Group Title: Annual report, University of Florida Warrington College of Business
Title: Annual report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089849/00002
 Material Information
Title: Annual report
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Warrington College of Business Administration
Publisher: Warrington College of Business Administration
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2009
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089849
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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MA MONOS &S.














DEAN'S MESSAGE

3

COLLEGE OVERVIEW

4

RESEARCH
8


ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
18


ALUMNI
















Both challenges and opportunities mark the past year, and the
one to come, for the Warrington College of Business Adminis-
tration. The inescapable reality is that, as a state institution, we
will have lost close to 20 percent of our state funding resources by 2010.
This dramatic loss will clearly and necessarily yield changes. Strategi-
cally, we will continue to focus on those things that allow us to deliver
innovative programs, as well as attract and retain quality faculty, staff,
and students. As a global leader in business education, our focus will
be on quality, not quantity, and we will be better, as opposed to bigger.
Many of the adjustments will require significant transformation. Yet,
we will continue to improve in every dimension. How will we accom-
plish this? By focusing our entrepreneurial activities and development
on attracting resources that augment and improve our programs.

Two years into the Florida Tomorrow capital campaign, we are nearly
94 percent of the way toward our $112 million goal. But with three
years remaining, we will adapt our strategy and those unmet needs
to position us for competition with the world's best programs-such
as creating new professorships, endowing our School of Business, and
building a new facility designed with the technological infrastructure
and modern workspace needed to best serve our large undergraduate
student body.

Our unique capacity to be entrepreneurial has allowed us to add pro-
grams, resources and staff, and to supplement our state resources. We
are optimistic that, with appropriate adjustments and strategies, we
will not merely weather this storm; we can come out of it in better form
than ever. The challenge is making the right decisions in an economic
environment that no one could have foreseen. But we are up to this
challenge. We can and will make the correct choices. But we can't do it
alone-now is the time that we need "all hands on deck," and we will
be relying, more than ever, on the continued assistance of our alumni,
students, friends, and donors.


Thank you for your support and best wishes,


l ii IN 1i\ T















Campaign Update


BREAKING NEW GROUND FOR GRADUATE
BUSINESS STUDIES: HOUGH HALL

Ground was broken on William R. Hough Hall,
new home of the Hough Graduate School of
Business, on February 21, 2009. Speakers at
the groundbreaking ceremony included Bernie
Machen, UF president, John Kraft, Warrington
dean, and William Hough (MBA 1948). Howie
Ferguson, coordinator of UF facilities planning,
and Rick Rowe of Rowe Architects, conducted a
virtual presentation of the facility.


Completion of the $23 million, 70,000 square-foot building is
projected to be in summer 2010. Hough Hall will expand the
College's potential to develop the world's new business leaders
by providing an outstanding learning environment that promotes
interaction between faculty and students with alumni, recruiters
and other constituents. Hough, the project's majority benefactor,
was founder of the investment banking firm William R. Hough &
Co. He credits his ability to make such a gift to William R. Hough
& Co., the success of which, while initiated by the education he
received at UF, was bolstered and sustained through the efforts
of the many other employees who worked there.

A NEW GOLD STANDARD FOR BUSINESS

As with all new construction projects at UF, Hough Hall has been
designed with long-term sustainability in mind, with an emphasis
on energy efficiency.

The university's project manager for Hough Hall says that the
facility will achieve a Gold level of LEED (Leadership in Energy
and Environmental Design) certification by the U.S. Green Building
Council. This signifies that its design and construction promotes
environmental quality, resource conservation, and sustainable


materials and systems. The LEED
Green Building Rating SystemTM is the
nationally accepted benchmark for the
design, construction and operation of
high performance green buildings. LEED
promotes a whole-building approach
to sustainability by recognizing perfor-
mance in five key areas of human and
environmental health: Site Planning,
Water Management, Energy Manage-
ment, Material Use, Indoor Air Quality
and Innovation & Design Process.

