• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Main
 Appendix 1: The information model...
 Appendix 2: The data base design...
 Appendix 3: Project team resum...
 Appendix D: Letters of commend...
 Appendix 5: Draft contract for...






Title: Project for access to library resources in the Belknap Collection
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089835/00001
 Material Information
Title: Project for access to library resources in the Belknap Collection
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: McTigue, Bernard
Publication Date: November 20, 1992
Copyright Date: 1992
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089835
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Appendix 1: The information model system
        Page A
        Page A-i
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
        Page A-9
        Page A-10
        Page A-11
        Page A-12
        Page A-13
        Page A-14
    Appendix 2: The data base design methodology
        Page B
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
    Appendix 3: Project team resumes
        Page C
        Page C-1
        Page C-2
        Page C-3
        Page C-4
        Page C-5
        Page C-6
        Page C-7
        Page C-8
    Appendix D: Letters of commendation
        Page D
        Page D-1
        Page D-2
        Page D-3
    Appendix 5: Draft contract for joint agreement between UF and IBM
        Page E
        Page E-1
        Page E-2
        Page E-3
        Page E-4
        Page E-5
        Page E-6
Full Text


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SPONSORED PROJECTS
APPROVAL FORM


SEND NOTICE OF AWARD TO:
The University of Florida
Division of Sponsored Research
219 Grinter Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
(904) 392-1582


-I
' I


I 2O-V

AGENCY APPLICATION DEADLINE
(DO NOT LEAVE BLAN

Date: Nov. 20, 1992
postmark O receipt


University Project # A

Title of Proposal: Project for Access to library resources in the Balknap Collection, UF


Submitted to Agency/Program: U.S. Dept. of Education, CFDA No. 84.091
(NOTE TO THE P.I.: Please provide mailing instructions on page 2)
UNIVERSITY ENDORSEMENTS: The attached proposal has been examined by the officials whose signatures appear below. The principal academic review
of the proposal is the responsibility of the Department/Center and Colleg. If additional space is needed for signatures, please provide them on a separate
sheet of paper.


Principal Investigator: object Direr

PJr, 7ial /I f // 2


Approval by Dean or Director: (If more than one)


NA M: C rnard McTfue v 7 tIon
rrn: Chair, Dept. of Special C elections
CAMPUS ADDRESS: 308 Smathers
TLEPHONE: 392-9075
SOC. SEC. NO.

Co-Principal Investigator: (If Applicable)


NAME Due
TITLE:
TELEPHONE
SOC. SEC. NO.

Department Head:



NAME: Bernard igue V
Trrri: as above



Department Head: (If more than one)



NAME: Due
TITLE:


Approval by Dean or Director:

d<^ /!? a~ u_____


NAME: Due
TITLE:




Other Endorsement (If Needed):


NAME:


Dae


TITLE:



Approval by Vice-President for Agricultural Affairs
(For all projects involving IFAS Personnel)


NAME: Dze
TrrLE:



Approval by Vice-President for Health Affairs:
(For all projects involving JHMHC Personnel)


NAME: Dam


Official Autho ied to Sign for the University:
(Leave BA N

/M^ HNO


V 2 0 1992


Du NAME: yR1JA ARmSALf(
rm: AS. STANT DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH
Division of Sponsored Research
University of Florida


'9',.z~ ~
a
C

y


NAME: Dale B. Canelas
rrIE: Director, The George A. Smathers
Libraries


DSR-I (6/88)


~------~- --- --








SEND NOTICE OF AWARD TO:
The University of Florida
Division of Sponsored Research
219 Grinter Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
(904) 392-1582


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SPONSORED PROJECTS
APPROVAL FORM


University Project # _____
(LEAVE BLANK)
Title of Proposal: Project for Access to library resources in the Balknap Collection, UF


Submitted to Agency/Program: U.S. Dept. of Education, CFDA No. 84.091
Submitted to Agency/Program:
(NOTE TO THE P.I.: Please provide mailing instructions on page 2)
UNIVERSITY ENDORSEMENTS: The attached proposal has been examined by the officials whose signatures appear below. The principal academic review
of the proposal is the responsibility of the Department/Center and College. If additional space is needed for signatures, please provide them on a separate
sheet of paper.


Principal Investigator: oject Diretr)

76J, bY .Ic


NA CBernard McT nue L C9 t / i
Tr.: Chair, Dept. of Special sections
CAMPUS ADDRESS: 308 Smathers
TELEPHONE 392-9075
SOC. SEC. NO.


Co-Principal Investigator: (If Applicable)


NAME: Dte

TELEPHONE:
SOC. SEC. NO.

Department Head:



NAME: Bernard igue / D
TnLE: as above



Department Head: (If more than one)



NAME: Dat
TITLE:


Soproval by Dean or Director:

^ t /^ c ^^______


Dae


DSR-I (6/88)


Approval by Dean or Director: (If more than one)


NAME: Due
TIrLE:





Other Endorsement (If Needed):


NAME:
TITLE:


Dom


Approval by Vice-President for Agricultural Affairs
(For all projects involving IFAS Personnel)


NAME: Dam
TrTLE.



Approval by Vice-President for Health Affairs:
(For all projects involving JHMHC Personnel)


NAME: Dae
TITLE:

Official Authorized to Sign for the University:
(Leave Blank)


NAME: Dua
TIrLE:
Division of Sponsored Research
University of Florida


AGENCY APPLICATION DEADLINE
(DO NOT IEAVE ILANKQ

Date: Nov. 20, 1992
E postmark Q receipt


NAME: Dale B. Canelas
rmrtE: Director, The George A. Sinathers
Libraries








OMI Approvl No. 0344-00A
ASSURANCES NON-CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMS
Note Certain of these assurances may not be applicable to your project or program. If you have questions,
please contact the awarding agency. Further, certain Federal awarding agencies may require applicants
to certify to additional assurances. If such is the case, you will be notified.
As the duly authorized representative of the applicant I certify that the applicant:


1. Has the legal authority to apply for Federal
assistance, and the Institutional, managerial and
financial capability (Including funds sufficient to
pay the non-Federal share of project costs) to
'ensure proper planning, management and com-
pletion of the project described in this application.
2. Will give the awarding agency, the Comptroller
General of the United States, and if appropriate,
the State, through any authorized representative,
access to and the right to examine all records,
books, papers, or documents related to the award;
and will establish a proper accounting system in
accordance with generally accepted accounting
standards or agency directives.
3. Will establish safeguards to prohibit employees
from using their positions for a purpose that
istitutes or presents the appearance of personal
or organizational conflict of interest, or personal
gain.
4. Will initiate and complete the work within the
applicable time frame after receipt of approval of
the awarding agency.
5. Will comply with the -ntergovernmental
Personnel Act of 1970 (42 U.S.C. (, 4728-4763)
relating to prescribed standards for merit systems
for programs funded under one of the nineteen
statutes or regulations specified in Appendix A of
OPM's Standards for a Merit System of Personnel
Administration (5 C.F.R. 900, Subpart F).
6. Will comply with all Federal statutes relating to
nondiscrimination. These include but are not
limited to: (a) Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of
1964 (P.L. 88-362) which prohibits discrimination
on the basis of race, color or national origin; (b)
Title IX ', the Education Amendments of 1972, as
amendeo'.20 U.S.C. If 1681-1683, and 1685-1688),
which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex;
(c) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as
-'ended (29 U.S.C. 1 794), which prohibits dis-
mzination on the basis of handicaps; (d) the Age
Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended (42
U.S.C.11 6101-8107), which prohibits discrim-
ination on the basis of age;


(e) the Drug Abuse Office and Treatment Act of
1972 (P.L. 92-255), as amended, relating to
nondiscrimination on the basis of drug abuse; (i)
the Comprehensive Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Prevention, Treatment and Rehabilitation Act of
1970 (P.L. 91-616), as amended, relating to
nondiscrimination on the basis of alcohol abuse or
alcoholism; (g) 1f 523 and 527 of the Public Health
Service Act of 1912 (42 U.S.C. 290 dd-3 and 290 ee-
3), as amended, relating to confidentiality of
alcohol and drug abuse patient records; (h) Title
VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. I
3801 et seq.), as amended, relating to non.
discrimination in the sale, rental or financing of
housing; (1) any other nondiscrimination
provisions in the specific statutes) under which
application for Federal assistance is being made;
and (J) the requirements of any other
nondiscrimination statute(s) which may apply to
the application.
7. Will comply, or has already complied, with the
requirements of Titles II and III of the Uniform
Relocation Assistance and Real Property
Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 (P.L. 91-846)
which provide for fair and equitable treatment of
persons displaced or whose property is acquired as
a result of Federal or federally assisted programs.
These requirements apply to all interests in real
property acquired for project purposes regardless
of Federal participation in purchases.
8 Will comply with the provisions of the Hatch Act
(5 U.S.C. Il 1501-1508 and 7324-7328) which limit
the political activities of employees whose
principal employment activities are funded in
whole or In part with Federal funds.
9. Will comply, as applicable, with the provisions of
the Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. 11 276a to 276a-
7), the Copeland Act (40 U.S.C. 1 276c and 18
U.S.C. Ii 874), and the Contract Work Hours and
Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. If 327-333),
regarding labor standards for federally assisted
construction subagreements.


Sldafd aorm 424S (4-U4
PrecWtW d CUe Cndru A. 102


.. *L J.. J .. l I .- -_







Project for Access to Library Resources in the
Belknap Collection, George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida


October 1, 1993 September 30, 1994































Submitted to

U.S. Department of Education
November 20, 1992
CFDA No: 84.091





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection,
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

Application for Grant
under
Strengthening Research Library Resources Program
CFDA No.: 84.091


Name and Address of Applicant:

University of Florida
George A. Smathers Libraries
Gainesville, FL 32611


Title of Project:


Project Director:





Funding Requested:

Project Period:


Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap
Collection, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of
Florida

Bernard McTigue
Chair, Department of Special Collections
308 Smathers Library
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
(904) 392-9075

$147,629

October 1, 1993 September 30, 1994


Abstract:

Completion of this project will enable the George A. Smathers Libraries to build a set of
relational databases for automated access to performing arts materials in the Belknap
Collection for the Performing Arts. The project will utilize an information model for
automated tracking and presentation of ephemeral special collections material and items that
is built under a joint venture effort with the IBM Corporation. The databases will enable
online national access to an significant and underutilized collection of photographs, song
sheets and folios, playbills, memoirs, scrapbooks, programs, discographies, costume and
set designs, and critical reviews.

The project encompasses scanning and document delivery capabilities that will enable
national online access to rare and delicate items and materials and, in turn, promote their
preservation by limiting use of the originals.

Major project activities will be to implement the relational databases, analyze and enter the
collection records in the OCLC, RLIN, local OPAC databases, scan and make accessible
item level records and online images, and implement the national access to the databases.


778.21
Significance of the Libraries

This part of the application has been waived for the George A. Smathers Libraries.




Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 3
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992



788.22


a) Description of the Project.


1. The George Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, request funding to enter
information about the Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts into a user accessible
information management system, jointly developed by IBM and the Smathers Libraries,
and run at the University Libraries. In addition to creating AMC collection record
records for addition to the RLIN and OCLC databases, at least 100,000 records for
collection holdings and at least 10,000 images of the rare and valuable material will be
added and made nationally accessible through the Information Model System. Once
entered, the information and scanned items will be accessible for viewing, copying, as
well as entry into word processing.


2. The Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts is a nationally significant, non-
circulating, special collection that encompasses unique material on American theatre,
popular culture, music and dance. The key resources are collections from major
performing arts personalities of original costume and set designs, personal papers and
memoirs, playbills, programs, photographs, folios, song sheets, posters, and many
other widely varied primary source and ephemeral items. All of these materials are
currently inaccessible through any public catalog.


3. Objectives for this project will be to:


1. Provide access through OCLC and RLIN to the collections comprising the Belknap
Collection for the Performing Arts by generating at least 100 collection-level AMC
records.


