• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover














Title: Advertising Miami
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089490/00002
 Material Information
Title: Advertising Miami
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Advertising Club of Greater Miami
Publisher: Advertising Club of Greater Miami,
Advertising Club of Greater Miami
Place of Publication: Miami Fla
Publication Date: 1960
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Advertising -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Miami   ( lcsh )
Genre: directory   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1959-196
General Note: Description based on: 1959.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089490
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09223573
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Ad Miami

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Main
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 58a
        Page 58b
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Advertisers' index
        Page 82
    Back Cover
        Page 83
        Page 84
Full Text
















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'ROVEN SKILL TO USE IT


Creative Department Art Department Copy Department
Media Department Research Department Radio and
Television Department Production Department Traffic
Department Public Relations* Photography Studio
Photostat Lab Library Accounting Department.
A COMPLETE STAFF OF OVER 60 SKILLED ADVERTISING
AND PROMOTIONAL SPECIALISTS:
An unusually talented group of men and women, merging
their individual capabilities into a single potent team effort.
May we show you how B/G/F equipment and skill can
improve your "catch"?




BISHOPRIC/GREEN/FIELDEN 1
a d v e r t i s i n g

3361 Southwest 3rd Avenue, Miami 45, Florida FRanklin 1-1475


Public Relations Affiliate:
*WOODY KEPNER ASSOCIATES, Inc.
3361 Southwest 3rd Avenue, Miami 45,
FRanklin 3-4765
Jacksonville Divi wl .
RADCLIFFE AD-1RiS \
Smith Buildin. R
211 East Fo k Weet
ELgin 6-7432. ELgin 5-6056
West Palm Beach Representative:
CHARLES M. HIGGINS
120 South Dixie Highway
West Palm Beach, Florida
y TEmple 3-4463


Fully accredited internationally recognized B/G/F is the Florida affiliate of the CONTINENTAL ADVERTISING AGENCY NETWORK
























ADVERTISING FEDERATION OF AMERICA


A

STATEMENT

OF

ADVERTISING

PRINCIPLES


'ERTIS1NG aims to inform the consumer and help him to buy more
intelligently.
ERTISING tells the truth, avoiding misstatement of facts as well
as possible deception through implication or omission.
It makes no claims which cannot be met in full and
without further qualification. It uses only testimonials
of good witnesses.


GOOD' ADVERTISING




GOOD ADVERTISING


conforms to the generally accepted standards of good taste.
It seeks public acceptance on the basis of the merits
of the product or service advertised rather than
by the disparagement of competing goods. It tries to
avoid practices that are offensive or annoying.
recognizes both its economic responsibility to help
reduce distribution costs and its social responsibility
in serving the public interest.


ROLLINS COLLEGE
LIBRARY






















ofcore ereplaed


NO. 1 MIAMI / DUPONT PLAZA CENTER
SHARRIS & COMPANY ADVERTISING ,
MIAMI 32, FLORIDA / FRanklin 7-1751

Member: International Advertising Association / American Association of Advertising Agencies
4


In each profession there is a high point of recognition


S -a special honor that can be attained only through the


maintenance of the highest standards of professional


ability, business ethics and financial responsibility.


In the advertising profession this recognition is at


last reached when you are elected to membership in the


A6merican A association of Advertising Agencies


. . an honor that has been awarded to less than 10


percent of the over 4,000 advertising agencies in the


United States. That this 10 percent handles more than


two-thirds of the national advertising volume certainly


speaks for their worth and leadership in the profession.


Harris & Company is proud to have received this honor


and is proud also to be the only locally owned Greater


Miami agency awarded membership in JMA AAA


To our clients as well as to ourselves, the membership


means more than just the added assurance of our ability


to serve them. The extensive research and statistical


facilities of the AAAA will enable us to offer


our many clients an even more comprehensive and more


thorough advertising, promotion, and marketing service.














ADVERTISING


MIAMI



Published by the Advertising Club
of Greater Miami





Statement of Advertising Principles ........... ------.
Tomorrow, Today Will be Yesterday Charle
Officers, Advertising Club of Greater Miami ----
Directors, Advertising Club of Greater Miami -----.--..
Membership Roster, Advertising Club of Greater Miami
Metropolitan Miami-A Vast Industrial Center ---
Advertising/Miami Through the Years --- Rol
"100-Mile Dept. Store" Charge Plan ----- Sa
It Pays to Set Your Clock Ahead ----. ---------
Land Development Advertising ------ ---------.....------
Hard Sell is Key to Superior Success ----
Nassau Grabs 860% Sales Success ------------------
Art Exhibition is Barometer for Artistic Excellence
Pinpoint Your Market ---------------- Roi
Miami's Need for Top-flight Talent Growing ---
Miami-A Market Outdoors ----- Wili
Printing Industry Ranks Fourth in Dade ----
GMAAA Moves Into Its Second Year ..----- ---- W.
Two in a Row -----.------------ Jz
Sun, Surf, and Sales ---------------- Fran
Point of Purchase Advertising ... --------.. --
From Palm Beach to Key West-over 95% Own TV ------
Future Good for Dade Publishers' Reps. --- H
140 Newspapers Link Miami with the Nation ---
Greater Miami Marketing/Advertising/Latin America
What Exactly is Silk Screening? ------------..
Public Relations in South Florida ------------. J
Direct Sales With Direct Mail -.. ------------
Lend-a-Hand to The Handicapped ------------.-----
Picture Truth in Advertising ..--- ...---------... -- Ric
Miami Radio-A Dynamic Advertising Medium L---- I
Directory of Advertising Facilities ----- --.
Who's Who in Fourth District ------------....
Advertising Federation of America
Advertisers' Index ...- ---. -------


1960










-..--.---- ------- ------ 3
s H. Whitebrook 6
-- --- 8, 9
.--. -- 10, 11
... ..- 13, 15, 17, 19
Richard Welsh 21
ert E. Clarke 22, 23
nuel Garrison 24, 25
SPaul Klein 26, 27
Tom Ferris 28, 29
Robert Hurwitz 30
.----- Fred Roth 31
.. Sam Willig 33
semary Hoffman 34
SPalmer Tyler 35
liam J. Weiss 36-39
James L. Jones 40
Arthur Fielden 41
(dy Armayor 42, 43
ik R. Howell 44, 45
Allen B. Wilson 46
... Don Fischer 47
arold L. Dawson 48
John N. Brodel 49
Robert Salisbury 50
-.---. Ralph Rose 51
Philip De Berard 52
.- Jack Durant 53
--. --.. ----------- 54
hard E. Hinman 55
. L. Zimmerman 57
.-...-----. ------ 58-75
.---.......-- .. 78-81

---..------..-- 82











Tomorrow,


Today


will be Yesterday

by Charles H. Whitebrook
President, Advertising Club of Greater Miami


Similarly-Yesterday, Today was To-
morrow. Whichever way we say it,
one fact remains: Todays are but
fleeting instants in Time which often
slip through our lives unimpeded by
a single worthwhile accomplishment.
This, I believe, is tragically truest in
our own profession. Its demands can
appear so all-encompassing its de-
tails so involved, its activities so
time-consuming that it becomes easy
to say "No" to other requests. Yet
it is in the doing of "other," extra-
curricular projects that the greatest
self-satisfaction is derived.
Particularly is this true if the outside
activity is related to one's own busi-
ness. The Advertising Club of Greater
Miami is such an activity. During the
past few years it has grown in mem-


bership from 60 to 190. Nearly
three-fourths of the increase has
come from the "buying" side of the
coin agencies and advertisers -
so that the Club now truly offers a
place to meet and exchange ideas
with Miami's key people in all phases
of the profession of communications.
In addition, we have won much rec-
ognition from A.F.A. nationally, for
the quality of our work in many
fields, notably the High School Essay
Contest, Community Relations, Pro-
gramming, Advertising Week, and
our cooperation with the U. of Miami
Marketing Department. In these ac-
complishments, we have been for-
tunate in having a hard core of dedi-
cated members who rarely, if ever,
say "no" to an Ad Club request. As
I approach the end of my term as
President, I should like to recognize
publicly those whose willing contri-
butions have made the past months
so fruitful for all of us:
First, PAUL GREENAWAY, who,
after two tremendous years as Presi-
dent, accepted the thankless post of
Secretary, and whose friendship,
guidance and advice during these
past months have been invaluable.
HAL HERMAN, who as Program
Chairman spent hundreds of hours
to grace our meetings with the great-
est lineup of Guest Speakers in our
history, and whose witty imagination
has filled every other Wednesday
evening with the heady elixir of
humor.
DICK FOLTZ, our Membership
Chairman, whose tireless efforts have
resulted in our reaching a new high
in numbers and quality of members.
RUTH BLOWER and JOE ESTES,
whose excellent work as Editor and
Advertising Manager of this publi-
cation will be apparent as you peruse
these pages.
TOM STEELE, watchdog of our
treasury, whose lucid reports and
careful preparation of our budget
have made for the smoothest possible
of operations.
HERB ZUCKER, for doing a grand
job of re-activating our monthly bul-


