• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 The Rollins calendar
 The Rollins program
 Admission and expenses
 The Rollins standard
 The Rollins curriculum
 The Rollins community
 Rollins personnel
 Index














Group Title: Rollins College bulletin
Title: Catalogue number
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089523/00002
 Material Information
Title: Catalogue number
Series Title: Rollins College bulletin
Alternate Title: Rollins college bulletin catalogue number
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rollins College (Winter Park, Fla.)
Publisher: Rollins College,
Rollins College
Place of Publication: Winter Park Fla
Publication Date: 1962-1963
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Winter Park   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1951/1953-1966/1967.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089523
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 51330755
lccn - 2003229003
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual catalogue of Rollins College
Succeeded by: General catalogue

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece 1
        Frontispiece 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Introduction
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The Rollins calendar
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The Rollins program
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 16a
        Page 16b
        Page 16c
        Page 16d
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Admission and expenses
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 32a
        Page 32b
    The Rollins standard
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    The Rollins curriculum
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 48a
        Page 48b
        Page 48c
        Page 48d
        Page 49
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        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    The Rollins community
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 128a
        Page 128b
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
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        Page 144a
        Page 144b
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        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
    Rollins personnel
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
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        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
    Index
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
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        Page 194
Full Text







cI g
WITRPR Flu RID




BULETI 196 1963































III
-4



44
iion
















Rolis olee amu







Rollins


College


Bulletin


Catalog Number 1962-1963


FLORIDA


WINTER


PARK,



















































































1. Abbott House
2. Administration Building
3. Alpha Phi
4. Alumni House
S. Annie Russell Theatre
6. Art Building
7. Athletic & Physical
Education Department
8. Boat House
9. Buildings & Grounds
10. Carnegie Hall
11. Casa Iberia
12. Chase Hall
13. Chi Omega
14. Cloverleaf
15. Conservatory Practice Bldgs.
16. Corrin Hall
17. Creative Arts Bldg.
18. Cross Hall
19. Delta Chi


20. Dispensary
21. Dyer Memorial
22. Elizabeth Hall
23. Fox Hall
24. Fred Stone Theatre
25. French House
26. Freshman Dormitory
(under construction)
27. Gale Hall
28. Gamma Phi Beta
29. Guest House
30. Harmon Bungalow
31. Hooker Hall
32. Independent Men
331 Independent Women
34. Kappa Kappa Gamma
35. Kappa Alpha
36. Kappa Alpha Theta
37. Kappa Lodge
38. Knowles Hall


39. Knowles Memorial Chapel
40. Lakefront
41. Lakeside Hall
42. Lambda Chi Alpha
43. Lyman (classrooms)
44. Lyman Hall
45. Matthews House
46. Mayflower Hall
47. Mills Memorial Library
48. Morse Gallery of Art
49. News Bureau
50. O'Neal House
51. Orlando Hall
52. Parsonage
53. Phi Mu
54. Pi Beta Phi
55. Pinehurst Hall
56. Psychology Bldg.
57. Pugsley Hall


58. Rex Beach Hall
59. Rollins Hall
60. Rollins Institute
61. Rollns Union Bldg.
62. Rose Skillman Hall
63. Sandspur Bowl
64. Senior Course House
65. Senior Women's Honor House
66. Shell Museum
67. Sigma Nu
68. Sparrell
69. Strong Hall
70. Sullivan House
71. Tau Kappa Epsilon
72. Tennis Courts
73. Theta Lodge
74. Union Patio
75. Woolson English House
76. X Club












TABLE OF CONTENTS
An Introduction To ROLLINS COLLEGE ....... ............. ......... 4
THE RO LLINS CALENDAR ......................................... ......... ........ 7
DIRECTIONS FOR CORRESPONDENCE ..................... ................... 8
THE RO LLINS PRO GRAM .............................................................. 9
The Purpose of the College ................................. ....................... 11
The Rollins Conference Plan ........................................ 11
O orientation and G uidance ....................... ............. .................. 13
Student Services .................................... .......... ............... 14
Honors and Prizes ................................... ... .... ..................... 15
ADMISSION AND EXPENSES ........................... ............................ 23
Admission of Students ........................ ................................ 23
Student Expenses ......................................... ..... .. ........ .............. 26
Regulations Regarding Refund of Fees .............................. ... 27
Scholarships ......-.............. .......... ........... ............... 28
THE ROLLINS STANDARD ........................ ................................. 35
Conduct of Students .................................... ............ ................. .. 35
Evaluation of the Student's Work ............................................... 39
Requirements for Graduation .............. ....... ............................ 40
Honors Program ............... ............................... ................... 44
THE ROLLINS CURRICULUM ............................ .............. ........ 49
Specialized Training .......................................... 49
Careers Through Rollins ............................... .................. 51
Majors and Courses of Instruction ___ ... .... .................. 56
Conservatory of M music .......................... ............. ......... .............. 105
THE ROLLINS COMMUNITY ............................................. 125
The College ................................................................................................. 127
Student A activities .................................................. .................. 131
M music A activities ............................. .... ......... ............... ..... ...... .. 14 1
Radio A activities ........ ......... ...................................... ................... 142
Com m unity A activities ............................... .......... ....... .................... ... 144
Rollins Institute for General Studies ...................................... 144
A lum ni A activities ........................................... ... ................................. 150
THE RO LLINS PERSO NNEL ............................. .................................... 153
O officers and Trustees .......................... ........ .... ... .................. 155
The Adm inistration ......................................................... ..................... 156
The Office Staffs ............................... .......................... 157
Faculty ................ .. .. ...................... ........................... ..... .............. 162
Degrees and Awards Conferred .......................................................... 177
Summary of Enrollment ................................ ............................ 183
IN D EX .............................................................................................. .................... 18 5
This catalog supersedes all previous issues.
The College reserves the right at any time to
make whatever changes may be found necessary.
ROLLINS COLLEGE BULLETIN
VOL. LVII APRIL, 1962 No. 2
Issued Quarterly: Admitted as Second-class Matter at Winter Park,
Florida Post Office, under Act of Congress of July, 1894.









An Introduction To


ROLLINS
ORIGIN
Rollins was founded in 1885 under the auspices of the
Congregational Churches. The oldest Institution of higher
education in Florida, Rollins is a four-year undergraduate
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. It is non-denomina-
tional, coeducational, and independently supported by income
from tuition and contributions of friends and alumni. Per-
manent funds of the College are in excess of $4,940,000.
LOCATION AND CAMPUS
The College is located in Winter Park, a residential
community situated among the lakes of central Florida, 50
miles from the Atlantic Ocean. Winter Park is adjacent to
the city of Orlando.
The 65-acre campus is bounded by Lake Virginia to the
east and south, and Winter Park to the west and north. The
value of the physical plant is approximately $12,000,000.
ACCREDITATION
Rollins. is accredited by and a member of the Southern
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. It is also a
member of the Association of American Colleges, the Amer-
ican Council on Education, the Florida Association of Col-
leges and Universities, the National Association of Schools
of Music, and the College Entrance Examination Board.
DEGREES, CURRICULUM AND MAJORS
The academic program of the College is centered in the
basic liberal arts and sciences. Rollins confers the Bachelor
of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music degrees.
Pre-professional programs leading to Baccalaureate and
Graduate degrees are offered in co-operation with other in-
stitutions. The curriculum includes appropriate courses for
students intending to continue their education in graduate
schools in such areas as Business, Engineering, Forestry,
Law, Medicine, Foreign Service, and Teaching.
In addition to the above degrees awarded in the regular
resident College, Rollins offers the Bachelor of General
Studies, the Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Business
Administration, and Masters of Science degrees in the Rol-
lins Institute of Technology and the Rollins Institute for
General Studies.
Rollins offers majors in the following: Art, Biology,
Business Administration, Chemistry, Economics, Education,
4












COLLEGE
English, French, General Science, Geology, German, Govern-
ment, History, Human Relations, Inter-American Studies,
Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Pre-engineering,
Pre-forestry, Pre-medicine, Psychology, Sociology and An-
thropology, Spanish, and Theatre Arts.
Courses are offered in Music, Painting, Sculpture, and
Drama. A music conservatory, an art gallery, and two
theatres afford opportunities for both theoretical and ap-
plied study.
In the first two years, each student's schedule includes
courses in English Composition, the Humanities, the Natural
Sciences, the Social Studies, a Foreign Language, and
Physical Education.
ENROLLMENT
The student body numbers 800. The ratio of students to
faculty is ten to one. The average number of students in a
class is 17.
Rollins is international in scope. Forty-four states, the
District of Columbia, and fourteen foreign countries are
represented in its student body.
ADMISSION
Students are selected on a basis of preparation, char-
acter, and potential qualities of leadership. Scholarship help
and work-aid are available for students of proven ability.
All applicants must take the College Entrance Examination
Board examinations.
ACTIVITIES
There are more than 30 honorary, social, religious,
athletic, dramatic, musical, literary, linguistic, and scientific
organizations on campus. Included are fraternity and soror-
ity chapters of national Greek letter societies.
Independent Men and Independent Women welcome all
students who are not members of a fraternity or a sorority.
They enjoy the same privileges and standing as others.
Rollins has excellent instruction in sports, but does not
offer a major in physical education. Intercollegiate varsity
teams compete in baseball, basketball, crew, golf, soccer,
and tennis. Intramural sports include archery, basketball,
canoeing, crew, flag football, golf, softball, swimming, ten-
nis, and volleyball.










1962
JANUARY MAY SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 1
1 2 3 4 5 6 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
28 29 30 31 30
FEBRUARY JUNE OCTOBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 31
25 26 27 28
MARCH JULY NOVEMBER
S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3
1 2 3 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
APRIL AUGUST DECEMBER
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 1
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
29 30 26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31


1963
JANUARY MAY SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 6 7
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
27 28 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30
FEBRUARY JUNE OCTOBER
1 2 1 1 2 3 4 5
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
24 25 26 27 28 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 31
30
MARCH JULY NOVEMBER
1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
APRIL AUGUST DECEMBER
S2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
21 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30 31










The Rollins Calendar

1962-1963
FALL TERM
September 24, Monday, 4:00 P.M. ....First Meeting of the Faculty
September 24,
Monday .........New Students Report to Campus by 5:00 P.M.
September 28, Friday ............ Registration of Former Students
October 1, Monday, 8:30 A.M. ..........Fall Term Classes Begin
November 3, Saturday .............................Mid-term
November 21, Wednesday, 1:45 P.M. ..Thanksgiving Holiday Begins
November 26, Monday, 8:30 A.M. ............... Classes Resume
December 14, Friday, 1:45 P.M. ................ Fall Term Ends
WINTER TERM
January 3, Thursday, 8:30 A.M .............. Winter Term Begins
February 6, Wednesday ............................Mid-term
March 15, Friday, 1:45 P.M. ................ Winter Term Ends
SPRING TERM
March 25, Monday, 8:30 A.M. ............. Spring Term Begins
April 25, Thursday ...................... ..... ... Mid-term
June 6, Thursday, 1:45 P.M. .................. Spring Term Ends
June 7, Friday, 10:00 A.M. ................... Commencement

1963-1964
FALL TERM
September 23, Monday, 4:00 P.M ....First Meeting of the Faculty
September 23,
Monday .........New Students Report to Campus by 5:00 P.M.
September 27, Friday ............ Registration of Former Students
September 30, Monday, 8:30 A.M. ........ Fall Term Classes Begin
November 6, Wednesday ............................ Mid-term
November 27, Wednesday, 1:45 P.M. .Thanksgiving Holiday Begins
December 2, Monday, 8:30 A.M. ............... Classes Resume
December 17, Tuesday, 1:45 P.M. ............... Fall Term Ends
WINTER TERM
January 6, Monday, 8:30 A.M. ..............Winter Term Begins
February 8, Saturday .............................. Mid-term
March 13, Friday, 1:45 P.M. .................Winter Term Ends
SPRING TERM
March 23, Monday, 8:30 A.M. ............. Spring Term Begins
April 29, Wednesday .............................. Mid-term
June 4, Thursday, 1:45 P.M. ................. Spring Term Ends
June 5, Friday, 10:00 A.M. ....................Commencement
Each class period at Rollins College is 60 minutes long.









Directions for Correspondence

THE ROLLINS COLLEGE BULLETIN, which is issued
quarterly throughout the year, gives information about
various phases of College life. One number of the Bulletin
each year is the College Catalog.
The College is glad to send copies of the catalog and
other numbers of the Bulletin to those who are interested
in seeing them.
Correspondence relating to the various aspects of the
College should be addressed as follows:

Admission of New Students -----.....-......--. Dean of Admissions

Readmission of Former Students ..........Dean of the College

Educational Program -.....--........--------...... --Dean of the College

General Information ........-- Secretary to the Administration

Entrance and Transfer Credits .--...........-.--------.-....Registrar

Men Students-
Personal Welfare and Housing ..............------...Dean of Men

Women Students-
Personal Welfare and Housing .--........--.Dean of Women

Finances ..----...--...-- ......-----------. Treasurer of the College

Student Finances .-...-....-.....- ------------------ Cashier

Alumni ...--------.Executive Director, Rollins Alumni, Inc.

Visitors to the College are welcome at all times. The
Admissions Office provides regular tours of the campus.
The College offices are closed from 5:00 P.M., Friday until
8:30 A.M. Monday and members of the Administration and
Faculty may be seen during this time only by special ap-
pointment made in advance.












The Rollins Program






















The Purpose of the College .............---------.....---. 11
The Rollins Conference Plan -------.------------ 11
Orientation and Guidance .----------------.------ 13
Student Services .-.... .................-------------.---.. 14
Developmental Reading Program --...-------. 14
Vocational and Educational Advisement ...... 14
The Graduate Record Examination .-------- 14
The Center for Practical Politics ----..-........----.... 15
Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships ...---.... 15
Study Abroad -..........................---------..---..--..- 15
Honors and Prizes -----.........-.................-----..--- 15













The Rollins Program



THE PURPOSE OF THE COLLEGE
"THE NAME OF THE CORPORATION shall be Rollins
College . Its object, which shall never be changed, shall
be the Christian education of youth . ." So wrote the foun-
der of Rollins in 1885 in starting the first institution of
higher education in Florida. It was, indeed, the pioneer of
independent coeducational colleges in the lower Southeast.
What the founders affirmed the Trustees have constantly
reaffirmed, that Rollins shall remain a small independent
Christian College devoted to the highest type of undergrad-
uate liberal education.
Under the wise leadership of its presidents, Rollins
maintained its integrity and advanced its ideals. Edward
Payson Hooker (1885-1892), the founding president, estab-
lished high standards of quality. George Morgan Ward
(1896-1903) initiated the close relationship between teacher
and student that has become one of the great traditions of
the College. William Fremont Blackman (1903-1915) stood
for scholarship of top order, maintaining that it "should
not be size, but quality, highest standards of scholarship,
thoroughness of work, fineness of result" that should dis-
tinguish Rollins among its contemporaries.

THE ROLLINS CONFERENCE PLAN
Under the leadership of the fourth of these great presi-
dents, the late Hamilton Holt (1925-1949), there was de-
veloped in the 1930's a pioneering program of higher educa-
tion which attracted nation-wide attention among educators.
It was known as the Rollins Conference Plan. This plan was
guided by three principles that make up both an educational
philosophy and the program frequently referred to as "The
Rollins Plan."
1. All effective education is in large measure self-educa-
tion. This implies that the teacher-student relationship
must be direct and personal, that the progress of the student
is accomplished by what he is led to do and not by what is
done for him, and that the elements of a liberal education









Rollins College


may vary with the individual student's interests and needs.
2. College teaching is most effective in a conference
situation in which teachers and students evoke oral and
written expression from each other, and, by their criticisms,
lead the student to develop standards of judgment of his
own work.
3. The College should keep in touch with the creative
forces at work in the national life: economic, political, and
aesthetic. This is achieved by a wide range of public lec-
tures, concerts, and conferences, bringing national leaders
in many fields to the campus.
Rollins has developed a distinctive character through its
effective conference method of teaching, consisting of small
classes of roundtable discussion combined with frequent in-
dividual conferences between professor and student.
Under conditions where direct discussion provides the
basis for both teaching and learning, the conventional reci-
tation and lecture are de-emphasized. The conference meth-
od employs quite simply, group and individual discussion in
an atmosphere that supports and fosters the asking of
questions and the giving of answers.
The present program continues to put emphasis on self
and self-education. It is what the student does, not what
is done to or for him, that counts in the long run. While
formal lectures alone cannot provide for active participation,
they may play an important part in laying the basis for
more intelligent participation later, if skillfully done. Rollins
promotes the widest experimentation in teaching methods,
for no one scheme is equally good in the hands of all teach-
ers and all students.
Specific requirements for graduation are held to a mini-
mum so that the student may explore the areas of his in-
terest deeply or search broadly to find an interest. Depth
is obtained through the major field selected for concentrated
work in the two upper years. Breadth is achieved through
two requirements: (1) at least a year of work must be taken
in each of the three selective groups listed on page 41, the
Humanities, Social Sciences, and the Natural Sciences, in
the first two years, and (2) at least five advanced courses
must be taken outside the major field. Other specific re-
quirements include one year of English Composition and
Literature in the Freshman year, the equivalent of two
years of college Foreign Language, and the successful com-









Rollins Program


pletion of two years of Physical Education unless excused by
doctor's order.
Qualitatively, the student must maintain a minimum
average of C to remain eligible for graduation. Quantitative-
ly, he must maintain an average of 16 credits per term (a
minimum of 15 credits-3 courses) to graduate in four
years with the required minimum of 192' academic credits.
A large measure of freedom in learning is not only allowed
but expected among Rollins students. To make this degree
of freedom possible, an equivalent sense of responsibility is
demanded. High standards by the teacher and high quality
of performance on the part of the student are essential. By
selectivity in admission of students and by insistence on
high-level performance, the College has been able to succeed
in an educational plan that allows such a wide range of in-
dividual freedom.