2. Complete inputing of and creating structures for 100,000 item-level records for
non-book research resource materials over a one year period in the Information
Model System. (Remaining playbills, programs, etchings, posters, sheet music,
slides, manuscript collections, and other primary source material will be added as
part of University's post-project commitment).


3. Enter and link to the Information Model System 10,000 scanned images of
Collection Material.




Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 4
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992


4. Build system and user information documentation and publications.


5. Regularly review and measure project progress and status, create monthly status
tracking reports, and compile Quarterly Project Updates and Budget Performance
Documents.


4. Completion of the project will make nationally available online over 100,000 records of
information and 10,000 key images from this collection. Network interfaces, collection
level records on OCLC and RLIN, and direct linkage will open this collection to
national and international scholars, researchers, and theatre professionals. As a result,
researchers everywhere will gain critical information about the vast Belknap holdings as
well as the ability to access these holdings to retrieve detailed information and specific
scanned images online.

b) Significance of the Project.

The significance of this project lies in its implementation--the creation of databases
containing records and scanned images of research resources housed in the Belknap
Collection for the Performing Arts and making these records and images readily available
though electronic information networks. This project builds on a joint venture developed by
the University of Florida and IBM to create a relational model information system. The
system vastly improves the collection's ability to manage its collections, provides access to
a large number of information records and fields in all formats through a relational
database, and provides both access to and retrieval of the records and images in the
database through the internet. The project has brought together information specialists and
librarians to create a viable approach to managing large collections of performing arts or
other types of ephemera, and addresses specific needs on the part of scholars and students
to gain access not only to records about information but the information itself--all from an
important but practically unknown and inaccessible special collection in the libraries.
The Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts is a significant asset to the George A.
Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida which contains a combination of unique
primary source and ephemeral items, periodicals, reference documents, and books covering
a wide range of performing arts history. It is the only performing arts research level
collection in the Southeast and the United States. Much of the material, the ephemera
especially, has been largely unavailable to the scholarly community except through personal
request to the collection's curator.





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection,
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

The core of the collection was brought to the University in 1953 by Sara Yancey
Belknap, one of the first theater librarians and a student of George Freedley at the New
York Public Library. The organization and emphasis of the collection reflects his influence
and direction. Ms. Belknap was also the author and compiler of The Guide to Dance
Periodicals: 1931-1962 (10 Volumes) as well as The Guide to the Performing Arts: 1957-
68 (12 Volumes and The Guide to Musical Arts: 1957, many of which she completed while
at the University of Florida. These reference works are now considered standard and have
served as pioneering works in providing information about the performing arts. The project
follows her innovative lead.
The strength of the collection is both its uniqueness and its range, from 1790 Dublin
broadsides to original 20th century Broadway costume and set designs. The collection is
also quite deep, especially in the documentation of the early developments in American
Popular Entertainment from touring Theatre Companies of the 1880's to the cinema and
music of the latter parts of this century. Specifically, the major sets of resources in the
Belknap Collection which the project will concentrate on are as follows:

1. The Ringling Collection of Cabinet Photographs and Playbills. This
significant collection numbers over 100,000 items covering 19th and early 20th
century American and British stock companies, performances, and performers.

2. The John David Ridge Collection of original drawings, design "bibles", and
personal costume designs, more than 2500 items for over 50 productions.

3. The Denishawn Dance Collection of original photographs, programs, press
releases, reviews, and clippings, posters, personal correspondence, and
memorabilia related to Ruth St. Denis, Ted Shawn, the Shawn Project in Eustis,
Florida, and Jacob's Pillow (all male dance troupe).


4. The American Theatre Collection of original publicity photographs,
lithographs, and prints of 19th Century actors and actresses of both regional and
national scope. In addition, there are related news releases, playbills, and song
books.

5. The American Popular Culture Collection of original song sheets, music
folios, discographies, and bibliographies. These cover regional folk music,
African-American blues and popular music, regional ethnic music, and
contemporary popular music. The sheet music collection consists of approximately




Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 6
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

10,000 items, rich in photographs and period caricatures. A key set of papers is a
personally corrected and updated memoir by Alec Wilder.


6. The Original Ballet Russe and Ballet Theatre Dance Collection. The
other major portion of the significant Belknap dance archives, this collection details
the 1939 through 1943 seasons with performance programs, souvenir and publicity
programs, critical reviews, cast and performer pictures, and principal
correspondence.


7. The American Shakespeare Presentation Collection of nationally produced
Shakespeare festivals and plays. This valuable original collection of material has
been used often to support continuing national presentations of Shakespeare's
works.


8. The Publicity Poster Collection of Kabuki, movie stills and publicity,
performing arts festivals, and vaudeville.


9. The Charles MacArthur Papers consisting of personal memoirs, letters, radio
and film scripts, unpublished personal papers, scrapbooks, advertising flyers, and
works in progress MacArthur's personal papers cover both his professional career
and his life as husband of the actress, Helen Hayes. Also included in the papers are
draft materials from other writers, such as Edward Albee.


Current usage of the collection varies, emanating from both independent researchers
and academic scholars, as well as from theatre, history, English, and popular culture
students at all levels and the general public. Usage statistics over the past year show a
continuing increase in patronage, in spite of the lack of effective access and searching
capabilities. Specific users of the collection include theatre arts and film researchers, ethnic
and folk song historians (ethnomusicologists), students of popular culture and popular
iconography, dance specialists, novelists, artists, University and community theatre
groups, performing artists, and scholars interested in our wide variety of material on all
aspects of the performing arts.
Increasingly, readers request information which falls outside traditional categories. For
example, an historian specializing in American Theatre asked for ten categories of
information (clippings, photographs, press releases and more) on 65 actors and actresses
of the silent and early film era. To satisfy this request files were searched manually then
match them against the actor/actress list, eliminating those from the inappropriate time




Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 7
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

frames and genre relationships. Another request from a historian specializing in African-
American affairs asked for depiction's of Black performing artists on song sheets, in
publicity photographs, and on other visual material for the time periods covering 1840 to
1890. In both instances, useful material was organized but, certainly, a good deal was
missed. A professor of Theatre at the University of Florida, was researching early
renditions of "Hello Dolly". She came in seeking the 1835 John Oxenford script of "A Day
Well Spent," which she had been unable to locate on OCLC or RLIN. The Belknap
Collection of Dicks' Standard Plays, which numbers wellover 1,000, contained the needed
script with line illustrations. The collection was able to provide Max Cohen, a noted South
Florida author, information on Ellen Ternan (Charles Dickens' mistress), and he was able
to document early performances by the Teran family in the Ringling Collection
broadsides. The collection, following an extensive hand search, could supply all images of
Salome in theatre and opera productions for a patron intent on producing a slide lecture
called "Salomania," and information on all theatres owned by Oscar Hammerstein in New
York City: The Olympia, The Victoria, The Republic, and The Manhattan Opera House.
Since the collection is more than 85% ephemera, conventional cataloging methods do
not begin to satisfy the typical request. Currently the best search tools available are card
files and personal consultation with the curator. The material in the collection will be of
optimum use and benefit to scholars and researchers with a means of access that responds
to complex questions by presenting and relating information and materials immediately and
makes this information immediately available through the electronic networks. In addition
to speed and comprehensiveness at the item level, the collection level cataloging in the
OCLC and RLIN networks will indicate the broad collection coverage available and point to
internet addresses which will lead the researcher to the database itself. The nature of current
original research in the Belknap Collection means bringing together seemingly unrelated
information on demand. Automating collection information and materials into a readily and
widely accessible information model system will facilitate access, research, and collection
management.

c) Plan of Operation.

The operation plan requires the addition of records for and images of materials in the
Belknap Performing Arts Collection into the "Information Model System", a Joint Venture
Product in development by the University of Florida Libraries and the IBM Corporation.
This venture begins December 1, 1992 and will be completed by December 1, 1993.
Details of the project, including the draft agreement, are included in the Technical
Publication Appendix. The "Information Model System" enables the following:





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 8
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992



1. The means to readily and quickly discover and obtain multiple sets of information
not currently relatable except through painstaking and time consuming singularly
processed searches.


2. The capability to retrieve, communicate, and reproduce information, and transmit
textual contents of materials


3. The automated capability for managing non-book items and to track and present
both the materials and items and all pertinent information about them dynamically in
the format requested.


4. A scanning and document storage and delivery facility to allow rare and delicate
items and materials to be accessible on-line and promote preservation of the
original. Additional functional capabilities enable scanned input to be used as data
entry and allows scanned documents to be interfaced with word processing
documents.


5. A relational, personal-computer-based information management facility for
tracking, cataloging, storing, and inter-relating non-book (ephemeral) material
(specifically, photographs, playbills, slides, costume designs, and memorabilia) as
well as any and all sets of information categories, data, and scanned material.


6. A data formatting capability to enable tabular data and records to be viewed in any
form requested. It also enables disparate files and information to be accessed and
shared, which is critical for interfacing to other non-compatible systems.


7. A networking capability to allow access to the Belknap archival material from other
research institutions with appropriate access capabilities.


8. System provision and integration of local area networks, workstations, network
servers, relationship management within a relational data base system, data
formatting capabilities, scanning and storage facilities, and appropriate
communications equipment.


The Information Model System provides the means to dynamically satisfy information
requests. To do this, the information in the system must be accurate, complete, and readily





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 9
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

available. It must be able to be seen, not just as an isolated occurrence, but in context, as
part of inclusive groupings of related information. Information context is a dynamic
concept, one that changes as the information itself changes and more becomes known about
the information and how it relates to other information. Managing information in context
involves not only tracking the item but the known relationships between specific items or
sets of information. This makes it possible for related views of information to be built
dynamically through the utilizing the predetermined relationships.
Successfully and accurately providing information in context utilizing computerized
automation is.a relatively new concept. An additional critical need is to comprehensively
and effectively integrate for presentation information that is contained in multiple varieties
and types of media ranging from books to ephemera and visual materials to items of
memorabilia. For the library, information, especially at the item-level, about non-book
material is among the most difficult to track. It is also difficult to relate to other collection
information. Ephemera is not usually published. It is not dated and not authored in the
conventional sense.
Relating information across multiple media types and formats requires a new approach,
and that approach is provided by the Information Model System, which is built on a
relationship management approach enabling information to be viewed across a spectrum of
assumptions, criteria, formats, requirements, and time.
The plan is to build the Belknap Collection databases under the Information Model
System and utilize them to classify, categorize (through a functional decomposition
method), and cross-relate all media formats, such as print, audio, visual, and audio-visual
to the performing arts types and information tables. The end result will be to provide
linkages such as productions with performers in films, publicity material, videos, books,
periodicals, playbills, recordings, and more. Researchers will be able to trace the careers
of actors, composers, dancers and directors in various types of productions through
primary source material and ephemera, as well as books, periodicals, sections of books,
and others. Because of the relational management capabilities of the model, linkages
between categories such as vaudeville, musicals, dance, and film can be documented for
the researcher across a variety of formats. The model databases contain and report
groupings of information about specific authors, productions, titles, subjects, dates,
performers and virtually anything else covering all varieties of media and types of
performing arts. The presentation of the information groupings or views can be tailored to
the specifications of the researcher even to the building of detailed bibliographic listings for
the items.
The configuration for implementing the model is a turnkey micro- computer system
comprising up to eight machines per local area network, with one machine functioning as a




Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 1 0
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

server housing the data base system the relationship modules, and the networking
software. Growth is accommodated by additional sets of up to eight machines linked by a
token ring network that in turn is linked back to the primary cluster of machines. The
server on the primary network also functions as the communications link to other networks
or computer systems through a dial-back modem capability.
Microcomputer workstations, obtained through the IBM joint venture development, are
networked together for the project. They will be utilized for the development and
modification of the data base designs and'physical generations, for data entry (and for
monitoring entries and complex records), for scanning and scanning administration, as
servers, for public and network access, and for data and document transfer. The network
access capabilities will allow researchers to remotely access the data bases for information.
For the implementation of these databases, the configuration and internal networking
capabilities can be kept to a minimum because they will interface with a larger and
sophisticated telecommunications system (the University of Florida's UFNET) that
provides shared resources and servers, mixed services and networks, local and
departmental networks, gateways to other networks and communications systems, host-to-
host computer communication, as well as multi-protocol routing nodes. The formatting
capability internal to the relationship management modules will enable the platform to
access and deliver data compatible with any record layout or format requirement.
Access to the model system from other systems will be accomplished through utilizing
the following record developments:


1. The production of collection level descriptions in AMC MARC format for OCLC
and RLIN, and FCLA's LUIS network, which provides access to the Florida SUS
libraries.