letin, AD-LIBS, and turning it out
both well and economically.
FRANK JAFFE, our legal eagle, for
his yeoman leadership in all legisla-
tive matters, as well as in placing
many of the right people in the right
jobs in advertising.
DUKE ZIMMERMAN, JACK CAE-
SAR and DICK HINMAN, the 3
Musketeers of the Club's Old Guard,
who in addition to their regular du-
ties as Board Members and Commit-
tee Chairman, were always ready
and willing to pitch in anywhere an
experienced head was needed. Their
collective contributions to the Club
cannot begin to be recounted.
And so many others-SUE SZUCH,
BOB MITCHELL, RON ALLEN,
MARGARET LECKIE, The RAN-
DELLS, MANNY EISFELD, WIN
ANDERSON, BEN and TONI
WAKES, ED GROUT, BILL GLASS,
LOIS TANNER-all of whom con-
tributed greatly of their time and
efforts for our continued growth.
I feel sure that none of these fine
people expect nor want our grati-
tude. Rather, I imagine they would
like to express their thanks to the
Club for affording them the oppor-
tunity for their accomplishments, and
the inner gratification they received
from jobs well done in the commu-
nity interest. They have not let their
Todays slip by until they became Un-
fulfilled Yesterdays.
The Advertising Club of Greater
Miami, in the next few years, can
become the vital force for civic and
community betterment which its
counterparts already are in many
other cities. To do so, it needs the
efforts of all of its members, rather
than a dedicated few. I believe I can
speak for these latter in stating that
while your work toward this goal
may not be directly repaid in dollars,
it will come back many times over
in the comradeship and respect of
your colleagues, and the personal
satisfaction of having contributed to
the profession which gives you this
wonderful Miami way of life.









Scenes From Some of Last Year's Meetings





''. .- -- .- .. .. .

Charles 14hitebrook and

sGlor: : Hua.w C o a th -


and-Geoge Chamber
Direct Mail P ael: Ferd Nauheim
..- i 4 .,th r D n ....er, Robert De aayr..,

Gifford Booth J?. and Howard
Turiner
Gordon and Marlene Raudell with
a club guest at Pan Anmericana
Nite.




if:". :
.. ". : ,, ".-" ' "~ ' .Ile""" i: ,
14. .;
.~k g .,,~I ., .. .-.. ., ..!.G~ .2 ~mS ...:,.... :., ,,..; ,:.

.: .. ,- ... . : t :.. .. , :', . ,. :: ..:.. .. .. .-.-,, ,::

~~B~~ " ._DwtM4.-e?,i~~ a:Jem .. .....o-: ...,:-.,, :.. .
3 ":" .... :,- " " .. .:: ". r" ":- "'.. " ': ]"' '" "." o4. '-,"d' "':.
.. ..rt ,A IrDo'~ obx ~ y --. ,' .": :--;.,..._ .

iifior Booth Jr. a-d HiLrd.. ::. ..: ?-'....--'": :

























CHARLES H. WHITEBROOK, President
Vice-President,
Bishopric/Green/Fielden, Inc.
That he should be president of the Ad-
vertising Club of Greater Miami was a
logical step for Charlie who has devoted
tireless energy for the advancement of the
advertising industry and the welfare of
his community.
Now veep of one of the area's leading ad
agencies, Charlie has to his credit more
than thirty years in the ad field, twenty
of them fighting the endless battle of
Madison Avenue.
Under his careful guidance, this publica-
tion, ADVERTISING/MIAMI, was estab-
lished. He has brought to the Ad Club
many innovations, has been one of the
most active and successful new-member-
getters in the Club's recent history.
The Whitebrook civic activities include
Sheltered Workshop, Miami Beach Cham-
ber of Commerce, Miami Beach Rotary
Club, Jewish Vocational Service, Commit-
tee for the Physically Handicapped, Miami
Beach Little Theatre Group, Miami Beach
Swimming Association. Charlie is either
a present director, former president or
former director of all of these. He is also
a member of Alpha Delta Sigma.
A tournament bridge player, Charlie is a
director of the American Contract Bridge
League (is Life Master No. 199) and is
first vice president of the Florida Bridge
Unit.
Charles' wife, Lois, has been editor of sev-
eral local magazines. They have two chil-
dren, Nan, a freshman at the University of
Florida, and Paul, currently an M.P. in the
U. S. Army stationed at San Francisco's
Presidio.


1959 60






AND


DIRECTORS






Advertising Club
of Greater Miami


JACK CAESAR, First Vice President
Account Executive,
WCKT-TV
Jack's decade of service to the Ad Club
includes over four years as a director and
two terms as first veep. Along the way he
has done just about every job it takes to
keep a club successful.
Now an account executive at WCKT, and
prior to that a member of the Miami ad
agency of Hume, Smith, Mickleberry,
Jack's career has been as varied as only a
veteran ad man's career can be. Until re-
cently, he was in the local ad field many
years as account executive for Webster
Outdoor.
A former Pennsylvanian and Penn State
student, Jack was a theatre manager, a
graduate engineer, and a test pilot. He
came to Florida in 1946 as personal pilot
for a corporation president.
Jack served his country in the Air Force
as an instructor, and spent fourteen months
in Korea; he holds a captaincy in the Air
Force Reserve.
He is active in civic work, teaches Sunday
school class, plays golf to relax. The
Caesars live in Miami Springs with their
two boys.









OFFICERS

















S.







W. BENTLEY GLASS,
Second Vice President
Assistant Vice President in Charge of
Advertising and Promotion, Citizens'
Federal Savings & Loan Association
Bill joined Citizens' Federal when they
were both young in the finance field, and
they have grown in stature together, as
Bill's new title with the firm proves. Bill
has moved along just as fast in the Ad
Club, too, rising from his last year's appro-
priate post of club treasurer.
Active in civic affairs, Bill is a member of
the Boy Scout executive board and Hialeah-
Miami Springs Chamber of Commerce.
He is the new president of the Savings and
Loan Public Relations Society of South
Florida, is active in American Public Rela-
tions Association and Alpha Delta Sigma.
From 1951 to 1954, prior to joining Citi-
zens' Federal, Bill operated his own local
ad agency.


PAUL R. GREENAWAY, Secretary
Assistant Advertising Manager,
Florida Power & Light Company
A list of Paul's accomplishments in the
field of advertising and his contributions
to local civic life would fill this book. He
has been a sparkplug of the Ad Club,
responsible for much of its progress in
recent years.
He is immediate past president-two terms
--of the Ad Club, Lt. Governor of the
Fourth District AFA, and active at na-
tional conventions for years.
Paul came to Miami from Detroit, via
Pensacola, Jackson, Mississippi and Mem-
phis, where he was associated with utility
firms. His war service included the post
of Quartermaster aboard a Navy sub-
chaser in the Pacific. Since the war, he
has been active in the American Legion,
serving on many national committees; is
past commander of the Coral Gables Post,
and a member of Forty and Eight. He is
also a member of Alpha Delta Sigma,
Florida Public Relations Association and
Public Utilities Advertising Association.
Paul's wife, Kathleen, is well known to
Ad Clubbers, local and national, for she
shares his Ad Club interests. They have
a son and two daughters.






THOMAS WALTON STEELE, Treasurer
Advertising Representative,
The Miami News
Tom has served the Ad Club for the last
few years in a variety of important posts,
including program arrangement and hospi-
tality.
He came to Miami in 1954 from Pennsyl-
vania where he was retail ad manager of
the Huntingdon Daily News. From 1954 to
last year, Tom was retail ad manager of
the Miami Beach Sun.
Tom attended Juniata College in Hunting-
don; later spent eight years in the service
of Uncle Sam's army, including three years
in Germany.
The Steele's have two daughters. Tom, a
hi-fi enthusiast, spends the rest of his spare
time fishing.









J. WINSTON ANDERSON, Director
Vice President, Miami Post Publishing Company
Win is celebrating eleven years as an Ad Clubber, and has done yeoman service
during those years on various important committees.
A former Iowan, Win was born in Sioux City. He is a Miami High graduate,
but went back to the University of Iowa for his higher learning. During the
war, he enlisted and served in the Air Force.
This is Win's second stint as an Ad Club director; in addition, he has served
as secretary and as vice president.
He is a former president of the Printing Industry of Greater Miami; belongs
to Rotary, Alpha Delta Sigma, and is active in civic work.









RUTH E. BLOWER, Director
Account Executive, Venn/Cole & Associates, Inc.
Ruth's advertising and public relations career started in college with journal-
ism-management courses at Ohio State University that led to a B.S. degree.
Thereafter as copywriter for Ohio Fuel Gas Company, Ruth became active in
the Columbus Ad Club, helped edit the Club's publication, was a member of
Women's Council and became alumnae advisor to GAX.
In 1954, she moved to Kansas City, Kansas, and was an account-secretary
with Merritt Owens Advertising Agency. Three years ago, she brought her
boundless enthusiasm for advertising activities to Miami; joined Grant Ad-
vertising as copywriter; then last year joined Venn/Cole.
Ruth is editor of this publication; is treasurer of Florida Public Relations
Association (Biscayne Chapter); member of Theta Sigma Phi; Delta Delta
Delta; honorary member, Designers & Decorators Guild of South Florida;
and is chairman of publicity for the Miami Museum of Modern Art.