ORIENTATION AND GUIDANCE
All entering students assemble at the College about a
week in advance of the returning students. Each new stu-
dent is assigned to a small group headed by an upperclass-
man and a faculty member. In addition to learning about
one another, the history and objectives of the College, and
the physical plan of the campus, each student takes a
placement test in English and four tests prepared by the
Educational Testing Service of Princeton, New Jersey. These
tests are designed to help the student and his faculty ad-
viser develop an appropriate course of study. The results of
the achievement tests in modern foreign languages, admin-
istered through the College Entrance Examination Board,
are used as a basis for placement in modern language
courses. Students who have taken one of these tests in their
senior year of secondary school will not be required to take
the examination upon arrival at Rollins.
Each freshman student is assigned to a faculty member
of the Academic Advisers Committee. This faculty group
meets regularly throughout the academic year to discuss
individual student's programs and progress, and to share
experiences, reflective thought, and conclusions that can
shape policy that is consistent and uniform yet considerate
of individual needs and differences.
The over-all purpose of the Academic Advisers Commit-
tee is to integrate the social and intellectual guidance of
students, and to center the College educational program on
13









Rollins College


the student and his individual development in a social milieu.
Each adviser makes himself available for frequent con-
ferences with his student advises, and attempts to lead
each student toward greater acceptance of responsibility in
reaching reasoned decisions that could affect his life at
Rollins and after he leaves the College.
Shortly before the end of his sophomore year at Rollins,
the student chooses a major, or field of concentration. Hav-
ing chosen a major, the student may ask a professor in the
major department to serve as his adviser. If acceptable to
the professor concerned, the student should then see his
previous adviser and the Registrar, and give them the name
of his new adviser. Beginning with his junior year, the
student will then be under the guidance of his new major
adviser.
STUDENT SERVICES
Developmental Reading Program. The College maintains
a reading laboratory and conducts a development reading
program. The program is designed to help students develop
reading skills necessary for college work. The program em-
phasizes optimum skill for all students and is not primarily
a remedial program. Work taken at the laboratory is vol-
untary and on an individual basis. The laboratory is equipped
with devices and materials for use in improving comprehen-
sion, speed, vocabulary, and techniques necessary for the
various content fields in the College program.
Vocational and Educational Advisement. Counseling of
students in the areas of vocational and educational advise-
ment is available at the Student Services Center in the
Psychology Building. This counseling includes aptitudes and
interest testing and consultations with regard to results
and plans.
Counseling is available to students who feel a need for
assistance in the areas of personal problems or problems in
connection with adjustment to College.

THE GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION
All seniors are urged to take the Graduate Record
Examination (Aptitude). Most graduate schools either re-
quire or request candidates to take this examination. It is
given each year at Rollins, which serves as a Center for this
purpose, and is so designated by the Educational Testing
Service of Princeton, New Jersey.
14









Rollins Program


THE CENTER FOR PRACTICAL POLITICS
Activities of the Center for Practical Politics are fi-
nanced, in a large part, by a grant from the Maurice and
Laura Falk Foundation; the purpose of the Center is to
encourage student participation in political matters, through
political parties, as a condition of responsible citizenship.
The work is carried on by classroom seminars, personal
projects, and internships.

GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS
Announcements of graduate scholarships and fellowships
for advanced study are available in each major department.
Information on the Fulbright Fellowship is available from
Dr. Wendell C. Stone. Dean Schiller Scroggs is the Rollins
Representative for the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship. For
information on the Danforth and Rhodes Scholarships the
student should get in touch with the Office of the Dean of
Men.
STUDY ABROAD
Rollins encourages students to spend their junior year
studying in European countries as part of their educational
experience. A number of overseas study programs are avail-
able. Interested students should consult with the Dean of
the College.
HONORS AND PRIZES
The Academy of American Poets Poetry Prize of $100
may be awarded annually for the best poem or group of
poems submitted during the year by a Rollins undergrad-
uate. The award, which is administered by the English
Department, is made possible by a bequest from the late
Mrs. Mary Cummings Eudy, a former member of The
Academy of American Poets, who established similar be-
quests to nine other universities and colleges.
The Thomas R. Baker Memorial Prize is awarded an-
nually to the junior student at Rollins who has maintained
the highest scholarship record in the study of Chemistry.
The Ralph Lyman Baldwin Award of $50 and a medallion
are given annually to the graduating major in Organ or
Composition who is deemed by the Music Faculty as most
worthy of the honor.
The Campus Sing, sponsored by the Independents, was









Rollins College


organized to stimulate group singing on the campus. Prizes
are awarded to the fraternity and the sorority that win in
the competition held in the spring.
The Chi Omega Social Science Award of $25 is presented
by the Upsilon Beta Chapter to the woman in the graduat-
ing class with the highest scholarship record in the fields
of History, Sociology, Psychology, or Political Science.
The J. Gordon Clerk Trophy was donated in 1945 by
Mrs. J. Gordon Clerk in memory of her husband who was
killed in action in World War II. A cup is awarded to the
men's group with the greatest number of points in athletics
at the end of the sports year. Points are given for varsity
athletes and for intramural competition. Permanent posses-
sion is granted to any group winning the trophy for three
consecutive years.
The Nina 0. Dean Libra Group Leadership Award is
presented annually by the Order of the Libra, women's
honorary group, to the women's social group that is out-
standing in campus leadership as it exemplifies Libra's
ideal of the balanced life.
The Lecomte du Nouy Essay Prize is awarded annually
to the Rollins student who submits the best essay on a
subject covered by the works of the late Lecomte du Nouy.
The prize consists of income from a $3,000 fund established
for this purpose.
The Howard Fox Literary Prize is furnished from the
income of a $5,000 fund given by the late Howard Fox of
New York City in honor of his lifelong friend and former
Rollins College president, Hamilton Holt. This prize is offer-
ed for the best piece of literature produced by a student at
Rollins College, considered on the basis of originality, human
interest, and craftsmanship.
The Gamma Phi Beta Sorority Economics Prize of $10
is offered to the senior woman who has earned the highest
scholarship record in Economics or Business Administra-
tion. The object of this prize, which is awarded at com-
mencement time, is to create interest in these fields among
women students.
The Edwin B. Garrigues Foundation Scholarship. Funds
have been made available by the Garrigues Foundation for
scholarship awards to students majoring in the study and
practice of Applied Music. Awards may be made annually to
qualified students.
The Barbara S. Goldner Scholarship Awards are awarded

































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Rollins Program


annually on the basis of the best over-all academic average
of the pledge classes for the term in which they were
pledged. Separate awards are presented to the best men's
and women's pledge class. These awards were created by the
class of 1962, in memory of the late Barbara S. Goldner.
The George Chandler Holt Scholarship Trophy was estab-
lished in 1958. It is awarded annually at an all-College
convocation to the fraternity that maintained the highest
academic average during the preceding school year.
The Intramural Trophy is awarded annually to the men's
group with the greatest number of points in intramural
competition only. This trophy becomes the permanent pos-
session of any group winning it for three consecutive years.
Women's Intramural Trophies are awarded annually.
Permanent possession is granted to any group who wins a
trophy for three consecutive years.
Archery-presented by Pi Beta Phi.
Basketball-presented by Alpha Phi.
Golf-presented by Kappa Alpha Theta.
Softball-presented by all social groups.
Swimming-presented by Chi Omega.
Tennis-presented by Kappa Kappa Gamma.
Volleyball-presented by Gamma Phi Beta.
The Kappa Kappa Gamma Scholarship Trophy was estab-
lished in 1959. It is awarded annually at an all-College con-
vocation to the sorority that maintained the highest aca-
demic average during the preceding school year.
The O'Brien Intramural Trophy, donated by Mr. Neill
O'Brien of Winter Park in 1946, is awarded to the women's
group that has the greatest number of points at the com-
pletion of the intramural sports season. Permanent posses-
sion is granted to any group winning the trophy for three
consecutive years.
The ODK Leadership Trophy is awarded by the Alpha
Iota Circle of Omicron Delta Kappa, honorary fraternity, to
the men's group that has the best composite record of
achievement and leadership in scholarship, student govern-
ment, social and religious affairs, athletics, publications,
speech, music, drama, and other arts.
The Phi Beta Awards, one in Theatre Arts and one in
Music, are offered to the women members of the graduating
class who have shown the greatest accomplishments in these
fields.
The Central Florida Association of Phi Beta Kappa










Rollins College


Award is presented annually to the outstanding junior stu-
dent who has exhibited intellectual ability in the acquisition
of a liberal education.
The Phi Mu Athletic Award is presented annually by the
Phi Mu Fraternity to the outstanding senior woman
athlete.
The Pi Beta Phi Dramatics Prize of $20 is given by the
Pi Beta Phi Fraternity for the greatest improvement made
by a student in Theatre Arts.
The Pi Gamma Mu Honor Medal, established in 1956 by
Florida Delta Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu, may be awarded
annually to an outstanding senior in the Social Science field.
The Colonel Richard C. Plumer Memorial Award is given
annually to a student of business law who is outstanding in
the qualities represented by Richard C. Plumer: scholarship,
integrity of mind, humbleness of soul, and rendered service
to his fellow men in a spirit of kindness and dignity. The
award is the income from a fund created by the Class of
1954 in memory of Colonel Plumer.
The Charles Hyde Pratt Creative Writing Award of $50
is available for annual presentation to a Rollins student who
is outstanding in creative writing .
The General Reeve Awards for Scholarship, established
in 1945 by the late General Charles McCormick Reeve in
recognition of high scholastic standing, are awarded at
graduation each year to the five seniors who have main-
tained the highest scholastic record during their last three
years in Rollins.
The General Reeve Contest offers six prizes of $75 each
to Rollins men students who compose each year the best
original essays. The contest is made possible through the
generosity of the late General Charles McCormick Reeve of
Minneapolis and Winter Park. The subjects for these essays
are chosen by a committee of the faculty. The six winning
essays are delivered by their authors at a public meeting of
the members of the College. The author who, in the opinion
of specially selected judges, has most effectively composed
and delivered his material will be given the Hamilton Holt
Award of $50.
The Rollins Decoration of Honor was established by the
Board of Trustees on February 22, 1935, and the first award
was made to Dr. Hamilton Holt, president of Rollins. The
decoration is awarded to Alumni, Trustees, members of the
Faculty or Administrative Staff, or friends of the College










Rollins Program


in recognition of distinguished contribution to the progress
of Rollins.
The Sigma Xi Award. The Sigma Xi Club of Rollins
College authorizes the Science Faculty to select each year
an outstanding senior Science student for the Sigma Xi
Award. This award is used in the pursuit of postgraduate or
professional school studies.
An additional award is presented each year to the junior
Science major who, in the opinion of the Science Faculty, is
most deserving of recognition.
Social Organizations' Scholarship Trophies were estab-
lished through the generosity of the late Hamilton Holt
during his presidency of the College. They are awarded
annually under the auspices of the Panhellenic Association
and the Interfraternity Council to the men's and women's
social organizations that have the highest scholastic group
standing .
The Fred Stone Award. The Fred Stone award is for
excellence in work done in the Fred Stone Theatre, in act-
ing, directing, or designing. The recipient's name is en-
graved on a trophy which remains permanently in the
Theatre Arts Department. This trophy was presented many
years ago to Mr. Fred Stone by his admirers in the profes-
sional theatre. After his death it was given to the Fred
Stone Theatre. The first award of this trophy was made in
the academic year 1959.
The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award. In 1925 the New
York Southern Society established the Algernon Sydney
Sullivan Award. This award, in the form of a bronze medal-
lion, is intended to perpetuate the memory of its esteemed
founder. It is designed to recognize and encourage in others
those same principles of love for and service to men that
were his dominant characteristics.
Rollins College has the honor of being one of the limited
number of institutions chosen to bestow this award. It may
be given each year to not more than one man and one
woman of the graduating class, and to one other person who
is not a student at the College.
The recipients of the award are chosen by the faculty
of the College. In the selection of the recipients, "nothing
shall be considered except the possession of such character-
istics of heart, mind and conduct as evince a spirit of love
for and helpfulness toward other men and women!
The first award of the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Medal-










Rollins College


lion by Rollins College was made in 1927 to Irving Bacheller,
the distinguished novelist.
The Theta Alpha Phi Award is a prize given by the
Rollins chapter of this national honorary dramatic frater-
nity to the first-year man and woman doing outstanding
work as actors or technicians in the Theatre Arts Depart-
ment.
The Tiedtke Award is a gold medal given by Mr. John
Tiedtke to a student who has shown outstanding achieve-
ment and progress in the Fine Arts.
The Willard Wattles English Award is an expensive
book presented by the Rollins Key Society to the junior
English major with the highest over-all academic average.
The Zeta Alpha Epsilon Book Prize is awarded at the
final honors day program of the academic year to the senior
student member of the society having the highest record
of achievement in science.











Admission and Expenses



Admission of Students -..--..........----..----......----..... 23
Entrance Requirements, Admission From
Secondary Schools ...--.................-................----------------.....-- 23
Admission with Advanced Standing ............---.. 24
Admission From Other Colleges ...........-.--------.. 24
Admission of Veterans ---..--...............-----------.... 24
Application Procedure ....-------...------------ 25
Student Expenses ............-- ...........--- ---------------. 26
Application Processing Fee ------... -------. 26
Student Association Fee -........---.........----------. 26
Contingent Deposit ---- ------------ 26
Boarding Students .............--------.......------------. 26
Day Students .........--------------------.. 26
Schedule of Payment of Fees -----.... ---..-..-... --.... 26
Incoming Boarding Students -...---------.. 26
Returning Boarding Students ...-.............------ 27
Incoming Day Students -----....-----------... 27
Returning Day Students -----.- -----------... 27
Special Charges .---........................-------------.. .. 27
Regulations Regarding Refund of Fees --........-. 27
Medical Expenses Reimbursement Insurance .. 28
Insurance of Personal Belongings ..........-- .------.. 28
Scholarships ..------........-..-.................------------ 28
Honor Scholarships ---...-...----....... .----............ 29
Achievement Scholarships .------....................--- 29
Endowed Scholarships -........................---------- 30
21










Other Special Scholarships -......-.. ........----------. 31
Deferred Payments ...................-------.---..........--.........--...... 31
Loans to Students --..............-------.... ----... ---...--. 32
Special Regulations ...--......------..-....................... 32











Admission and Expenses


ADMISSION OF STUDENTS
The number of new students accepted by Rollins in any
one year is limited. The College strives to select only those
whose qualities of character, personality, intellectual abil-
ity, and interest in higher education indicate that they can
pursue a college course with profit. It is assumed that a
student who is mature enough to be admitted to college is
mature enough to be held responsible for adequate adjust-
ment to college life.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS
ADMISSION FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Graduates of secondary schools, if recommended, are
eligible for consideration upon receipt of the three-and-one-
half-year record and the results of the Scholastic Aptitude
Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. All appli-
cants for admission are required to take this test during
the senior year of secondary school. Registration forms
may be obtained by writing to the College Entrance Exami-
nation Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey.
In addition, not as a requirement for admission but to
be used for placement purposes, accepted applicants must
present the results of the College Board Achievement Tests
in English Composition, a Foreign Language (either mod-
ern or classical) and one other of the candidate's choice.
The College Board Writing Sample is not required but
should be submitted if taken.
There are certain areas of study which should receive
the same special emphasis in preparatory school years as
they will in college. Ideally, the candidate for admission to
Rollins should present four years of English, at least three
years of Mathematics, three years of one Foreign Language
(or two years of each of two Foreign Language), and cred-
its completed in History and Science. A credit represents
a year's study of a subject in a secondary school under the
condition specified by the regional accrediting association.
Although consideration will be given to candidates who of-
fer courses outside these five main areas, Rollins judges








Rollins College


the school records of its candidates chiefly by performance
in these traditionally college preparatory subjects.

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING
Entering freshmen who pass advanced placement tests
given in May by the College Entrance Examination Board
will, with the approval of the Academic Standing Commit-
tee and the department concerned, be eligible for admission
to advanced courses in the department. Students may use
these tests to meet, in advance, certain distribution re-
quirements for graduation. The tests may not be used to
reduce the number of credit hours required for the Rollins
degree. Information about these tests may be obtained
from the College Entrance Examination Board.

ADMISSION FROM OTHER COLLEGES
Rollins accepts a limited number of students who wish
to transfer from other colleges. Such students must meet
all the requirements established for graduation from Rol-
lins. It is of particular importance to note that Rollins re-
quires two years of work in a Foreign Language as well as
one year of work in a Laboratory Science, a Social Science,
and in the Humanities to qualify for graduation. No trans-
fer credit is given for work completed with a grade of D
or for work which is not typically offered in a liberal arts
college. No credit will be granted for courses taken by cor-
respondence, and not more than 30 credits will be allowed
for extension courses.
To receive information regarding the evaluation of trans-
fer credits, a student must first apply for admission and
pay the application fee. He must be in good academic
standing and eligible to return to the institution from which
he proposes to transfer.

ADMISSION OF VETERANS
Veterans may offer their General Education Develop-
ment Test scores as a part of their admission requirements
in addition to, but not as a substitute for, the required
Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examina-
tion Board.
Evaluation of service credits (viz. USAFI) will be made
upon receipt of an official record. Only those courses com-








Admission and Expenses


pleted in an accredited institution or an approved Armed
Forces establishment are transferable.
Rollins is recognized by the Veterans Administration
for training under Title 38, United States Code, which in-
cludes laws formerly referred to as Public Laws 16, 894,
634, and 550.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
The following steps should be taken when applying for
admission to Rollins College:
1. Request an Application for Admission and return
this form with the application fee of $10 which is
paid only once and is not refundable. Two small
photographs are also required.
2. Upon receipt of the Application for Admission, the
Admissions Office will send to the candidate:
a. The Secondary School Record form, which the
candidate is asked to hand to the head of his
school. It is requested that the school submit
this form directly to Rollins College as soon as
the midyear grades for the senior year are avail-
able.
b. Four Personal Recommendation forms, which the
candidate is asked to give to the guidance coun-
selor and teachers listed on his application.
c. Information regarding the College Entrance Ex-
amination Board requirement.
d. The Parent Questionnaire, which the candidate is
asked to hand to his parent or guardian for com-
pleting and mailing to the College.
After an applicant has complied with the above steps
his name will be placed before the Admissions Committee
and he will be notified regarding his status. Upon notice
of acceptance, boarding students pay a reservation fee of
$250 and day students pay $100. Since Rollins adheres to
the Candidates Reply Date as established by the College
Entrance Examination Board, the reservation fee must be
paid by that date and is not refundable. The Candidates
Reply Date for 1963 is May 1st. Applicants accepted after
this date will be asked to pay the reservation fee immedi-
ately upon acceptance. Payment of the boarding student
reservation fee automatically reserves dormitory space for
the accepted candidate.
Accepted applicants are asked to read carefully pages 35








Rollins College


through 44 of this Bulletin, and are required to comply
with regulations regarding health as outlined on pages 137,
138, and 139.
An accepted student who requests that his application
be transferred to a later term must be reconsidered by the
Admission Committee. Applicants are urged to inform the
College promptly of any change of address, transfer from
one school to another, or withdrawal of application.