2. The creation of the Information Model System data base records at the item level on
personal computer-based software which capture detailed information on material
within the Belknap Collection to provide access according to the criteria desired.


The collection level records will enable construction of gateways to the model systems
data bases. The internal communications facilities together with those available through
INTERNET comprise the information gateway structure as captured in Figure 1.2 entitled
"The Information Gateway." The figure depicts how the various networks and servers
provide a number of different ways to access the model system.
The final results will be to to present dynamic views and formats of related information
over a wide communications environment. It is this ability to retrieve, communicate, and




Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 1 1
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

reproduce information, transmit text, and dynamically fulfill research requests across a
wide range of telecommunications gateways that makes this project so valuable, unique,
and trend-setting.

Workplan:


Objective #1: Provide access through OCLC and RLIN to the collections comprising the
Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts by generating at least 100
collection-level AMC records.


Parallel to the creation of 100,000 records describing selected items in the Belknap
collection will be the analysis of the collection's holdings overall and the generation of
approximately 100 records in the Archives and manuscript control format. The curatorial
staff will appraise the collections and subcollections, choose the appropriate descriptive
level (starting at the largest, the collection level) and generate records for sharing in RLIN
and OCLC.
The Departments of Special collections and the Catalog Department have a well-
established procedure for the creation of AMC records i.e. input into RLIN as provisional
records by Special Collections staff; quality control review by catalog staff; revision and
input into RLIN and OCLC; and downloading with the local network, LUIS.
The Information Model Systems integrated database design will have the capacity to
migrate records to the national bibliographic networks. Data will be formatted using the
MARC AMC record as the model and progamming will insure compatibility. However,
we view the creation of the 100,000 item records as curatorial and research supports and do
not choose to contribute them to RLIN and OCLC at this time. But the capability is there- it
has been designed into the model. Objective 1 recognizes our commitment to contributing
cataloging of special materials to the rational databases.


Time Frame: Weeks 11 through 20 500 FTE hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Project Director.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Project Director, Project Librarian, Special
Collections Cataloger.


Objective #2: Complete inputing of and creating structures for 100,000 item-level
records for non-book research resource materials over a one year period in
the Information Model System.





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 1 2
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

I. Complete Selection of Items.


The criteria used to determine which records input into the Information Model System
are applied by the curator who appraises the value of the item or sets of items.
Between December 1992 and October 1993 (IBM/UF Joint Venture Phase) the major
data fields of approximately 50,000 items will have been selected and input. The
criteria used to select the items is as follows:


a) Publications containing original art by noted artists.


b) Playbills which document a significant event in the life of a play or performer,
i.e. opening night, farewell performance, first appearance of a now important
celebrity.

c) Unique costuming by a significant designer.


d) Annotations and autographs by important performers or authors.


e) Manuscripts, programs, photographs, and the like that are unique to the
Belknap Collection.


Detail: Continue the selection of items deemed by the curator to be most significant
for the support of research and instruction in accordance with the
established criteria.
Time Frame: Weeks 1 through 10 250 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Project Director.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Project Director, Project Librarian.


II. Record Formatting.

Detail: Summarize and categorize item-level records by collection categories and
emphasis, build collection record fields, and specify controls and offsets.
Time Frame: Weeks 1 and 2 140 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist, Project
Librarian.





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 1 3
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

II. System and Data Base Creation Tasks.


A. Data Base Design (of Information and Category tables).


Detail: Data Design, Data Normalization, Table Specifications, Physical Sizing and
Implementation, and View Specification and Creation.
Time Frame: Weeks 3, 4, 5, and 6 280 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist.


B. Relationship Pre-specification.


Detail: Analyze entity relationships, Specify relationship parameters, and Build
index structures.
Time Frame: Weeks 7 and 8 140 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist, Project
Librarian.


C. Implement Physical Files, Indices, Parameters.


Detail: Specify File Parameters, Specify Fields and Occurrences, Specify Category
Entries and Access Structures.
Time Frame: Weeks 9 and 10 140 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist.


D. Screen Formats, Controls, and Parameters.


Detail: Code Screen Layouts, Specify Parameters, Code Screen Algorithms, Code
Screen Linkages.
Time Frame: Weeks 11, 12, and 13 210 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist, Project
Librarian.


E. Program Screen Management Exits, Interfaces, and Algorithms.





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 1 4
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992


Detail: Design Programs, Code and Interface Exits, Code Linkage Algorithms.
Time Frame: Weeks 14, 15, and 16 210 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist



IV. Data Entry (Manual and Scanning) Processes.


A. Scan Pre-specified Information and Category Table Fields.


Detail: Enter Field Information (Standardized Forms), Scan Forms, Run Data Base
Entry Programs, Build Relationship Specifications.
Time Frame: Weeks 17, 18, and 19 210 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist, Project
Librarian.


B. Enter Non Pre-specified Information Table Fields.


Detail: Enter Required Data (Pre-formatted Data Entry Screens), Enter Relationship
Information, Specify Indices, Run Verification Routines.
Time Frame: Weeks 20, 21, and 22 210 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist, Project
Librarian.



Objective # 3: Enter and Link to the Information Model System 10,000 Scanned Images of
Collection Material.


Project Phase Projections and Assumptions.


A. Scanned Item Time Requirements.
Current experience shows that entry and administration of scanned items is
completable on the following time basis:





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection,
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

1. Playbills: Five complete items per hour.
2. Programs: Five complete items per hour.
3. Fliers: Five complete items per hour.
4. Photographs: 10 complete items per hour.
5. Reviews: 10 complete items per hour.


B. Time Projection Assumptions for Scanning: In order to process 10,000 items
(according to above established requirements for item entry by item classification)
the following time requirements are determined:

1. 2,000 Playbills 400 FTE-hours.
2. 2,000 Photographs 200 FTE-hours.
3. 2,000 Programs 400 FTE-hours.
4. 2,000 Fliers 400 FTE-hours.
5. 2,000 Reviews 200 FTE-hours.

Total Scanning Activities FTE-hours: 1,600 FTE-hours.

The determination is based on actual scanning activities with each
separate item classification by two data specialists over a three week work period.
The results are based on a dedicated scanner as requested as part of this proposal.


C. Time Projection Assumptions for Scanning Verification: In order to properly
verify the scanning results and correct an approximate one and one-half percent
o o error rate, an additional 70 FTE-hours are required (approximately 5% of
'i, projected FTE time requirements for scanning activities).

I. Select 10,000 items by the following breakdown Item Classification:

1. 2,000 Playbills.
2. 2,000 Photographs.
3. 2,000 Programs.
4. 2,000 Fliers.
5. 2,000 Reviews.


Time Frame: Weeks 23 through 25 200 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Project Director.





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 1 6
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

Project Phase Resource Allocation: Project Director, Project Librarian.


II. Item Scanning Activities.


A. Scanning Tasks.


Detail: Enter/Scan Standardized Information (on or attached to item), Scan Item, and
Specify Acceptance.
Time Frame for Playbills: Weeks 23 through 27 400 FTE-hours.
Time Frame for Photographs: Weeks 28 through 30 200 FTE-hours.
Time Frame for Programs: Weeks 31 through 35 400 FTE-hours.
Time Frame for Fliers: Weeks 36 through 40 400 FTE-hours.
Time Frame for Reviews: Weeks 41 through 43 200 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist, Project
Librarian.


B. Verification Processes.


Detail: Visually and programmatically check image quality, and process corrections as
listed.
Time Frame: Weeks 44 and 45 140 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist, Project
Librarian.


C. Administrative Processes.


Detail: Run data base link processes, and verify linkages.
Time Frame: Weeks 46 and 47 140 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist, Project
Librarian.


Objective # 4: To Build System and User Information Documentation and Publications.


Project Assumptions.





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 1 7
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992



Pre-existing documentation and help and message information will be built into the
creation of the system, thus rendering these processes largely collative and
coordinational,


I. System Documentation Tasks: Technical Manual Writing.


Detail: Print, edit, and collate all procedural and user-required explanatory texts,
arrange text by operational procedure, and verify final documents.
Time Frame: Weeks 48 and 49 140 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist, Project-
Librarian.


II. Online Documentation Tasks: Build Automated Help Screens and Message
References.


Detail: Format and populate screens, compile message numbers by procedural
operation, write explanatory and corrective texts by individual message.
Time Frame: Week 50 70 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, Data Entry Specialist, Project
Librarian.



Objective # 5: Project Administration Regularly Review and Measure Project Progress
and Status, Create Monthly Status Tracking Reports, and Compile Quarterly
Project Updates and Budget Performance Documents.


Outline of Reviewing and Reporting Activities: High Level Task Overview, Detail
Breakout, and Schedule and Time Allocations.


I. Data Base Design Reviews.


Detail: Review and Measure Data Base Technical Designs and Implementations,
Table Specifications and Sizings, and Relationship Management
Capabilities.





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 1 8
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

Time Frame: End of Each Project Week 200 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Data Analyst.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, System Design Reviewer and
Technical Consultant, and Project Director.


II. System Development Reviews.


Detail: Review and Measure Progress of System Development, Installations, Data
Entry, and all other Technical and Implementation Aspects of the Project
Time Frame: End of Each Project Week 200 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Project Director.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Data Analyst, System Design Reviewer and
Technical Consultant, and Project Director.


III. Compilation of Monthly, Quarterly Reporting, Status, and Budget Tracking
Documents.
Detail: Create monthly reports, roll-up quarterly reports, track budget performance
and create financial reporting documents, send to sponsoring organization
for review.
Time Frame: End of Each Monthly Project Period. 60 FTE-hours.
Project Phase Responsibilities: Project Director.
Project Phase Resource Allocation: Project Director, Data Analyst.


The project's one year plan is as follows:


d) Quality of Key Personnel


1. Principal Investigator: Mr. Bernard F. McTigue. .20FTE. Chair, Dept. of
Special Collections. With over 20 years experience in the research library field,
primarily at the New York Public Library, Mr. McTigue has developed an in-depth
awareness of the need to make ephemeral materials in library collections more
accessible to students and scholars. He is the author of several articles and
bibliographic studies, as well as co-author of the technical study on the Information
Model System to be published in forthcoming months. Mr. McTigue holds a
Masters degree from Columbia University as well as one from Hunter College




Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 1 9
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

2. Data Analyst personnel (1FTE) is Steven Opdyke. Mr. Opdyke has been a data and
systems architectural specialist and consultant for over 15 years in the financial and
management areas of large corporations. The past five years were spentdirecting
groups responsible for building information systemsarchitecture for a large banking
institution. It was his success in building the similar information model system
with scanningcapabilities that will enable the successful completion of thisproposal.
He is currently the major developer of the Information Model System, underway at
the University of Florida as a jointventure project with the IBM Corporation. Mr.
Opdyke graduated from the University of Florida in 1975 with a master's degree in
Political Science, including upper level specialization in Library Administration.
He is the primary author of the forthcoming publication on the Information Model
System.


3. The Data Entry Specialist: TEA. (1FTE). The Date Entry position is to be filled
based on institutional qualifications for this position and hiring policies and
procedures.

4. The Project Librarian/Curator: Ms. Mary JaneDaicoff (1FTE). Ms. Daicoff is the
curator of the Belknap Collection. Under her direction the collection has
sponsored theatre displays and has grown through drives for donations of private
collections and papers. Ms. Daicoff also teaches humanities at the Santa Fe
Community College. She has a Masters in English from the University of Chicago
and is a Ph. D. candidate there in 19th Century American Literature. She is co-
author of a recently-published work on Victorian Ladies, which presented the
various costumes and styles of that period.