GEORGE CHAMBERLIN, Director
Vice President, Henry Quednau, Inc. Advertising Agency of Florida
The assistant business manager of ADVERTISING/MIAMI/1960, George
came up through the ranks in radio and TV. In the early days of radio, back
in the 1930's, George became a radio announcer in New York City, not too far
from his Yonkers birthplace. A two-weeks vacation in Ft. Lauderdale con-
vinced George never to go back to northern climes.
SHe made a natural transition into TV, selling for WITV, then back to radio
in the WJAM sales department, then more TV sales at WTVJ. The fast-
growing Quednau organization claimed George for the managership of the
new Miami office over two years ago.
George is secretary of the Greater Miami Association of Advertising Agen-
cies; member of the state board of directors of Florida Public Relations As-
sociation, is active in Navy League, Chamber of Commerce and other groups.







RICHARD U. FOLTZ, JR., Director
South Florida Representative, Philbin & Coine
Dick is the dynamo whose membership chairman activities have sent our
Ad Club's roster soaring to new all-time highs.
Coming to Miami from Massachusetts in 1952, Dick joined Grant Advertising
doing production, and a year later associated with his present firm. Dick's
activities in the field keep him traveling the South Florida highways and by-
ways, but he manages to find time to serve on ad club committees, take part
in Alpha Delta Sigma activities and other community services.
Last year, Dick organized TRT/MACMS, the ad club luncheon group that
meets informally as the Tuesday Round Table of the Madison Avenue
Chowder and Marching Society.
The Foltz family of Dick, Betty, Doug (4), Lisa (2) and, by the time this
is in print, Junior (?), enjoy their typically-Florida pool home way down
south in the Cedar 5 exchange.







RICHARD E. HINMAN, Director
Owner, Hinman Photography Studio
Dick is the only current member of the Miami Ad Club who has held every
office at least once and some twice.
A rare-type native Floridian, Dick started his career in the ad department
of the Florida Times-Union in his native Jacksonville, later worked his way
from hotel bellboy to manager, became a practicing musician, and then a
script writer, associated with Miami's WQAM for years.
Since 1938, Dick has operated one of the area's top photo studios. He is editor
and published of Southern Exposure, the nation's second largest professional
photographers' magazine; is past president of Florida Photographers' As-
sociation and Professional Photographers' Guild of Florida, member of the
national council of Professional Photographers of America, Inc., American
Society of Magazine Photographers, and Alpha Delta Sigma.



-4




FRANK JAFFE, Director
Attorney-At-Law and Advertising Consultant
A 20-year veteran of the Miami scene, Frank comes from Iowa where he was
a pioneer news, special events and sports broadcaster.
In Miami, Frank has served the industry as promotion manager of the
Miami News, WIOD and WGBS; as food chain ad director; liquor chain ad
director; Miami Beach Sun columnist; instructor of radio and advertising at
SU. of M.; and as head of his own PR and ad agency.
Holder of B.A. and M.A. degrees in journalism and political science from
University of Iowa (1933 and 1934), Frank graduated from U. of M. law
school in 1954. Today, aside from practicing law, Frank is active in the ad
industry; is executive secretary of Greater Miami Association of Advertising
Agencies; legal advisor to advertising and allied groups; and member of
Omicron Delta Kappa honorary society.









CHARLES A. LUMBLEY, Director
Sales Manager, R. L. Polk & Company
A recent transfer away from Miami has forced Charlie to become less active
in the Club than he would like, for truly, his service to the Club has been
noteworthy.
As chairman of the committee for the Miami Club and later chairman for the
Fourth District, AFA, Charlie led the Miami Ad Club in a program that
twice won the coveted Governor's Cup for the Festival of Florida Products.
Associated with R. L. Polk & Company (Directory Division), Charlie has
worked in many parts of the Southeast, coming to Miami in 1955 as Sales
Manager.









BEN A. WAKES, Director
President and Creative Head, Wakes-Silvershein-Wakes, Inc.
Both as a team and individually, Ben and his wife, Toni, endear themselves
to everyone who know them, and their devotion to the cause of advertising;
and for their work in the Miami Ad Club and other ad industry groups.
Ben, a native of Poland, moved to the U.S. when he was twelve. He went
into advertising in 1939 after graduating from Chicago Institute of Design;
took time out to serve in World War II with a U.S.A.F. film training unit;
served a stint as art director for the Air Force publication, "Briefs"; in
1949, moved to Miami, and four years later opened his own agency.
Toni became art director for the agency prior to becoming Mrs. Ben Wakes.
For a while after the war, Ben was art director for Helene Curtis Industries
in Chicago. He is past president and an active worker for the Direct Mail
Association of Greater Miami, and is a member of Alpha Delta Sigma.








Creative
:go.
Interchange .

of Ideas .

is the Business of ".* ;
J. Walter Thompson Company



We have over 5,600 people in 44 offices around
the world-including a fully-staffed creative office
in Miami-devoted exclusively to that business.

J. WALTER THOMPSON COMPANY
MIAMI
299 Alhambra Circle


NEW YORK CHICAGO DETROIT SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES LONDON



GOOD...

OR BAD?

You can't tell until you break them.
Then, the answer is obvious.

Advertising is like that, too.
On the surface, excellent.
After it "breaks," however, the
difference shows up... and
sometimes the result is not good.
Good advertising is fresh advertising -
fresh in ideas, in concept,
in execution. The public finds
it palatable... and the client
finds it profitable.


TALLY EMBRY, INC.
ADVE RT ISI NG
SUITE 458, PAN AMERICAN BANK BLDG.* MIAMI 32, FLORIDA















OFFICIAL ROSTER


Advertising

Club of

Greater Miami


Corrected to Feb. 4, 1960. ("t" indicates Associate Member;
"*" indicates Junior Member.)
Board Meetings-1st Wednesday, each month.
Club Meetings--2nd and 4th Wednesdays, each month.


H. L. ABRAMSONt
Central States Paper & Bag
342 Madison Ave., New York 17, N.Y.
LEON S. ADLER
The Leonard Company
311 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 39
JE 8-6614
RONALD R. ALLEN
WAME-Radio
Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami 32
FR 3-5533
DAVID M. AMDUR
David & Dash, Inc.
2445 No. Miami Ave., Miami 37
FR 1-6554
J. WINSTON ANDERSON
Miami Post Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 52-186, Miami
FR 9-3471
RICHARD N. ASCH
Webster Outdoor Advertising
120-150 N.W. 54th St., Miami 37
PL 8-8711
EDITH ASHER*
University of Miami
Rm. 760, 1101 Miller Dr., Coral Gables
MO 1-2511, Ext. 2865
MAUREY L. ASHMANN
Film-Art Display Service
150 N.W. 1st St., Miami 36
FR 9-4745


BURTON L. BAETZ
Miami News
P.O. Box 1-2410, Miami
FR 4-6211
LOUIS BAIDA
Louis Baida Specialties Inc.
922 N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami 32
FR 4-6586
ALBERT R. BAXTER
Baxter & Crim Adv. Agency
230 Almeria Ave., Coral Gables 34
HI 8-1749


HARRY B. BERGERE
605 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 39
JE 2-2868
ROBERT C. BEVIS JR.
Robert C. Bevis Company
241 Minorca Ave., Coral Gables 34
HI 4-1503
WILLIS E. BISHOP
Willis E. Bishop Adv. Art
S4012 Aurora St., Coral Gables 36
HI 3-2711
RUTH BLOWER
Venn-Cole & Assoc.
300 Dupont Center Bldg., Miami 32
FR 4-1331
BERNARD BLYNDER
Tele-Visual Aids
3361 S.W. 3rd Ave., Miami 45
FR 4-7370
PAT BOHAN
Moloney, Regan & Schmitt Inc.
213 N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami 32
FR 4-6262
DAVID BOWERS
Miami Photo-Engravers
151 Majorca Ave., Coral Gables 34
HI 5-2511
GEORGE BREMSER JR.
Marshalk & Pratt
100 Biscayne Blvd. So., Miami 32
FR 9-2821
R. A. BROCKHOUSE
Intercontinental Travel Service
304 N.E. 1st St., Miami 32
FR 1-8414
JOHN N. BRODEL
Kelly-Smith Company
Langford Building, Miami 32
FR 7-3332

JULIAN I. BURG
Burg Advertising Inc.
Penthouse, Congress Bldg., Miami 32
FR 1-5496
AUSTIN BURKE
Austin Burke Inc.
1628 Pennsylvania Ave., Miami Beach 39
JE 8-1492

ERNEST H. BURKONS
Graphic Arts Inc.
8365 N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami 38
PL 7-8429


JACK R. CAESAR
WCKT-Channel 7
P.O. Box 38-M, Miami
PL 1-6692
NICHOLAS M. CESTARI
Ace Letter Service
3800 N.E. 1st Ave., Miami 37
PL 7-4577
GEORGE H. CHAMBERLIN III
Henry Quednau Inc.
534 Pan Am. Bank Bldg., Miami 32
FR 1-8643
ANN RYERSON CLARK*
University of Miami
5901 S.W. 26th St., Miami 55
MO 6-4529
BERNAL E. CLARK
Florida Home Heating Institute
904 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32
FR 3-5701
SHEELAGH DILLE CLARKE
526 N.E. 34th St., Miami 37
FR 9-2107
ARTHUR B. COHEN
P.O. Box 4474, Miami Beach 41
UN 6-6783
AL CONSTANTIN
Buitoni Foods Florida Inc.
3920 N.W. 37th St., Miami 42
NE 4-7211
JOHN R. COPUZELO
Publishers Press Inc.
355 N.E. 59th St., Miami 37
PL 4-5475
JAMES R. CORYELL JR.
Coryell Associates Inc.
127 Santillane, Coral Gables 34
MO 7-7517
HENRY COVE
Vogue Laundry & Cleaners
1425 20th St., Miami Beach 39
JE 8-8721
FRANK S. CRAIG
WINZ-Radio
Biscayne Terrace Hotel, Miami 32
FR 1-6641
SAMUEL B. CRISPIN
Arthur R. Mogge Inc.
150 S.E. 2nd St., Miami 32
FR 1-7686







(.1jfmt 0


5e


4,-


1


YOU'LL LIKE WHAT YOU SEE!