STUDENT EXPENSES
Fees for 1962-63 will be as follows:
(Fees are subject to change at any time by action of the
Board of Trustees.)
Application Processing Fee
(Payable with submission of Application
for Admission) ---.-..-............._.-------------.. .. ..... ..$ 10
Student Association Fee
(Levied by Student Association) ---.--.......-----....----. 40
Contingent Deposit
(Refundable upon graduation) ..........----------....... -- 25
Linen Fee for Freshman Boarding Students ------------ 10
The linen fee includes the issuance of two sheets,
one pillow case, three bath towels and one face
cloth per week. All entering boarding students
are required to use this service. It is optional
with returning boarding students.
Boarding Students
General Fee .-........-------........ ....----.....-............. 2,235
The general fee includes items usually differentiated as tui-
tion, board, room; certain special fees such as laboratory
fees and instruction in music; limited medical service for
minor illnesses; and the use of all College facilities.
Day Students
General Fee .... ...................-------------.... -............1,135

SCHEDULE OF PAYMENT OF FEES
Incoming Boarding Students
Payable upon acceptance (non-refundable
after M ay 1st) ................................ 250
Balance payable September 15th









Admission and Expenses


Returning Boarding Students
Payable April 15th (non-refundable) ............. 250
Balance payable September 15th
Incoming Day Students
Payable upon acceptance (non-refundable
after M ay 1st) ................................ 100
Balance payable September 15th
Returning Day Students
Payable April 15th (non-refundable) ............. 100
Balance payable September 15th
All students must meet or arrange for the April 15th in-
stallment promptly to assure the reservation of a place in
the College.
All financial obligations must be fulfilled before the student
attends classes.
SPECIAL CHARGES
Over-Registration. Any student who registers in an
academic year for more than an average of eighteen term-
hours per term, exclusive of Physical Education, Choir, and
the Rollins Singers, is charged $4 for each term-hour over
fifty-four hours for the academic year.
Late Registration. A fee of $5 is charged for late reg-
istration.
Water-Skiing. A fee of $35 per term is charged for
students who elect to take this physical education activity.
A fee of $10 per academic year is charged to all enter-
ing boarding students for linen rental service. This includes
the issuance of two sheets, one pillow case, three bath tow-
els and one face cloth per week. All entering boarding stu-
dents are required to use the above service. The use of this
service is optional with returning boarding students.

REGULATIONS REGARDING REFUND OF FEES
As the College predicates its expenses and bases its budg-
et upon the full collection of the general fee from all ac-
cepted students, adjustments are made only under the fol-
lowing regulations:
1. A student who is obliged to leave College during the
academic year because of serious accident or major medical
or surgical illness necessitating two or more weeks' hos-
pitalization may be eligible for a refund; such unavoidable
departure must be recommended by the College physician.
In this particular situation, the College desires to share the








Rollins College


monetary loss with the parents of the student by canceling
75% of any unearned portion of the general fee and re-
funding such portion as has been prepaid.
2. If any student enrolled at Rollins receives a manda-
tory call from the Federal Government to enter the mili-
tary service on an active duty status, the general fee for
the year will be pro-rated as of the date the student is re-
quired to leave College to report for duty.
3. If a new student fails to enter College after accept-
ance has been granted, or if any student who has been in
previous attendance fails to return, or if any student leaves
College for any reason other than those stated in No. 1 and
No. 2 above, or is suspended or dismissed, no refund will
be made.
Failure to pay the stipulated installments of the ap-
plicable general fee promptly upon the dates specified for-
feits all previous payments and deposits as well as the right
to a place in the College; and the College reserves the
right to select another student immediately to fill the va-
cancy thereby created.
4. A student will be considered in attendance at the Col-
lege until formal notice of withdrawal has been filed in the
Office of the Dean by the parent or guardian.

MEDICAL EXPENSES REIMBURSEMENT INSURANCE
An agreement has been entered into with an insurance
company that makes health and accident insurance avail-
able on a group basis for students at Rollins College. Full
details and application blanks are available in the Cashier's
Office. This insurance is not compulsory, and students may
elect to waive the premium if the insurance is not wanted.

INSURANCE OF PERSONAL BELONGINGS
The College does not carry insurance on students' per-
sonal belongings and is not responsible for loss or damage
from any cause. Students should arrange for adequate cov-
erage on existing policies or make arrangements for insur-
ance locally upon arrival.

SCHOLARSHIPS
Scholarships are awarded competitively to those men
and women who give evidence of academic attainment and










Admission and Expenses


future promise. Transfer applicants are usually not eligible
for such awards. The stipend accompanying such awards
is based on financial need. For entering freshmen, infor-
mation on financial need must be submitted by parents or
guardian on The Parents' Confidential Statement supplied
by the College Scholarship Service, Box 176, Princeton,
New Jersey. This form can be obtained from most sec-
ondary school offices, or from the Admissions Office of
Rollins College.
Scholarships are renewable providing the student main-
tains the necessary academic record and exhibits the quali-
ties of character and leadership expected, and providing the
need continues as determined on the basis of information
shown in The Parents' Confidential Statement, which must
be filed each year. Several types of scholarships are of-
fered.
HONOR SCHOLARSHIPS
The College annually awards a limited number of Honor
Scholarships to outstanding students with superior aca-
demic records. These awards are made in amounts varying
from $200 to $2,235 each, depending upon financial need.
At least one of these scholarships is designated as a
"Florida Honor Scholarship" and is awarded to a student
who has attended a Florida secondary school for not less
than three years, including the senior year, and whose par-
ents are legal residents of the state of Florida.

ACHIEVEMENT SCHOLARSHIPS
Rollins College awards a limited number of Achievement
Scholarships each year. These are given to students who
have a strong academic record or who indicate talent in a
special field such as Music, Drama, etc., who cannot pay the
full fee at Rollins College. The stipend accompanying these
scholarships varies according to ability and need. This
award is divided between work opportunity and direct cred-
it to the account of the student.
In appreciation of the loyal support that the residents
of central Florida have given Rollins College, a limited num-
ber of Achievement Scholarships are awarded, designated
as "Achievement Scholarships for Day Students." The sti-
pend accompanying these scholarships varies according to
ability and financial need. The conditions of award are the
same as explained in the preceding paragraph.










Rollins College


ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS
Endowed Scholarships have been provided as follows:
Carolyn Hulbert Bassett Scholarship Fund. Income from
this fund is available for scholarship aid to needy students.
This scholarship was established through the generosity of
the late Carolyn Hulbert Bassett.
Anna G. Burt Scholarship. This scholarship is available
to Florida girls and amounts to approximately $400 annu-
ally.
Jessie Ball duPont Scholarship Fund. The fund for this
scholarship was created by donations of Mrs. Alfred I. Du-
Pont.
Mrs. Davis E. Fishback, Sr.-Mrs. John T. Galey Schol-
arship Fund. The income from this fund is to be awarded
to an outstanding and needy student in Fine Arts. This
scholarship was established in 1958.
Alfred J. Hanna Scholarship Fund. This fund was cre-
ated by an anonymous donor in 1960.
Eldridge and Marion H. Hart Memorial Fund. Created
by the late Marion H. Hart, in 1961, the income from this
fund may be used to provide scholarships or loans to Latin-
American students at Rollins College.
Hamilton Holt Scholarships. To be awarded to outstand-
ing students. Amounts: up to $1,000 annually. These schol-
arships have been established by donations in honor of
Hamilton Holt, former president of Rollins College.
Arthur Knowles Hutchins Scholarship Fund. Estab-
lished by James O. Hardee in 1957, the recipients are se-
lected from among scholarship students who are candidates
for the Bachelor of Music degree.
Blanche Mallett Scholarship Fund. The income from
this fund is to be awarded as a scholarship to a woman stu-
dent who is studying business and economics. This scholar-
ship was established in 1956 by Mrs. Branche W. Mallett.
Edward S. Meyer Scholarship. Available for an outstand-
ing student, preferably one majoring in Modern Languages.
Amount: approximately $300 annually. This scholarship
was established in 1941 through the generosity of the late
Professor Edward Stockton Meyer.
Henry Buckingham Mowbray Scholarship Fund. The in-
come from this fund is to be used to aid needy students.
The fund, established in 1960, was the bequest of Henry B.
Mowbray, an early graduate of Rollins College.
Charles A. and Jessie W. Noone Scholarship Fund. This










Admission and Expenses


fund was created in 1961 by a bequest of the late Charles
Ashton Noone, Rollins alumnus. The income of approxi-
mately $1,000 a year is available for a period not to exceed
four years for any one person.
Caroline G. Plant Scholarship Fund. To be awarded to
outstanding students either in the form of scholarships or
loans. Amount: $1,150 annually. This fund was established
in 1949 through the generosity of the late Caroline G. Plant.
Alice H. Southworth Fund. The income from this fund
is to be awarded to worthy students. This scholarship was
established in 1957.

OTHER ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS
The following endowed scholarships to be awarded to
upperclass students in honor of donors to the endowment
fund to the College:
The Angier Scholarship
The Burleigh Scholarship
The Chase Scholarship
The Duval Scholarship
The Hall Scholarship
The Mark Scholarship
The Palmer Scholarship
The Pearsons Scholarship
The Scott Scholarship
The Worthington Scholarship
The Wyeth Scholarship
The amount of each scholarship is $50 annually.

OTHER SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS
The Presser Music Scholarship. Funds have been made
available by the Presser Foundation for scholarship awards
to outstanding students who are majoring in Music. These
are primarily for students who are preparing to become
teachers of music.
The Rollins Student Association Scholarship. In order
to make it possible for an outstanding graduate from a local
high school to attend Rollins College, the Student Associa-
tion of the College is offering a $500 scholarship for the
academic year 1962-63 to a qualified high school senior.

DEFERRED PAYMENTS
The College predicates its budget on the assumption that










Rollins College


all fees and expenses will be paid promptly and in full on
the dates outlined in this Bulletin. Parents or students who
find it essential to discuss any variation in the stated terms
or dates of payment should take the matter up in writing
with the College Cashier in ample time to have any pro-
posed change officially reviewed before the stipulated date
of payment arrives. In such cases there is an arrangement
available through Tuition Plan Inc. whereby a portion of
the fees may be paid in monthly installments.

LOANS TO STUDENTS
The College has a number of loan funds from which
loans may be made to qualified students. If a student who
has been granted a loan transfers to another institution,
the loan must be paid in full before the student will be
granted an honorable dismissal from Rollins College.
Funds have been made available to the College from the
National Defense Student Loan Fund for loans to qualified
students who must borrow money to continue their educa-
tion at Rollins. Information regarding such loans is avail-
able at the Cashier's Office.

SPECIAL REGULATIONS
Boarding students who receive scholarships or other aid
on the basis of financial need are disqualified from receiv-
ing such scholarships or aid if they own or maintain an
automobile on the Rollins campus unless authorized for
business or similar purposes.
For further information regarding financial aid to stu-
dents, address Miss Chloe M. Lyle, Rollins College, Winter
Park, Florida.




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The Rollins Standard











Conduct of Students ......--....-- ...........---------------35
Class Attendance ------........................................-----------------..... 35
Academic Warning and Probation -....-----. 36
Social Probation __ .......-------- ........--------------.. 37
Transfer Students .--.....--.....-......-----------------.. 38
Withdrawals -----..............-.... ....--------------. 38
Marriage -----......--...-......---------------------.. 38
Registration -----... ......--.---.-----------------. 38
Change in Registration .----......--------------.. 38
Dropping Work ...........---...........--------------- 39
Evaluation of Student's Work .-----...-------- 39
Requirements for Graduation ------.... ------- 40
Residence Requirements -------...--------- 40
Grade Requirements ....--..........-- ......--------....--- 40
Credit Requirements ...............----------- -------------. 41
Classification of Students ------.....---------- 41
Honors Program ------------------- 44
Individual Reading Program -........------....... --- 44
Individual Independent Study
for Honors at Graduation ------___. -------45
33












The Rollins Standard


CONDUCT OF STUDENTS
We at Rollins are concerned with the learning that takes
place on the campus through our classrooms, our religious
activities, our social functions, and all other opportunities
for interpersonal and intellectual relations.
The Faculty has been entrusted and charged by the
Board of Trustees with all matters pertaining to the order,
instruction, discipline, and curriculum of the College. It is
responsible for the maintenance of good order and discipline
within the student body, and for the authorization and
enforcement of needed rules and regulations. The Faculty,
in turn, has delegated most of the specific responsibilities
for these matters to the Dean of the College and to the
Student Deans.
The possession or use of alcoholic beverages by minors
is illegal in Florida. Possession or use of alcoholic beverages
is expressly forbidden on the Rollins campus. Intoxication
by Rollins students is not acceptable.
As part of the over-all educational program on the cam-
pus, students are encouraged to assume responsibility both
for group and for individual behavior. However, any student
who makes himself an undesirable citizen of the campus or
community because of unsocial or irresponsible acts or be-
cause of his general attitude may be warned, placed on
probation, advised to withdraw, be suspended, or be dismiss-
ed from College, as the conditions warrant. Specifically, a
student may be advised to leave or may be dismissed from
College without particular charges if, in the opinion of the
administration, his attitude or conduct is incompatible with
the best interest of the College.

CLASS ATTENDANCE
Because the class period is important and discussions
cannot be reproduced, absences cannot be "made up." It is
for this reason that Rollins does not have a "cut" system
whereby students are allowed a certain number of absences
without penalty. Prompt and regular attendance at all









Rollins College


classes is required. A student who is repeatedly absent from
classes without permission from his instructors may be
placed on probation or may be required to withdraw from
the College.
Each student is held responsible for all absences from
classes. When a student is absent, it is his responsibility to
arrange with his professor to make up the work deemed
necessary. In this respect there is no differentiation between
excused and unexcused absences. If a student is not in at-
tendance at class, he is marked ABSENT.
Absences immediately before or after a holiday or vaca-
tion are considered a violation of the attendance policy.
Disregard of these rules will make the student liable for
suspension or probation.

ACADEMIC WARNING AND PROBATION
Academic warning and probation are not to be considered
as punishment, but are intended to give the student oppor-
tunity and encouragement to achieve and maintain good
academic standing. In order to protect the academic stan-
dards of the College, warning and probation also serve as
notice to the student and to his parents or guardian that
dismissal may result from failure to improve his academic
record.
A student may be placed on academic probation when-
ever his record endangers his reasonable progress toward a
degree according to standards established by the Academic
Standing Committee. If in the opinion of the Committee it
is in the best interests of the student, a term of academic
warning may be substituted for the first term of probation.
Actions of this Committee in individual cases are based on
consideration of all factors presented in each case, and such
individual actions are not to be considered as establishing
precedent or policy.
If a student on academic warning does not show satis-
factory progress and achievement by the end of the term,
he is usually placed on academic probation. A student on
academic probation is not in good standing and may not
represent the College in extracurricular activities, own or
maintain a motor vehicle, or hold a scholarship. The student
may be asked to abide by additional regulations determined
by the Committee. A student who has been placed on warn-
ing or on probation for unsatisfactory academic standing
must complete one term with a satisfactory record after









The Rollins Standard


being removed from warning or probation before being
eligible for initiation into a fraternity or sorority.
If a student on academic probation does not show satis-
factory progress and achievement by the end of the term,
he is usually dismissed from the College. A student with a
previous record of academic warning or probation who fails
to maintain the standards established by the Committee
may be placed on probation or dismissed without further
period of warning or of probation.
Academic Standards. A student is ordinarily placed on
academic probation under the following conditions:
(1) If in any term his academic average for that term
is substantially below C-.
(2) If at any time his cumulative academic average be-
low C jeopardizes his normal progress toward eligi-
bility for graduation.
In applying this condition, a graduated scale is used.
A freshman may remain in satisfactory academic
standing if his cumulative academic average is
slightly below C-; a sophomore slightly above C-; a
junior slightly below C; a senior must maintain a
cumulative average of C.
A student who fails to attain a satisfactory academic
standing after a term of academic probation will be con-
sidered for dismissal from the College.
As a matter of general policy, the probationary period
for a freshman will be extended to the end of his first year
if such extension appears to be in the best interests of the
student. Such consideration, however, will not be granted to
a freshman whose record discloses a lack of aptitude or a
flagrant neglect of work.
Removal from Academic Probation. A student on aca-
demic probation will ordinarily be removed from probation
if in the next succeeding term he carries a normal academic
load and substantially remedies the deficiencies for which
he was placed on probation.

SOCIAL PROBATION
A student who makes himself an undesirable citizen of
the campus or community because of unsocial or irrespons-
ible acts or general attitude may be placed on social proba-
tion by the lower court.
A student on social probation may not represent the
College as a member of any athletic team, in an extracur-









Rollins College


ricular dramatic production, or in any other way. He is not
eligible to hold any College or fraternity office, to partici-
pate in any public or intramural activities, to receive finan-
cial aid of any sort from the College, to own or maintain a
motor vehicle, or to use the Pelican housing facilities.
While on social probation, a student must comply with
any additional restrictions outlined for him by the Student
Deans or the Student Government Courts.

TRANSFER STUDENTS
Transfer students must meet all of the Rollins require-
ments if they expect to graduate from Rollins. (See pages
23 and 24, Admission, for further details.)

WITHDRAWALS
A student withdrawing from the College is expected to
have his parents or guardian write a formal letter of with-
drawal to the Dean of the College, preferably prior to with-
drawal.
MARRIAGE
In order to remain in good standing at Rollins College,
students planning to be married will advise the Student
Deans and have the consent of their parents (if they are
not of legal age) prior to the wedding. The College dis-
courages elopement. It is not responsible for refunding any
portion of the boarding charge to students who become day
students because of marriage during the academic year. The
College does not operate any housing facilities for married
students.
REGISTRATION
Students must present themselves for registration on
the days that are assigned for that purpose. Completion of
registration after the regularly appointed period subjects
the student to a fine of $5.

CHANGE IN REGISTRATION
Any change in registration must be made during the
first week of the term. Approval of changes later in the
term will be granted by the Dean of the College or the
Registrar. Such changes will be made only to meet circum-
stances beyond the control of the student.