The LEED system has been in place for


12 ) -.a -a but was adopted for use on
all mil'ior LI F projects beginning in 2001.
At that time, the goal was the lowest
of four levels of certification, "Basic,"
but that was later raised to "Silver"
and, recently, to "Gold," as UF-and
the industry itself-has adapted to the
"green" way of designing and construct-
ing buildings. The smallest details are
taken into consideration, beginning
with site selection. Hough Hall, being
constructed on a former parking lot,
was awarded points for being built on
an already "disturbed" site, thus no ad-







Building a Better Business School


ditional campus green space was lo-t
The fact that shower facilities will be.
available, as well as bike storage,
also add points to the tally, as
cycling commuters help to reduce
local carbon emissions overall.
The showers themselves will
use water heated by solar pan- .
els on the building's west side,
according to Ferguson, even
though no additional points
were awarded for this. "We
(UF) just felt it was the right
thing to do," he says. Likewise,
some runoff water from the
facility will be captured and
used on the landscaping.

UF has redoubled its commitment
to the process as energy costs have
risen dramatically in the past year.
From helping to educate local contrac-
tors on green materials-such as carpet-
ing made with recycled materials, Zei \ C
(volatile organic compounds) paints, and Forest
Stewardship Council (FSC)-certified wood-to using local recyclers for all types of
waste materials and regional materials in construction, the impact of the effort has
a domino effect. Other state universities have looked to UF for guidance in how to
create sustainable campuses. And, not only does building to LEED standards help
preserve the environment, but it helps UF conserve its budget.

"Even though there's been a $50,000 to $100,000 premium for
building Hough Hall to these standards," says Ferguson, "we
did so not only to reinforce our commitment to sustainability-
especially as it stands at UF's front door-but we expect Hough
Hall to be roughly 40 percent more energy efficient than the
'baseline' model of a similar building. That translates into a
$60,000 annual energy savings. That's the kind of bottom line
we expect a school of business, especially, to appreciate."


As strong as the Warrington College of Business Administration is today,
we are ;... ,', i. positioning the College for an even better future through
the private funding committed in the Florida Tomorrow capital campaign.


T he College has focused on
three priority areas throughout
the campaign: support for faculty,
student-centered programs and for
facilities. The funds raised in the
campaign will establish permanent
endowments to benefit faculty and
students, provide capital to build
and upgrade our physical infrastruc-
ture, and provide immediate cash
flow through annual gifts.

The campaign will run through fall 2012,
and the College has raised more than
$101 million since the campaign began
in July 2005. We have reached this point
thanks to many individuals making
multiple commitments; with more than
5,500 donations made so far, 69 of these
have been major gifts-$100,000 or more.
Through the incredible generosity of
our donors, this campaign has brought
to fruition major milestones, such as the
permanent endowment of the [Hough]
Graduate School of Business, as well as
several centers and specialized mas-
ter's programs. The campaign has also
allowed us to begin construction of a
landmark graduate studies building,
and provide a home for undergraduate
Career & Leadership Programs. Signifi-


cantly, almost half of the dollars raised in
the Florida Tomorrow campaign are estate
planning commitments, in the form of
documented bequests, trusts and insur-
ance commitments, which will provide
essential resources in the future.

Our success to date will allow us to
now intensify our focus on our strategic
priorities. We will increase our efforts
on faculty support to ensure that we
continue to attract and retain the world-
class faculty expected by our high caliber
students. We will also seek to endow the
undergraduate School of Business, and
build a new School of Business build-
ing, to provide a 21st century teaching
environment.

We are encouraged by our success so far,
and humbled by the response of donors
who have chosen to invest in the College
through the Florida Tomorrow campaign.
The Warrington College of Business Ad-
ministration is now firmly established
among the top public business programs
in the country, thanks to the support of
our alumni and friends. With their con-
tinued assistance, we will keep advanc-
ing the field of business education, and
the business community as a whole.


\
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the guidance of a sophisticated, adaptive mindset.


Faculty Making Their Mark, and a Difference


DEMSKI IS RANKED #1 IN ACCOUNTING LITERATURE

A new working paper authored by Jean L. Heck of Saint Joseph's University has
named Joel Demski, Frederick E. Fisher Eminent Scholar in Accounting, the most
prolific author in the accounting literature of the past half-century (1959-2008).
Heck calls the authors identified in the study "truly remarkable." Even more
remarkable: a comparison of "Five Leading Accounting Journals" rankings with
"25 Core Accounting Journals" rankings reveals that Demski,
number one in both data sets, had 42 of his 52 articles appear in
the top five journals.