MODERN MIAMI RADIO!




AM and FM


Dial 610


97.3 meg.


S A new product-a new service? Miami is the ideal proving
TEST M IAM I ground to test its merits. Here you get the buying reactions
S of residents and tourists assembled from throughout the coun-
AND try-a true cross-section of buying power and preferences.


SELL THE


REST!


Rely on one of Miami's fine advertising agencies to plan
a test campaign that will sell the rest of the country, too.


FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
Helping Build Florida


li. .m







WILLIAM M. CROCKETT JR.
Miami Beach Taxpayers Ass'n..
Rm 223, 940 Lincoln Rd.,
Miami Beach 39
JE 8-0461


DONALD A. DAVIS
Rex Engraving of Miami Inc.
63 N.W. 6th St., Miami 32
FR 7-4761
MISS ELIZABETH S. DAVIS
Jordan Marsh of Miami
1501 Biscayne Blvd., Miami 32
FR 4-7251
HAROLD L. DAWSON
The Dawson Company
1206 Chamber of Com. Bldg., Miami 32
FR 3-8847
CHARLES E. D'HONAU t
Time Inc.
9 Rockefeller Plaza New York 20, N.Y.
JU 6-1212
DANIEL D. DIEFENBACH
Peninsula Promotions Inc.
P.O. Box 64, No. Miami Beach
WI 7-3201
JEROME DOBIN
Dobin Advertising Inc.
4014 Chase Ave., Miami Beach 40
JE 2-1778
BRYAN L. DONALDSON
Flagler Federal Savings & Loan Assn.
100 N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami 32
FR 3-3671
FRANK M. DUNBAUGH
Department of Marketing
Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables 46
MO 1-2561, Ext. 462
JACK W. DURANT
Elliott Company of Miami
844 W. Flagler St., Miami 36
FR 1-7274


HELGA EASON
Miami Public Library
1 Biscayne Blvd., Miami 32
FR 1-7411
E. M. EISFELD
Tally Embry Inc.
Pan American Bank Bldg., Miami 32
FR 1-3621
LOUIS ENTLER
Louis Entler Associates
1651 N.W. 34th St., Miami 42
NE 5-3737
JOSEPH T. ESTES JR.
Wall Street Journal
150 S.E. 2nd St., Miami 32
FR 3-2609


GLEN B. FEWELL
Litho-Arts Inc.
1260 N.W. 29th St., Miami 42
NE 3-8501
VINCENT J. FIORINO
Vincent J. Fiorino & Assoc.
c/o Bazaar International
301 Broadway, Riviera Beach
VI 4-4447


ALBERT E. FLUTIE
Flutie Outdoor Advertising
252 N.W. 29th St., Miami 37
FR 3-0005
RICHARD FOLTZ
Philbin & Coine
914 N.W. 1st Ave., Miami 32
FR 4-4539
ERNEST L. FOSS
11701 Old Cutler Rd., Miami 56
MO 1-3385
ARTHUR P. FRANK
Fuchs Baking Company
P.O. Box 43-957, So. Miami
MO 1-3441


RAY GABER
WTVJ-Channel 4
306 N. Miami Ave., Miami 32
FR 4-6262
PAUL N. GALLAT
Screen Art Poster Inc.
4590 E. 10th Ct., Hialeah
MU 1-4641
J. SAMUEL GARRISON
Sottile Banking Group
232 Pan Am. Bank Bldg., Miami 32
FR 3-7357
E. R. GEGENSCHATZ
First Federal Savings & Loan Assn.
100 N.E. 1st Ave., Miami 32
FR 4-6292
GAY GILBERT
Daniels Department Store
2117 Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Coral Gables 34
HI 3-1647
W. BENTLEY GLASS
Citizens Federal Savings & Loan Assn.
400 Hialeah Dr., Hialeah
TU 8-2432
AURORA GLIDEWELL
Keyes, Madden & Jones
Penthouse, Ainsley Bldg., Miami 32
FR 7-1609
EDWARD GOMEZ
Diario las Americas
4349 N.W. 36th St., Miami Springs 66
TU 8-7521
HARRY GORDON
Gordon International Adv.
927 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 39
JE 2-2481
BEN C. GREEN
Bishopric/Green/Fielden Inc.
3361 S.W. 3rd Ave., Miami 45
FR 1-1475
JACK I. GREEN
Bishopric/Green/Fielden Inc.
3361 S.W. 3rd Ave., Miami 45
FR 1-1475
PAUL R. GREENAWAY
Florida Power & Light Company
P.O. Box 1-3100, Miami
FR 4-5333
RICHARD H. GREGORY
A. D. Weiss Lithograph
2215 N.W. 2nd Ave., Miami 37
FR 1-8421
EDWARD M. GROUT
Florida Power & Light Company
P.O. Box 1-3100, Miami
FR 4-5333


JOSEPH C. GIEGER
Gieger Electrotype Company
636 S.W. 2nd Ave., Miami 36
FR 1-9945
GEORGE H. GIESE
Marshalk & Pratt
100 Biscayne Blvd., So., Miami 32
FR 9-2821
CAROL GUILD
Fiber Craft Inc.
1820 N.E. 146th St., Miami 61
WI 7-1441


WILLARD B. HALL
Hal Winter Co.
7136 Abbott Ave., Miami Beach
UN 5-2661
ROBERT E. HANLEY
Philbrick Funeral Homes
660 W. Flagler St., Miami 36
FR 3-6363
RICHARD P. HEIMAN
1532 Beech Valley Way, N.E.
Atlanta, Ga.
HAL HERMAN
McAskill, Herman & Daley
4014 Chase Ave., Miami Beach
JE 2-1715
W. RODGER HERNDON
W. Rodger Herndon Advertising
1517 DuPont Bldg., Miami 32
FR 1-4485
NORMAN HERSHON
TV Guide
967 W. Flagler St., Miami 36
FR 1-1369
ROBERT HILDRETH
Coral Gables Fed. Savings & Loan Assn.
2501 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables 34
HI 4-3541
RICHARD E. HINMAN
Hinman Photography
4 Biscayne Blvd., Miami 32
FR 3-6224
EDWD. B. HOLLINGSWORTH
Bevis Associates Adv.
1140 Ingraham Bldg., Miami 32
FR 9-2696
DOROTHEE ANN HOPPEN
Peninsula Promotions Inc.
P.O. Box 64, No. Miami Beach
WI 7-3201
FRANK R. HOWELL
WTVJ-Channel 4
316 No. Miami Ave., Miami 32
FR 4-6262
CHARLES V. HUNTER
WSKP-Radio
420 S.W. 2nd Ave., Miami 36
FR 1-1585


ARTHUR C. JACOBSON
Tally Embry Inc.
1701 S.W. 30th Ave., Miami 45
FR 1-3621
FRANK JAFFE
Attorney
Ainsley Bldg., Miami 32
FR 3-0761








The dynamic growth of Florida brings a challenge
to those in the advertising agency field that can be
found in no other state. This growth also brings a
responsibility-to build the kind of service that makes
it unnecessary for any business or industry to look
outside the State of Florida for its advertising agency.

By keeping everlastingly at it, Florida Agencies
will build the best advertising service in the nation
-right here in Florida.


HEINJTRY QTJUEDIAU. INC.


JACKSONVILLE MIAMI TAMPA TALLAHASSEE


ASSOCIATION


MEMBER AMERICAN


OF ADVERTISING AGENCIES


It's no coincidence that so many Grant clients
Share leading the sales parade in their respective
fields. South Florida's oldest advertising agency
gives them a unique combination of creative
ingenuity, skillful planning, and sound research-
strengthened by enthusiasm and plain hard work.