The Rollins Standard


DROPPING WORK
Work for which a student has once registered may not
be dropped except by formal permission of the adviser, the
instructor, and the Dean of the College or Registrar. Drop
cards may be secured from the Registrar's Office. A course
dropped after the first week of classes in any term is re-
corded as W if the work to date is passing, or WF if failing,
on the student's permanent record. WF is included in com-
puting a student's average. The grade of XF is recorded
for a course abandoned without an official withdrawal, and
is computed in the average as a failure.

EVALUATION OF THE STUDENT'S WORK
The report card is based on the following principles:
(a) The evaluation of a student should be an appraisal
of his desirable habits and qualities of character as well as
of his academic achievement.
(b) The report should be an individualized evaluation.
The goal at Rollins is the education of the individual. This
is achieved by regarding each student as an individual.
Hence the report card provides for individualized grading.
It also offers an opportunity to evaluate many habits and
traits of character.
The instructor records letter grades and any other eval-
uations he feels should be made.
Grade "A" is reserved for work that is exceptional in
quality, for work showing keen insight, understanding, and
initiative well beyond the requirements of the course. This
grade cannot be earned solely by conscientious preparation
of assigned work or by high grades on tests.
Grade "B" is given for work that is consistently supe-
rior, for work that shows interest, effort or originality that
lifts it well above the average. Conscientious preparation of
assigned work alone does not merit "B"; the grade is a
recognition of quality.
Grade "C" is a respectable grade. It is the minimum
grade required for graduation. It assumes regular attend-
ance at class, puntuality, consistent preparation of work
day by day, and completion in a satisfactory manner of all
work required in the course.
Grade "D" is an unsatisfactory grade. It is below the
standard necessary for meeting graduation requirements.
Grade "F" is failing.








Rollins College


For each term hour of credit, letter grades are assigned
quality points as follows:
Grade A 12 quality points Grade C- 5 quality points

A-11 D+ 4 "

B +10 D 3

B 9 D- 2 "

B- 8 F 0 "

C+ 7 WF 0

C 6 XF 0 "

A grade of "I", indicating that the work of a course is
"Incomplete," may be assigned only when circumstances
beyond the control of the student, such as illness or neces-
sary absence from the campus, have made it impossible for
the student to complete the work of the course within the
normal period. The student receiving a grade of "I" must
complete the work of the course and have a regular letter
grade assigned for the course within the next succeeding
term of residence in the College. Failure to complete the
course within one term will result in the assignment of a
grade of "F".

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
In order to be eligible for the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor
of Science, or Bachelor of Music degree, a student must ful-
fill certain specific requirements. The degree received de-
pends upon the students' major field of concentration.
1. Residence Requirements. The entire senior year (i.e.,
the last 45 credits leading to the Bachelor's degree) must
be taken at Rollins College. For special requirements in co-
operative programs with other colleges or universities see
pages 51, 52, 53, 54, and 55.
2. Grade Requirement. A student must have a minimum
academic average of 6.00 (C) for all courses taken at Rol-
lins. For an explanation of grades and scholastic require-
ments, see pages 39 and 40.










The Rollins Standard


3. Credit Requirements:
Total Hours.
Completion of 192 credits of academic work and two
years (6 terms) of Physical Education.
Distribution Requirements.
(See explanation below)
Credits:
(1) English Composition and Literature 15
(2) Foreign Language 0-25*
Economics Philosophy
(3) Courses selected from the following group: 15
Geography Psychology
Government Sociology and Anthropology
History
(4) A one-year course selected from the following group: 15
Biology Geology
Chemistry Physics (or Astronomy)
(5) Courses selected from the following group: 15
Art
English (beyond distribution requirement 1 above)
Foreign Language (above 200-level)
Music
Philosophy (if not selected in 3)
Religion
Theatre Arts
(6) Courses selected from major field and electives 108-132
192
(7) Physical Education 6 terms
(8) All students must complete a minimum of 64 credits in 300-
and 400-level courses and must take at least 25 credits at the
300- and 400-level outside the major department.
*The Foreign Language requirement may be met in part or entirely
by qualifying examination.


CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
Sophomore standing -------...... -----.------ .---40 credits
Junior standing .---........................----------------....90 credits
Senior standing ---..-----..... ---... ......-----....... ------141 credits
plus satisfactory completion of
2 years of Physical Education
Explanation of Distribution Requirements. In addition
to the statements that follow, the student should read the
departmental announcements that appear elsewhere in this
Bulletin.
Requirement 1, English Composition and Literature.
English 101-102-103 is required of all freshmen except a
small group mentioned below. The purpose of this course is









Rollins College


to develop two abilities that are among the essential quali-
fications of every educated person: (1) the ability to write
correctly, clearly, and effectively, and (2) the ability to
read literature with an appreciation of its meanings and its
artistic qualities. To achieve these, every student at Rollins
is required to meet at least a minimum standard of literacy;
and to this end every freshman who is enrolled in 101-102-
103 must pass the Minimum Essentials Test of English
Composition.
Those entering students who demonstrate superior
abilities in English in their entrance examinations are per-
mitted to substitute a course in Literature for English
101-102. They must, however, enroll in English 103, in
which emphasis is placed on the techniques of research and
scholarly writing; and then continue in English 282, 283,
Introduction to Literature.
Requirement 2, Foreign Language. The College feels
that all of its graduates should have some acquaintance
with a foreign culture through the study of its language.
Every student, therefore, is required to achieve some pro-
ficiency in a foreign language. Interested students are urged
to elect further work in either Advanced Foreign Languages
or Area Studies. Students who have studied a language in
secondary school are advised to continue the study of the
same language. All students who are to continue in college
the study of the foreign language they began elsewhere
will be placed on the basis of the College Board Achieve-
ment test in the language. The language requirement can
be met in the following ways:
(1) Students whose score on the achievement test shows
an achievement equivalent to the satisfactory com-
pletion of a second-year college course will be ex-
cused from further language study.
(2) Other students will be placed in the first-year or
second-year course according to their level of
achievement as shown by the examination, and they
must continue the study of the language through
satisfactory completion of the second-year course.
1(201, 202, 203).
(3) Students who begin the study of a new language in
college must complete two full college years of the
language.
Requirements 3, 4, 5, Group Requirements. During their









The Rollins Standard


first two years, students are usually required to obtain 45
credits distributed equally among the Humanities, the Lab-
oratory Sciences, and the Social Studies. These requirements,
which are an essential feature of the Rollins Program, as-
sume that students shall have a broad education before
specializing in their major field during their junior and
senior years. The requirements are also designed to help
students decide, if they have not already done so, which
field they should choose for their major.
Requirement 6, Major and Electives. Before the end of
his sophomore year at Rollins, the student chooses a major,
or field of concentration. The majors or pre-professional
programs have two general purposes: (1) to give the stu-
dent a sense of mastery in a particular field, and (2) to
prepare him for an occupation. Quantitatively, a student
must take, on the average, one-third of his courses in a
specific field, with a majority of them in his junior and
senior years. Ordinarily, the major will, therefore, include
45 or more credits in the subject chosen, some of which
must be earned in 400-level courses. The student works out
his preparation for his major program with the assistance
of his adviser and members of the department in which he
specializes.
In special cases, with the approval of the adviser, the
Dean of the College, and the departments concerned, a stu-
dent may major in two fields, meeting the full requirements
of each or taking departmentally approved reductions in
both departments.
Since the majority of the student's courses during his
first two years are outside his major field and since he is
required to take at least 25 credits at the 300- and 400-level
outside the major department, the student not only gains a
broad and deep understanding of one field of study, but also
receives a satisfactory liberal education.
Once the student has chosen a major or a field of con-
centration, shortly before the end of his sophomore year at
Rollins, he may ask a professor in the major department to
serve as his adviser. Upon acceptance by this professor, the
student should see his previous adviser and the Registrar,
and give them the name of the new adviser. Beginning with
his junior year, the student will then be under the guidance
of his new major adviser.
Requirement 7, Physical Education. Two years of physi-
cal education, unless excused for medical reasons, are re-









Rollins College


quired of all students for graduation. A satisfactory grade
must be achieved. Each student carries the required physi-
cal education course regularly through each term of the
first two years. Any student who fails to complete this
requirement with satisfactory grades by the end of the third
year will be liable for probation or dismissal.
Requirement 8. This requirement ensures that all stu-
dents obtain an adequate number of credits in advanced
level work, and that a reasonable proportion of these credits
are obtained in fields outside the student's major field.
Course Load. A full term load is defined as 15 to 18
credits. Any student registering for more than 18 or fewer
than 15 credits must have the program approved by his
adviser and by the Dean of the College or the Registrar.
Except in unusual circumstances, the distribution in
English, Foreign Language, and courses selected from Re-
quirements 3, 4, and 5 should be met during the first two
years. In no case may they be deferred beyond the end of
the third year.
Advanced courses may be taken to satisfy a requirement
if the student is qualified to take such work.

Honors Program
The purpose of the Honors Program is threefold:
1. To grant recognition for unusually high academic
achievement and promise of intellectual and personal
leadership.
2. To afford students having such qualities the oppor-
tunity of programs for individual study in addition to
their regular courses, from their entrance as fresh-
men through their senior year.
3. To provide seniors with the opportunity to be grad-
uated with honors.
The Honors Program consists of two parts: (1) Honors at
Entrance Freshmen, and (2) Upperclassmen.

I INDIVIDUAL READING PROGRAM
The term "Reading" is used in a broad sense to include
laboratory projects, art projects, field works, etc.
Eligibility for reading for honors is earned as follows:
1. Each year a small number of entering freshmen is
selected for Honors at Entrance in recognition of









The Rollins Standard


outstanding scholarship in their secondary school
work. Freshmen so selected may have the privilege
of reading for honors during their first College term.
To introduce these students to the College early in
their careers, certificates will be presented at the first
Convocation each fall.
2. Similarly, all students who earn and maintain an
average of 10.00 at Rollins are also eligible to partici-
pate in the Reading Program.
The Individual Reading Program is planned under the
guidance of an honors sponsor, who is selected by the stu-
dent in consultation with his adviser. This program must
be approved by the Committee on Honors Work. The spon-
sor has full responsibility over the program but may ask
some other members of his department or related depart-
ments to supervise some parts of it.
The student may receive one to three hours' credit per
term for approved reading but may not accumulate more
than seven hours' credit during the year. Once a term's
program has been approved, it cannot be dropped except by
permission of the sponsor, the adviser, and the Dean.

Students who have at the end of an academic year a
cumulative average of 10.00 and who have completed during
that year at least one term in the Individual Reading Pro-
gram are designated Rollins Scholars.

II INDIVIDUAL INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR HONORS
AT GRADUATION
Students are invited at the end of the second term of
their junior year by the Committee on Honors Work and
the major department to engage in independent study for
Honors at Graduation. An approved plan of independent
study may be started in the third term of the junior year
but cannot be started later than the beginning of the second
term of the senior year. A thesis must be presented within
two weeks after the beginning of the final term of the senior
year. It must by typewritten, with an original and two
carbon copies. The original is filed in the College library;
one copy goes to the department files, the other is returned
to the student.
Students who are candidates for graduation with dis-
tinction take final examinations which include one or more
written examinations in the major field, and an oral one









Rollins College


in the special field of the honors thesis. The Graduate
Record Examination will be used if there is such an exami-
nation in the student's major field. The oral examination is
conducted by a special Committee appointed by the Dean
of the College consisting of members of the major depart-
ment and two members of other departments. One or more
members of the Committee on Honors Work will be present
at this examination.
The program of individual study for Honors at Gradu-
ation carries a minimum of five hours' or a maximum of ten
hours' credit during the senior year. Progress reports from
the department are filed with the Registrar at the end of
each term.
Seniors participating in Individual Study for Honors are
designated at graduation as follows:
Graduation with Distinction-A cumulative aver-
age of 10.00 and recommendation of the Committee.
Graduation with High Distinction-A cumulative
average of 10.50 and recommendation of the Com-
mittee.
Graduation with Highest Distinction-A cumula-
tive average of 11.00 and recommendation of the
Committee.
A student who has not done independent study for Hon-
ors but whose general average is high may be awarded his
degree with distinction. The requirement for this honor is
an average for all courses of not less than 11.00.












The Rollins Curriculum

Numbering of Courses .-------..............----------...............-.. 49
Credit per Course .-..-..-..-....-- ........--. ------...-... 49
Specialized Training .-------.........----.....----. 49
Teacher Education and Certification ..--....... 49
Careers Through Rollins .................-------...--------.....-....... 51
Co-operative Programs ---------------- ---................ 51
Business Administration .-..-..------.................- 52
Engineering .......................------------.... .--.... 52
Foreign Service .-----......................--------------. 53
Forestry ---....-----.......... .. ........- ----.. .. ........ 53
Law --. -----------........................ .. ...-- ......... 54
Master of Arts in Teaching ..---.....----............. 54
Medical Technology ..--- --..--.................--........ 55
Medicine --...---......--- --- ..-.--.............. 55
Dentistry ..........-------.......- ------------........... 55
Majors --...........---------........................... .... ....... 56
Combined Majors .............................--------------.---........ 56
Courses of Instruction -..-....--.------------..-..--....... 57
Area Studies --------.....--------... ------ .-............. 57
Art --..---- --------------..... -.... -- ----.... .... .......... ..... 58
Biology --.. --.............----------.---..... ............ 61
Business Administration ------....... --............-- ... 63
Chemistry -----..-----....-----------------................ 65
Economics ----------------. ---------..--.-................. 67
Elementary Education ---------------.....-.........- 69
Professional Courses for Elementary
and Secondary School Teaching ............ 69
47













The Rollins Curriculum


Specialization for Elementary
School Teaching----------...-.....---..---....-...-.... 71
Courses for Elementary Teachers in Ser-
vice or Pursuing MAT Degree Program 71
English ..................................----------.. ---.. 72
Foreign Languages --...........--..-.........------------.. 74
French ..............----------..---.......---- 75
German ----.....---.----------------.----....... 76
Russian -------------.....---------------------------... 76
Spanish ---...-....................------------....------. 77
General Science ...-----.....-----.-.. ---..........- 78
Geography ..---.......---........ .--...----..... ----78
Geology -....-.................---------------.. --...... 79
Government .-..------------.------...-.-------....... ... 81
History -------------.---------------...----.....------. 82
Human Relations ----------------- --.--------............ 83
Mathematics ----------------------------....---------... 84
Music -------------------------------------------..--.. 85
Philosophy -..--....-.........------..------------- 88
Physical Education -------................-..---..----.. 90
For Men --.........-------. ------..-------....... 91
For Women -----------.--------------------....-... 92
Physics ...---..-----.---- ---------------.. 92
Pre-Medical -.....----...........-------------.. .. 94
Psychology --.............-----------------..--.. 94
Radio ...---.........--- -.-...--....--------. 97
Religion ---...-...---......---------.......--...----- 98
Secretarial Courses ---......................------..--.. -- 93
Sociology and Anthropology .............------...----. 99
Speech -..-...---.....-....-----------..-----------101
Theatre Arts ...-------------------------.102
Conservatory of Music ....--....--...-- ------.105
48




I -







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The Rollins Curriculum


NUMBERING OF COURSES
In the numbering of courses the following system is
used: courses open to freshmen and sophomores are num-
bered from 100 to 299; those open primarily to juniors and
seniors are numbered 300 and above. The term is indicated
with the letter: f, fall; w, winter; s, spring.
Many courses are offered in one-term units; however, in
some cases two or more terms constitute a unit. The pres-
ence of a hyphen between the term numbers, i.e., 101f-102w-
103s, indicates that all parts of that particular course must
be taken as a unit. No credit will be allowed for the com-
pletion of part of a course.
The presence of a comma between the term numbers, i.e.,
101f, 102w, 103s, indicates that any term's work in the
course may be taken separately provided that the pre-
requisites have been met. When course numbers are repeat-
ed and separated by a semicolon, the course is repeated, i.e.,
101f; 101w. Where courses are given in alternate years, the
year in which the course is given follows the course descrip-
tion.
CREDIT PER COURSE
The number of credits given for each course is listed
after the description of the course. Five-credit courses
usually meet five times a week. Two-credit courses may
meet once a week. All credit is term credit which can be
translated into semester credit as follows: one term credit
equals two-thirds of a semester credit; one semester credit
equals one and one-half term credits.

Specialized Training
TEACHER EDUCATION AND CERTIFICATION
Rollins College offers a major in Elementary Education
for those planning to teach in elementary schools. Those
preparing to teach in secondary schools may major in the
subject they desire to teach, and as part of their elective
work may select courses in Education.









Rollins College


Requirements for teacher certification in Florida are
divided into three categories: (1) General Preparation, (2)
Professional Preparation, and (3) Specialized Preparation.
Other states have similar requirements, which can be ascer-
tained from the Registrar or from the Education Depart-
ment at Rollins.
The courses in General Preparation that are required for
the Florida Certificate include a minimum of sixty-eight
term hours or their equivalent divided among the following
fields, with a minimum of nine term hours and a maximum
of eighteen term hours in each field:
Arts of Communication. Minimum requirement:
nine term hours in English Composition, Rhetoric,
and Grammar. (Speech and Foreign Language may
also be counted.)
Human Adjustment. Health, Physical Education,
Psychology, Religion, Philosophy, Logic, Ethics,
Nutrition, Problems of Living in Home and Family,
and Community living.
The Biological and Physical Sciences; Mathematics.
(In no case may the entire field be represented by
Mathematics.)
The Social Studies. At least two of the following:
Geography, History, Government, Sociology, An-
thropology, and Economics.
Humanities and Applied Arts. At least two of the
following: Literature (English, American, and
World), Literature Written in a Foreign Language,
Technological Arts, Constructive Design and Fine
Arts, Music, and Philosophy.
In the Professional Preparation the course requirements
in Education include Practical Experience in Teaching)
(Educ. 414-415-416), two 5-credit courses in Foundations of
Education (Educ. 204 or Educ. 351 and Educ. 233), two 5-
credit courses in Teaching in the Schools (Educ. 324, or
Educ. 404 and Educ. 406, 407, or 408), and a 3-credit course
in Special Methods (Educ. 417 For. Lang. 417 or as part of
Educ. 414-415-416 for secondary; and Educ. 409 for ele-
mentary).
For the Specialization Requirements for elementary
school teachers or for secondary school teachers, and for
the special requirements in other states, the Registrar or
the Education Department should be consulted as early as
possible in the college course.