Demski says he "had no idea" about the volume of his work.
"I have never been a fan of publication or citation counts or
what have you," he added, "but if someone is going to count, it
certainly is flattering-and totally surprising-to be at the top
of the list."

Demski was credited with 27.5 appearances. Heck says that this
examination provides hard data for the first time on research
productivity in accounting literature.

Demski has long been an advocate of how the study of the theory
of accounting relates to practical accounting applications, and
accounting as a source of information. He sees peril in the trend
of focusing on the rules at the expense of nurturing a conceptual
view of what financial measurement is all about, that is, without


"In accounting, we continue to look at how to do the measurement, how to comply
with the latest rule," Demski says, "and give scant attention to how this might be
affecting behavior-or how anticipated rules themselves affect behavior. This is why
theory matters."

It is this slant that Demski sees as adding to the "explosion" of financial engineering
in the past decade with an ever-increasing supply of exotic instruments.

"Fair value rules, in turn, have encouraged development of instruments with
specific accounting goals in mind," Demski observes. "Add to this an increased
political side to financial measurement, and a lagging understanding of the nature
of risk, and the recent turmoil can hardly be viewed as surprising."







Seen and Heard: Jen


Jenny Tucker, the Fisher School's Luciano Prida
Sr. Professor, has attracted significant attention
from academic scholars, accounting and finance
professions, and the financial press. Her paper,
"To guide or not to guide...," forthcoming in a
leading accounting journal, has been discussed in
the The Wall Street Journal, Barron's, Forbes.com,
The Economist, Guardian (through Reuters News
Services), CFO Magazine, and TheStreet.com. Tucker
says, "Our faculty has an impact beyond the reach
of scholarly journals."

rThe United Kingdom's Guardian quoted Tucker in
December 2008 about her take on GE's decision to
scrap quarterly forecasts. While some business leaders
say companies make too many short-term decisions to
ensure they don't fall short of their own forecasts, other
experts caution investors that such moves could signal that
companies have something to hide. According to her, "There
are two theories about stopping guidance. One side says
that by providing quarterly earnings guidance, managers are
distracted from their long-term goals and stopping guidance
allows managers to refocus. The other side of the story is...that
when performance is poor, they don't want to talk about it." She
warned that companies that stop quarterly guidance should
avoid becoming less transparent: "What we have seen from
the financial crisis is that investors wanted to know more and
see more disclosures." She had previously appeared in a live
interview on CNBC's "Squawk Box" to discuss this topic.

Tucker was also quoted in a March Dow Jones
Newswires article about a study she co-authored
("Return performance surrounding reverse stock
splits: Can investors profit?"), which determined
stocks that underwent reverse splits produced "sta-
tistically significant negative abnormal returns over
the three-year period following the ex-split month."
The study, which examined more than 1,600 firms
that conducted reverse stock splits over a 40-year


Students in Gerson Hall -home of the Fisher School of Accounting


period, showed that the companies also experienced "poor operating performances
over the same time." Tucker warned that investors should not expect the company's
performance to automatically pick up just because the stock is trading above a
threshold that allows more investors to participate. She said if the companies were
optimistic about their future, and their ability to lift their prices through improved
fundamental performance, they wouldn't feel the need for a reverse split.

Professor Tucker has also been asked by The U.S. Chamber of Commerce to help
develop the association's recommendations regarding corporate disclosure strategies.

















































teriences Deweenl U .. stanllarS issue(
by the Public Companies Accounting
Oversight Board (PCAOB) of the Secu-
rities and Exchange Commission and