GRANT
Grant Advertising, Inc. 201 S.W. 13th St., Miami, Fla. FR 3-6611 John A. Dey, Exec. Vice Pres., Palmer Tyler, Vice Pres.
16







LEWIS C. JAMIESON
WQAM-Radio
1723 DuPont Bldg., Miami 32
FR 4-6121
BERT Y. JOHNSON
WVCG-Radio
377 Alhambra Circle, Coral Gables 34
HI 8-7411
WILLIAM H. JOHNSON
Velda Corporation
P.O. Box 64-600, No. Miami Beach
WI 7-3511
JAMES L. JONES
Printing Industry of Greater Miami
5384 No. Miami Ave., Miami 37
PL 7-2468
AUDREY LEE JUN
Grant Advertising, Inc.,
Apt. 3, 1025 S.W. 7th Ave.,
Miami 36
FR 3-6611
ROBERT F. JUSTICE
2266 S.W. 23rd Terr., Miami 45
HI 4-0018


JOHN A. KAAY
Sears Roebuck & Co.
1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami 32
FR 9-5411
ALFRED KAPLAN
McAskill Publishing Co.
4014 Chase Av., Miami Beach
JE 4-4715
DIK KELSEY
WQAM-Radio
1723 DuPont Bldg., Miami 32
FR 4-6121
H. TURNER KNIGHT, JR.
Knight Brothers Paper Co.
3485 N.W. 65th St., Miami 47
NE 4-0688


ROBERT F. LAMMONS
E. B. Elliott Adv. Co.
252 N.W. 29th St., Miami 37
FR 4-0511
AL LANGE
Al Lange & Associates
1377 N.W. 36th St., Miami 42
NE 5-0574
FRED V. LAVIS
Rose Poster Printing Inc.
6875 S.W. 81st St., So. Miami 43
MO 1-1621
CHARLES M. LEAVY
National Lithographers
7700 N.W. 37th Ave., Miami 47
OX 1-2800
MARGARET E. LECKIE
Miami Beach Fed. Savings & Loan Assn.
401 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 39
JE 8-5511
JACK E. LEEDS
Leeds Advertising Agency
600 Dade Commonwealth Bldg.
Miami 32
FR 7-2324
SANFORD LEVKOFF
Ace Letter Service
P.O. Box 37-395, Miami
PL 7-4577


CHARLES A. LUMBLEY
R. L. Polk Company
P. O. Box 37-641, Miami
PL 4-4454


J. C. MACMILLON
Ryder System Inc.
P.O. Box 33-816, So. Miami
HI 5-3661
SANFORD JAY MANDELL
Sanford Jay Products
3420 N.W. 2nd Ave., Miami 37
NE 5-4707
ART MAYER
Candid Art Photography Inc.
16509 N.E. 6th Ave., N. Miami Beach
WI 7-7341
SAM McCOLLOCH
Burdine's Department Store
7100 N.W. 32nd Ave., Miami 47
FR 3-1111
MALCOLM B. McDONALD
Florida Power & Light Company
P.O. Box 1-3100, Miami
FR 4-5333
RON MILLER
Florida Real Estate & Investments
19944 N.W. 2nd Ave., Miami 69
NA 4-3181
EZRA MILLSTEIN
Caryl Richards Inc.
924 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 39
JE 8-3817
ROBERT E. MITCHELL
WINZ-Radio
Biscayne Terrace Hotel, Miami 32
FR 1-6641
ROBERT A. MOGGE t
Arthur R. Mogge Inc.
333 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, Ill.
AN 3-3540
LAWRENCE MONAHAN
Electro Neon Sign Co.
2955 N.W. 75th St., Miami 42
PL 4-1033
WILLIAM P. MOOTY
Franklin Press Inc.
928 S.W. 10th St., Miami 36
FR 3-8306


BERT NOBLE
WFEC-Radio
350 N.E. 71st St., Miami 38
PL 1-7534
JACK NOBLES
WMIE-Radio
139 N.E. 1st St., Miami 32
FR 3-5556


DORIS A. OLIVER
Grant Advertising Inc.
201 S.W. 13th St., Miami 36
FR 3-6611
J. R. O'NEILL
Sarge O'Neill Cartoons
5945 S.W. 107th St., Miami 56
MO 7-6149


RUTH OVERTON
196 N.W. 60th St., Miami 37
PL 7-4343


NORMAN A. PALMER
WGBS-Radio
1605 Biscayne Blvd., Miami 32
FR 9-2401
AUSTIN S. PARKER
J. Walter Thompson
San Juan, Puerto Rico
VERNON PAUL
Donnelly Advertising Corp.
1790 N.W. 54th St., Miami 37
PL 4-5511
WALLACE PAWLEY
Miami Transit Company
P.O. Box 3581, Miami 30
FR 7-3641
WILLIAM PEARSON
Bus Benches Inc.
707 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32
FR 3-3371
HOWARD W. PETTINGILL
Florida State Theaters Inc.
615 Olympia Bldg., Miami 32
FR 4-3173
JANICE M. PLATT
Jan Platt Art Service
2922 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables 34
PL 9-3839
HALE PRINTUP
Hale Printup & Associates
Langford Bldg., 121 S.E. 1st St.
Miami 32
FR 9-2668
ANDREW PURCELL
Marshalk & Pratt
100 Biscayne Blvd., So., Miami 32
FR 9-2821


HENRY E. RAMIREZ
Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co.
160 N.E. 4th St., Miami 31
FR 9-0873
GORDON RANDELL*
2150 S.W. 26th St., Miami 33
PL 1-4322
GRETA L. RASSEL
Llewellyn Machinery Corp.
P.O. Box 33-646, Miami
HI 4-7481
RAY RICKLES
Ray Rickles & Company
Chamber of Com. Bldg., Miami 32
FR 9-1495
JACQELINE T. ROBAN
Gottschaldt & Associates
2505 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables 34
HI 4-5739
RALPH B. ROSE
Rose Poster Printing Co.
P.O. Box 43-1406, So. Miami
MO 1-1621
FRANCES ROSEN
929 16th St., Miami Beach
JE 1-3573
































MARSCHALK AND PRATT
DIVISION OF McCANN-ERICKSON, INC.


First National Bank Building, 100 Biscayne Boulevard, South, Miami 32, Florida


there a right anwer

... to any given sales or communications
problem. The big job is to define the total
problem. Then bring the right combination
of the right forces to bear on a total solution:
Research, Advertising, Sales Promotion,
Public Relations. Together they make
up what Marschalk and Pratt, Miami, calls

TOTAL MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS.
This concept is working effectively for
our South Florida clients. We'd like to show
you how it might be put to work for you.

affiliates.
COMMUNICATIONS COUNSELORS, INC.
public relations
MARKET PLANNING CORPORATION
market research and development
McCANN-ERICKSON CORP. (International)
international advertising
SALES COMMUNICATION, INC.
sales promotion and merchandising


SOUTH

FLORIDA'S

LARGEST

DAILY

CIRCULATION


MEDIUM


ENTERPRIS


Call FR 4-6262 for complete information












STUART H. SAGONA
The New York News
407 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 39
ROBERT E. SALISBURY
Time-Life International
507 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32
FR 9-1710
J. W. "PEPPY" SCROFANI
Empire Adv. Co. of Florida Inc.
346 N.W. 1st St., Miami 36
FR 4-1322
EDWARD J. SCHEAFFER
E. J. Scheaffer Adv. Agency Inc.
1101 N.E. 79th St., Miami 38
PL 4-5568
ARTHUR C. SCHOFIELD
1195 N.E. 87th St., Miami 38
PL 4-7405
HAROLD SCHUYLER
Jack Pector Specialties
996 S.W. 1st St., Miami 36
FR 3-1019
EMIL L. SCHWETZER
Woody Kepner Associates
3361 S.W. 3rd Ave., Miami 45
FR 9-1895
HORACE W. SCOTT
1660 S.W. 23rd St., Miami 45
HI 6-9841
WILLIAM C. SCRIMGEOUR
Southern Paper Company
7300 N.W. 35th Ave., Miami 47
OX 1-7310
TAMARA FRANCES SHERMAN
Apt. 10, 230 Mendoza Ave.
Coral Gables 34
HI 3-4939
FRED K. SHOCHET
Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 18-2973, Miami
FR 4-1141
DAVID SHUBOW
Florida Building Journal
3620 N.W. 7th St., Miami 44
HI 4-5749
GEORGE B. SLICK
North Miami Beach Publ. Co.
P.O. Box 64-405, No. Miami Beach
WI 7-3233
GEORGE HENRY SMITH
Keyes, Madden & Jones
Penthouse, Ainsley Bldg., Miami 32
FR 7-1609
ANN K. SNYDER
Adv. Dept., Burdine's
Flagler St. at Miami Ave., Miami 32
FR 3-1111, Ext. 763
SAMUEL SOLOMON JR.
Samuel Solomon Adv. Specialties
P.O. Box 34-284, Coral Gables
HI 3-0723
IRVING SPIEGEL
Mirror Poster Printing Inc.
914 N.W. 1st Ave., Miami 36
FR 1-8895
WILLIAM M. SPIRE
William M. Spire Inc.
61 Giralda, Coral Gables 34
HI 4-8337
HARRY SPITZER t
Sales Promotion Director
Sattler's
Buffalo, New York


THOMAS W. STEELE
The Miami News
P.O. Box 1-2410, Miami
FR 4-6211
RALPH SWANSON
McMurray Printers
2134 N.W. Miami Ct., Miami 30
FR 4-8441
SUE SUCH
Bishopric/Green/Fielden Inc.
1170 N.W. 121st St., Miami 50
FR 1-1475