5. The System Design Reviewer and Technical Consultant: Mr. William Covey
(.05FTE) Mr. Covey is currently the Director of Systems for the Smathers
Libraries at the University of Florida. Mr. Covey has been with the University
Libraries as Systems Manager much of his career. He has specialized in
networking and communications systems. His current effort centers around linking
disparate stand-alone systems with the multi-region UFNET telecommunications
system. He is also a data base design expert, especially in relational design. He
brings extensive expertise to the project in the areas of data base performance,
indexing, and inter-systems communications.




Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 20
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

6. The Special Collections Cataloger: Ms. Elaine Yontz (.15FTE). Ms. Yontz has
cataloged over 11,000 titles, including literature in all languages for the general and
special collections, over the past five years. Her experience includes both original
and copy cataloging in various formats. She is currently responsible for the
original cataloging for the Belknap Collection.


Overview of Key Project Personnel Roles


The project's principal investigator and director, (.20FTE) will direct the project,
review and monitor selection of materials included, organize schedules, manage the project
team personnel, publish and co-author regular reports as well as publicizing and
informational articles, meet with other institutions interested in accessing the data bases,
utilizing the system, manage the budget and meet with national organizations to encourage
interest in the project.

The major system developer is the data analyst who will:


1. Complete the major tasks of the project as outlined in the project plan details.

2. Map the various relationships between the entries captured on the data bases and the
various category and role tables, which capture relationships and enable the creation
of cross-referenced listings on any subject or individual.


3. Create data bases which can be accessed through other computers locally or off-site
via electronic mail or electronic copy services transmitting either the source material
itself or the information about the source.


4. Compile computerized listings containing pertinent bibliographic and location
information on ephemera, such as playbills, photographs, set descriptions,
recording logs, portions of books, specific articles in periodicals, letters, and even
transcripts of interviews.


5. Provide any and all necessary automated collection management capabilities and
software procedures.





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 2 1
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

6. Write up details of the project for other performing arts librarians, systems
specialists, technical reviewers and journals, as well as for the sponsoring
organization, and all other patrons and interested parties.

These positions are critical to the success of the project. It is the expertise of the
analyst that is key to the successful completion of the project. This individual has been the
one who made this type of model data management and scanning system work in
production for a very large bank. It is this person who has built an accurately scheduled
project plan at a detailed level based on the successful implementation of similar efforts.
The Project Librarian will select, in collaboration with the Project Director, and prepare
documents for scanning and will analyze the contents for record specification. Other tasks
will be to provide curatorial and collection management insight and direction. The librarian
will ensure that standards are set and followed, that cataloging procedures are followed,
that collection records are correctly formatted, and that information for these records are
correct. The screen design and algorithms will be reviewed and signed off on by the
librarian. This is the important function of collection direction, materials handling and
collecting, and record verification.
The System Design Reviewer and Technical Consultant is key to the project because
that individual will be ensuring the effectiveness of data base, screen, and communications
designs. That individual will facilitate the implementation of the system gateway approach
by coordinating with the appropriate network personnel. This person will function in the
context of a regular and specific design review methodology. In addition, this person will
ensure that communications specifications and protocols are designed for
and followed.
The Special Collections Cataloger will create the collection level records. This
person will assist the project librarian in populating the fields of the collection records
and will assist the data base and data entry people in the formatting of tabular
information in AMC MARC format.





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection,
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

e) Budget and Cost Effectiveness


USDE


Personnel
Salary
.20FTE Project Director
1.00FTE Data Analyst
1.00FTE Project Librarian
.15FTESpecial Collection Cataloger
.05FTE Systems Office Head
1.00FTE Computer Entry Specialist.
Total Salary
Other Personnel Services
450 hours student assistance


$40,000
$26,000


$9.000
$75,000


UF Share


$9,000


$4,000
$2,400
$9.000
$24,400


$3.000


Total Personnel


Fringe Benefits
General Rate @ 26.1
Medical $2,860 per FTE
FICA @ 7.65% on OPS.
Total Fringe Benefits


Equipment
1 IBM Image Scanner 2456-001
Hard Disc Backup
1 2400 Baud Modem
Total Equipment


Supplies


$78,000


$19,575
$5,720
$230
$25,525


$7,000


$7,000


$24,000 $102,400


$6,368 $25,943
$2,002 $7,722
$230
$8,370 $33,895


$500
$200


$700

$400
$48
$100
$548


Computer Printer Paper
Cabling-Parallel
Surge Protection Units
Total Supplies


$7,000
$500
$200


$7,700

$400
$48
$100
$548


Total Direct Costs

Indirect Tate @ 4.3% TDC


Total Project Costs


$107,525 $34,018 $141,543

$4,624 $1,463 $6,086

$112,148 $35,481 $147,629


Total


$9,000
$40,000
$26,000
$4,000
$2,400
$18,000
$99,400

$3000


$3,000




Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 2 3
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992


zf) Evaluation Plan

The project team has established measures for determining project progress and status.
Production and deliverable quotas have been determined and are integrated into the weekly
milestones as outlined in the project plan and schedules.
The project director will conduct weekly design reviews and project status meetings to
ensure the project is progressing as scheduled and committed. The completion of project
milestones that focus on the weekly deliverables will be documented in these meetings.
Problem areas will be identified and assigned for resolution. Absorption of any extra time
caused by unanticipated problem areas will be the responsibility of the director to continue
to keep the project on schedule.
The design reviews will concentrate on the technical and data base designs and
definitions as targeted in the detailed project plan. The methodology to be followed in the
design reviews is that recommended and employed by the IBM Corporation in their
customer data base design review programs.
The project director will compile monthly status reports and incorporate them into
quarterly project overviews and budget tracking documents. These documents will be
submitted to the granting organization as specified for their review.
At the conclusion of the project the director will submit a status of completed activities,
to include specific numbers of item-level and collection-level records, scanned items, usage
statistics, and system modules. The director will also submit an article for publication
detailing the project and its results. The article will be submitted to an automation journal.
In addition, the director will present, at national library conferences (a minimum of three), a
formal demonstration of the results of this project.


g) Adequacy of Resources

The University of Florida will provide any additional office equipment, space and
professional assistance required by the project for its effective completion. The University
of Florida participates in the OCLC network through SOLINET and is a general member of
the Research Libraries Group. This project builds on a joint venture between the
University of Florida and IBM which has provided the hardware and software required to
develop the system and data base. See IBM draft contract-Appendix 5.


h) Institutional Commitment





Project for Access to Library Resources in the Belknap Collection, 2 4
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
November 20, 1992

The George A. Smathers Libraries of the University of Florida supports one of the
largest Special Collections departments in the Southeast. The Belknap Collection for the
Performing Arts is an integral part of this operation whose central mission is to acquire,
preserve and make accessible primary research materials for the use of scholars and
students at the University of Florida, in the Southeastern region of the country and
throughout the nation. The Libraries will continue to support the Belknap Collection and
its goal of documenting the history of the preforming arts and it is committed to creating
machine-readable records for all of its holdings.
The Libraries, through the Florida Center for Library Automation, have strong and
ongoing commitments to developing on-line catalogues. More than 98% of UF's
collection, or more than 2,000,000 records, is now in machine-readable form and loaded
into the NOTIS based State University System system. These records are now available to
any user at any of more than 1,000 terminal locations within the SUS system and by
remote to any user with access to a computer capable of communicating with the Northeast
Florida Data Processing Center at the University of Florida. UF is committed to high
standards of cataloging. The George A. Smathers Library Catalog Department is a current
active participant in NACO, OCLC Enhance and CONSER programs. The Florida Center
for Library Automation, which provides automated library services to all nine state
universities, operates the largest NOTIS database system in the United States, maintaining
a bibliographic database containing more than six million records.















APPENDIX 1:

"THE INFORMATION MODEL SYSTEM"














Managing and Providing Information in Context:
An Information Model System for Research Library Collections.



A Technical and Research Article

by

Steven Opdyke, Information Management Consultant, Special Collections,

Mary Jane Daicoff, Curator, Belknap Performing Arts Collection,

Paula Hamilton, Former-Curator, Belknap Performing Arts Collection, and

Bernard F. McTigue, Director and Chairman, Special Collections,
The University of Florida Libraries.






Managing and Providing Information in Context:
An Information Model System for Research Library Collections.



Overview of Contents



Article Abstract.


Section One. Introduction of the Model System Approach.


I. Presentation of the Information Environment and Problem Areas.

II. Presentation of Information Model System.
(Figure 1.1 "The Integration Platform Capabilities).


III. Presentation of the Model System Design.


Section Two. Implementation of the Model System.


I. Presentation of the Implementation Environment.
(Figure 1.2 "The Information Gateway).


II. Presentation of Information Model System.
(Figure 1.3 "The Information Model System Architecture).
(Figure 1.4 "The Model System Configuration).


III. Concluding Remarks.

Bibliography.







Managing and Providing Information in Context:
An Information Model System for Research Library Collections.


Article Abstract.

The purpose of this article is to introduce to research libraries the concepts behind and potential
of the Information Model System for managing and providing information in context and
delivering scanned images of non-book collection material. This system is now under
development in response to demands faced by'special collection areas within research libraries to
increase automated access to collection information while preserving the contents of those
collections.
The Information Model System provides automated access at the most detailed level while
limiting handling of priceless and fragile original material by enabling the following:

1. A relational, personal-computer-based information management facility for tracking and
inter-relating a wide range of information about collection materials, significantly the non-
book items. The system will provide timely computerized access to a multiplicity of
information not currently available through a medium that can automatically relate all of
that information.

2. A scanning and document storage and delivery facility integratedwith the information
management system to allow automated access to visual and textual items on-line in
response to inquiries about collection holdings.

3. A data formatting capability to enable information to be viewed in any form requested and
to be available through national systems.

4. Networking capabilities that integrate telecommunications networks, local area gateways,
workstations, and network servers to enable access from other locations with appropriate
access capabilities as well as access through the model system to those same locations.

The primary activities underway for accomplishing these goals are the implementation of a
personal computer configuration encompassing a local area network, workstations, network
servers, a relationship management capability, a relational data base system, data





Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida 3

formatting modules, scanning and storage facilities and conversion routines, with the appropriate
communications environment.
The information model system will provide the means to readily and quickly discover and
obtain cross-sections of information currently not relatable and accessible only through painstaking
and time consuming searches. The model system solves long-standing dilemmas in special
collections and archives over access versus preservation needs by enabling both aims to be
achieved at the same time through the same automated system. It also solves current issues in
library collection building of ownership versus access. In the end, it resolves the biggest challenge
universities now face, which is to retrieve, communicate, and reproduce information, transmit
textual contents of materials, and dynamically fill research and archival requests and requirements
across a wide range of library locations, collections, and environments.





Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida 4

Managing and Providing Information in Context:


An Information Model System for Research Library Collections.




Section One: Introduction of the Model System Approach.


I. Presentation of the Information Environment and Problem Areas.


This is the Information Age, highlighted by an increasing, almost instant, demand for
computerized access to information and the corollary ability to make optimum use of it. The
information must be viewable in a variety of contexts and settings in order to effectively interpret
and understand it and draw the most meaningful conclusions from it. Managing the information
environment is a foremost challenge in both business and education. It is a time of extreme
challenge for all libraries, especially research ones, "to provide sophisticated electronic information
access" and move to "the forefront of accessing electronic information." (Morris p. 63). Dr.
Charles Osburn, Dean of Libraries, University of Alabama, in a paper entitled, "Challenges to
Collection Development in the 1990s", observed that "the large-scale introduction of information
technology into the scholarly communication system has created a far more complex universe than
we have ever imagined." (EBSCO p. 7). At the same time, requirements that research libraries
continue to receive from their clientele are every bit as complex.
The research librarian, or collection specialist, must be able to satisfy, dynamically, a multitude
of difficult-to-anticipate requests from a wide spectrum of interdisciplinary researchers with
specialized, yet far-reaching interests. Requests range from specific questions for detailed
information to broad inquiries involving major cross sections of collections. After the information
request is satisfied, as much of the referenced material as the researcher needs must then be readily
provided. The challenge is two-fold and must encompass both information and document
management.
The information management challenges are effectively summarized by two recent
observations. The first, an unpublished study on "problems of access to special collections
materials" done at Ohio State University, articulated the problem as being the lack of a system to
"provide the researcher with the multiple avenues of retrieval necessary for full interdisciplinary
use." The second source, an article entitled, "Electronic Information and Technology: Impact and
Potential for Academic Libraries", by Dilys E. Morris, Iowa State University, quoted an
observation by Frank Newman, President of the Education Commission of the States, that, "we
have already reached the point where the central purpose of the library ... will be the connection of
the scholar to different forms of information located in widely diverse places."





Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida

Once the scholar is "connected" to the information, that scholar will want to be provided with
the actual material to which the information refers. This is becoming as great a challenge and as
high a priority.
A recent New York Times article, "Library Thieves Take All But the Covers", detailed the
"tremendous theft and mutilation of valuable books" and the loss of large amounts of "irreplaceable
material." How is the librarian going to give the researcher any significant material if that material
is already gone? The solution presented in the article is the "library of the next century" where
"much of what people want will be optically scanned. You can call it up on a computer, but you
can't get your hands on it." (New York Times p. A18). Already this is a major goal of RLG
(Research Libraries Group) which recently formed a task force to study "issues inherent in large
photograph collections." Specifically, the group was charged to "further the goal of preserving,
and improving access to, research collections of visual materials." (RLG News p. 7).
Photographs and other visual material are among the many forms of non-book and ephemeral
primary source materials that are increasingly the subject of research requests and the emphasis of
special collections. This type of material has always been difficult to track. Information about it
has also proven to be difficult to relate and integrate with other collection content information
because of its unique characteristics and because it needs to be tracked at the item, as opposed to
the collection, level. Ephemera and non-book items are almost never found in book, or even
periodical, format. These items are rarely dated or authored in the conventional sense, though
there may be a creator or producer. In the case of photographs, as well as sketches and other
forms of visual material, the most important informational aspects to capture are, according to
Barbara Orbach, Cataloger of Pictorial Collections in the Prints and Photographs Division of the
Library of Congress, "captions; impact; cumulative information value; the significance of creators;
and...multiple copies." (Orbach p. 168). This is certainly a far cry from what has traditionally
been kept in the fixed-length collection catalog records but much more in line with current avenues
of research.
In Broadway Ballyhoo, Mary C. Henderson explains how ephemera, especially theatrical,
evolved from being a mere collectible into attaining historical significance. She wrote that,
initially, "programs, posters, newspaper clippings, magazines, photographs---all this theatrical
paper was meant to be ephemeral, and much of it was, in fact, destined to accompany the next
day's garbage. But because it had to do with the theater, because aficionados declined to dispose
of anything to do with their obsessive interests, because it was colorful and readable and great fun,
because a few people decided it was also history and, once in a while, art, much of what should
have disappeared has miraculously survived and migrated to libraries, historical societies, and
museums." (Henderson p.8).
Diverse types of ephemera are now massively acquired as both historical documentation and
visual representations of past styles and cultural trends. For researchers in many disciplines,
ephemera has become a major primary source. There are, however, numerous issues associated





Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida 6

with managing, integrating, and making available not only the material itself, but detailed
information about it, as well. These issues involve, among other considerations, item-level
tracking, cataloging, and being able to provide extensive relational attributes and search
capabilities.
Resolving these issues necessitates the creation of an automated system that can manage
information in context and relate that information across multiple formats and media categories in
order to satisfy any number of assumptions, criteria, and considerations. Within the University of
Florida Libraries Special Collections Department, an information model system is being built to
provide just such a solution. Development has begun and is proceeding as a joint venture project
with the IBM Corporation. A first release of a marketable system is planned within a year of
project initiation.

II. Presentation of the Information Model System.

The major unique component of the information model system is the integration platform, a set
of proprietary software modules encompassing a relationship management capability, a data
formatting facility, and the ability to manage the storage and delivery of optically scanned images.
The capabilities of the model system to manage and utilize information through the integration
platform is illustrated in Figure 1.1 entitled "The Integration Platform Capabilities." These system
capabilities built on top of a networked personal computer-based hardware configuration utilizing
relational data base and image software, provide the capacity to do the following:

1. Utilize pre-determined relationships to manage and present any and all information about
materials in a collection or collections.

2. Dynamically ask questions about, obtain views of, and conduct searches on any set or sets
of information relative to research requirements.

3. On demand, format the collection information as relational tables, catalogue records,
bibliographic listings, and enable compatibility between disparate data.

4. Execute "what-ifs", algorithms, and queries and facilitate interfaces with other systems,
networks, and national library catalogues.

5. Populate the data bases with optically scanned input in place of data entry.

6. Administer, store, and retrieve scanned images and digitized material and automatically
deliver them on demand following an information request about them.

7. Isolate and protect changes and updates and enforce integrity rules and restraints.

The essential purpose of the information model system is to track and provide information in
context. When satisfying research requests, the information must be accurate, complete and
readily available, not just as an isolated occurrence, but as part of some set containing related
information. Managing information in context is a dynamic process which changes as the




Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida
Figure 1.1

THE INTEGRATION PLATFORM

CAPABILITIES

COLLECTION INFORMATION AND MATERIAL


Infor-
mation
Category
Tables
I


Scanned
Images

Storage
I^-


Completed
Research
Requests


Catalogue

Records


Data
Base
Infor-
mation
Tables
I


INTEGRATION PLATFORM
Relationship Management Modules
Scanner Conversion Software
Data Formatting Modules


Screen or
Print
Images




Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida 8

information changes and as more becomes known about the information. It is a process of
enabling the linkage between specific items of sets of information through pre-determined
relationships and keeping track of those linkages dynamically. Related views of information can
then be built and presented in any format stipulated. Creating and using an automated system to
manage information in context has only recently become a technologically feasible consideration.
Once the information a researcher inquired about is supplied, the next challenge is to provide
the actual material in an automated fashion. Then, after viewing the requested information, the
researcher will be able to automatically retrieve any specific material referenced by the information
returned.

III. Presentation of the Model System Design.

The information model system is built on a unique architected relationship management
approach. This approach incorporates a functional decomposition method with relational modeling
and normalization processes. Normalization eliminates anomalies and null occurrences within the
information. Functional decomposition hierarchically breaks down the functions, information, and
relationships from top down or most general to most detailed or finite. Relational modeling results
in the mapping of relationships across all occurrences, levels, and categories of the information
entities. The critical essence of this approach is that it is both hierarchical and relational, with the
ability to keep track of pre-determined relationships between information items across all levels of
definition, assumptions, criteria, and time factors.
Utilization of the relationship management capabilities as part of the integration platform
enables information to be comprehensively integrated and interpreted. As a result, it can be
presented in a variety of ways, ranging from standard fixed records to dynamic layouts tailored for
automated screen or printed output. The ability to format data or information as specific groupings
is accomplished through the data formatting modules which make the information viewable based
on actual requirements or specifications.
When built, the model system will provide the capabilities to capture and relate information on
all types of material within a specialized collection and across any number of other collections. The
most effective use for this model, in a library setting, is with a critical collection of largely non-
book source material.

Section Two: Implementation of the Model System.

I. Presentation of the Implementation Environment.

Implementation of the model system within the Special Collections Area will utilize the material
in the Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts. This collection contains enormous amounts of
ephemera: programmes, playbills, posters, photographs, etchings, clippings, and slides from





Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida 9

theatrical performances in the United States, England, and Europe dating back to the early 1800s.
In addition, it comprises a unique resource of sheet music and popular music papers from both the
19th and 20th centuries. With the access, presentation, and internal management capabilities
made possible by the model system, the Belknap Collection will be brought to the attention of an
extensive cross-section of potential users. Anticipated usage will include theatre arts researchers,
folk song collectors and archivists, historians of popular culture, ethnomusicologists, novelists,
and documenters of Americana and regional history, as well as novelists and biographers. As a
major and unique national and regional archive housing rare and critical performing arts materials,
the Belknap Collection will finally attain national recognition.
Functional decomposition of collection information commences at the most general point, the
collection level description. When dealing with self-contained collections, most national cataloging
systems operate at that level: the overview of the collection content. It is the level at which a more
detailed decomposition-based design begins.
Currently on the national databases, such as Online Computer Library Catalog (OCLC) or
Research Library Information Network (RLIN), which use the MARC or AMC format, whole
collections of non-book materials are cataloged as one high-level record containing a very limited
amount of information. Within a given collection, the information model system provides the
means for detailed item-level tracking. Through its data formatting capabilities and its support for
multiple access points, the model system is able to tie in with both OCLC and RLIN and other
automated systems as well (the Florida state-wide system, in particular).
Access to the model system from other systems will be accomplished through utilizing the
following record developments:

1. The production of subject and collection level descriptions in AMC and MARC format for
national distribution and access through OCLC and RLIN, which serve in excess of ten
thousand participating colleges and universities nationally and world-wide.

2. The availability of the same subject and collection level descriptions in AMC format on a
state level through LUIS, a Florida-wide system incorporating multi-type libraries.

3. The creation of the model system data base records at the item level on personal computer-
based software which capture detailed information on all the material within the Belknap
collection to provide access according to the criteria desired. The data base records will
contain the wealth of information excluded from the highest level collection records.

The ties from the collection level records to the model systems data bases form the basis for
multiple points of access into the model system itself. Its internal communications facilities
together with those available through the other systems comprise the information gateway structure
as captured in Figure 1.2 entitled "The Information Gateway." The figure depicts how the various
levels of collection records enable the use of networks and servers to provide a number of different
ways to access the model system.





Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida
Figure 1.2

"THE INFORMATION GATEWAY"


THE MULTIPLE PATHS FOR ACCESS TO THE

INFORMATION MODEL SYSTEM


U.F.
Special
Collections
Collection-level
Records


Local Area
Network Server


-Screen Menu
Entry for
Information Model
System










The Information

Model System

(Special
Collections)





Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida 11

When completed, the implementation of the model system with the Belknap Collection will
enable performing arts categories such as vaudeville, musicals, dance, and film, media formats
such as print, audio, and audio-visual, and information sets covering specific artists, productions,
time spans, and considerably more to be inter-related. Functionality to link productions and artists,
for example, to publicity releases, videos, clippings, reviews, playbills, song sheets, programmes,
photographs, and the like will give researchers the ability to trace individual careers and
developments throughout various types of productions.
Most important, the model system will be developed and working, automated access to the
Belknap Collection will be provided, information about its resources will be tracked at the item
level, scanned images of collection material will be automatically available, and the interfaces
between it and other, especially national, systems will be in place.

II. Presentation of the Implementation Configuration.

The configuration for implementing the model is a turnkey micro-computer system comprised
of up to eight machines per local area network, with one machine functioning as a server housing
the data base system the relationship modules, and the networking software. Growth is
accommodated by additional sets of up to eight machines linked by a token ring network that in
turn is linked back to the primary cluster of machines. The server on the primary network also
functions as the communications link to other networks or computer systems through at least a
dial-back modem capability. Figure 1.3 entitled "The Information Model System Architecture"
illustrates the functional workings of the configuration. The fundamental concept on which this
configuration is based is a "client/server architecture" in which the functionality of the networked
data base system software is itself spread across the server machine (the personal computer on
which the data base software resides) and some number of client work stations (the personal
computer or computers from which the data base tasks and requests originate). (Tandowski p. 3).
The physical components of the configuration are based on the design done for the Seville
(Spain) General Archives Project. The Archives Project system, like the model system, is built on
the IBM Token Ring Network and is being used to handle, along with data volumes in the millions
of items, 25,000 pages of inventories and catalogues and 8,000 maps and plans. Over 15,000
people are to utilize this system within this next year. (Kaebnick p. 36).
The software components of the Seville system center around the IBM SQL model relational
database (AS 400 architecture). (Kaebnick p. 3). The model system approach is to utilize the
same relational structure found in the IBM relational data base manager for the PS2 personal
computer. The operating system to be used is OS2 with an Extended Services server that will
enable DOS and Windows to be run under its control. Because of the integration platform on the
server, the need for a computer the size of the AS 400 is eliminated.





Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida 1 2

For the implementation of this model, the configuration and internal networking capabilities can
be kept simple, as illustrated in Figure 1.4 entitled "The Model System Configuration," because it
will readily interface with larger and sophisticated telecommunications systems (such as the
University of Florida's UFNET) that provide shared resources and servers, mixed services and
networks, local and departmental networks, gateways to other networks and communications
systems, host-to-host computer communication, as well as multi-protocol routing nodes. The
Information Gateway Figure (1.2) provides the pictorial concept of the basis for this type of
networking and communication. Underlying the communication potentials is the formatting
capability internal to the integration platform, which will enable the model system to access and
deliver data compatible with any record layout or format requirement residing on any other system.

fi. Concluding Remarks.

Through the utilization of far-reaching technological advances the model system is able to offer
many distinctive abilities to manage rare and unique materials. It also enables accurate and
automatic interfaces between libraries because of its vast potential for inter-system accessibility
along with its capability to interpret and present information in any format.
Dilys Morris wrote that the current focus of libraries must change from managing "access to
material that they own" to "providing information to users" about any material that can be "used but
not owned" by the library. (Morris p. 60). The model system can make it possible to realize the
concept of the "virtual" library by bringing together and relating collection information and contents
across multiple collections. This will allow libraries to present related views of collection holdings
to an ever-increasing clientele wherever that clientele may be located. As a result, the amounts of
information that can be seen and used will extend well beyond what is in the collection initially
accessed or managed by the model system.




Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida
Figure 1.3

THE INFORMATION MODEL SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE

Turnkey Model Configuration


INTEGRATION PLATFORM
Scanner Conversion Software
Relationship Management Modules
Data/Record Formatting Modules




Information Model System
Appendix 1 University of Florida

Figure 1.4

THE MODEL SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
The Preliminary Overview


WORKSTATION TO PRINTER (S)

TERMINAL SCANNER


Functions:
Retrieve Documents

Uiew Documents
Input Commands, Data

Enhance/Modify
Data, Images


Data
Base
system
Integ

Platf


Scanner
Storage


Functions:

Scan Records, Documents



SERUER

MACHINE


ration

orm Functions:
Populate Databases

Format Data (for Presentation,
Forms, and Records)
Fulfill Searches, Inquiries, Requests

Translate Data, Images


Y



















APPENDIX.2:


THE DATA BASE DESIGN METHODOLOGY







TECHNICAL APPENDIX.


The Data Base Design Methodology

The data bases utilized in the information model system are built on a unique relationship
management design approach. This design approach has the benefit of several previous
years worth of data and system architecture research in a major finance business
institution. The basis for this research is documented and critical information model
systems have been built from the architectural research and specifications.


The architected data base design is based on the hierarchical decomposition of functions,
relationships, and information. The functional decomposition method is incorporated with
relational modeling and normalization processes. Normalization eliminates anomalies and
null occurrences within the information sets. Functional decomposition hierarchically
breaks down the functions, information, and relationships from top down or most general
to most detailed or finite. Relational modeling results in the mapping of relationships
across all occurrences, levels, and categories of the information entities. The critical
essence of this approach is that it is both hierarchical and relational, with the ability to keep
track of pre-determined relationships between information items across all levels of
definition, assumptions, criteria, and time factors from the general to the more specific or
finite. Relationships are tracked between topics, subjects, and individuals anywhere across
the tabular records. The functional decomposition hierarchy begins at the collection level.
Most cataloging systems operate at this sphere: the general description of contents of a
collection. It is the level at which the more detailed tracking begins.


Utilization of the relationship management capabilities as part of the integration platform
enables information to be comprehensively integrated and interpreted. As a result, it can be
presented in a variety of ways, ranging from standard fixed records to dynamic layouts
tailored for automated screen or printed output. The ability to format data or information as
specific groupings is accomplished through the data formatting modules which make the
information viewable based on actual requirements or specifications.


Individual pieces of ephemera will be identified and cross-related to other items or more
general collections. Thus, the database will provide not only a specific point of reference
but a view relative to a researcher's range of inquiry.




Data Base Design Methodology
Appendix 2 University of Florida

THE FUNCTIONAL DECOMPOSITION APPROACH.


1. Category Tables
a. Performance Arts Tables
b. Media Classification Tables
c. Performance Individual Tables


2. Information Tables
a. Production Table
b. Subject Table
c. Individual Name Table
d. Publication Table
e. Location Table
f. Visual Material Table
g. Collection Information Table


Table Layouts (for the Category Tables)


Level One Table: The Performing Arts


Theatre
Cinema
Music
Dance
Mime
Comedy


Level Two Tables


Theatre: Drama, Musical Comedy, Shakespeare, Review, Vaudeville,
Burlesque, Gay Theatre, Black Theatre, Guerilla Theatre, Trouping,
Children's.
Cinema: Cartoons, Silent, Cinemascope, Musicals, Action, Animation, Short
Subjects, Soundtracks.
Music: Popular, Sacred, Classical (Serious), Folk, Theatre, Specialty.




Data Base Design Methodology
Appendix 2 University of Florida

Mime: Note: although Mime is a major category of the Performing Arts, it
has not been beneficial to decompose it into sub-category tables.
Comedy: Stand-up, Slapstick, Satirical, Political, Burlesque


Level One Table: Media Classification Tables


Media Class


Print
Audio
Visual
Audio-Visual


Level Two Tables


Print: Books, Periodicals, Fiche, Data Bases, Programmes, Playbills,
Bibliographic Listings, Clippings, Documents, Tickets, Bills.


Audio: Tape, Disc, Recording, Sound Recreation.


Visual: Photographs, Etchings, Drawings, Artworks, Charts, Maps,
Posters, Slides, Graphics.


Audio-Visual: Video, Film, Laser Disc.


Level One Table: Performing Individual Categories


Performing Individual


Author
Composer
Actor/Actresses (Performer)
Librettist
Lyricist
Playwright
Script Writer





Data Base Design Methodology
Appendix 2 University of Florida

Screen Writer
Critic
Director
Choreographer
Producer


Level Two Tables


There are no Level two tables in this category as the Level One
entries primarily serve as a catalogue for indexing the various
roles an individual may hold within the Performing Arts area.





Data Base Design Methodology
Appendix 2 University of Florida

Table Layouts (for the Information Tables)

A. The Production Table

This table captures the following information:
Production Title, Date (of Production), Location, Theatre Name.

B. Subject Table.

This table captures the following information:
Document Subject (Performing Arts category), Document Type.

C. Individual Name Table.

This table captures the following information:
Name (Personality name), Performing Arts role, Charact"
(where appropriate), Production Title.

D. Publication Table.

This table captures the following information:
Publication Title, Bibliographic Information, Individual Function
Information, Collection Location Information.

E. Location Table.

This table captures the following information:
Production Information, Names of Characters, Artists' Lames.

F. Visual Material Table.

This table captures the following information:
Production Tite, Publication Title, Date, Collections Loction.

G. Collection Information Table.

This table captures the following information:
Collection Name, Collection Size.















APPENDIX 3:

PROJECT TEAM RESUMES






Bernard McTigue
1500 N.W. 16th Avenue
Gainesville, FL 32605

Home: (904) 371-4204
Work: (904) 392-9075

EDUCATION

B.A., Columbia University, 1973
M.S., Columbia University, SLS, 1974
M.A., Art History, Hunter College, 1980

Non degree course: ARL Management Training Institute, 1987

LANGUAGES

French, Italian, Latin and Greek

EMPLOYMENT

1990 Present: Chairman, Department of Special Collections, University of
Florida. Overall administrative responsibility for five units of the University
Libraries: Archives, Rare Books & Manuscripts, P.K. Yonge Library of
Florida History, Baldwin Library of Children's Literature, and the Belknap
Collection for the Performing Arts. I also serve as Executive Secretary of the
Howe Society, the support group for the Special Collections and I am one of
three library representatives on the Faculty Senate.

1988 1990: Curator of the Arents Collections and Keeper of Rare Books,
New York Public Library. Overall responsibility for a collection of 125,000
volumes, including Americana, incunabula, modern fine printing and the
history of tobacco and books in parts. Supervised four full-time professionals,
one full-time paraprofessional and three part-time assistants

1981 1988: Curator of the Arents Collections, New York Public Library.
Responsible for the conservation, cataloging and acquisitions for this 12,000
volume collection devoted to the history of tobacco and to books in parts.

1974 1981: Librarian, The Arents Collections and the Spencer Collection,
New York Public Library. Responsible for reference and reader service for
those collections devoted to the history of tobacco, books in parts and to the
illustrated book, illuminated manuscripts and fine bindings.

1969 1974: Various paraprofessional positions at New York Public Library in
periodicals, newspapers, patents and acquisitions, including supervisory
responsibilities.

Other employment: Editor, American Book Collector, 1984 -1988.
Editor, Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 1990.
Advisory Editor, Bulletin of Bibliography, 1990-1991.
Editor in Chief, Bulletin of Bibliography 1992-.
American Correspondent, Bulletin du Bibliophile, 1992-.






SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Asian Dance Images from the Spencer Collection. 1977. Exhibition Catalog.

"English and Continental Bookbinding and the Xylographic Tradition."
Printing History, 1981.

A Child's Garden of Delights: Pictures. Poems and Stories for Children from
the Collections of the New York Public Library. New York: Abrams, 1987.

Treasures of the New York Public Library. New York: Abrams, 1988.

Nature Illustrated. 1550 1900. New York: Abrams, 1989.

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS ORGANIZED AT THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

1980: The People's Choice: Political Ephemera from the Collections.

1984: Censorship and Libraries Today. (Travelled by ALA, OIF.)

1987: Truman Capote: Manuscripts and Books.

Douglass Morse Howell, Papermaker.

1988: Timeless Tales: 300 Years of Children's Literature.

1989: Nature's Mirror: 200 Years of Botanical Illustration.

1990: In Praise of Collectors.

OTHER ACTIVITIES

From 1984-1990 I advised the New York Public Library's Public Education
Office on the programs for the annual Pforzheimer Lectures in the History of
Printing and the Graphic Arts. I have delivered lectures in two of these series
S and other talks to the Typophiles, APHA's annual meeting, the Grolier Club,
the Caxton Club and the Rowfant Club. Since 1990 I have been a member of
the Board of Directors of the Center for Book Arts in New York City and a
member of its executive committee.

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATION

ALA/RBMS, AIB, APHA, BSA, CHLA, Grolier.






RESUME of STEVEN OPDYKE


Address: Telephone:
4821 NW 16th Place (904) 373-5040 HOME
Gainesville, Florida (904) 392-0322 OFFICE

PROFESSIONAL CAREER SUMMARY.

Current: Information Management Consultant,
Special Collections, University of Florida Libraries.

Joint Uenture position for directing, designing, and building the
Information Management Model System (with relationship
management and dynamic data delivery capabilities on networked
Personal Computers utilizing Paradox, CASE tools, and Optical
Technology) for University record management and archival
information access.

Prior: (1986 to end of 1991):

Manager/AUP, Information Technology Services,
Security Pacific Automation Corp., Seattle, WA.

Responsible for directing Executive Information Systems Group.
Planned, designed and built the data architecture for personal
computing environments, utilizing Paradox, IEF, Knowledgeware
(CASE) for budget tracking systems, EIS, Decision Support, and
Financial Models. Developed and published corporate direction
papers for MIS Context, Office Environment, 24 Hour/7 Day Banking.
Co-developed the Enterprise Data Processing Impacts Analysis.
Planned the interfaces for acquisitions and new business.

Manager/AUP, Data Management Department,
Security Pacific Bank, Seattle, WA.