requests from orner s
similar opportunities







NIAIB Students Chosen for Prestigious

St. Gallen Symposium


NIAIB STUDENTS FL\ ON "WINGS OF EXCELLENCE" TO THE ALPS


E \ tr\ \I ,.lar. ithe C0ilpUtitiOtln 1 1'r tile
-t Gallon \\ nllls t E\i .lk'lncL'
\ai rd OtIl- the % world -tiudejint- tlhu
luniqlL' o'ppotrtuintl ttlo lakL part in thl.
St. (iGallin -\ lltpo- iii in II I S\it/,.rlland.
Till- \ i ear. tl -Ltudi'n ll tr trin ll' HoLIghl
SciIool, Nicllila1 Ca.iipi/ a.ld Richard
\\i,,>d-', w'rti e a.CC'ptl'd tor tiln- prUl ti-
;i-'ln 1- int' riiatiO(n l \ nl p01.i.li1, lIl,'ld at
Liml er-tr oI St. Gallhn. rla\ t-I,. 21 11 .
Both earned mia-te.r d.;gr-rL' l i1 11t .'
I1 V-Inti'rnilathin.al Bi.-in.l-'0 NI M IBI Pro-
-,rain. and hi.ard iaboit tiihe \ mp ii-im
thlrouih thu' pr'graiill. Co lmpe.ition toL
participate i- rig'oroi'-: 1tih' ltudoi.'lnt % hi

.'\ liharne.' tl J idea,- i itli todal\ l4oball
iIadIer, abot i t thli' prte'.- g c11 t' '111' Ii
and rs ietal tio, ior n e ntreren trial.

The p't t. GaTllhe Houh stden theme
Among the authors of the best B 20 utii -
Ile-- lld Fiih.111 alid -thideillt- ei.'
i qliIlr'ed t> ',iilinit all e aii \ a oiiae i>' a
pnl'| t loppol >Il pliopo,-al a Iml ltlllledla
presentation, or an entrepreneurial
concept. The Hough students were
among the authors of the best 200 (out


,t artrIund 1., II ol I IIen ti a" It ludg.'d bv
a panel Io ploIte'-.-r-.. corporate eI\eLtu-
tie\ -. e'litepreileur'l aind p blltlicall '.
Camiipj/ iad \\'oo'd- ier Il\ n i hed to
thie L\ nipowiii, all e\pein-e- paid by
St. Galleln. tc l imiake tlli'ir pre.e ll taIth' l,.
CaiipJ/ I\ IE ai l-i, pur-,tLi a I Ill-,tor
I11 Ei oii('niui Ge,';graphi\. i\ nlte h~ paper
(1n the contir iinI.ll impoI tanlie ot place
IIn tile la-tlt Inl: %\o Id ot hlii ce.n.
Liindej-,tandiil I'lNae: A N:.c-,ar\.
Iltdlk i "l iplllnar\ Co ,icept I11 the Nei%
Global Ecoi(> iii\. \ old,,d '-eai\'
Capitaljiim \, l'opuil niil: The Fi;glit tor
tile E (cojiollii Heart oIf S IIIIo t -\lliioi ia
and it,. liIplica(tion, to the De\ e'lpiinl,
\lilld, Ha- ba'ed oI tlhe political
'trug.le bel. een thle 'Populi',t natio in oIt
\ene/inela, Boli\ la, and Ecuiador and theli
Capitali-,t iia.tioii., ot Bla/il Chile and
U I iIgu4V. He H ,a -. \\ liat'\ er ec,'iollinic
tllllll\li) % i11 rll t I ld del tei illll l the
C0'lII-,'O a'It i lO I ll >'I all I SN til \ 0lllell a
dlid e\l ii collild -et a plei deillit II' a
iadical cildal. e ,, eCilll0,lll l iic hII yill:.
for the entire developing world."

Against the backdrop of the current


economic crisis, Campiz says, "It was
fascinating to watch CEOs, chairmen,
finance ministers, academics-and even a
Nobel Laureate, Robert Aumann-debate
the causes of and solutions." Some of
the most prominent speakers were three
national leaders: President of the Swiss
S Confederation, Dr. Hans-Rudolph Merz,
President Toomas Hendrik Ilves (Estonia)
and President Boris Tadic (Serbia). Other
notable presenters included Tharman
Shnmugaratnam (Minister of Finance,
Singapore), and Lord Griffiths of Fforest-
fach (Vice Chairman, Goldman Sachs).