LOIS COWART TANNER
Visitor Publishing Co.
333 S.W. 30th Rd., Miami 36
FR 9-7079
DONALD G. TATUM
Bishopric/Green/Fielden Inc.
3361 S.W. 3rd Ave., Miami 45
FR 1-1475
J. W. TODD
Engravers Inc.
233 N.E. 1st St., Miami 32
FR 3-6651
NORMAN R. TODD
Hartley's Inc.
144 E. Flagler St., Miami 32
FR 1-1611
JOHN L. TOLOMEO
Your Florida Guide Inc.
303 Alcazar, Coral Gables 34
HI 3-4276
ROBERT F. TOWN
National Lithographers
7700 N.W. 37th Ave., Miami 47
OX 1-2800
EDNA TUCKER
Richards Department Store
1 N.E. First St., Miami 32
FR 9-4311
WALTER TURNER
Pan American World Airways
P.O. Box 48-817, Miami
NE 4-5411
PALMER TYLER
Grant Advertising Inc.
201 S.W. 13th St., Miami 36
FR 3-6611


OWEN F. URIDGE
WCKR-Radio
P.O. Box 38-M, Miami
PL 1-6692


THEODORE G. VALLAS
Wall Street Journal
150 S.E. 2nd St., Miami 32
FR 3-2609


RALPH K. WADSWORTH
Wadsworth & Walker Inc.
P.O. Box 33-775, Miami
HI 4-7318


BEN WAKES
Wakes-Silverstein-Wakes Inc.
Suite 229B, 561 N.E. 79th St., Miami 38
PL 1-4322

TONI WAKES
Wakes-Silverstein-Wakes Inc.
Suite 229B, 561 N.E. 79th St., Miami 38
PL 1-4322

DEWAINE E. WALL
Steiner & Wall Adv. Inc.
2890 N.W. 7th St., Miami 35
NE 3-3406

MYRON B. WEIL JR.
WTVJ-Channel 4
316 N. Miami Ave., Miami 32
FR 4-6262

MANDEL WEINSTEIN
Metro Mat
28 N.W. 20th St., Miami 36

JOAN INGOLDBY WEIR t
27 E. 13th Street, New York 3, N. Y.

SARA WEISBERG
Tampa, Fla.

WILLIAM J. WEISS
Webster Outdoor Advertising
120-150 N.W. 54th St., Miami 37
PL 8-8711

ERNIE WELKER
Shells Super-Market
N.W. 7th Ave. & 58th St., Miami 37
PL 1-1676

WILLIAM E. WHALEY t
William E. Whaley Company
307 W. Broadway, Louisville 2, Ky.

CHARLES H. WHITEBROOK
Bishopric/Green/Fielden Inc.
3361 S.W. 3rd Ave., Miami 45
FR 1-1475

ALLEN B. WILSON
Power-ful Displays
100 E. 10th Ct., Hialeah
TU 5-1644

MURRY WORONER
WAME-Radio
Chamber of Com. Bldg., Miami 32
FR 3-5533

BRADFORD WYCKOFF
First Continental Mortgage Co.
203 Huntington Bldg., Miami 32
FR 1-1401


W. HUBBELL YOUNG
The New York Times
519 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32
FR 9-1601


L. L. ZIMMERMAN
WCKR-Radio
P.O. Box 38-M, Miami
PL 1-6692
HERB ZUCKER
TV Guide
967 W. Flagler St., Miami 36
FR 1-1369












DIRECTION


Where you tell your sales story is
just as important as what you say.

And concern about "where" is one reason
advertisers turn to TV GUIDE.
For America's biggest weekly is also
America's Most Flexible Magazine.

TV GUIDE'S 53 editions-including
two big Florida editions-offer a
regional pattern that makes sense.

That's why TV GUIDE is an advertising
vehicle for 50 major Florida companies.
You try it. Take advantage of the most
flexible magazine pages in print.


Circulation Guarantee Now 7,250,000


GREATER MIAMI ASSOCIATION OF ADVERTISING AGENCIES









S* SPEAKING OF TRADEMARKS
Note this one well, for it is dedicated to you. GMAAA, an association
of independent advertising agencies, stands for Progress in advertising,
works ceaselessly to achieve it through higher ethical and professional
standards.


BEVIS ASSOCIATES BISCAYNE ADVERTISING BISHOPRIC/GREEN/FIELDEN
SBURG ADVERTISING, INC. TALLY EMBRY, INC. FRIEDLANDER
ADVERTISING, INC. GORCHOV ADVERTISING, INC. GOTTSCHALDT &
ASSOCIATES, INC. GRANT ADVERTISING, INC. HARRIS & CO. ADVER-
TISING, INC. HUME/SMITH/MICKELBERRY ADVERTISING, INC. KNICK-
ERBOCKER ADVERTISING, INC. R. A. HURWITZ ADVERTISING AGENCY *
HENRY QUEDNAU, INC. LIPMAN ADVERTISING COMPANY McCANN-
MARSCHALK MILLER, BACON, AVRUTIS & SIMONS, INC. LEO JAY
ROSEN ASSOCIATES, INC. E. J. SCHEAFFER & ASSOCIATES ADVERTISING,
INC. SCHWARTZ/GRAHAM ADVERTISING, INC. STEINER AND WALL
ADVERTISING, INC. STUART/SCHWARTZ, INC WAKES/SILVERSHEIN/WAKES


Executive
Offices *
1013 Ainsley Bldg.,
Miami 32, Fla.
Frank Jaffe,
Executive
Secretary

FR 3-0761


[7
.k r 4


TGUIV
GUIDE









metropolitan


miami


a vast


industrial


center











Never before has advertising been
more necessary than in Metropolitan
Dade County's modern economy.
magazines.
Jet aircraft have reduced the mile to
a six-second interval and brought an
entire nation within easy vacation and
convention distance of Miami.
All these new customers need to be
sold!
An even greater selling job is re-
quired to move the ever expanding
output of Dade County's 2,403 manu-
facturing firms!
Few realize that Metropolitan Miami
is a vast industrial center. One out of
every four local workers is in the
manufacturing field today. This seg-
ment of our economy is expanding


by Richard J. Welsh,
Director
Dade County Development Department


rapidly. The number of plants has in-
creased by 54 percent over the past
five years and the number of employ-
ees by an impressive 92 percent.
Advertising is essential to Dade
County's manufacturing community
not only because one-third of the
products made here are sold outside
of South Florida, but also because the
other two-thirds are competitively
challenged by goods made elsewhere.
Of clinical interest is the fact that so
many of Miami's products and serv-
ices lend themselves to informational
dissemination through the several ad-
vertising media.
If you are surprised because the
Sunday metropolitan newspaper re-
sort section is crammed with Metro-
politan Miami hotel, restaurant and
sightseeing paid space advertisements,
you'll be astonished to see the area's
vast industrial and manufacturing
plant advertising allocations in tech-
nical, trade, commercial and business
magazines
Metropolitan Miami has long been
recognized because of the tremendous
and potent advertising, publicity and
public relations programs inaugu-
rated, and maintained here, by the
late Steve Hannegan. His genius at


star-dusting the nation's eager eyes
with glittering bathing beauties on
Miami Beach literally launched this
area into big time orbit. From this
we have never recovered-fortunately.
So industrial advertising, originating
here in this largest manufacturing
center of Florida, enjoys a spring-
board advantage stemming from
Hannegan. And, oddly enough, this
has one interesting critical aspect:
from time to time Northern industrial
management asks this Dade County
Development Department for an
evaluation of manufacturing-employee
attitude toward the internationally
famed entertainment and recreational
facets of the community. Are em-
ployees tempted by horse racing, the
beach, fishing or boating to indulge
in absenteeism?
The answer, happily, is negative, be-
cause the employee works even closer
to his job here than in inclement
weather regions; he takes no more
time off for horse races than the Man-
hattan employee does to go to the races
at Long Island tracks. Less, in fact,
probably because the power of indi-
vidual manufacturing plant advertis-
ing here contributes to increased
product sales.
One tangent consideration lies in the
efficacy of employment advertising.
This is the nation's last vast reservoir
of skilled and semi-skilled labor.
Occasions arise locally when a newly
established manufacturer seeks cer-
tain specialized skills in numbers
greater than our hidden labor pool
supplies. Advertising appropriate to
his need, in selected media, never fails
to bring overwhelming response from
reader areas: thousands of people
want only a good job "excuse" to live
in Metropolitan Miami.
Travel advertising, particularly, bears
abundant yields in tourist response
and some of today's posh hotel, or
pure jet passenger airliner, advertise-
ments are literally classic in all re-
spects . .in all media.
This area's colorful advertising pano-
rama-like the spectrum-flows from
deep sea indigo, to royal purple hos-
pitality, to manufacturing gray . .
and at the end of this rainbow is Mag-
ical Metropolitan Miami.








ADVERTISING/


MIAMI


THROUGH


THE


YEARS


Ask me if the advertising agency pic-
ture in Dade County has changed
through the years, and I will answer
you with a decided YES! In those
early days we had a picnic!
Don't misunderstand me. We worked
many long hours and very hard hours
. with many days beginning at
4:00 a.m. But, back in the middle
twenties and thirties-even the forties
-it was a gravy train. Nobody knew
what ulcers were!
The grandad of the agency world in
Miami was Graydon E. Bevis. He
opened the first agency in the News
Tower building in 1923. It was the
middle of the monumental land boom,
and at that time, Horace E. Loomis
and Stuart Hall were associated with
the METROPOLIS as business man-
ager and advertising director respec-
tively. The METROPOLIS, you'll
recall, was later sold, and the name
was changed to the MIAMI NEWS.
By 1925, advertising agencies were
popping up all over. They were mostly
one-man operations-hip pocket oper-
ations. The area was bombarded by
free-lance artists and copywriters.
Then, the boom "busted," and all the
agencies "busted", save one: Graydon
E. Bevis.
With Horace Loomis and Stuart Hall,
Bevis formed a new corporation,
Loomis, Bevis & Hall, and continued
to reign as the area's lone agency.
Through E. G. Sewell, then mayor of
Miami, the agency promoted and de-
veloped the City of Miami advertising
account, and did it so soundly that
Stuart went to New York and won
ANPA membership. This, to my
knowledge, was the first national
recognition to be given a Florida ad-
vertising agency.