Responsible for directing and implementing the Data Management
Department, comprising a Data Planning (Enterprise Model), Data
Base Administration (Technical Services), and Data Security. Built
the data model and architecture (integrated with function model)
for Customer Relationship Banking. Utilized DB2, JANUS, CASE Tools,
FOCUS, and Paradox in systems implementations.







(1982 to 1986):


Manager, Technical Services, Data Administration,
and Communications, Ore-Ida Foods, Boise, ID.

Responsible for directing communications network (Cross-country
backbone), data management, and technical support (including
factory systems). Managed network function with expanded
facilities at reduced cost and 99.5% reliability. Managed equipment
and software budgets exceeding several millions of dollars.
Oversaw Problem Resolution Center. Responsible for data center
services strategic and capacity planning and analysis. Served as
Marketing Task Force Advisor for modeling product development.

Additional Professional Experience (1976 to 1982):

Manager, Technical Services, CF&I Steel Corp.
Responsible for data center management and budgets. Organized
and managed the data administration and technical service groups.
Built Executive Information System for tracking production.

Data Analyst and Co-Data Base Administrator, LSU SNCC.
Responsible for MUS conversion (TSO, USAM), data base design
for administrative systems, and data base systems programming.

Business Systems Specialist, McDonnell Douglas Automation.
Responsible for systems conversion planning, CAD/CAM Data Base
Administration, capacity planning, and user support.

Professional Education:
Advanced Banking Management, Disaster Planning, Data Security,
Database: A Manager's Guide, Top Down Software Design, Strategic
Systems Planning, CASE Tool Implementation, Data Base Design,
Capacity Planning, Logical Data Modeling, Business Systems
Planning, Contract Administration, and DB2 Performance,

Formal Education:
Bachelor and Master's Degrees, University of Florida (with Honors
and election to Honor Society). Academic emphasis: Systems and
Political Theory.






Mary Jane Daicoff
302 NW 32nd St.
Gainesville, FL 32607

Home: (904) 378-5647
Work: (904) 392-0322


EDUCATION

B.S., Education, Magna Cum Laude, Indiana University.
B.S., Library Science, Florida State University.
M.A., English, The University of Chicago.
Ph.D. Candidate, 19th Century American Literature, The University of
Chicago (University Fellow).

PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT

1975 to Present: Senior LTA/Curator Function, Belknap Collection for
the Performing Arts, Special Collections, The University of Florida
Libraries, The University of Florida.

1975 to Present: Professor of Humanities, Santa Fe Community
College, Gainesville, FL.


Other employment:


Instructor of English, University College,
University of Chicago.
Instructor of English, Indiana University
Gary Center, Gary Indiana.
Teacher, Indianapolis Public School System,
Indianapolis, IN.
Teacher, Antilles School, Virgin Islands.
Editor, Gainesville Cultural Commission
Newsletter.
Information Specialist/Writer, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL.
Staff Writer, The University of Chicago
Alumni Journal, The University of Chicago.
Editor, Biological Sciences Newsletter,
University of Chicago.
Editor, Research in Surgery, University of
Chicago.


PUBLICATIONS.

Co-author with Paula Hamilton, "Late-Victorian Ladies", in Journal of the Comparative
Drama Conference, 1991, pp. 35-47.






William C. Covey, III
Page 1
Profession: Computer Analyst, specializing in
Computer assisted research, including research design, database, computer simulation, and statistical analysis on
mainframes
Microcomputer system configuration and use
Applications software evaluation and development
Presenting overviews of information resource issues for lay audiences

Areas of Primary Expertise
Microcomputer software, including word processing, spreadsheet, database, telecommunications, and accounting
Microcomputer hardware, including Macintosh and IBM/MS-DOS microcomputers and associated peripherals
Languages (decreasing order of experience): FORTRAN, BASIC, dBase, PL/I, Pascal, Forth, Rexx, C, and 6502
assembly
lMainframe statistical packages, including SPSS and SAS_

Current Position:

Coordinator, Computer Appllications 1985 to present; Head of Systems Office since 1987
University of Florida Libraries
Gainesville, Florida

Responsibilities: 1) general administrative duties as Library Systems Officer/Head of Systems Office (supervising
two systems analysts, two librarians, a telecommunications specialist, and a tape archive coordinator); 2)
supervise mainframe programming in support of Library functions; 3) supervise information center functions of
the Systems Office (responsible for software and hardware for 200+ microcomputer workstations); 4) determine
strategic direction for Library information resource acquisitions; 5) supervise Systems Office function as campus
machine readable data file archive; 6) supervise management and configuration of the Library SNA terminal
system (250+ terminals located in multiple different buildings). Local mainframe work is done in MVS, TSO,
and VM/CMS environments on IBM 3090/600. Responsible for coordinating information resource expenditures
of 5400,000 annually, including a mainframe computing budget of $140,000.

Previous Positions:

Director of Systems Support, 1983-1985
Advanced Microcomputer Solutions, Inc.
Tampa, Florida

Responsibilities: 1) general management; 2) user liason activities, including systems analysis and troubleshooting;
3) critical evaluation of microcomputer hardware and software for ease of use, performance, ease of support, and
cost-effectiveness; 4) selection of appropriate components for customized computer systems; 5) familiarization
and training of sales personnel for a variety of microcomputer hardware and software; and 6) development and
presentation of user training sessions in the use of microcomputers.

Computer Research Specialist, 1978-1983
Florida State University College of Business

Responsibilities: 1) end user consultation, problem solving, and training; 2) research data base design; 3) selection
and use of statistical packages; 4) custom programming of research applications; 5) statistical/econometric
modelling; 6) transfer of data between systems; 7) conversion of programs and packages between systems; 8)
system configuration and selection; and 9) lab hiring and management. Most computer work was done in a
mainframe environment (CDC Cyber 170 series, under NOS and KRONOS).





William C. Covey, III
Page 2
Business, Training and Research Experience

Designed and taught nine-week computer literacy course to University of Florida library staff.

Gave workshop on MRDF for 1991 RLG pre-conference on computer files.

Served as primary technical consultant to University of Florida participation in RLG/Pew grant on MRDF. Wrote
acquisition and access policies for MRDF, and designed and taught three-week course on MRDF for collection
management staff.

Served as Library Information Resource Coordinator (coordinates Library compliance with Florida Information
Resource Commission regualtions)

Planned and supervised electrical and data wiring phases of construction projects in support of information resources
in University of Florida Libraries.

Performed needs analysis and selection of applications software for business computer users.

Analyzed and implemented Corvus-based microcomputer networks.

Designed a survey of local community college educational needs for BGR Research Associates, Rochester, NY.

Designed a statewide manpower survey of Florida workers in the alcohol rehabilitation area, and coordinated the
initial computer analysis of the resulting data

Produced graphic animation and computer-controlled sound generation, and user interface for a demonstration of a
touch-controlled reactor training system.

Performed systems analysis and programmed the user interface for a mainframe package for the analysis of
population survival rates.

Taught undergraduate and graduate computer classes, including programming languages, system documentation, and
surveys at the University of South Florida and Tallahassee Community College.

Conducted software and hardware training and orientation sessions for businesses on wordprocessing, database, and
productivity applications.

Various academic and technical papers, presentations, and publications. Publications list/writing sample on request.


Educational Background

BA, (Political Science) Virginia Polytechnic Institute & SU, 1973
MA, completion of doctoral coursework and comprehensive exams (Political Science) University of Rochester,
Rochester, NY, 1976


Affiliations Personal Data
American Library Association (ALA) Other Interests:
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) T'ai chi chuan, hobby computing, reading,
IEEE Computer Society photography, bridge
Past President, Gainesville Apple Peelers (local Bor 29 January 52
Apple II users' group) Excellent Health
Past Chairman, Tallahassee Apple Users' Group Single
Mensa, ARRL, and various other interest/hobby
groups








Elaine Yontz


George Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
904-392-0351



Education

Master of Science in Library Science
Florida State University School of Library and Information Studies,
August 1988

Master of Fine Arts in Music History, .Literature, and Criticism
University of Florida, December 1984



Work Experience

Special Collections/Humanities Monograph Cataloger, Geroge Smathers
Libraries of the University of Florida, 9/01/88 present



_L-ected Professional Service Activities

Contributed paper on "Cataloger/Archivist Cooperation," Association
of College & Research Libraries Sixth National Conference,
4/12/92
Poster session on "Sharing Managerial Responsibilities
through Subject Teams in Monograph Cataloging," American Library
Association 109th Annual Conference, 6/23/90
Presentation on "Other People's Cataloging," Copy Cataloging
Discussion Group of the Association for Library Collections &
Technical Services of the American Library Association, American
Library Association Midwinter Meeting, 1/09/90
American Library Association New Members' Round Table:
Chair of Exhibitor Contact and Relations Committee, 6/92-6/94
Chair of Membership Meeting and Program Committee, 6/91-6/92



Publication

Herbsman, Yael, and Elaine Yontz. "Sharing Managerial
Responsibilities through Subject Teams in Monograph Cataloging."
Technical Services Quarterly, 9, no. 3 (1992): 21-30















APPENDIX 4:

LETTERS OF COMMENDATION





DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GAINESVILLE, FL 32611-2036 (904) 392-0777, 392-0794


Mr. Bernard McTigue September 25, 1992
University Librarian and Chair
Special Collections
UF

Dear Mr. McTigue:

I am writing this letter in support of your grant application for
the Belknap Collection at the University of Florida libraries. As
a frequent user of the Special Collections division at the
University of Florida, I can testify-to its value and to its
accessibility.

In writing books about Floridiana, e.g. shipwrecks, lighthouses,
pirates, early newspaper history, and cultural resources of the
state, I recognize the value of UF's collections and strongly
recommend any outside sources to fund the grant you are applying
for. Having worked this summer in such collections as the New
York Historical Society's library, the Schomburg Center for
Research in Black Culture, the New York Public Library, and the
Billy Rose Theatre Collection at Lincoln Center, I have come to
value even more what our library has. The Belknap Collection is
one of the strong areas of our library and one that I and other
scholars find invaluable.

In working with Dr. Karelisa Hartigan of our Classics Department
on a study of Greek drama in America, I found your collection of
clippings and magazines and photographs to be very valuable. The
care and professionalism shown over the years by the staff
members who'work in the Belknap Collection have enabled the
library to build up a substantial storehouse of material related
to all aspects of theater in America. The presentation that your
staff members made on early theater in our country, a
presentation that was later published in the proceedings of a
drama conference, testified to the strong holdings in the library
and to the broad knowledge of those working with the Collection.

I would strongly recommend any grant that would strengthen your
collection. More and more scholars are becoming aware of what a
valuable source of information the Belknap Collection is at the
University of Florida and are using its resources in their
research and publications.


Dr. Kevin M. McCarthy, Professor of English and Assoc. Chair
Department of English
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-2036


EQUAL E.MPL-o MENT OPPORTUNITY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYEE




University of Florida College of Fine Arts

^ DEPARTME.'T OF THEA TRE





Sept . 17'?


Tc Whom It May Conczrn:

The Dell.nap Ccllection for the Perfc-ming Ar=- ic a
unique and invaluabie resoLurco for- both yOu-'iu anri
experienced performing arts schclars at the University of
Florida. It contains ample serials. ephemera, and r-ference
materials and is the only library of its type in the
southeast.

As a dance faculty member, I particularly appreciate
the collection's delicious assortment of ephemera which
makes dance history come alive for students. Posters and
programs from local visits by Ted Shawn's company of men
dancers, for example, are far more likely to pique a
student's interest in this modern dance pioneer than simply
Reading the usual discussions given in general dance
sources. These same sorts of materials often provide
informational details unavailable from other sources and can
therefore add a distinctive edge to faculty and graduate
level research.

In addition, the Collection's staff is highly
knowledgeable and quite willing to help visitor in lccating
useful and interesting materials both within and outside the
Collection's doors. Whether the project is a class term
paper, a theatrical role, or a scholarly article, the
Theatre Department depends upon the Belknap Collection's
resources and personnel to provide resear--h materials and
assistance for it's undergraduate, graduate and faculty
researchers.