One of the major advantages of the sym-
posium, Campiz says, was the plethora of
smaller discussion sections, and therein,
ample time dedicated to questions
from the audience, most from student
participants. Another plus of being in
.. .the company of 600 entrepreneurs, top
managers, politicians and scientists
nIli nl11e tilan 'I I Ilatio 1- a that 11 participants, students and professionals,
o ee treated pelt\ lucli equatLldl\ and that made for a very positive, interactive
atllh,-plllie laccoldlllg tIo Calllpl/ There was no separation whatsoever between
the t Io 4tIoup- and that %%a oIi- e ,'i his favorite things about the conference, he says.
BetLteen eli, n- -ttldenti and plo Iessionals alike dined in the same pavilion.
-llllot all table- %oIle -tadildln table- and had no chairs, so we were forced to walk
dlillI iid ll I1111e Illeet el\ el\ ,'i' and continue discussion and debate. The CEO
I, I I cI % atel I ,,u-e ..00.pel, ate
dlllllel da o L table ,11 II l ll-

Before the symposium's start,
there were two days of pre-
programming just for students,
to experience "the full Swiss
treatment," Woods says, com-
plete with hearty food, drinks,
mountain climbs and alphorn
performances. The Symposium
itself was set up so the two were
either in sessions or discussions,
experiencing Swiss culture,
or meeting other student par-
ticipants. Woods says he met IilIIII.







ticipants that came from American state schools, and that most of the American
students were Ivy League or went to school abroad ("like Cambridge or the London
School of Economics," he says), he would recommend that any student apply for
the award. In fact, both say they would love the chance to return and savor such a
... ......... unique experience again.

"While there, I experienced Swiss Culture, the Alps, heard and talked to some of
the greatest minds of our time, and met great students from all over the world-and
everything on the trip is paid for. If I go back to school for any reason, I will apply
again," says Woods.

Campiz, meanwhile, isn't finished with his graduate studies yet, and is looking
forward to another chance to visit the "rare air" of St. Gallen.

"What I experienced was incredible," he says, "and every conference I will go to
will be a letdown, I think, from here. And, apparently, this was a 'down year,' too,
because of the economy! Next year is the 40th year Jubilee celebration; I will be
applying again."









students from all over Europe, Argentina, South Africa, New Zealand, Singapore,
India, Japan, and even Mongolia. An example of the high level of business partici-
pants-as well as the relaxed, positive atmosphere-Campiz says, was a statement
he overheard: "I actually prefer St. Gallen over Davos." Woods says that the mix
made for interesting group dynamics and, by the end, he had made a lot of friends
from all over the world, as well as possible future business contacts or partners.

Campiz was also enthusiastic about future endeavors that might possibly be
wrought from the contacts he made with fellow students. "I plan to keep in contact
with as many of them as possible," he says. "Meeting up and working together in
the future was discussed-from small business ideas to getting academic papers
published together-I believe I will get at least one published with a collaborator
from St. Gallen."

Both Woods and Campiz were overwhelmed by the experience as a whole, from
the renowned presenters to student peers to the impressively organized event
itself: "all by students of the University of St. Gallen, with a high level of technical
sophistication, great deal of critical thought given to participant needs, and the
Swiss timepiece efficiency you would expect," according to Campiz.


Although Woods notes that he and Campiz were among only a handful of par-















School of Business Undergraduates Take

Different Paths to Bright Futures


ONLINE BUSINESS PROGRAM: BUILDING
COMMUNITY IN A VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT

The Online Business Program attracts outstand-
ing students from all over Florida, giving them
the opportunity to earn a nationally-ranked
undergraduate business degree from UF-
without having to move to Gainesville! Since
the program's inception in summer 2002, more
than 1,100 students have enrolled, enjoying the
freedom to view courses on the Internet any
time, day or night, and eliminating the need
to relocate and/or arrange work or daycare
around traditional classroom schedules.

In the past two years, three program initiatives have been put into place to create
a more cohesive online community and to significantly enhance the experience of
students: the Online Student Center, the Gator Online Student Association (GOSA),
and Elluminate.

Using the existing E-Learning platform for UF's online courses, the Online Student
Center was created as a "student union," pulling together a myriad of student ser-
vices into a "one-stop" location, where students already congregate to access their
course website and online lectures. Streamlined information and services include a
program orientation video, access to registration information, dates and times for
statewide exams, required textbooks, and recommendations for course combina-
tions each term. Students can also ask questions through the "Ask An Advisor"
discussion board.

