lessons learned from USAID
Guatemala experience in creating a policy dialogue and action issue by planning and
implementing a national conference.

MICROENTERPRISEILABORIEMPLOYMENT

* USAID and Microenterprise, 1990-1993: Report to Congress (PN-ABM-794)
Microenterprise Monitoring System
USAID, June 1992, 14 pp.

Describes microenterprise program in detail, with particular attention on women.
Includes beneficiary data and quantitative data on loan numbers and magnitudes for
each recipient country.









* Gender and Generation in the World's Labor Force, Module One: International and
National Trends (including wall chart) (PN-ABQ-348)
USAID/WID, December 1993, 33 pp.

First in a series whose purpose is to provide an overview of gender-based trends and
variations in labor force participation in the world's regions; explore associations with
educational level, marital and childbearing status, and wage levels; and to identify
strengths and weaknesses of various sources of labor data.

This module analyzes global labor force differences, explores the extent to which
women are economically active in relation to men, and compares men's and women's
work patterns. An accompanying wall chart prepared by the Bureau of the Census
presents the data statistically and graphically.

* Gender and Trade and Investment in Latin America and the Caribbean: An Overview
of the Literature (PN-ABN-187)
GENESYS Special Studies No. 8. Mary T Mulhern and Suzanne B. Mauze.
The Futures Group for USAID/WID, December 1992, 91 pp.

Prepared by request of the USAID/LAC Bureau WID Working Group this literature
review examines how T&l topics have been analyzed with a gender-oriented
approach, and suggests further research needs. Analysis of labor market issues is a
key theme of this document. It identifies and explores the strong linkages between
T&I, labor, and gender, with attention to the differential impacts on men and women,
and discrimination within the labor force.

Financial Services for Women -- Tools for Microenterprise Programs: Financial
Assistance Section (PN-ABL-375)
Jean C. Weidemann, Weidemann Associates
USAID/WID, March 1992, 40 pp.

State-of-the-art guide on financing women's enterprises. Discusses the benefits as well
as misconceptions about financing women, women's special credit needs and
problems, and operational issues affecting programs. Includes a detailed review of
available financing for female entrepreneurs.

Gender Issues in Small Scale Enterprise (PN-AAY-219)
Maria Otero, Laurence Semenza, et al.
USAID/WID, July 1987, 74 pp.

Summarizes the reasons why women must be integrated into small and
microenterprise development, presents a set of guidelines, and examines the
implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of SME projects in regard to gender
issues.










Making the Case for the Gender Variable: Women and the Wealth and Well Being of
Nations (PN-ABC-454)
Rae L. Blumberg, University of California San Diego.
USAID/WID, October 1989, 115 pp.

Document makes case for gender as a critical variable in development. An overview
and specific examples of women's contributions to national economies are given.
Topics presented include the impact of women's production and control of income,
women's use of income, implications for the African food crisis, women food
producers' contributions and constraints, the consequences of women's education, and
policy implications for women's participation in national economies.

Executive Summary: Making the Case for the Gender Variable: Women and the
Wealth and Well Being of Nations (WID-011)
USAID/WID, 1989, 5 pp.

Summarizes the benefits of integrating women into national economies and includes
case examples, lessons learned, and sectoral analyses.

Private Enterprise Development: Gender Considerations (PN-ABE-612)
Arthur Young
USAID/Bureau for Private Enterprise, November 1988, 58 pp.

This manual represents a first step in exploring the role of gender in private enterprise
projects and programs.

ECONOMIC CHANGE/STRUCTURAL ADJUSTMENT

Socio-Economic and Gender Issues in Policy-Based Development Assistance: Shifting
to Sectoral Cash Transfers in Latin America (PN-ABC-453)
LAC Bureau Regional Workshop on "Gender Considerations in Development,"
Antigua, Guatemala.
Philip Boyle. USAID/WID, November 1988, 11 pp.

Examines the USAID shift in the late 1980's from economic development support
funds (ESF) for macro-economic policy reform to the focus on specific sectoral
reforms. Makes the case that sectoral reform must take the population into account
by analyzing its characteristics and proposing remedial measures when negative
impacts are predicted.









The Effects of Structural Adjustment on Women (PN-ABC-276)
Paper presented to the DAC, Paris, October 1988.
Philip Boyle. USAID/WID, October 1988, 18 pp.

Examines the overall impacts on women of macro-economic policy reform and
stabilization programs of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.
Reviews the controversial literature and concludes that the numerous negative impacts
require further study and remedial measures.

Gender and Adjustment (PN-ABI-677)
Ron Hood, Mary Altomare, Lawrence Haddad, Martha Starr-McCluer, Virginia Hubbs.
The MayaTech Corp. USAID/WID, October 1992, 194 pp.

Covers various theories and models of adjustment and includes case studies from
several countries, with lessons for donors.

Poland: Gender Issues in the Transition to a Market Economy (PN-ABL-103)
Coopers and Lybrand Ass., Ltd.,
USAID Bureau for Private Enterprise & USAID/WID, December 1991, 59 pp.

Documents how women in Poland are bearing a disproportionate amount of hardship
due to the country's economic and political reforms. Includes recommendations for
addressing gender considerations in U.S. development assistance programs.

Hungary: Gender Issues in the Transition to a Market Economy (PN-ABK-002)
Coopers and Lybrand Ass., Ltd.
USAID Bureau for Private Enterprise & USAID/WID, December 1991, 61 pp.