The Rollins Curriculum


CAREERS THROUGH ROLLINS

CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAMS
An excellent foundation for advanced study may be
acquired at Rollins College in Chemistry, Church Vocations,
English, Geology, History, Mathematics, Music, Physics,
Psychology, Sociology and Anthropology, and Social Work.
Rollins courses provide an excellent background for teach-
ing in a college or university, or entering a specialized
career in research, public service, or industry.
Co-operative agreements between Rollins College and
certain universities make it possible for students to shorten
the time of preparation when their academic ability and
performance meet the requirements of the professional
school concerned. This is an advantage for the student who
wishes to have a liberal arts foundation for his later special-
ization. Such a foundation is preferred by employers, and
is recommended by many professional schools in technical
and professional areas.
Most college students complete the full four years that
are usually required for the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor
of Science degree and then enter professional training,
where two to four additional years are required. Rollins
students who qualify, however, may avail themselves of
one of the co-operative or accelerated programs outlined
below. In most instances, it will be noted, the student re-
ceives his Bachelor's degree from Rollins after successfully
completing his first year at the co-operating institution.
Students who wish to qualify for one of these programs
(Master of Arts in Teaching excepted) should consult their
adviser probably by the beginning of their sophomore year.
Only students who have completed three years in resident
study at Rollins will be recommended. Thus, a student who
does his junior year abroad cannot qualify.

ARCHITECTURE
A student who wishes to plan a joint curriculum in
Architecture in Rollins College and the Massachusetts In-
stitute of Technology may be indicating the fact upon
entering Rollins College follow a program at Rollins for
three years and at M.I.T. usually for three additional years
receiving the bachelor of Arts degree from Rollins and the
51









Rollins College


degree of Bachelor of Architecture from M.I.T. The details
of the co-operation are not yet complete but should be by
September, 1962.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Rollins College Institute for General Studies
Students graduating from Rollins who have majored in
Business Administration and Economics are eligible to apply
for admission to the Rollins Graduate Program in Business
Administration, leading to the Master's degree in Business
Administration. Those whose undergraduate major has in-
cluded substantially all the subject matter covered by the
basic courses of the first-year MBA Program may expect
to complete the MBA degree requirements in one year by
attending some evening classes, and enrolling for appropri-
ate research and thesis projects. As indicated on page 141,
the Graduate Program in Business Administration is a
division of the Rollins Institute for General Studies. Bro-
chures are available setting forth the specific admission
procedures and degree requirements. Rollins seniors who
contemplate entering the MBA Program in order to receive
the MBA degree in one year should consult their adviser or
a member of the Business Administration and Economics
Department for details.
ENGINEERING
Columbia University School of Engineering
Students who wish to obtain a Bachelor of Science degree
in Engineering from the Columbia University School of
Engineering in addition to the Bachelor of Science from
Rollins College may enter Rollins and, after following suc-
cessfully a course of study approved by both schools, may
transfer to Columbia at the end of three years. After meet-
ing the graduation requirements of both institutions he is
granted the appropriate degree from each.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Students who wish to obtain a Bachelor of Science in
Engineering degree from the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology in addition to a Bachelor of Sciences degree from
Rollins College may follow a program at Rollins for three
years that has been agreed upon by both institutions. Suc-
cessful completion of this program will enable the student
to apply for transfer to M.I.T. to complete the work for the
52









The Rollins Curriculum


Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree, usually in two
more years. The exact time will depend upon the student's
studies before going to M.I.T.
New York University
Rollins College has also entered into an agreement with
New York University. Under this program, students attend
Rollins for three years and New York University for two
years. They earn two degrees, the Bachelor of Science from
Rollins College and the Bachelor of Engineering from New
York University. The program at Rollins includes basic
courses in the Liberal Arts Field and concentration in Math-
ematics and Physics. At the end of three years the student
will have an opportunity to choose among eight branches of
Engineering.
FOREIGN SERVICE
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service,
Georgetown University
Students who would like to follow a course of study
leading not only to a Bachelors degree in the Liberal Arts
but also to the degree of Master of Science in Foreign
Service may apply for admission to the co-operative pro-
gram carried on by agreement between Rollins College and
Georgetown University. Under this agreement, students at-
tend Rollins College for their freshman, sophomore, and
junior years. The senior year is spent at the Edmund A.
Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University
in Washington, D. C. A fifth year of study is then taken at
the Georgetown University Graduate School. By this ar-
rangement, successful students receive their Bachelor of
Arts degree from Rollins College after one year at George-
town University. Upon completion of the second year at
Georgetown, they receive the degree of Master of Science in
Foreign Service from that University. Thus, participating
students may receive two degrees in five years. The program
is intended to qualify graduates to enter the Foreign Ser-
vice of the United States.
FORESTRY
Duke University School of Forestry
Upon successful completion of a five-year co-ordinated
course of study, a student may earn the Bachelor of Science
degree from Rollins College and the professional degree of
Master of Forestry from Duke University. The student









Rollins College


electing this curriculum spends the first three years in resi-
dence at Rollins and the last two at Duke University, pur-
suing the professional forestry curriculum of his choice.
LAW
It is possible for selected students to plan their studies
at Rollins so that they can qualify for both the Bachelor of
Arts degree from Rollins and the Bachelor of Laws degree
from certain law schools within a period of six years. This
necessitates careful planning by the student of the three
years of study at Rollins College in order that all distribu-
tion and other general requirements are fully completed.
Students who wish to pursue this plan should inform their
adviser as early in their college course as practicable.
Duke University School of Law
Selected students who wish to obtain a Bachelor of Law
degree from Duke University in addition to the Bachelor of
Arts degree from Rollins College in six years may be admit-
ted to the Duke University School of Law upon the success-
ful completion of a special three-year curriculum at Rollins.
They will be eligible to receive the Bachelor of Arts degree
from Rollins College after receipt of a transcript showing
that the first year of study in the law school has been suc-
cessfully completed.
Stetson University College of Law at St. Petersburg
Students who desire to complete both liberal arts and
legal education in a period of six years instead of seven may
apply for admission to the co-operative program agreed up-
on between Rollins College and Stetson University College of
Law at St. Petersburg, Florida. They earn both Bachelor of
Arts and Bachelor of Law degrees.
MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING
Duke University
Supported in part by a grant from the Ford Foundation
to Duke University, this program is designed to prepare
those selected college graduates for a teaching career who
did not prepare professionally for their teacher certifica-
tions as undergraduates. The program provides professional
courses, carefully supervised teaching experience, and grad-
uate study in special fields. The student who completes the
program successfully achieves a year of teaching experience,
earns his Master of Arts in Teaching degree and full certi-
fication as a teacher-all within a fifteen month period. For








The Rollins Curriculum


particulars about scholarships for this program, which at
present are very substantial, interested candidates may
confer with the Senior Professor of Education.

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY
The growing field of Medical Technology offers a re-
warding opportunity for both men and women who may
desire to aid the sick in a specialized way or who cannot
afford the long training needed to become a doctor. Three
years of college are now required with an additional year of
training in one of the schools approved by the American
Medical Association. Rollins offers the required basic courses
in all fields and the B.S. degree upon completion of the year
of study in a school of Medical Technology approved by the
College.
The basic course at Rollins would include a minimum of
Biology (24 credits), Chemistry (30 credits), Math (5 cred-
its for less than 4 years of high school math), other Science
courses (15 credits) which should include Physics if not
taken in high school.
In addition the student would be expected to meet the
distribution requirements, except for number 8 (see page
41).
MEDICINE
Duke, Tulane, and Vanderbilt Universities
Qualified students who wish to enter medical school
after three years at Rollins and receive the Bachelor of
Science degree from Rollins after successfully completing
the regular first year in medical school may apply to the
Committee on Pre-Medical Education. Medical schools in
three universities-Duke, Tulane, and Vanderbilt-will re-
ceive selected Rollins students for this accelerated program.

DENTISTRY
The Council on Dental Education prescribes that the
pre-professional requirements be met in an accredited liberal
arts college. Rollins is accredited and gives the required
courses in English, Biology, Physics, and Chemistry. Many
Rollins students enter Dental School. Students interested in
this specialization may make their preparation for this pro-
fession at Rollins with full confidence that entrance re-
quirements will be adequately met. However, no exemption
is granted from the usual Liberal Arts requirements.








Rollins College


Majors
Rollins College students may choose any of the following
fields in which to concentrate:
Fields leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts:
Art General Science
Business Administration History and Government
Economics Human Relations
Elementary Education Inter-American Studies
English Music
Foreign Language Philosophy
French Psychology
German Sociology and Anthropology
Spanish Theatre Arts
Fields leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science:
Biology Mathematics
Chemistry Physics
Geology Pre-Medical
Fields leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music:
Choral Conducting Organ
Composition Voice
Instrumental Music Education
Piano
Violin
A student is expected in the first two years to do the
introductory work in his major subject which will give him
the fundamental knowledge necessary for advanced work.
He should consult his adviser in regard to this work. The
major will normally include 45 or more credits in the sub-
ject, including some 400 courses.
The major will be arranged to fit individual needs as far
as possible within the limits of the established general and
major requirements.
COMBINED MAJOR
A student may elect a combined major made up of
courses from two or more departments, if in the judgment
of the adviser and the Dean of the College such proposed
major has coherence and depth and better meets the needs
of the student than do any of the regular majors offered.
A combined major must be approved by the departments
concerned. A combined major from two departments will
normally require approximately two-thirds of the courses
required in the regular major of each department.









Area Studies Art


Courses of Instruction

Area Studies
L. GLEASON, HANNA, MOMSEN
Rollins College also offers courses in Area Studies that cover the
history, geography, anthropology, art, literature, and current social,
political, and economic problems of an area, particularly as these
problems affect relations with the United States. The first of these
studies was offered in 1957-58 in the Latin American Area which
was particularly appropriate because of the College's long-time interest
in that part of the world.
211f-212w-213s. Latin American Studies
Introductory course for the Latin American Studies major. Open as an
elective to all C or better students. A study of Latin America, with
emphasis on an understanding of modern economic, social, and political
problems of its countries and including background work in the history,
social patterns, and geography. Delves into the problems of geography
and economics, American Literature and Art, Political and Social
development.
Casa Iberia, the Inter-American Center, serves as a laboratory for the
Latin American Studies course. Among its activities is the Cafezinho
Book Review Series on Saturday mornings designed to interpret selected
writings in the fields to which this course is related. 3 credits
L. Gleason, Hanna, Momsen
A student majoring in Inter-American Studies should take, in
addition to the Introductory Latin American Studies course, 211-212-
213, 45 hours selected from the following courses, not more than 15
hours in any one department:

Field Trip to Latin America
(See Geography 401)
Required of majors. (Credits to be arranged)
Geology
Mineral resources of Latin America (See Geology 451) 3 credits.
Geography of Latin America
A study of physical, cultural, and economic geography of Latin Amer-
ica (See Geography 303) 4 credits.
Government
Comparative Government with emphasis on Latin America (See Gov-
ernment 337) 5 credits.
Sociology and Anthropology Seminar
(See Sociology 314-315-316)
Alternates with Sociology 414, 415, 416.
Survey of Latin American Literature
(See Spanish 419-420-421)









Rollins College


History
Hispanic Heritage and Colonial Period (To be offered in the near
future)
Latin American Independence Period and United States Relations with
Latin America (To be offered in the near future.)

Art
ANDERSON, MCKEAN, ORTMAYER, PETERSON, SILINS
A major in art requires broad fundamental training in the various
phases of art expression. The student should have a thorough under-
standing of fundamental art principles. He should be able to analyze
art problems, and suggest a logical plan for their solution. Emphasis
on creative thinking is the aim of the department's program.
Students may choose between Creative Art and Art History. The
student who specializes in Creative Art must schedule the three-term
course in basic principles (131-132,133) and 10 credit hours each
of Painting, Sculpture, and Design as prerequisites for advanced work.
He must then take 15 credit hours of advanced work in Creative Art
and three advanced courses in Art History.
Recommended electives:
Aesthetics
Music
History
Literature
The student who specializes in Art History must schedule the
three-term course in basic principles (131-132-133), two survey
courses in Art History (219, 267), one course in Philosophy, and
10 credit hours in Creative Arts of his own choosing. Advanced
study consist of five advanced courses in Art History and one course
in Aesthetics.
Recommended electives:
History
Psychology
French or German
Students interested in a combined major in Creative Art and
Theatre Arts should consult an adviser in one of these departments.

101w-102s. Introduction to Art and Artists
A general introduction to the visual arts. Works of architecture, sculp-
ture, and painting are studied through illustrated lectures and discus-
sions. Class work is supplemented by outside reading and reports. Open
to all students. 2 credits. Anderson
131f-132w-133s. Principles of Art
A basic practice course in the theory and application of color and
design fundamentals, including work in drawing, painting, and three-
dimensional construction. Required of majors. Open to all students.
5 credits. Peterson










The Rollins Curriculum


151f, 152w, 153s. Elementary Sculpture
A short course in fundamentals of sculpture. No previous training re-
quired. Four hours of class per week. Open to all students. 2 credits.
Ortmayer

219f. A Survey of the Arts of Ancient Civilizations
Deals with the visual arts of the Stone Age, paralleled by art of modem
primitive civilizations. The development of the architecture, sculpture,
and painting of Assyrian, Babylonian, and Egyptian civilizations. The
artistic problems and styles are studied in relation to religious, political,
and social conditions of life. (1962-63) 5 credits. Silins

231f, 232w, 233s. Painting
Intermediate-level studies in the problems of still life, landscape and
figure painting, employing water tempera, oil, and various drawing
media. Prerequisite: Principles of Art or consent of the instructor.
5 credits. Peterson

254f, 255w, 256s. Elementary Sculpture
Basic problems in modeling and carving. No previous training required.
Open to all students. Six hours of class per week, 3 credits, or ten
hours of class per week, 5 credits. Ortmayer

267f. Medieval Art and Architecture
A survey of the world of the Middle Ages as reflected in the develop-
ment of art. A discussion of the decline of the Classical civilization and
the late Classical art, and the growth of a new Christian civilization;
the inter-relations of art in the East (Byzantium) and the West. The
relationship of art and art styles to social and cultural life are stressed.
Romanesque and Gothic art are discussed from the aesthetic point of
view, and are investigated as symbols of human life, beliefs, and ideas.
Attention is given to the problems of the decline of the Medieval
World. Open to all students. (1963-64) 5 credits. Silins

271f, 272w, 274s. Design
Line, form and color are studied in relation to practical design prob-
lems. 271 and 272 open to all students. Prerequisite for 274: five
credit hours of design or consent of instructor. Ten hours of class per
week. 5 credits. Anderson

304f, 305w, 306s. Advanced Sculpture
A continuation of Elementary Sculpture. Students work on projects of
their own choosing. Prerequisite: 10 credit hours of sculpture or consent
of the instructor. Six hours of class per week, 3 credits, or ten hours
of class per week, 5 credits. Ortmayer

311w. Renaissance Art in Italy and Northern Europe
The roots and the main periods of the Renaissance are discussed. A
comparison is made of the development of art in Italy and the North.
Emphasis on problems of style in relation to the ideas and ideals of
contemporary civilization. Prerequisite: one course in art history or
consent of the instructor. (1963-64) 5 credits. Silins










Rollins College


313s. Baroque Art
A study of the porblems of Mannerism and the sources of Baroque
style. Various trends of the European Baroque art during the seven-
teenth and eighteenth centuries are discussed, and consideration is given
to the influence of Catholicism and Protestantism on art. Prerequisite:
one course in art history or consent of the instructor. 5 credits.
Silins

321w. Nineteenth Century European Art
A survey of the development of architecture, sculpture, and painting
in European countries since the French Revolution. Classicism and
Romanticism, Realism and Impressionism are discussed as artistic trends
in their relation to the existing conditions of culture and social life.
Prerequisite: one course in art history or consent of the instructor.
5 credits. Silins

322s. American Painting: Nineteenth Century
A presentation and discussion of the main trends and tendencies of
painting in America from Neoclassicism and Romanticism to the Ar-
mory Show. Emphasis is placed upon the development of the American
School and the expressions of American life in art. Open to all students.
5 credits. Silins

323s. Contemporary Art
A study of the roots and development of the Postimpressionistic trends
in art. Artistic problems and ideas of Aninaturalism, of expressive and
abstract art studied as symptoms of the crises and deep changes in
modern civilization, and in the structure of social and political life.
Prerequisite: one course in art history or consent of the instructor.
(1963-64) 5 credits. Silins

331f, 332w, 333s. Advanced Painting
Studies in several media, concentrating on the students individual de-
velopment. Prerequisite: 10 credit hours in painting and consent of the
instructor. 5 credits. Peterson

373f, 374w, 375s. Advanced Design
Selected problems in the application of design principles, using a variety
of technical media, e.g., silk screen, enameling, mosaic. Prerequisite:
10 credit hours in design or consent of the instructor. Ten hours of
class per week. 5 credits. Anderson

391f-392w-393s. Seminar in Museum Work
Practical training and discussion in the problems, techniques and pro-
cedures of museum operation. Open to junior and senior art majors.
2 credits.

411f, 412w, 413s. Specialized study in Painting, Sculpture,
Design or Art History
Consent of the Art Department is required. 5 credits. Staff










Biology


Biology

SHOR, VESTAL
Florida offers a unique opportunity for out-of-door study. The
major in biology stresses (1) a broad understanding of the interrela-
tionship of the local fauna and flora correlated with (2) the basic
ideas and techniques associated with formal training in the laboratory.
The course offers the broad basic background that is needed for the
many opportunities available in botany, zoology, and conservation.
A student majoring in Biology must take a minimum of 60 credits
in the field, beginning with General Biology (104-105-106). Subse-
quent courses are scheduled in a sequence that, in the opinion of the
major professor, best reflects the interests and needs of the student.
A student majoring in Biology must take a minimum of 60 credits
in the field, beginning with General Biology (104-105-106). Subse-
quent courses are scheduled in a sequence that, in their opinion of the
major professor, best reflects the interests and needs of the student.
All students majoring in Biology must have a knowledge of gen-
eral chemistry and other fields of study that provide a broad cultural
background. If graduate work is contemplated, the student is strongly
urged to acquire knowledge of organic chemistry and modern physics,
and a reading knowledge of German or French.