The GOSA, completely created and administered by students, has enhanced the
student experience of the Online Business Program. The site includes 42 discussion
boards, which focus on everything from specific courses to textbook swapping to
mentoring new students. Students use boards arranged by geographic area to facili-
tate the formation of study groups. There's also a board for prospective students,
where they can learn from the direct experience of current students who can speak


about fitting their studies around
full-time jobs and family responsi-
bilities. An alumni section provides
a platform for program graduates to
offer their advice on everything from
courses to employment opportuni-
ties after graduation. "Jill's Corner,"
named for program associate direc-
tor Jill Lingard, facilitates dialogue
between students and academic
advisors, and has the added benefit
of offering student services staff
a window to current issues in the
program.

In the first two years of its existence, GOSA attracted more than 1,000 members and
logged 82,000 posts. This online association has even brought students out of cyber
space and into real spaces, promoting student gatherings for picnics, canoe trips,
bowling outings, orientations, and graduation receptions. In November 2008, three
students who helped launch the site traveled with Lingard to Phoenix, Ariz. to tell
the GOSA story at the Western Cooperative for Educational Telecommunications
(WCET) distance education conference.

Elluminate technology permits real-time interaction among distance education
students, faculty, teaching assistants and advisors. It has been introduced into some
of the more quantitative courses that focus on problem solving and complex math-
ematical formulas, such as finance and managerial economics, in which the white
board function is especially useful.


w I, w ., .H et t l slll,,ll,;/ .s... .- l l,
www.cba.ufl.edu/sb/programs/obsba 0






International Programs: Sponsoring three

College programs and twenty-five global

exchange programs


COLLEGE SPONSORED PROGRAMS PROVE
POPULAR WITH UNDERGRADUATES


Last year, 156 students participated in our programs to London, Madrid and Rome.
The previous record was 135 students, during the 2005-06 academic year.

students have participated in
Sthe program since it started in
the summer of 2005. Our partner in London is FIE, Foundation for International
Education, an independent organization formed to assist American universities
design unique study abroad programs. As part of the curriculum, FIE also facilitates
internship placements for our students with London firms. This opportunity is very
attractive to the students, especially because of London's multicultural workforce
and the variety of businesses operating in this city of 9 million people, with the
world's sixth-largest economy in the world.

-i I students have participated in the
-- I i L program since it started in the fall
of 2005. The College's partner is Universidad Antonio de Nebrija; the University's
Centro de Estudios HispAnicos has three decades of experience in the teaching of
Spanish as a foreign language. Students attending fall and spring semesters take an
intensive three-week Spanish language course to renew past skills and prepare them
for living in a Spanish-speaking country.

U students have participated in the program
since it started in the fall of 2007. The Col-
lege's partner is St John's University, one of America's leading Catholic universities.
St. John's Rome campus and dormitory is centrally located in the heart of the city;
the predominantly Italian faculty engages students by using the grandeur of Rome
as a classroom, where language and history are ideal subjects for study.



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tIudeInt-, ti 'and tlhe pio'gi .aii- that ht then nieiie.d-. ;g~al- and e\peci i.nce.-












































































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TOA CREIT HOR EANE = 15O7


O" U n e g a u t ............................. 4,759

" M s e .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 1,6 2



" h D .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . .6



TOA ENOLMN = 6,5


S. .... .... .... .... ...


" U n e g a u t ............................ 7



" M a te .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..D8


.................................................................................................................................................. ...
...................................................................................
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N:: flom ch ...............
.a e n ...............
h Un vers
............. .... ::.::::::::::::F .. ...... ..........
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ............... ......... ................. .. ...... ..........































ALL THE RIGHT MOVES

Steven Seifert was a three-year varsity
starter and captain of his high school
basketball team in Naples, Fla. Anyone
who's played competitive team sports
knows that such honors aren't handed
out-they're earned by hard work and
perseverance. Most spectators never
think about the many hours of practice
that are behind the "Go-to Guy" status.
But it's that type of singular dedication
to a goal that brought Seifert into the
William R. Hough Master of Science in
Finance (MSF) program. Building on
the hard work he put in on the court
and at his studies throughout high
school, the National Merit Scholar came
to UF and financed 100 percent of his
tuition with those funds and a Bright
Futures scholarship. Seifert says that
some time in his sophomore year at UF,
he made two realizations. One, that he
wanted to take more challenging and
specialized classes in finance and, two,
that he wanted to work on Wall Street.