Major accounts in those days and
through the years until the end of
World War II were primarily hotels,
municipalities and neighboring coun-
tries such as Nassau and Cuba . .
all making a strong bid for the tourist
dollar. The first industrial account
whose advertising was placed on a
national basis was Ronrico Rum.
1928 saw the start of Miami's second
agency. It was then that Loomis and
Hall opened their own agency, and
Bevis' new agency was afterwards
called Graydon E. Bevis, Inc. (This
was later to become Bevis & Tyler.)
Ed Westman, founder of Miami Post
Publishing Co., opened the third
agency in the area, and called it West-
man Advertising Agency. "Pop" Pur-
cell, the fabulous copywriter from the
New England area, and then adver-
tising manager of Coral Gables, Inc.,
joined Westman as copywriter, and I
joined as Account Executive.
1929 saw Loomis and Hall the giants.
Their offices almost filled the entire
seventh floor of the Congress Build-
ing. With several dozen employees,
the agency serviced such important
accounts as the Cities of Miami,
Miami Beach, Jacksonville, Daytona
Beach, Orlando, West Palm Beach,
Nassau, Cuba, the Doherty account,
the Biltmore, Roney Plaza, etc.
The early 30's brought another new
agency to the scene, headed by Gus
Dorr, and known as Parsons, Dorr
and Hume.
In 1938, Loomis and Hall sold out
to Brooke, Smith, French and Dor-
rance-a national agency which at
that time had offices in New York
and Detroit.
In April, 1939, I opened Robert E.
Clarke & Associates, Inc. and worked


By Robert E. Clarke
as told to
Ruth E. Blower, Editor
































to develop only industrial and com-
mercial accounts throughout the
South.
World War II saw a heavy mortality,
as many of the agencies suspended
operations. Brooke, Smith, French
and Dorrance dropped from the
Miami scene, but the Miami office of
Grant Advertising was opened by
John A. Dey to give the area its first
representation by one of the country's
"Top Ten" agencies.
It was the end of the war that gener-
ated the start of the many agencies
we know today. The war's end
brought into the area, too, many new
suppliers and service agencies to ac-
commodate the new growth in busi-
ness and industry.
Immediately after the boom days, ad-
vertisers in the Greater Miami area
were spending two to three million
dollars a year in national advertising.
Today, it is estimated by some that
total local advertising billing has
zoomed to a staggering sixty millions.
You might be interested to know how
some of us allocated the space in those
days gone by.
During a period when Loomis & Hall,
Inc. and Graydon Bevis, Inc. were the
only two agencies here, we enjoyed a
most unique relationship between
media and agency. During the sum-
mer months we would make up our
schedules for fall and winter advertis-
ing for all of our resort accounts.
(You see, in those days . Florida
and the neighboring islands were
strictly seasonal advertisers.) Some
time in September, all the newspaper
reps. would hit Miami in a body,
headed by Bill Dresser of the New
York SUN. Bill, at that time, was
known as the Dean of resort news-


paper men . so called by his col-
leagues. We allowed the reps. to come
in, and study all schedules, evaluate
them, and make recommendations. Bill
acted as chairman. Around him at a
large conference table were gathered
the representatives of all the major
media from New York, Chicago, St.
Louis, Kansas City, Boston, Detroit,
etc. For two weeks usually, they
would study, argue, then vote the
recommendations; and Bill Dresser
would bring back to us the final
selections for approval.
How did the publishers' representa-
tives handle the non-advertisers? The
whole group usually forty men -


would descend on the client-one at a
time-in rapid succession until the
client broke and bought.
Times have changed, save one basic
analogy. I think the old-timers will
agree that today as yesteryear, the
advertising profession is for those
who are ambitious, knowledgeable,
"seasoned" and well equipped to un-
derstand and service the needs of the
progressive and fast-growing adver-
tiser.
Surely for him, the advertiser, Dade
County offers many important ad-
vances in agency services, printing,
marketing, media selection, merchan-
dising, production, and particularly in
the graphic arts.

t~ 0 46 IN MA


PAUL GREENAWAY (left), winner of the Club's A.F.A. Silver Medal
Award, and FRANK JAFFE (right), Miami's Advertising Man of the Year,
happily flank DICK HINMAN, Chairman of the Ad Club's Awards.



















ADVERTISING CREDITED WITH SUCCESS

OF

"100-MILE DEPT. STORE" CHARGE PLAN


Sam Garrison, Advertising
and Public Relations Director
Sotille Group Banks


You can scarcely walk down a South
Florida shopping area, such as Mir-
acle Mile, Flagler Street, Las Olas
Boulevard, or Worth Avenue, or visit
a shopping center, without seeing
posters and emblems in countless store
windows inviting you to "charge it".
The reason they are there is due in no
small part to advertising by its origi-
nator, the Pan American Bank of
Miami, a Sottile Group Bank and one
of the South's largest financial insti-
tutions. It is considered the dean
among the many "Charge Plan" oper-
ators that have since sprung up
around the country.
The plan was put into effect in Miami
in 1953 and will be seven years
old in April, 1960. It admittedly owes
its successful operation to its con-
sistent overall advertising program
using all of the tools of the trade,
including P.O.P. displays, direct mail,
window displays, billboards, TV, radio
and newspaper advertising.
For the first five years of its exist-
ence, the "Charge Plan" confined
itself strictly to the Greater Miami
area, and had some 900 retail mer-
chants and professional men partici-
pating, with over 35,000 individuals
proudly carrying the Pan American
Bank Charge Plan identification card.
Early in 1959, however, it expanded
itself in its operational scope to
include two other members of its
parent organization, the Sottile Bank-
ing Group, i.e., American National
Bank of Fort Lauderdale, and the
Boynton Beach State Bank at Boyn-
ton Beach, Florida. Arrangements
were made to permit charge-card
holders of any of the three banks to
use them on an interchangeable basis.
In other words, residents of the Boyn-
24


FASTEST DRAW IN THE EAST
Pardner, if you need money pronto, open up a Pan Am Bank Charge Plan.
account with new "Instant Money" feature. Then you can
"charge cash" whenever you need money fast.
Walk up to the "Instant Money" teller draw $50, $100 or even
$200 and just charge it to your Pan Am Bank Charge Plan account!
Saddle up and ride over to the Pan American Bank of Miami today!


PAN AMERICAN BANK OF MIMI
Pleas s -1. pllcai- d i-d-f- W.-- f.,I
. .. I
. ..,, s_.
dr-.s . .. I
Geys State


3% ON SAVINGS BANK WHERE
YOU CAN BORROW
I1~1 I(nel rll (& d l .!.' In--~ (I~r-l


23I S.E. Fir1t Str :t FR 4-711
ioulh- ~- Moci' ocllSooa I
) *


ton Beach area could not only use
their Boynton Beach card in their own
area, but could say "Charge It" on
their visits to Miami in any of the
Pan American Bank member stores,
and receive their bill from their own
bank in Boynton Beach.
This applied similarly to American
National Bank of Fort Lauderdale
members and the Pan American Bank
of Miami members who wished to
make purchases in Boynton Beach or
Fort Lauderdale.
If this sounds complicated, the Adver-
tising-Public Relations Department of
the Sottile Banking Group straight-
ened it out by referring to the area
to be served by the banks as "The
100-Mile Department Store."
Once the basic idea of a "100-Mile
Department Store" was decided on by
the bank, the bank asked its agency,
Arthur R. Mogge, Inc., to develop the
copy, art, and media schedules. Con-
tinuity was achieved by using the
same basic art in all visual media,
along with a map showing a shopping


area along a 100-mile stretch from
Palm Beach to Homestead.
Although I, as the Sottile Group
Banks' Public Relations and Adver-
tising Director, and Arthur R.
Mogge's Manager, Sam Crispin, and
Creative Director, Jack Nelson, spent
months planning basic strategy, there
were inevitable last minute details to
attend to as announcement date drew
close.
Thus, several gallons of midnight oil
were burned in the offices of Arthur
R. Mogge as plates were finalized and
approved, TV and radio scripts
readied, outdoor board paper printed,
and all distributed with contracts to
media from Palm Beach to Miami.
They projected this image throughout
all their advertising, particularly
through radio, TV (WTVJ, Channel
4, Miami) and good-sized space in
most newspapers from Palm Beach
to Homestead, as well as making use
of statement stuffers, especially devel-
oped window displays, etc.
Members of the staff then arranged
to meet with and talk before service