104f-105w-106s. General Biology
An introduction to the entire field of biology, designed to point up its
significance to a general education as well as to provide a background
for major work in the field. Evolution is used as the unifying principle.
Open to all students. 5 credits. Shor, Vestal

207f-208w-209s. Botany
An intermediate-level course dealing with the facts and principles of
plant life. Local flora are utilized as illustrative material to show rela-
tionships of the fields of forestry, horticulture, conservation, ecology,
etc., to a fundamental knowledge of botany. Class, laboratory, and field
work. Prerequisite: Biology 106. 5 credits. Vestal
308f. Genetics
A course dealing with the laws of variation and heredity. Texbook and
laboratory work. Prerequisite: Biology 106. 3 credits. Vestal

316s. Bio-Ecology
The relation of organisms to their environment and the laws affecting
their geographical distribution are studied. Special attention is given to
local forms. Prerequisite: Biology 106. 3 credits. Vestal

323f-324w-325s. Comparative Anatomy
Integrated comparative morphological and embryological studies of the
organ systems of the vertebrates. The course includes discussions, and
dissection of representative types. Prerequisites: Biology 106. 5 credits.
Shor
61











Rollins College


328f. Bacteriology
The application of bacteriology of household and sanitary sciences; bac-
terial diseases; classification of bacteria; identification of various types
of bacteria. Prerequisite: Biology 106. 5 credits. Shor
331s. Biology of the Algae
Attention is directed toward the morphological, taxonomic, genetic, and
ecological aspects of the algae. Class, laboratory, and field work is in-
cluded. Prerequisite: Biology 209. 3 credits. Shor
343s. Phylogeny
A course designed to integrate those disciplines that contribute to pres-
ent-day concepts of evolution. 3 credits. Staff
351f. Entomology
Studies in the general characteristics, metamorphosis, control, and eco-
nomic importance of the principal families of insects. Field work in col-
lection, preservation, and identification of representative Florida insects.
Prerequisite: Biology 106. 3 credits. Shor
355w-356s. Natural History of the Invertebrates
An upper-level course in which the invertebrate animals, exclusive of
the insects, are studied in the class, laboratory, and field. Morphologic,
ecologic, taxonomic, and evolutionary aspects are considered. A special
study of mollusks is made in the spring term. Prerequisite: Biology
106. 5 credits. Shor
363w. Conservation of Natural Resources
The course presents the principal biological concepts and techniques
that contribute to the maximum use of our natural resources. Stress is
placed upon the responsibility of man as a vital yet dependent resource.
Prerequisite: Biology 106. 3 credits. Shor, Vestal
365w. Orinthology
Morphology, distribution, adaptations, ecological relations, and field
identification are included in this study of birds. Prerequisite: Biology
106. 3 credits. Shor
404f, 405w, 406s. Special Problems in Biology
Individual problems or special topics are selected for study, depending
upon the interests and preparation of the students. For majors only.
3 or 5 credits. Shor, Vestal
436f-437w-438s. Biological Literature
Critical reading and discussion of important writings in biological liter-
ature. Prerequisite: two full years of Biology or consent of the instruc-
tor. 3 credits. Shor, Vestal
461f-462w-463s. Modern Biology for High Schools
Workshop and studies relating to the modern trends in biology teaching
at the secondary school level. This will be based on the programs de-
veloped by the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study and may include
other materials developed by the Committee on Laboratory Innovations
and the Committee on the Gifted Student. Prerequisite: permission of
instructor. 3 credits. Vestal










Biology Business Administration


Business Administration

EVANS, HUNTER, KANE, MAGOUN, PASTERNAK, TIEDTKE, WELSH
The program for most majors in Business Administration includes
the following:
Business Mathematics (Bus. 201) or the passing of a test estab-
lished by the Business Administration and Economics Department.
Principles of Economics (Econ. 211-212)
Principles of Accounting (Bus. 204-205)
Introduction to Statistical Methods (Bus. 208)
Business Finance (Bus. 307)
Principles of Marketing (Bus. 311)
Managerial Accounting (Bus. 314)
Business English (Bus. 317-318-319)
Business Law (Bus. 322-323)
Business Management (Bus. 409)
Plus three additional three-or-four-hundred-level courses in this or
other departments, selected with the approval of the adviser.
201f; 201w. Mathematics of Finance
A study of simple and compound interest; discounts, annuities, bonds,
and selected related topics. 5 credits. Welsh
204f-205w. Principles of Accounting
Principles of accounting as applied to business enterprises including
analysis of transactions, making all types of original entries, posting,
adjusting, summarizing, and the interpretation of statements. 5 credits.
Evans
208f; 208s. Introduction to Statistical Methods
Analysis of sources and methods for collecting data. A study of fre-
quency distributions, averages, measures of dispersions and skewness;
correlation and sampling. The interpretation and presentation of results.
Prerequisite: Business 201 or Business Mathematics Test. 5 credits.
Welsh
301s. Applied Statistics
Projects in the sources, uses, and application of statistics to management,
industry, finance, marketing, and government problems. Introduction to
advanced techniques in the preparation and critical appraisal of statisti-
cal reports. Prerequisite: Business 208. 3 credits. Welsh
304w. Production Management
A study of the principles of management applied to the productive proc-
esses. Topics include plant location and layout; material flow, storage,
and control; standardization of operations through quantity and quality
control systems; basic time and motion methods; development, diversi-
fication, and obsolescence of productive capacity; relation of the pro-
duction function to other areas of management. 5 credits. Welsh

307f. Business Finance
Financial problems of the business firm. A survey of information and











Rollins College


control; capitalization; long term and short term sources of funds; ex-
pansions, combinations, and reorganization. Prerequisite: one course in
Economics or Business 205. 5 credits. Evans
308s. Fundamentals of Investments
Investment problems from the investor's viewpoint. The securities mar-
kets and their regulation. Evaluation of forecasting methods. Analysis
of securities. 5 credits. Welsh

311f; 311w. Principles of Marketing
A basic course in principles and methods of marketing, and analysis of
the market structure. Movement of goods from producer to consumer,
including marketing functions and institutions, channels of distribution,
policies, costs, problems of creating demand, wholesaling, and retailing.
5 credits. Welsh
314s. Managerial Accounting
A study of the principles underlying the basic concepts of accounting,
and the measurement of income, expenses, and valuation of assets. Ac-
counting as a "tool" of management. Analysis and interpretation of
financial reports from the viewpoint of management and investors. Pre-
requisite: Business 205. 5 credits Evans
317f-318w-319s. Business English
Methods and mechanics of effective communication in business letters
and reports; extensive practice. (Knowledge of typing advisable.) Busi-
ness 319 will be open to Economics majors with the consent of the
instructor. 2 credits. Magoun
322f-323w. Business Law
Basic principles of law relating to contracts, agency, bankruptcy, negoti-
able instruments, business organizations, personal and real property,
labor relations, security for credit transactions, and trade regulations.
5 credits. Hunter
325w-326s. Personnel Management
Selection and training of employees; job analysis; work standards and
labor productivity; merit rating and promotion procedures; wage de-
termination; handling of employee grievances; worker morale; health
and pension plans. Prerequisite: one course in Economics. 2 credits.
Kane
335w. Federal Taxation
A study of federal taxes: income, estate, gift, social security and excise
taxes. Emphasis is on income taxes. Prerequisite: Business 205. 5 credits.
Evans
336w. Cost Accounting
A study of cost systems: job costs, process costs, etc. The nature and
purpose of cost accounting in relation to management. Budgets, stand-
ard costs, preparation and analysis of cost reports. Prerequisite: Busi-
ness 205. 5 credits. Evans
401f. Principles of Merchandising
The organization and operation of wholesale and retail establishments;










Business Administration Chemistry


trends in merchandising; management problems, and technique of mer-
chandise control. Prerequisite: Business 311. 5 credits. Welsh
409s. Business Management
Methods and problems of the business world presented from the view-
point of the businessman at work. This course emphasizes the con-
tinuity and unity of the problems of the business manager. It is useful
to both women and men who contemplate working in the field of
executive management. Prerequisite: Economics 212, Business 314.
5 credits. Evans
421s. Market Research and Consumer Relations
Gathering, recording, and analyzing facts relating to the transfer and
sale of goods and services from producer to consumer. The scope,
value, and uses of market research in developing and testing new prod-
ucts and product preferences, market measurements, and research in
market policy of selected industries. Prerequisite: Business 311. 3 credits.
Pasternak
491f, 492w, 493s. Research Projects in Economics and Bus-
iness
Independent research and reports on assigned topics. Prerequisite: per-
mission of the instructor. 1 or 2 credits. Romita, Welsh

Chemistry
CARROLL, HELLWEGE
For a major in Chemistry, the following courses are required:
General Chemistry (105-106-107) or Principles of Chemistry
(110-111)
Analytical Chemistry (201, 202-203)
Organic Chemistry (311-312-313)
Physical Chemistry (405, 406, 407)
General Physics (201-202-203)
Mathematics through Calculus (211-212-213)
Recommended course: General Biology (104-105-106)
Chemistry electives: at least four hours
If graduate work is contemplated, one or two years of German
are essential.
105f-106w-107s. General Chemistry
A course of principles, theory, and laboratory practice designed for all
students desiring to learn the fundamentals of chemistry. Prerequisite:
a working knowledge of arithmetic and algebra. 5 credits. Carroll
llOf-lllw. Principles of Chemistry
An introduction to the study of the principles and laws of chemistry
dealing with the structure of matter, chemical bonding, the behavior
of gases, liquids, solids, classification of elements and compounds,
solutions, ionization, colloids and the descriptive chemistry of some
typical elements. Designed for students intending to major in chemistry,
physics, and other sciences and for pre-medical students. Must be ac-










Rollins College


companies by Chemistry 201. Prerequisite: high school chemistry or
approval of department. High school physics is also desirable. 5 credits.
Hellwege
201s. Qualitative Analysis
Principles of chemical equilibria. Chemical equilibrium applied to re-
actions in solutions. The separation and identification of the common
anions and cations by semi-micro methods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 107
and Chemistry 111. Three class hours and two laboratory periods (three
hours each) per week. 5 credits. Hellwege
202f-203w. Quantitative Analysis
Theory and technique of volumetry and gravimetry. Principles of in-
strumental analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111 or Chemistry 107.
Three class hours and two laboratory periods (three hours each) per
week. 5 credits. Hellwege
311f-312w-313s. Organic Chemistry
One year course in the basic chemical principles and theories of the
hydro-carbons and their derivatives. Qualitative organic analysis is in-
cluded in the treatment of both subject matter and laboratory work.
Three class hours and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite:
Chemistry 107. 5 credits. Carroll

321s. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
A descriptive and theoretical course based on the periodic classification
of the elements, with emphasis on inorganic reactions and structure.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 203. 5 credits. Hellwege

405f, 406w, 407s. Physical Chemistry
An elaboration of the principles of chemical behavior. Laboratory
work up to six hours per week. Prerequisite: Physics 203, Calculus,
and Chemistry 203 (or third year standing). 5 credits. Hellwege

413. Problems in Chemistry
Study of individual problems or special topics, depending upon the
interests and preparations of the students. Use of chemical literature,
experimental work, and preparation of reports are required. 5 credits.
May be repeated for credit. Carroll, Hellwege

417. Organic Preparations
Selected syntheses to illustrate useful methods of preparative organic
chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 313. 1 to 3 credits. Carroll

418. Inorganic Preparations
Selected syntheses to illustrate useful methods of preparative inorganic
chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 201. 1 to 3 credits. Hellwege

421f. Introduction to Biological Chemistry
Emphasizes the product used for food in growth and maintenance of
the life processes. Includes a brief review of physico-chemical concepts
and of reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: Chemistry 313. 5 credits
Carroll










Chemistry Economics


431f. Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry
A non-laboratory seminar treating such special topics as nitrogen hetero-
cylics, elements of chemotherapy, etc. Prerequisite: Chemistry 313.
4 credits. Carroll

Economics
KANE, PASTERNAK, ROMITA, WELSH
The program for majors in Economics usually includes the fol-
lowing:
Principles of Economics (Econ. 211-212)
Introduction to Statistical Methods (Bus. 208)
Economic Analysis (Econ. 303)
Money and Banking (Econ. 309)
Public Finance (Econ. 306)
Labor Problems (Econ. 321)
International Trade (Econ. 305)
Three of the following:
Economic Development of the United States (Econ. 243)
History of Economic Thought (Econ. 327, 328)
Current Economic Problems (Econ. 331, 332)
Economic Projects (Econ. 491, 492, 493)
Report Writing (Bus. 319)
Five additional courses in this or other departments must be se-
lected with approval of the adviser. The following are recommended
for consideration:
Comparative Economic Systems (Econ. 422)
Business Fluctuation (Econ. 431)
Principles of Accounting (Bus. 204-205)
Business Law (Bus. 322-323)
Business Finance (Bus. 307)
Principles of Marketing (Bus. 311)
Business Management (Bus. 409)
Courses in history, philosophy, political science, psychology,
and sociology and anthropology.
109f. Consumer Problems of the Family
A study of economics from the consumer viewpoint. Family expenditures
and personal finance. Standards of living, income distribution and
demand. Relationships of economic institutions to consumer behavior.
5 credits. Romita
211f-212w; 211w-212s. Principles of Economics
Production, exchange, and income distribution in the modern economy.
A foundation course for majors in Economics and Business Administra-
tion. 5 credits. Kane, Romita
243f; 243s. Economic Development of the United States
A survey of economic growth since Colonial times. Economic effects
of the westward movement, immigration, and changes in population.










Rollins College


The rise of mass production and large-scale corporate enterprise. Evolv-
ing economic position of the United States in relation to other nations.
5 credits. Kane

303s. Economic Analysis
The basic concepts in contemporary economics; demand, supply, cost,
productivity, and the indifference analysis. Prerequisite: Economics 211-
212. 5 credits Romita

305s. International Trade
A study of the general principles of international trade, promotion of
foreign trade, trading organizations and methods, and various interna-
tional practices in use throughout the world. Emphasis is given to the
leading role played by the United States. 5 credits. Romita

306s. Public Finance
Revenues and expenditures of the federal, state, and local governments.
Repercussions of governmental expenditure and taxes upon individuals,
business firms, and the entire economy. Implications of the national
debt. Prerequisite: one course in Economics. 5 credits. Kane

309w. Money and Banking
A study of money, types of currency, modern banking operations, and
the nature and use of credit. Monetary and financial theory applied to
business and government. Prerequisite: Economics 211-212. 5 credits.
Romita

321f. Labor Economics
The labor force, trends in employment, problems of unemployment,
wages and hours, labor unions, labor disputes and methods of settle-
ment, and the theory and practice of collective bargaining. Prerequisite:
one course in Economics. 5 credits. Kane

327w, 328s. History of Economic Thought
The development of economic thought, based upon reading and interpre-
tation of standard works in economics. Prerequisite: Economics 211-
212. 2 credits Romita

331f, 332s. Current Economic Problems
The application of economic analysis to problems of contemporary
interest. Prerequisite: two courses in Economics. 2 credits. Romita

422s. Comparative Economic Systems
The basic problems faced by all economic systems, and the special prob-
lems of authoritarian, competitive, and mixed economies. Prerequisite:
two courses in Economics. 5 credits. Kane

431f. Business Fluctuations
A study of business prosperity and depression. Theories accounting for
changes in the level of business activity. Prerequisite: three courses in
Economics. 5 credits. Kane









Economics Elementary Education


491f, 492w, 493s. Research Projects in Economics and Bus-
iness
Independent research and reports on assigned topics. Prerequisite: per-
mission of the instructor. 1 or 2 credits. Kane, Romita, Welsh

Elementary Education
ANDERSON, EDWARDS, GRISWOLD, KELLER, PACKHAM, WEBBER
Students majoring in Elementary Education should take in their
freshman or sophomore years at least one course from each of the
following fields: Psychology, Geography, and Sociology. In addition,
the general preparation requirements for teachers' certificates as found
on page 49 must be started. Students should begin the foundation
courses for a field of concentration outside of Education and take the
two 200-level courses in Education.
In the junior and senior years the student should take at least six
300- and 400-level courses in Professional Education including the
practical experience courses. All the specialization requirements should
be completed. All general preparation requirements must have been
met for the certificate. In addition, the student should take at least
three 300- and 400-level courses in one field of concentration outside
of Education. The practical experience courses, as well as Education
406, and Education 409, must be taken in the senior year.