Grad Students Find

MSF is Secret of

Their Success


"MSF gave me both of these opportuni-
ties," says Seifert. "Joining MSF was
one of the easiest decisions I've made;
I've already taken six graduate level
courses on more focused subjects, and
the recruiting opportunities that MSF
provided me have been outstanding."

With an athlete's sense of timing,
Seifert was keen to reach his goal by
the swiftest route possible. He says
he never even considered waiting to
apply to an MBA program, since he was
able to accomplish his two objectives
with the MSF program. "The greatest
thing about the MSF program was that
I could finish the degree within four
years, and that I could take graduate
level classes while I was still an under-
graduate," he says.

The advanced concepts put forth were
not just welcomed by Seifert, but a nec-
essary part of formulating his own criti-
cal analysis process. For him, Professor
David Brown, and his fixed income
courses, were favorites in helping create
this extremely important framework.

"His goal is not to have you learn
formulas or memorize methods," Seifert
explains, "but to inherently understand
the material at an intuitive level, and be
able to form your own ideas and con-
clusions. With technology and global-
ization at the levels they are today, it is
not enough to just memorize a formula
or a method; to add value to an organi-
zation, you have to be able to think and
understand things at a deeper level."


Exceptional faculty and extracurricular activities are what Seifert feels are the
program's greatest strengths. This powerful combination is already paying him
dividends; he did an internship in New York City this summer at Bank of America,
and will be interning at the University of Florida Investment Corporation (UFICO)
this fall and spring.

"I was interviewed by the head of fixed income derivatives at one of the NYC
banks, and she went so far as to say that my MSF coursework put me well ahead of
other candidates," Seifert relates. "Her questions were very technical and difficult,
and there is little chance I would have been able to answer them had I not taken Dr.
Brown's graduate level fixed income courses."

The Professional Speakers Series is an outstanding example of how initiatives
beyond the classroom can be invaluable to students. Each speaker brought some-
thing unique to the event, and there have been numerous times when a speaker has
sparked Seifert's interest in their line of work. On top of all that, the speaker series
also adds some tremendous recruiting benefits.

"One of the past speakers that I had lunch with actually arranged an interview for
me at his firm in New York," Seifert recounts. "So, not only did MSF provide me
great interview opportunities, but my MSF coursework also allowed me to excel in
the interviews and, eventually, get offers."

For Steven Seifert, all it takes is a little assist; just pass him the rock-he knows
what to do.
































From the Swamp to t- J


In 2008, UF's finance program was voted among the best in the U.S. in a student
survey published by Princeton Review. For MSF student Azer Songnaba, that was old
news. According to him, when it came time to pick a school, "UF just stood out from
the crowd. The excellence of the faculty and student body was a key factor in my
choice."

Originally from Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Songnaba learned about UF from a
friend of his father, who was a Ph.D. student here at the time. After graduating from
high school, Songnaba was looking to study abroad, and his options were the U.S.,
France and Canada. France was the obvious choice because it was closer to his home
in West Africa, his sister went to school there, and he also speaks fluent French. But
Songnaba wanted to come to the U.S.-first, for the language skills, and second,
since he wanted to study finance, he knew that the U.S. would be advantageous
because of the sophisticated financial market here. The family friend told him about
schools in Florida, but emphasized that UF was the best-and that the business
school was one of the best in the country.

For Songnaba, from his first undergraduate finance course, he knew that it was
something he truly enjoyed, and he wanted to learn more. He thought about going
to graduate school, but wasn't quite sure about which program (MSF or MBA) to
choose. He says he leaned toward the MSF because it was more specialized and
covered in-depth all the areas of finance he was interested in.


"The MSF is also accessible right out of
undergraduate, unlike the MBA, and
it was shorter," says Songnaba. "The
competitiveness and excellence of the
MSF program also helped me make my
decision to join the program. I strongly
believe that the MSF was the right
choice for me."