Yours rul.



Rru. -.s, as 11 .- Er z r. nd n?.
"i?-atce F'rcf-Tcnr











AlcCarry C/Hur e Llbrary Gainesvlle, Florida 32611-2t039 (904) 392-203S Fax (904) 392-5114

A fewr:ber School of the Naitir al A wodatinn If Schools of Theatre and Univeryitv -'Reidel~ Thelatre A wcciatio)n
EOUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTL'NITY.ArRl.i.MA'InE ACTION CMrLOY R




University of Florida College of Fine Arts


DEPARTMENT OF THA,4 TRE


October 5, 1992


Bernard McTigue, Chair
Department of Specinl Collections
100 Smathers Library
University of Floridn
Gainesville, FT. 32611


VIA FAX TO (904)392-7251


.SUBJECT: LETTER OF SUPPORT FOR THE BEI.KNAP COLLECTION

Dear Hr. McTigue:

As an associate professor of Theatre and former Broadway actress I am
writing on behalf of and in support of the Belknap Collection of the
Library at the University of Florida.

The Belknap Collection has proved invaluable to both my colleague
Heather Hollingsworth and me in our jobs as co-directors of publicity
for the Theatre Department. The cooperation and Interest shown us by
the your staff has been wonderful end articles from the collection
placed in display cases during our productions are.visually and
intellectually stimulating.

Perhaps even more important is the preservation of plays, playbills,
and reviews from which our students cnn gnt a real understanding of the
legacy of theatre and the performing arts. The collection helps
preserve the history of our performers and performances, and can
certainly enrich our young students' lives.

I cannot support this special section enough and contemplate donating
my own collection of playbills knowing they will be preserved and made
available to students through the Belknnp Collection and its very
capable staff.

Hoping this letter of support Is usefii] to thf continuance of the
Belknap Collection, T remain,

Since0oly /
SJA*/


Melissa Hart f
Associate Professor of IThcatre


MH/dl


AfcCarty C/Hurne library


Gainr rille. Flnrida 32611-2039


(904) 92-2035


Fax (904) 392-5114


A .l Meber .S heol of ithe \V'jinal A.-onariwon c, f / heols of Throra anid L'nciersty'/Re,'ide'n Thi,'tre Ass ocrtiatio
SCl.1I 11M'fL ,;l' 1 (irWf()K 1l '1' AI I IkMATI'b, A('110- CnI .' 01 X
















APPENDIX 5:

DRAFT CONTRACT FOR JOINT AGREEMENT
BETWEEN UF AND IBM







DRAFT as of 10/2/92
APPENDIX A

SCOPE OF WORK

A. Jointly Defined Effort Objective

The GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES at the University of Florida will
develop and implement a pilot image archives database of the Belknap Performing Arts
collection to be known as the Information Model System. The objectives of this project
include: building an information model for automated tracking and presentation of visual
materials, records, and documents; and building a scanning and document storage and
delivery facility to enable online access to library special collections and archival materials
and records. IBM ImagePlus/2, OS/2 and Token Ring technology will be the base for this
project, which will result in an image database framework for library archives and museum
applications. A key development will be a link between the image database on a LAN and
the mainframe-based library system over a network. The techniques of implementation will
be shared with other educational institutions.

B. Tasks to be Performed

1. IBM furnished Equipment and Licensed Programs listed in Appendix B and C are
to be installed in the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of
Florida.

2. Design and development of a performing arts archives image database.

3. Development of the internal networking capabilities necessary to effect
a network link between the performing arts archive image database and the
mainframe-based library system.

4. Implement a pilot of the image database and make adjustments as required.

5. Install a production version of the image database system software using the
integration platform modules (enabling relationship management,
data formatting, and scanner conversion) developed by personnel at
the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida.

6. Prepare at least one set of guides and documentation for the image database
framework.

7. Provide a quarterly status report on the project until the project is completed,
arriving at IBM the first day of the month due.

8. At the end of the project, projected to be one (1) year from the installation of all
required components, provide a final report to IBM summarizing the George A.
Smathers Libraries experience with ImagePlus/2 and OS/2, any survey results
relative to this project, and any suggestions the George A. Smathers
Libraries at the University of Florida has for improvements to ImagePlus/2
and OS/2.




UFIIBM Joint Agreement--draft


9. Provide demonstrations to other parties interested in the use of the developed
package as requested by IBM and agreed to by the parties. These on-site
demonstrations shall not exceed one per month and will continue until July, 1994.

10. The GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES staff will write at least one
article on the project and submit it for publication in one or more appropriate
professional journals.

C. Responsibilities of the GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES at the
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.

1. The GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES at the UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA will furnish the necessary qualified personnel for implementation of
the tasks set forth in Section B. above and will designate in writing to IBM its
Managing Coordinator who will be responsible for coordinating the efforts of his
or her team.

2. The GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES at the UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA agrees that the package prepared pursuant to the tasks in Section B.
above and this section will be made available to other educational institutions for
their research and instructional purposes through the GEORGE A.
SMATHERS LIBRARIES at the UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. First
refusal rights available for IBM Corporation pursuant to further
negotiable marketing agreements.

The project will be implemented in phases as follows:

PHASE I (4 months)

Develop version 1 of the Information Model System (IMS):

configure a local area network
create a demonstratable prototype capable of tracking, cataloging and inter-
relating specific materials.
-- produce collection-level and item-level records and table entries with high-
level information content about a wide variety of materials.
document complete system design specifications.

PHASE II (4 months)

Develop version 2 of the IMS:

design capabilities to interface scanned information to databases
incorporate relationship management capabilities
enable support for local and remote communications capabilities
incorporate compaction of stored information

PHASE III (4 months)

Develop version 3 of the IMS:

develop data formatting software to enable information to be viewed and
preformatted as requested over SNA local and remote networks
build formatting capabilities to translate tabular information and records




UF/IBM Joint Agreement--draft


D. Responsibilities of the IBM

1. Designate its Managing Coordinator to the GEORGE A. SMATHERS
LIBRARIES at the UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA in writing.

2. IBM shall furnish the GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES at the
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA with the Equipment and Licensed Programs
listed in Appendix 2, as set forth in sections B and C of this Agreement and under
the conditions set forth in the University Master Agreement 18
which reads as follows:

18:0 LOANED IBM PROPERTY

IBM property, including but not limited to, equipment, manuals, magnetic
media and related items loaned to UofF for the performance of work
under this Agreement will be done in accordance with an IBM Property
Loan Agreement (PLA) executed between the Parties, under terms and
conditions substantially similar to the representative PLA attached hereto
as Attachment 2 of this agreement.

During the term of the task order, title to the loaned equipment shall
remain with IBM. UofF shall ensure that the loaned equipment shall be
used solely for fulfillment of the Scope or Work of the applicable task
order, during the term of said task order.

If, in IBM's sole judgment, UofF has successfully completed the Scope
or Work as set forth in each task order issued under this Agreement, and
the Loaned equipment has been announced and is generally available to
the public, title to such equipment listed in the PLA and/or the applicable
task order, and/or any IBM equipment added or substituted, shall be
transferred to UofF in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth
with charges waived, upon completion of said task order, provided: (1)
such loaned equipment is not intended for continuing or follow-on work
for IBM as agreed to by the Parties, and (2) this Agreement is not
terminated due to a material breach by the Agreement by UofF. At time of
title transfer all costs associated with the equipment become the
responsibility of UofF.

ANY TRANSFER OF TITLE TO IBM LOANED EQUIPMENT
IN NO WAY TRANSFERS ANY TITLE TO SOFTWARE
SUPPLIED TO UofF IN CONNECTION WITH THIS
AGREEMENT AND/OR THE PROPERTY LOAN
AGREEMENT. In the event title transfer occurs, in accordance with
the terms and conditions set forth herein, UofF agrees to abide by the
terms and conditions of all program license agreements for any software
which UofF has been licensed to use, pursuant to the program which
UofF has been licensed to use, pursuant to the program license
agreements) accompanying such software programs, (1) while
performing under this Agreement, (2) after any equipment transfer, and/or
(3) after any expiration or termination of this Agreement where UofF will
continue to use such software.




UFIIBM Joint Agreement--draft
4

Equipment transfer. Following acceptance by IBM of the final written
report, IBM will transfer ownership of all IBM hardware used in the
project and will arrange continuing licensing of IBM software to the
University of Florida. The University of Florida retains its rights to
continuous uninterrupted use of this system following completion.

E. Work Product of the Jointly Defined Effort

1. Relational, personal computer-based image database facility for tracking and inter-
relating archival materials. This facility will have the capability to:

a) retrieve, transmit and present information across a multi-vendor SNA-
based networks in the specific formats requested
b) scan, store and deliver images of documents
c) format data to enable records to be viewed and accessible in multiple formats
and available to an SNA protocol network
d) connect to multiple SNA-based networks, both local and remote

2. Documentation containing complete system design specifications

3. At least one set of promotional and instructional handouts to acquaint library staff
and users with the IMS

4. Quarterly reports describing the status of the project

5. A written final report containing a summary of the history of the project and its
implementation and recommendations for improvements to IBM ImagePlus/2 and
OS/2.

F. Intellectual Property

This agreement will be in accordance with the Master Agreement in
16.1.3 which reads as follows:

6.1.3 Special Deliverables Exclusive License

UofF hereby grants to IBM the option to acquire an exclusive, worldwide,
royalty-bearing license including the right to use, execute, reproduce,
display, perform, distribute and prepare derivative works based upon all
works of authorship prepared for or submitted to IBM by UofF as "Special
Deliverables Exclusive License" works. Any royalty or other
considerations payable to UofF by IBM for the grant of an exclusive license
shall be determined as a result of good-faith negotiations between UofF and
IBM and will be in accordance with applicable industry standards. UofF
further agrees to consider IBM's technical and financial contributions
toward the development of the licensed technology in negotiating any
royalty of license. IBM's option shall expire one (1) year after delivery of
the final report for the applicable IBM purchase Order.





UFIIBM Joint Agreement--draft


APPENDIX B

IBM FURNISHED EQUIPMENT


TYPE/MODEL
8580-A31
0149
0162
1005
1060
1108
1140
3390
3933
5887
8770
9870


QUANTITY
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1


DESCRIPTION
PS/2 MODEL 80 386 25MHZ
IBM Token-ring Network 16/4
3.5 Rewritable Optical Drive
PS/2 SCSI Adapter
PS/2 4MB System Board Memory Expansion Kit
320MB SCSI Fixed Disk Drive
Card to Option Cable
T6ken-ring PC Adapter Cable
PS/2 4MB Module Kit
PS/2 SGA Display Adapter/A
PS/2 Mouse
Enhanced Memory Adapter 4MB Kit


2 PS/2 Model 56SLC
2 IBM Token-ring Network 16/4
2 Token-ring Network Cable
2 SP SVG Keyboard English (US) (No charge)
2 PS/2 8 MB Memory Module Kit 70-NC
2 PS/2 XGA Display Adapter/A

3 IBM 8508 Monochrome Display

1 Image Scanner

1 Laser Printer 5E (5 Pages/minute)
1 1MB Memory Option
1 Parallel Printer Cable

APPENDIX C

IBM FURNISHED LICENSED PROGRAMS


TYPE/MODEL
5871-AAA
2261
2267
2278
2280


QUANTITY
3
3
3
3
3


5877-AAA
2284

5621-047
2284
5001
9001

5696-125
4088


DESCRIPTION
PC Software
PS/2 Tape Backup V2.0
Operating System/2 V2.0 3.5
Extended Services Svr V1.0
E.S. V1.0 SVR W/Admin Kit

PC Software
Extended Services DB Client Enabler

ImagePlus Workstation
Basic OTC
3.5" Diskette
Asset Registration

IBM SAA ImagePlus/2
Basic OTC Program Package


8556-055
0149
3390
5109
5116
5887

8508-001

2456-001

4029-010
3333
5612





UBM Joint Agreement--draft
6

5040 3 Basic MRM 3.5" Diskette
9001 3 Basic Asset Registration




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