PROFESSIONAL COURSES FOR ELEMENTARY
AND SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHING
204f. Child Development
The physical and psychological growth and development of the child
from birth to adolescense, with emphasis on the school-age child's
adjustment in school and home. Practical experience with children. To
be taken in the first or second year. Prerequisite: Psychology 201.
5 credits. Packham
233w; 233s. Social Basis of Education
An introductory course that includes education in its relation to society,
introduces the most significant problems in the schools today, explores
the history of the philosophy and principles of education, and studies
teaching as a vocation. To be taken in the first or second year. 5 credits.
Edwards, Griswold
301. Sociological Foundations
Deals with the relation of education to the social trends, the historical
development, and the emerging issues of our society, as these affect
elementary, secondary and junior college programs. For students of the
MAT program. 3 semester hours. Edwards
304. Psychological Foundations
A study of human growth and development and of the best methods
of learning as these affect elementary, secondary and junior college
programs. For students of the MAT program. 3 semester hours.
Burnett
69









Rollins College


324f. The Curriculum and School Organization
This course includes a study of curriculum planning and of school
organization for both elementary and secondary schools. To be taken
in the third year. Prerequisite: Education 233. 5 credits. Griswold
351w. Adolescent Development
A study of the growth and development of adolescents in the school,
the home, and the community. To be taken in the third or fourth year.
Prerequisite: Psychology 201. 5 credits. Packham
404s. Tests and Measurements
The interpretation and use of evaluative techniques for use in class-
rooms and schools. To be taken in the third or fourth year. 5 credits.
Packham
406f. Teaching in Elementary Schools
A course in the principles and methods of teaching and learning. For
elementary teachers. Preparation for student teaching. To be taken in
the fourth year. Prerequisite: Education 233 and Education 324 or
consent of instructor. 5 credits Griswold
407f. Teaching in Secondary Schools
A course in the principles and methods of teaching and learning. For
secondary teachers. Preparation for student teaching. To be taken in the
fourth year. Prerequisite: Education 233 and Education 324 or consent
of instructor. 5 credits. Packham

408f. Teaching in Junior Colleges
A course in the principles and methods of teaching and learning. For
junior college teachers. Preparation for student teaching. Prerequisite:
Education 233 and Education 324 or consent of instructor. For students
of the MAT Program. 3 semester hours. Edwards

409f. Reading in Elementary School
Objectives of a reading program for the elementary grades, with tech-
niques of developing reading skills. To be taken in the fourth year.
3 credits. Edwards

412-413. (fall, winter, or spring) Practice Teaching
A minimum of 160 clock hours of observation, and practice teaching
in elementary or secondary public school, or in a junior college, dis-
tributed for sixteen weeks of two hours per day or eight weeks of four
hours per day. To be taken concurrently with Education 417 in the
fourth year. Prerequisite: Education 406, or 407, or 408 and consent
of the instructor. 10 credits or 6 semester hours. Edwards, Packham

414-415-416. (winter or spring). Internship and Special
Methods
Eight weeks of all-day experience in an elementary or secondary public
school, and three weeks of planning in the special field of secondary
teaching or language arts methods for elementary teaching. To be taken
in the fourth year. Prerequisite: Education 406, or 407, or 408.
15 credits Griswold, Packham









Elementary Education


417f; 417w; 417s. Special Methods
A course that gives specific help in teaching materials, content, and
techniques in the special field that the individual plans to teach. To be
taken prior to or concurrently with Education 412-413. 3 credits.
Edwards, Packham

SPECIALIZATION FOR
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHING

310w. Physical Education in Elementary School
Organizing and conducting physical education program in elementary
grades, including the principles of health education. May be taken in
the sophomore year. 5 credits. Keller
316s. Instructional Materials
The selection and use of audio-visual materials in teaching; including
children's literature and library materials. To be taken in the senior
year. 5 credits. Griswold
317f. Music in Elementary Education
Content and methods of teaching music in the elementary grades. To
be taken in the junior or senior year. 5 credits. Webber
318f. Art in Elementary Education
Content and method of teaching art in the elementary grades. To be
taken in the junior or senior year. 5 credits. Anderson
319w. Science in the Elementary School
Content and methods of teaching science in elementary school. To be
taken in the junior or senior year. 5 credits. Griswold
320s. Teaching Arithmetic
Content and methods of teaching arithmetic in the elementary grades.
To be taken in the junior year. 3 credits. Griswold
325w. Social Studies for Elementary Schools
Content and methods of teaching social studies in the elementary
grades. To be taken in the senior year (Not offered in 1962-63).
5 credits. Griswold
COURSES FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
IN SERVICE OR PURSUING MAT DEGREE PROGRAM
All of the courses listed below are offered primarily for elemen-
tary teachers in service or those pursuing the MAT degree program.
To be admitted, the student must have the approval of the Director
of the MAT Program, or be fully certified for elementary school
teaching.
460. Laboratory in Elementary School Music
Scheduled only as demand justifies. Provides enriched content for teach-
ing music in elementary grades 1-6. (1st sem., 2nd sem., summer)
3 semester hours. Staff









Rollins College


461. Laboratory in Elementary School Art
Scheduled only as demand justifies. Provides enriched content for teach-
ing art in elementary grades 1-6. (1st sem., 2nd sem., summer)
3 semester hours. Staff
462. Laboratory in Oral and Written Communication for
Elementary Teachers
Scheduled only as demand justifies. Provides opportunity for the teacher
to improve her own ability to communicate effectively as well as to
assist children in more effective, creative expression. (1st sem., 2nd
sem., summer) 3 semester hours. Staff
463. New Content in Elementary School Mathematics
Scheduled only as demand justifies. Provides opportunity for the teacher
to gain a knowledge of new content in mathematics now being in-
corporated in the elementary school program. (1st sem., 2nd sem.,
summer) 3 semester hours. Staff
464. New Content in Elementary School Science
Provides opportunity for the teacher to gain a knowledge of new con-
tent in science now being incorporated in the elementary school pro-
gram. Scheduled only as demand justifies. (1st sem., 2nd sem., summer)
3 semester hours. Staff
465. Corrective Reading in Elementary and Secondary
Schools
Technique of handling reading difficulties in the classrooms. Prerequisite:
Education 409 or classroom experience. 3 semester hours. Staff


English

ADICKS, DEAN, DEWART, DORSETT, FOLSOM, GLASSER, CRANBERRY,
HAMILTON, KOONTZ, MAHAN, MENDELL, SANDERLIN (on leave of
absence, 1961-62), STALEY, STETLER, STOCK, WAIDNER.
In their second year all English majors should take the first three
period courses: English Literature and Its Backgrounds (203, 204,
205).
In the third and fourth years the following courses are required
of all English majors:
Eighteenth Century (301)
Nineteenth Century (332, and either 333 or 356)
Plays of Shakespeare (317, 318, 319) two terms
American Literature (303, 304)
In addition, each English major must take a minimum of three
courses in one of the following fields of study:
Development of the Drama (351, 352, and 363 or 364)
The English Novel (355, 356, 365)
Twentieth Century Literature (313, 363, 364, 365, 366)
Creative Writing (367, 368, 369)









Elementary Education English


101f-102w-103s. English Composition and Literature
A course in the basic principles of correct and effective expository
writing and in the basic literary forms: essays, fiction, poetry, and
plays. Must be taken in the first year. 5 credits.
203f, 204w, 205s. English Literature and its Backgrounds
Fall-Old English and Middle English periods; winter-the Elizabethan
and Cavalier Poets; spring-Milton and the writers of the Restoration.
5 credits. Dean, Dewart, Glasser
281f. 282w, 283s. Introduction to Literature
An intensive critical study of fiction, drama, and poetry, selected from
the literature of various countries and various periods. The genre pre-
sented in each course will be selected at the discretion of the instructor.
5 credits. Dewart, Koontz, Staley
301f. Eighteenth Century
English literature from Swift to Burns, with special emphasis on the
beginnings of the Romantic Movement and the ideas that have shaped
the thinking of modern times. Prerequisite: two courses in literature.
5 credits. Mendell
306f, 306s. Advanced Grammar and Composition
A course designed to give prospective high school English teachers a
thorough knowledge of grammar and basic writing techniques. Fulfills
the state requirements for teacher certification. 5 credits. Staley
313w. Southern Folk Lore
A study of the fiction, poetry, and drama written by Southerners or
reflecting the life in the South, and a consideration of the folk tales of
the section in their relation to the literary media. 5 credits. Dean
317f, 318w, 319s. Shakespeare
A study of the major plays of Shakespeare. Fall-the early plays and
sonnets; winter-the middle plays; spring-the late plays. 5 credits.
Dean, Dorsett
332w. Nineteenth Century, Part I
A study of the literature and the leading ideas of the English Romantic
Movement, with special emphasis on the poetry of Blake, Wordsworth,
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 5 credits. Stock
333s. Nineteenth Century, Part II
A study of the literature of England from 1850 to 1900. Special at-
tention is given to the leading ideas of the period and to the work of
Carlyle, Tennyson, Browning, Ruskin, and Arnold. 5 credits. Stock
351w, 352s. Development of the Drama
A survey of important plays from the Greeks to the mid-nineteenth
century. In English 351 Greek drama is emphasized; in English 352,
English and French. Emphasis on dramatic principles as an aid to en-
joying the theatre. 5 credits. Mendell
355w. 356s. English Novel
The development of the novel in England into a major literary medium
interpreting man's experience in life, both as an individual and as a









Rollins College


member of human society. Winter-Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, Austen,
Scott; spring-Dickens, Thackeray, Trollope, Meredith, Hardy, 5 credits.
Mendell
363s. Twentieth Century Drama: European
From Ibsen to Ionesco, including Strindberg, Chekhov, Rostand, Lorca,
Pirandello, and others. 5 credits. Dorsett
364w. Twentieth Century Drama: British and American
From Shaw to Tennessee Williams, including Wilde, Galsworthy, Barrie,
Coward, Fry, Yeats, Synge, O'Casey, O'Neill, Maxwell Anderson,
Thornton Wilder, Odets, and others. 5 credits. Dean
365f. The Twentieth Century English and American Novel
A study of twentieth century English and American fiction, including its
roots in the nineteenth century, and a detailed analysis of the work of
five representative contemporary novelists. Critical papers and oral
reports. 5 credits. Stock
366f. Twentieth Century British and American Poetry
A study of the important British and American poets of the twentieth
century. 5 credits. Folsom
367f, 368w, 369s. Creative Writing
A course in creative writing, conducted on the workshop plan. Weekly
reading and criticism of manuscripts that are written outside class.
5 credits. Granberry
391f, 392w, 393s. World Literature
Selected readings in English from the great literature of the Western
world. Fall-the literature of Greece and Rome; winter-the literature
of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance; spring-the literature of the
seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 5 credits.
Hamilton, Folsom
403w, 404s. American Literature
A critical, historical survey of the forms and ideas shaping-and pro-
duced by-American writers and of the unique contributions of Amer-
ican literature as related to the literature of other countries. The course
is designed to make the student a more critical and mature reader of
American literature both past and present. It is strongly recommended
that the course be taken no earlier than the senior year. Open to
advanced non-majors by permission of the instructor. Winter-from the
Colonial period to Whitman; spring-from Whitman to the present.
5 credits. Hamilton
467f, 468w, 469s. Advanced Creative Writing
Prerequisite: English 367, 368, 369. Consent of the instructor is re-
quired. 5 credits. Granberry


Foreign Languages

BANNER, COOKE, FISCHER, L. GLEASON, HARDEE, MARCOTTE, TRAP-
NELL, WRIGHT
A student majoring in French, German, or Spanish must take 45









English Foreign Languages, French, German


credits of 300- or 400-level courses in the major field, and complete
two years or its equivalent of a second foreign language. Students
who plan to do graduate work are advised to take two or more addi-
tional courses in the major field.


French
101f-102w-103s. Elementary French
The basic grammatical structure of the language. Phonetics, together
with intensive oral-aural drill. 5 credits. Marcotte, Trapnell
104f-105w-106s. Elementary French
For those students who did not score sufficiently high on the achieve-
ment test to be placed in the 201 sequence. This course has the same
syllabus as the 101 sequence, but meets only three times per week.
3 credits. Marcotte, Trapnell
201f, 202w, 203s. Intermediate French
Grammar review, conversation and intensive reading. Prerequisite: two
high school units or their equivalent. 3 credits. Hardee, Trapnell
204f, 205w, 206s. Intermediate Conversation and
Composition
Intensive oral-aural training and composition. Designed primarily for
students in French who intend to take courses beyond the 200-level.
Prerequisite: two high school units or their equivalent. 2 credits. Hardee
321f, 322w, 323s. Advanced Conversation and Composition
Advanced, intensive oral-aural training and composition. Prerequisite:
one 200-level course (three terms) or its equivalent. 3 credits. Marcotte
331f, 332w, 333s. The Seventeenth Century
Representative movements, authors, and works of the seventeenth cen-
tury. Prerequisite: French 206 or its equivalent. 5 credits. Hardee
401f, 402w, 403s. The Eighteenth Century
Representative movements, authors, and works of the eighteenth century.
Prerequisite: French 333 or its equivalent. 5 credits. Marcotte
405f, 406w, 407s. The Nineteenth Century
Representative movements, authors, and works of the nineteenth century.
Prerequisite: French 333 or its equivalent. 5 credits. Marcotte
409f, 410w, 411s. Contemporary French Literature
Representative movements, authors, and works of the contemporary
period. (Offered in alternate years). 5 credits. Marcotte
413f, 414w, 415s. Reading Seminar
The syllabus of this course will be determined by the areas of the stu-
dents' literary interests. Prerequisite: French 333 or its equivalent.
2 credits.
417f. Methods in Teaching Foreign Languages
A course in methodology designed for future teachers. 2 credits. Banner









Rollins College


499. Honors Course in French
Prerequisite: permission of the department and the Honors Committee.
2 to 5 credits.

German
101f-102w-103s. Elementary German
Beginners' course. Phonetics, elementary grammar, reading, translations,
vocabulary building, and simple conversation. Students should acquire
good reading ability and fair speaking and writing knowledge of the
language. 5 credits. Fischer
201f, 202w, 203s. Intermediate German
Review of grammar and syntax; composition; conversation about every-
day topics; reading of German masterpieces; special consideration of
the economy, geography, and history of Germany and German-speaking
countries. Prerequisite: German 103 or its equivalent. 3 credits. Fischer
204f, 205w, 206s. Intermediate Conversation and
Composition
Intensive oral-aural training and composition. Designed primarily for
students in German who intend to take courses beyond the 200-level.
Prerequisite: German 103 or its equivalent. 2 credits. Fischer
251f, 252w, 253s. Scientific German
Prerequisite: German 103. 2 credits. Fischer
301f, 302w, 303s. Advanced German
Systematic study of German history and civilization, combined with a
study of the outstanding masterpieces of German literature. Advanced
composition and conversation. Students are expected to acquire fluency
in speaking and writing German. The course is conducted entirely in
German. Prerequisite: German 203 or its equivalent. 5 credits. Fischer
401f, 402w, 403s. German Civilization and Literature:
Middle Ages and Classics
A study of the civilization and literature of German-speaking countries:
Sagen and Dichtung des Mittelalters, die deutschen Klassiker. The
course is conducted in German. Prerequisite: German 303 or its equiv-
alent. 2 to 5 credits. Fischer
404f, 405w, 406s. German Civilization and Literature:
Romantic and Modern
A study of the civilization and literature of German-speaking countries:
Romantik and Neuzeit, das deutsche Drama. The course is conducted
in German. Prerequisite: German 303 or its equivalent. 2 to 5 credits.
Fischer

Russian
101f-102w-103s. Elementary Russian
The basic grammatical structure of the language. Phonetics, together
with intensive oral-aural drill. 5 credits. Silins










Foreign Languages, German, Russian, Spanish


201f, 202w, 203s. Intermediate Russian
Grammar review, conversation, and intensive reading. Prerequisite: two
high school units or their equivalent. 3 credits. Silins

Spanish
101f-102w-103s. Elementary Spanish
The basic grammatical structure of the language. Phonetics, together
with intensive oral-aural drill. 5 credits. L. Gleason, Wright
104f-105w-106s. Elementary Spanish
For those students who did not score sufficiently high on the achieve-
ment test to be placed in the 201 sequence. This course has the same
syllabus as the 101 sequence, but meets only three times per week.
3 credits. Cooke, L. Gleason, Wright
201f, 202w, 203s. Intermediate Spanish
Grammar review, conversation, and intensive reading. Prerequisite: two
high school units or their equivalent. 3 credits.
Cooke, L. Gleason, Wright
204f, 205w, 206s. Intermediate Conversation and
Composition
Intensive oral-aural training and composition. Designed primarily for
students in Spanish who intend to take courses beyond the 200-level.
Prerequisite: two high school units or their equivalent. 2 credits. Banner
321f, 322w, 323s. Advanced Conversation and Composition
Advanced, intensive oral-aural training and composition. Prerequisite:
one 200-level course (three sessions) or its equivalent. 3 credits.
L. Gleason
331f, 332w, 333s. Survey of Spanish Literature
Representative movements, authors, and works from early times to the
contemporary period. Prerequisite: Spanish 206 or its equivalent.
5 credits. Banner
401f, 402w, 403s. The Golden Age
Representative authors and works of the Golden Age. The spring ses-
sion is devoted to Cervantes. Prerequisite: Spanish 333 or its equivalent.
5 credits. Banner
405f, 406w, 407s. The Nineteenth Century
Representative movements, authors, and works of the nineteenth cen-
tury. Prerequisite: Spanish 333 or its equivalent. Offered in alternate
years. 5 credits. Banner
409f, 410w, 411s. The Generation of 1898 to the Present
Representative movements, authors, and works from the Generation of
1898 to the present. Prerequisite: Spanish 333 or its equivalent. Offered
in alternate years. 5 credits.
413f, 414w, 415s. Reading Seminar
The syllabus of this course will be determined by the areas of the stu-
dents' literary interests. Prerequisite: Spanish 333 or its equivalent.
2 credits. Banner










Rollins College


417f. Methods in Teaching Foreign Languages
A course in methodology designed for future teachers. 2 credits. Banner
419f, 420w, 421s. Survey of Spanish American
Literature
Representative movements, authors, and works from early times to the
contemporary period. Prerequisite: Spanish 206 or its equivalent.
5 credits.
499. Honors Course in Spanish
Prerequisite: permission of the department and the Honors Committee.
2 to 5 credits.

General Science
CARROLL, HELLWEGE, LOVEJOY, Ross, SAUTE, SHOR, THOMAS, VES-
TAL, WAVELL
A student who wishes to gain broad training in science may take
a major in General Science. The primary purpose of this course is
to satisfy the needs of those who plan to teach science or to enter the
business side of technical industries. This major leads to a Bachelor
of Arts degree.
In his first two years the student should take the first-year courses
in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, and should have had mathematics
through trigonometry.
In the third and fourth years the student should take at least seven
additional 5-credit courses in Science, of which at least three should
be 300- or 400-level courses, and at least five 300- or 400-level
courses in another department or division.

Geography
MOMSEN
201f. World Regional Geography
An introduction to the major physical and cultural regions of the
world. 5 credits. Momsen
302w. Geography of the U.S.S.R.
Besides being a study of the physical and cultural geography of the
Soviet Union, this course is designed to acquaint the student with the
regional approach to geographic analysis. Prerequisite: Geography 201
or consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years. (1962-63).
4 credits. Momsen
303s, 304s. Geography of Latin America
A study of the physical, cultural, and economic geography of Latin
America. In order to provide a more thorough approach, one half of
the area is dealt with in alternate years: 1962-63 will take up Brazil
and Argentina, 303; Northern and Western Spanish America, 304 will
be studied in 1963-64. Prerequisite: Geography 201 or Area Studies
211-212-213. 4 credits. Momsen










Foreign Languages, Spanish General Science -
Geography Geology

311f, 312f. Elements of Physical Geography
A more advanced and detailed treatment of the physical phenomena of
world geography than could be offered in the introductory course. In
order to provide a more thorough approach, one half of the topic is
dealt with in alternate years: 1962-63 will offer 312, geomorphology
and soils; 1963-64 will take up 311, climate and vegetation. 5 credits.
Momsen

321s. Geography and World Affairs
An examination of world political and economic patterns in the light of
the natural environment, cultural differences, and spatial relations.
Particular emphasis is placed on the respective roles of the Western,
Communist, and uncommitted national blocks. Prerequisite: at least one
prior geography course, or consent of the instructor. 5 credits. Momsen

352w-353s. Geographic Mapping and Techniques
This course is designed for advanced students in either the physical or
social sciences who may wish to gain a basic theoretical and practical
knowledge of geographic work. Laboratory periods will be devoted to
map making, airfoto interpretation, and field trips, culminating in a
research project to be prepared by each student. Although not required,
it is suggested that this course be preceded in the fall by Geology 351
(Geologic Mapping). Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 3 credits.
Momsen

401s. Field Trip to Latin America
The Latin American Area Studies Program conducts an annual field
trip, usually between winter and spring terms, to some part of Latin
America. Well-suited to the intellectual and practical advancement of
the student who has demonstrated a capacity to carry out geographic
work, participation may be arranged on the recommendation of Pro-
fessor Momsen. Credits to be arranged.