It's more than just
a belief. The proof: the
this summer, his de-
gree took Songnaba
from the Swamp of S
Gainesville to the
heart of the concrete
jungle-Wall
Street-in a position as a financial
analyst for Goldman Sachs. He par-
ticipated in a summer internship with
the firm in 2008 as a credit analyst, and
even though he secured that internship
before taking any classes in the MSF
program, Songnaba says he was able
to network with classmates who had
previous internships on Wall Street, and
learn from them what companies expect


from their interns. Equally helpful, he
says, were the workshops organized
by the program on career/internship
preparation. In addition to being a great
resource for connecting with success-
ful professionals in different areas
of finance, the Professional Speakers
Series also allowed
Ofut Songnaba to see
the application of
what was learned
in the classroom to
real world situa-
as I tions. And, with so

choice. many principals
from high-profile
companies sharing
their paths to success, Songnaba also
remarks that, "Since most of the speak-
ers are UF alumni, it's also a motivating
factor to work hard."

No doubt, more than ever, it's a jungle
out there. But this Gator has got the
cho(m)ps to make it in New York-and
if he can make it there, he can make it
anywhere...












CEI Helps Alum Build

the Perfect Network


Trey Lauderdale (MSE '07) remembers his "A-ha" moment
well. It came on March 6, 2008. As a student in the Thomas
S. Johnson Master of Science in Entrepreneurship program,
like many others, he had awaited Apple's release of the
iPhone Software Developer's Kit with great anticipation.
Literally thousands of developers couldn't wait to start
making simple games and amusing applications, but
Lauderdale sat in his office, plotting something far
greater-a communication revolution that would redefine
the point-of-care in hospitals.

In his position as a respected industry professional, he had
listened intently to his customers as they searched for better
options for receiving phone calls and alarms. As an engineer
(BSISE '04), he also knew there had to be a better solution,
and he was excited about the possibilities that an innovative
communication platform such as the iPhone could deliver.

Armed with just this belief, Lauderdale headed to the Apple
World Wide Developer's Conference in San Francisco-
without a ticket-and stood outside for five days, talking to
anyone wearing a developer's badge, searching for some-
one who shared his vision. He eventually met his match in
Benjamin King, software guru for CardioMems (a healthcare
start-up in Atlanta) and founder of Demand EO.


Convinced that this was their chance of a lifetime, they left their jobs to begin
work. But, they quickly realized that an innovative product would not be enough.
Lauderdale turned to Oscar Callejas, a longtime friend and MSE classmate, and
veteran of the hotel industry. His work in upscale boutique hotels made him the
ideal candidate to develop the unique customer experience that the industry was
lacking. All they needed now was someone to shepherd this talent and help bring
their first product to market.

Enter: Rob Campbell-he had been working with the Center of Entrepreneurship
and Innovation (CEI) as an executive board member since 2001 (he was selected as
its 2005 Entrepreneur in Residence). A former executive for Apple and Microsoft,


he holds the distinction of having worked directly for Steve Jobs and Bill Gates. As
a "serial entrepreneur," his companies have created such products as the innova-
tive PowerPoint and FileMaker programs. It was a start-up's dream come true-he
agreed to lead the company as CEO and Voalt6, Inc. was formed.
















































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PU BL1SHER: Dean John Kraft

EDITORIAL: Tracey E. Johnson

DESIGN, TYPESETTING, AND PRODUCTION: Jason Williams

PHOTOCRAPHY: Jason Williams, Tracey E. Johnson,
David Blankenship, UF University Relations,
courtesy of St. Gallen Symposium, iStock

PRINTrINC: Alta Systems, Inc.

The 2009 Warrington Dean's Report was printed on F'orest
Stewardship Council (I'SC)-certified paper: Wausau Linen
Cover, l'ortune Gloss Cover, and Lynx Recycled Smooth 'lTxt.

@2009 Warrington College of Business Ad inistralion,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.

All art and photography are copyright of their respective
owners and used with permission. All other names may be
trademarks of their respective owners. All rights reserved.

Warrington College of Business Administration
University of Florida
100 BRY
PO Box 117150
Gainesville, FL 32611-7150
TEL 352.392.2398
FAX 352.392.2086
www.cba .ufl.edu

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