Documents how women in Hungary are bearing a disproportionate amount of hardship
due to the country's economic and political reforms. Includes recommendations for
addressing gender considerations in U.S. development assistance programs.

DEMOCRACY

* Democracy and Gender A practical Guide to USAID Programs (PN-ABN-926)
GENESYS Special Studies No. 9
David Hirschmann
The Futures Group for USAID/WID. February 1993, 54 pp.

Reference manual addresses the integration of gender in USAID's Democracy
Initiative. Intended to aid design, implementation, and evaluation of policies,
programs, and projects focusing on the initiative. Document breaks down initiative into
components and explains each with respect to gender.










* Women and the Transition to Democracy in Latin America and the Caribbean: A
Critical Overview (PN-ABN-186)
GENESYS Special Studies No. 6
The Futures Group for USAID/WID, december 1992, 53 pp.

Presents an overview of woman-based democratic transition literature and identifies
gaps in the existing research. Considers some of the constraints women face in
gaining political and economic equity. Discusses factors which set stage for
democratic participation and the role of women in establishing civil and political
liberties. Concludes with gender-oriented research recommendations.

GENERAL

* 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women Bilateral Donors Support to Preparations
for Beijing: Information Note on the Facilitation Initiative (WID-041)
OECD/DAC Expert Group on Women in Development. 1994, 9 pp.
(specify English, Spanish. French, or Portuguese)

Booklet provides background description on conference, purpose of the Expert Group,
and purpose of the Facilitation Initiative. Also provides regional contact point
information.

* Women and the Municipality: A New Community Presence in Local Development in
Latin America: Notebook of the Local Government Training and Development Center,
Second Edition (PN-ABP-830)
Women and Local Development Program,
USAID Regional Housing and Urban Development Office/South America and Office of
Women in Development. August 1991, 134 pp.

Volume of papers presented at an international seminar by senior Latin American
women government officials. Subjects include women's experience in government,
low-cost community housing, inter-institutional cooperation, local women's programs,
and municipal actions and policies for women.

Gender Relevant Findings: Synthesis Report (PN-ABL-106)
Deborah Caro, Mary Mulhern.
GENESYS Project. USAID/WID, June 1992, 72 pp.

The synthesis of a series of office-by-office exercises in USAID's Research and
Development Bureau to identify specific examples of the role gender plays as a critical
development variable. Provides sector-specific examples.









Conference Proceedings: Women, Economic Growth and Demographic Change in
Asia, the Near East and Eastern Europe (PN-ABK-842)
Inji Islam, Paula J. Byran, Tulin Pulley, ed.
USAID/WID, May 1991, 50 pp.

Proceedings of a conference held in May 1991. Part of a special series of studies
prepared for that conference.

Women's Income, Fertility and Development Policy (PN-ABH-726)
Boone A. Turchi, Mary Mulhern, Jacqueline J. Mahal.
GENESYS Project. USAID/WID, May 1991, 61 pp.

Provides a framework for understanding how development policy can affect women's
fertility through its impact on their labor force participation. Presents several
hypotheses explaining the inverse relationship between female participation in the
labor force and fertility rates, an overview of evidence from Asia and the Near East,
and useful policy recommendations.

Lessons Learned from the Advanced Developing Countries (PN-ABH-729)
Susan P. Joekes. Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex
USAID/WID, May 1991, 75 pp.

Argues that the rapid economic growth witnessed in advanced developing countries of
Asia is causally linked to women's economic participation, and that early attention to
female education was important to this pattern of development. Hong Kong,
Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan are examined. Discusses policy lessons for
middle income countries.

Institutions Working in Gender Issues in Latin America and the Caribbean
(PN-ABL-343)
GENESYS Project. USAID/WID, April 1992, 62 pp.

Lists Private Voluntary and Non-Governmental Organizations and Universities based
in LAC countries and those based in the U.S. which conduct programs in LAC
countries. Organizations are listed by country and by sector.

Bibliography: Gender Issues in Latin America and the Caribbean (PN-ABL-267)
Suzanne B. Maize, GENESYS Project. USAID/WID, June 1992, 85 pp.

Chapter headings include: agriculture and natural resources, democratic initiatives,
human resources, poverty, statistics/indicators on women, and trade and investment.










Engendering Development in Asia and the Near East: A Sourcebook (PN-ABL-503)
Rekha Mehra, David Burns, et al.
Gender Manual Series, International Center for Research on Women.
USAID/WID, 1992, 121 pp.

Contains sections on trends in women's participation in economic and public life,
private enterprise, agriculture, environment and natural resources, education, and
health, population and nutrition. In each section. Each section includes discussions
of women's role in the sector, their constraints, country examples, USAID activities
and interventions, comparative country statistics, and a list of relevant references.

Women and the Law in Asia and the Near East (PN-ABH.727)
Lynn P. Freedman. Futures Group, May 1991, 44 pp.

Outlines ways in which the law deprives women of autonomy and undercuts the
success of women's participation in USAID projects. Provides a conceptual framework
to analyze how the law in any given society relates to women's lives.

Gender Issues in Latin America and the Caribbean: Integrating Women into
Development Programs (PN-AAX-047)
K. White, M. Oterao, et al,
International Center for Research on Women, May 1986, 88 pp.

Provides practical, applicable guidance to help the USAID LAC Bureau integrate
concerns regarding women's economic participation into project design,
implementation, and evaluation.







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WID Office Users Guide, 1994
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Gender Information Framework Pocket Guide
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Making the Case for the Gender Variable
Private Enterprise Development
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The Role of Women in Evolving Ag. Economic
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