Geology

LOVEJOY, REGNIER
A student majoring in Geology should take all the courses listed
below and a one-year course in general chemistry. In addition, a
summer field course is strongly recommended. If graduate work is
contemplated, the student should take General Physics or General
Biology, Mathematics through the Calculus, and acquire a reading
knowledge of German, French, or Russian.

101f-102w-103s. General Geology
A survey of physical and historical geology. A study of minerals and
rocks, processes that shape the earth, and the geologic history of the
earth and its inhabitants. Class discussions, laboratory work, and field
trips. A course in General Chemistry is desirable but not prerequisite
to the course. 5 credits. Lovejoy, Regnier










Rollins College


204f. General Mineralogy
A survey of the fields of mineralogy and crystallography. The origin,
conditions of occurrence, and economic significance of minerals. Class
discussions and laboratory work. Prerequisite: Geology 103. 5 credits.
Regnier
205w. General Petrology
A survey of the field petrology. The origin, conditions of occurrence,
and economic significance of rocks. Class discussions and laboratory
work. Prerequisite: Geology 204. 5 credits. Regnier

206s. Structural Geology
A survey of the structural features of the earth, with emphasis on their
origin and conditions of occurrence. Class discussions and laboratory
work. Prerequisite: Geology 205. 5 credits. Regnier

301f. Economic Geology
A study of metallic and non-metallic mineral deposits. Geological oc-
currence, methods of exploration and development, smelting and re-
fining, history and uses, world importance, problems of valuation and
appraisal. Class discussions and laboratory work. Prerequisite: Geology
103. 5 credits. Regnier

303s. Economic Geology
A survey of petroleum and mineral fuels. The geology, exploration,
development, processing and refining, and marketing of petroleum,
coal, and other mineral fuels. World importance and problems of valua-
tion and appraisal. Prerequisite: Geology 103. 5 credits. Regnier

312w. Paleontology
A survey of the forms, classification, and geologic history of groups of
organisms found as fossils, with emphasis on the more common fossils
that are useful in determining the age of the sedimentary rocks in
which they are found. A course in General Biology is desirable but
not a prerequisite. Class discussions and laboratory work. Prerequisite:
Geology 103 or General Biology. 5 credits. Lovejoy

313s. Stratigraphic Geology
The processes and environments of sedimentation. Properties and classi-
fication of sedimentary rocks. Interpretation of the stratigraphic record
from the rocks with respect to their characteristics and fossils to
determine the past history of the earth. Class discussions and laboratory
work. Prerequisite: Geology 312. 5 credits. Lovejoy

351f. Geologic Mapping
Construction of a base map by plane table methods. Construction of a
geologic map and cross sections in an area of moderately complicated
structure. Class discussions, laboratory work, and field trips. Prerequisite:
permission of the instructor. This course is followed by Geography 352
and 353, which are strongly recommended for students majoring in
Geology. 3 credits. Lovejoy









Geology Government and History


451. Seminar in Geology
Open to students who have completed the basic courses in geology and
wish to do advanced work in a field that is of special interest to them.
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 1 to 3 credits.
Lovejoy, Regnier

Government and History

BRADLEY, DOUGLASS, DRINKWATER, HANNA, SMITH
Students majoring in Government and History must take a mini-
mum of 60 credits in their major field, at least 15 of which will be
100-level courses. It is recommended that majors elect their courses
in the following sequence: History 112, 113, 114; 331, 332, 333, or
341, 342, 343, electing the remaining courses in Government or His-
tory. Those specializing in Government must take at least 30 credits in
Government and the remaining 30 in the field of History.
201f; 201s. Principles of Government
An introduction to the nature of the state and the behavior of political
man with emphasis on responsible citizenship, approached through the
study of classics from Plato through Jefferson and the major thinkers
of the American democratic tradition. Value systems as articulated
through the political process. Emphasis on principles and concepts. Pre-
requisite for further studies in government. 5 credits. Douglass
205f, 206w, 207s. Major Issues of Our Times
A forum for the development of informed attitudes and responsibilities,
approached through a discussion of contemporary problems selected to
encourage on-going citizen concern. Distinguished lecturers; readings in
mass media; writing of a journal; pro and con memorandums; position
papers. 2 credits. Departmental Staff
337w. Comparative Government
Representative types of political institutions in major national states are
studied. Prerequisite: Government 201. Offered in alternate years. (1963-
64) 5 credits. Douglass
347f. American National Government
Study of the constitutional structure, functioning, interstate relationships,
and value issues in the federal system. Prerequisite: Government 201.
5 credits. Douglass
348w. State and Local Government
Organization and functioning of state, county, and municipal government
with emphasis on effective citizen participation. Special attention to
evolving regionalism and the government and politics of Florida. Pre-
requisite: Government 201. 5 credits Douglass
361w. American Foreign Relations
Diplomatic history of the United States from Colonial days to the
1960's. Prerequisite: Government 201 or a course in American or
European History. Offered in alternate years (1962-63) 5 credits.
Douglass
81










Rollins College


390f, 391w, 392s, and 393 (Summer) Practicum in Politics
Combined seminar, laboratory, and field work program designed to
develop a mature understanding of the political process and skill in the
exercise of responsible citizenship through activity in political parties.
Supervised summer projects and internships. Summer credits determined
by nature of project. Program conducted under a grant from the Maur-
ice and Laura Falk Foundation. Prerequisite: Government 201. 2 credits.
Douglas and Staff
457w. International Organization
Practice and institutional arrangements among sovereign states for carry-
ing out their national interests, for the pursuit of welfare, and for na-
tional security. Attention to regional arrangements, functional agencies,
and the United Nations. Prerequisite: Government 201. Offered in
alternate years. (1962-63) 5 credits. Douglass
458s. International Law
The rights, obligations, and relationships of national states in their in-
tercourse with one another. Prerequisite: Government 457 or consent
of the professor. Offered in alternate years. (1962-63) 5 Credits
Douglass
490f, 491w, 492s. Political Theory
Ideas about the structure and purpose of political society as expressed
by representative thinkers from Greece to the 1960's. Supervised read-
ing tutorial. 2 credits. Departmental Staff
499. Independent Program
An offering to enable especially competent students to carry forward
independently, but under close faculty inspection, projects involving
research and original inquiry. Credits determined by nature of project.
Douglass and Staff

History
112f, 113w, 114s. History of Western Civilization
History of western civilization from prehistoric times to the present.
The first term is devoted to a survey of the civilizations of the ancient
Near East, Greece and Rome. The second term covers the period from
the fall of Rome to the Renaissance. The third term is a survey of the
history of European civilization from the Renaissance to the present
day. 5 credits. Bradley, Drinkwater, Smith
331f, 332w, 333s. Modern European History
Modern European history from the Renaissance to the present day. The
first term covers the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the age of
absolutism to the death of Louis XIV. The second term presents a
study of the revolutionary period from 1715 to 1870. The third term
is a study of the subsequent and contemporary history. Prerequisite:
History 114. Open by special permission for graduate study. 5 credits.
Drinkwater, Smith
341f, 342w, 343s; 342f, 343w, 341s. History of the United
States
History of the United States from the discovery of America to the
present day. The first term is devoted to a study of the colonial period,










Government and History History Human Relations

1492-1783. The second term is a study of the period before the Civil
War, 1783-1861. The third term is devoted to recent American history,
since 1861. Prerequisite: History 114. Open by special permission for
graduate study. 5 credits. Bradley, Smith
359w, 360s. Spain and the Spanish Empire
Spain and the Spanish Empire from prehistoric times to the present. The
first term covers the period of ancient and medieval Spanish history
through the modern period to the decline of the Spanish Hapsburgs.
The second term covers the period of modern history from the acces-
sion of Philip V to the present. Prerequisite: History 112, 113, 114.
Open by special permission for graduate study. 5 credits. Smith

412s. History and Historical Writing
A study of the tradition of European and American historical writing.
Selections from the works of great historians, relationship of the his-
torian and his environment, and analysis of the philosophical and
critical problems of writing history. Open by special permission for
graduate study. 5 credits. Drinkwater


Human Relations

BRADLEY, DARRAH, DEGROOT, DOUGLASS, DRINKWATER, FELTON,
HANNA, KANE, PACKHAM, ROMITA, SMITH, STONE, WAITE
The Human Relations major provides a group program in the
related departments of Sociology and Anthropology, Economics, His-
tory and Government, Education, Psychology, Philosophy, and Re-
ligion. It is intended for the student who wishes to avoid early con-
centration in any one field while exploring new areas of knowledge,
or who desires a broader perspective on human relations studies as
a whole than is offered by a departmental major, or who needs time
before making a decision that will affect his future life. Transfers
from this group program to departmental majors or joint majors in-
volving two departments are encouraged. With careful planning such
transfers may be made without any loss of time.
This program requires that the student study during his first two
years Sociology and Anthropology 201 and 202, Psychology 201, a
200-level course in Economics, a course in History or Government,
and one in Philosophy or Religion.
For the third and fourth years the student should plan a program
that will include a minimum of fifty-five term hours in the depart-
ments participating in this program. This plan should include within
these fifty-five hours a minimum of four courses in one department
plus an independent reading and/or research project in the depart-
ment of concentration. In connection with this independent project
the student must take, either previously or concomitantly, the course
in Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences.
To provide encouragement toward understanding the basic con-
cepts of social science and human values, and as a guide to the stu-










Rollins College


dent and his major professor, a written integrating examination is re-
quired of a Human Relations major at the end of his junior year. On
the basis of the results of this examination, the work of the student
during the senior year is planned in the best interest of his education.


Mathematics
BOWERS, LOVELL, SAUTE, WOLFE
A student majoring in Mathematics must earn a minimum of 45
credits in mathematics, at least 7 of which must be from the 400-
level courses.
In addition, it is recommended that the student complete at least
one two-year sequence of physical or biological science course.
If graduate work is contemplated, the student should take courses
that will equip him with a good reading knowledge of German or
French.
111f, 112w; 111w, 112s. Principles of Mathematics
A modern introduction to mathematics, replacing the conventional
college algebra and trigonometry. Main topics include logic, the number
system, groups, fields, sets, functions, (algebraic, trigonometric, expo-
nential, and logarithmic); and concepts underlying analytic geometry and
calculus. 5 credits. Staff
113f; 113s. Mathematics of Sets, with applications
An introduction to set theory, which is essential for understanding most
parts of modern mathematics. The subject is valuable for students of
the natural and social sciences. Main topics include algebra of sets,
partitions, classifications, mathematical systems, algebraic structures,
applications to probability, genetics, switching network design, etc. Pre-
requisite: Mathematics 111 and 112, or consent of the instructor.
5 credits. Staff
211f, 212w, 213s. Plane Analytic Geometry and The
Calculus
Work with co-ordinate systems, graphs, and geometry and the straight
line and conic sections. Methods of differentiation and integration with
application to physical problems and geometry. Prerequisite: Mathe-
matics 111 and 112 or four years of high school mathematics. 5 credits.
Saut6, Wolfe
307f-308w-309s. Mechanics
Fundamentals of mechanics, including kinematics, Newton's laws of
motion, energy, gravitation, harmonic oscillations, rigid bodies, elasticity,
statics, and wave motion. Mathematical and vector analysis developed as
needed. Selected experiments. Prerequisite: Physics 203 and Mathematics
213. 2 credits. Ross, Thomas
311f, 312w. Solid Analytic Geometry and Intermediate
Calculus
Fall-The analytic geometry of space; winter-partial derivatives, mul-
tiple integrals, infinite series. Prerequisite: Mathematics 213. 5 credits.
Bowers










Mathematics Music


313s. Differential Equations
The classification, solution, and application of various equations in-
volving not only variables, but also the derivatives of these variables.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 312. 5 credits. Bowers
406s. Mathematical Statistics
Mathematical and empirical tables, and probability. Topics form the
mathematical theory of statistics, such as measures of dispersion, curve
fitting, statistical correlation, and random sampling. Prerequisite: Math-
ematics 213. Offered in alternate years. 5 credits. Staff

431f, 432w, 433s. Advanced Calculus
Convergence, continuity, partial derivatives, functions of several vari-
ables, multiple integrals, and infinite series including Fourier Series.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 313. 3 credits. Bowers

434w. Partial Differential Equations
Extension of work in Mathematics 313 (Differential Equations) to
functions of more than one variable. Prerequisite: Mathematics 313.
5 credits. Bowers

435f, 436w, 437s. Foundations of Mathematics
A survey of the most important concepts and methods employed in
modern mathematics, with an account of their historical origins. Main
topics include mathematical reasoning, the revolutions in geometry and
algebra, postulation method, the real and complex number systems,
algebraic structures, set theory, and philosophies of mathematics. Pre-
requisite: Mathematics 213. 2 credits. Staff


Music
A. CARLO, CARTER, C. GLEASON, HORSZOWSKI, HUFSTADER, MOORE,
ROSAZZA, WEBBER, WILSON
For the Bachelor of Arts candidate with a major in Music ap-
proximately two-thirds of the work taken will be in courses other than
music. This same plan, in general, is carried out over the four-year
period.
Students are expected to elect their major in Music upon entrance
to the College. A definite amount of prerequisite work is necessary
in one field of applied music. This varies with the major subjects
(voice, choral conducting, piano, violin, organ, etc.)
In the freshman and sophomore years the student must complete
satisfactorily two years of theoretical music. In addition, the student
receives two private lessons a week, with a minimum of two hours a
day practice, in his chosen field of applied music (voice, piano, etc.).
Examinations of technical and musical progress will be given at the
end of the freshman and sophomore years.
The candidate for the degree must have made satisfactory achieve-
ment in the study of the history of music, solfeggio, and ear training,










Rollins College


and have participated in ensemble and repertoire groups. Participation
in and attendance at student recitals is required, and one full recital
program must be given, to which the public is invited.
In addition to the applied and theoretical music in the junior and
senior years, a student may elect two correlated subjects each term.
The courses for Music majors are listed under Conservatory of
Music. (See page 105).
101f, 102w, 103s. Introduction to Music Literature
A course designed to introduce the student to the widely varying
styles, forms, and compositional techniques in the history and develop-
ment of the art of music. Required of all music majors in the freshman
year. Open to non-major students with consent of instructor. 1 credit.
Carlo
104f, 105w, 106s. Harmony
Presentation of the elements of music and their combination in simple
and complex melodic and chordal structures; dissonance, diatonic, and
chromatic, together with simple formal organization. Special emphasis
on chorale style of J. S. Bach. Consent of the instructor is required.
3 credits. Carter
107f, 108w, 109s. Sight-Singing and Dictation
The singing of progressively graded material stressing melodic and
harmonic values. Study of meter. Development of skill in rhythmic
and melodic dictation, with special emphasis on harmonic and con-
trapuntal hearing. Aural analysis of music literature selected from
examples of the eighteenth century to the present. 2 credits. Hufstader
lllf-112w; lllw-112s. Fundamentals of Music
A course in rudiments, terminology, and knowledge of the keyboard.
Prerequisite for students taking applied music who have had little or no
previous training. With permission of the instructor may be taken simul-
taneously with Applied Music. 1 credit. Hufstader
127f-128w-129s. Vocal Workshop
A laboratory workshop dealing with the fundamentals of voice pro-
duction and the basic principles of singing. Required of all beginning
voice students. Students not majoring in voice must obtain consent of
instructor. 1 credit. Rosazza
147f, 148w, 149s. A Survey of Recorded Music
A course designed to acquaint the student with the finest of recorded
music. Emphasis is placed upon listening. 1 credit. Carter
184f, 185w, 186s. String Class Instruction
A course designed to provide elementary training in playing string in-
struments. Emphasis is placed upon ensemble experience, leading to the
benefits and enjoyment of group participation. 1 credit. Carlo
214f-215w-216s. Advanced Harmony
Advanced study of the materials of 104, 105, 106. Consent of the in-
structor is required. 3 credits. Carter










Music


217f-218w-219s. Advanced Sight-Singing and Dictation
Advanced study of the materials of 107, 108, 109. Consent of the in-
structor is required. 3 credits. Carlo
224f-225w-226s. History of Music
The study of the development of music from primitive times to the
present. Correlation with general history; recordings, illustrative ma-
terials, and supplementary outside reading. Consent of the instructor is
required. 3 credits. Carlo
227f-228w-229s. Song Repertoire
A studio course designed to enrich the voice student's repertoire and to
stimulate his progress through research, analysis, and performance. Re-
quired of all majors. Prerequisite: Music 127-128-129. 1 credit.
Rosazza
284f, 285w, 286s. String Class Instruction
Intermediate level. Prerequisite: Music 183 or its equivalent. 1 credit.
Carlo
327f. Survey of German Lieder
Consent of the instructor is required. 1 credit. Carter
328s. Survey of Beethoven Pianoforte Sonatas-Part I
Consent of the instructor is required. 1 credit. Moore
329s. Survey of Beethoven Pianoforte Sonatas-Part II
Consent of the instructor is required. 1 credit. Moore
337f. Oratorio Analysis
Major choral works to be performed at the Bach Festival will be
studied in detail. 1 credit. Hufstader
339s. Survey of Chamber Music
Consent of the instructor is required. 1 credit. Carlo
347f, 348w, 349s. Survey of Recorded Music
A course designed to acquaint the student with the finest of recorded
music in various media. Emphasis is placed on listening. Prerequisite:
Music 147, 148, 149. Consent of the instructor is required. 1 credit.
Carter
357f, 358w, 359s. Choral Music Survey
Fall-Gregorian chant and liturgy; winter-medieval music up to 1500;
spring-Renaissance music. Consent of the instructor is required.
1 credit Hufstader
377w. Survey of Piano Literature of the Nineteenth
Century
Piano literature by composers from Schubert to Faure. Consent of the
instructor is required. 1 credit. Moore
378s. Piano Literature of the Twentieth Century
European and American piano literature of the twentieth century. Con-
sent of the instructor is required. 1 credit. Wilson
379f. The Keyboard Works of J. S. Bach
Analysis of the polyphonic forms for the keyboard, including the Two
87




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