organizations at the luncheons of
Chamber of Commerce groups, etc.,
throughout this 100-Mile strip. By
the time the speakers met with these
groups, the individual members of the
club were already aware of the
Charge Plan program through the
various media used. Therefore, the
speaker met a responsive audience.
Discussing the program with Mr.
Robert Rudolph, Vice President of the
Pan American Bank of Miami who
instituted the Charge Plan for the
banks, he said: "Without advertising
properly planned and executed, the
program, no matter how wonderful in
concept, would never have been
brought into fulfillment. We believe
our Public Relations and Advertising
Director's statement that 'you've got
to tell them that you are going to tell
them, then tell them, and then tell
them that you've told them' type of
advertising and publicity is to be
credited substantially with the won-
derful success we have met so far."
"The plan has a three-fold advantage
for everybody participating: (1) of
course, it brings additional traffic
and revenue into the banks involved,
(2) it gives an additional merchandis-
ing tool for the participating mer-
chant and (3) it permits the mer-
chant to educate his sales force in the
value of multiple sales which can only
be successful with the aid of a Charge
Plan program.
The merchants all over the area credit
the Pan American Bank of Miami and
its Charge Plan program with per-
mitting them to confidently compete
with chain and department stores in
their shopping areas. This includes
now over 1,600 merchants and almost
65,000 members.
Under the Charge Plan program, the
bank assumes full responsibility for
checking the credit capability of the
individual Charge Plan member with-
out recourse to the store in question.
This in itself is quite a selling tool.
On top of this, it eliminates the need
of the individual stores maintaining
their own Credit Departments which
is quite an item since the cost of main-
taining such a department is gener-
ally greater than the percentage
charged by the bank to the merchant
for handling accounts receivable.
The bank, under this program, makes
the money involved in the sale im-
mediately available to the merchant
by depositing to his account cash in


the amount of the sales slips turned
in each day. This cuts down the cost
on the part of the merchant by elimi-
nating much of his bookkeeping per-
sonnel and his cash is immediately
available for more regular purchases
of additional inventory. To the cus-
tomer, on the other hand, it gives the
opportunity of engaging in the ever-
growing All-American sport of saying
"Charge-It." This has tremendous ap-
peal to the customer since all of us
like to feel that we are accepted on
the face value or, in this case, just
the signature.
To add further to the program itself,
the bank has instituted the "Instant
Money" program-the first of its kind
in the country. It permits the Charge-
Plan member to charge cash as well
as merchandise. Amounts of $50,
$100 and up to $200 can be charged
to the account of the individual by his
merely coming into the bank and say-
ing, "I would like to charge $100 to
my account." By identifying himself
as he would in a store with his Charge
card and his signature, the Instant
Money teller of these three banks
makes out a charge slip to the cus-
tomer in the amount he requests, and
charges his account. This may be pre-
paid without any interest in thirty
days or it can be repaid over a period
of six to nine months at a lower serv-
ice charge than many department
store rates.
This Instant Money program was
highlighted and advertised by the use
of a little character dressed in typical
Western garb, headlined with the cap-


tion: "Fastest Draw in the East".
This was also "punched" on the
Banks' TV program and through the
use of printed media, both direct mail
and newspapers.
The advertising the Banks do with
respect to the Charge Plan program
is on a year-round basis, but more
space is purchased during the tradi-
tional shopping seasons-Christmas,
Easter, pre-vacation and pre-school.
The Sottile Group bankers have
agreed many times when asked to
what one thing they attribute most of
the success of their various programs:
"Proper advertising and public rela-
tions."
The Bank (Pan American Bank of
Miami) is credited with having aided
most of the now 62 banking organiza-
tions throughout the country in de-
veloping their own Charge Plan sys-
tems using Pan American as a
prototype.
Mr. Rudolph (President of the Na-
tional Credit Association) further
stated: "Quite often a customer has
shown us the way to increase the uses
of Charge Plan. For instance, there
is the story of the six-year old whose
dog had a fish hook caught in his
mouth. It was this young fellow who
forced the Charge Plan to make ar-
rangements to include a local veteri-
narian in order to cover the bill for
the dog's medical care. This finally
worked it around to where we have
been able to include dentists, doctors,
and professional men who were not
originally included as merchant mem-
bers of the Charge Plan program."


I ----------------
... . ...
....... ..

















it pays to set your clock ahead!


Case history of
an advertising
campaign that
continues to pay
off on schedule-
13 years after
it was launched!


Paul Klein, Copy Director, Bishopric/Green/Fielden, Inc.


To understand the campaign, it is best
that you first understand the adver-
tiser's special problems.
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Institute
had a less-than-spectacular beginning.
It was founded in Cincinnati, Ohio, in
1926-before air travel had received
the tremendous stimulus of Lind-
bergh's momentous flight to Paris, of
the Post-Gatty around-the-world
marathons, of Amelia Earhart's solo
jaunt across the Atlantic, before air
power was accepted as an indispen-
sable arm of a nation's military
power. The young aviation school
struggled along and finally suspended
operations late in the depression.
In 1938, however, with Hitler's
Reichswehr goose-stepping over the


corpse of Europe, with his Luftwaffe
screaming destruction into ill-equip-
ped enemies and with the chilling
menace that he aimed at the rest of
the free world, the big rush for allied
air power was on. The need for well-
trained personnel was apparent.
In the year 1939 Embry-Riddle Aero-
nautical Institute was re-opened in
Miami with John G. McKay, an attor-
ney, entering the firm as a partner.
(In 1944, Mr. McKay purchased full
interest in the school and assumed
the role of President.) The re-acti-
vated school did well during the war
years, operating four large Army
Flight Training Schools in Florida
and Tennessee. From all parts of the
United States, from Great Britain,


from France, from Latin America,
from virtually every country that
blocked Hitler's path to world con-
quest, the young air trainees came.
They entered the Embry-Riddle
schools as raw recruits; emerged soon
after as skilled, capable combat pilots
and mechanics, ready to take their
places in their country's defense.
Embry-Riddle's role in those trying
years was a significant one and
helped to establish its excellent repu-
tation that was to prove to be of great
importance in the years that followed
the war's end.
In 1947, with the war over and the
future of the airplane glowing more
brightly than ever before, returning
veterans-aided by the G. I. Bill of
Rights-were streaming into Embry-
Riddle. It was at this time that
Houck and Company, a Virginia-based
advertising agency opened its Miami
office. It set its sights on the Embry-
Riddle account and sent its Media Di-
rector, 22-year-old Karl Bishopric, to
the area to prepare media recom-
mendations as part of its presenta-
tion. A strong point was made of the
fact that Embry-Riddle had to build
for the future. A detailed analysis of
Embry-Riddle's source of revenue at
that time showed how it would change
after the expiration of the G. I. Bill.
The fact was recognized that, al-
though the stimulus of government
subsidy was all-important in those
days, it was an ephemeral stimulus at
best. Although the enrollment was
nearly 100% G. I. Bill in 1947, the day
would inevitably arrive when it would
plummet to 0%. And so, working with
Dean of Admissions, L. D. Carlton
and the Embry-Riddle planning board,
the agency looked ahead to the '50's
and beyond-and made its media rec-
ommendations accordingly. The name,
Embry-Riddle, well-established dur-


When research indicated that the de-
sire for security was of greatest con-
cern to young men, ads emphasized
how much an Embry-Riddle education
could be worth in terms of future
security and income.


-L,- Young man at the
Crossroads
.1 of a Vital Decision
.. n.. .l'.. .....-.''.- .. ... . .:; ', 2 .rl I u ; ....
, .e, m . ... ... r.. I .,,. . ,- .. .. . .,



... ...j,,, . .

. .


AO
~a~ ~f







ing the war, must be kept before the
public as insurance against the lean
years that might follow. The account
was won and as eloquent testimony to
those recommendations is the fact
that this media schedule was adhered
to and has been maintained-with
some up-dating modifications-to the
present time.
Through the evolution of Houck and
Company into Bishopric/Green/
Fielden, through the regime of John
McKay as President of Embry-Riddle
until his death in 1951, this basic phi-
losophy of looking ahead, of careful
continuing analysis prevailed. It con-
tinued from the time that Mr. Mc-
Kay's widow, Mrs. Isabel G. McKay,
took over the reins of the business
and assumed the role of President of
Embry-Riddle-the only woman ever
to head a school of this type, any-
where in the world. (A most remark-
able woman, Mrs. McKay is also the
only woman ever to serve on the 12-
member Board of Directors of the
National Aeronautical Training Soci-
ety.) It has continued through the
present day, with Embry-Riddle's
managerial staff (Mrs. McKay, Presi-
dent, Mr. L. D. Carlton, Vice-Presi-
dent, Mr. G. E. McAuley, General
Manager and Mr. Fred Begy, Director
of Admissions and Director of Adver-
tising) working closely with the
agency to plan future campaigns that
will keep enrollment at the highest
practicable level. The efficacy of the
far-reaching planning that has always
characterized Embry-Riddle's promo-
tional efforts is indicated by this im-
pressive statistic: where the percen-
tage of non-G. I. students entering in
1947 was almost 0%, it was close to
73% in 1959, and is now at approxi-
mately 85%-and its total student
body has increased over 300%! Thus,
it is obvious that forward thinking on
the part of Embry-Riddle's manage-
ment coupled with intelligent media
planning has kept the school oper-
ating at maximum efficiency and has
helped bridge a gap that could have
been a disastrously impassable one-
one that has proven to be a bottomless
chasm to so many other similar but
shorter-sighted institutions.
But the campaigns on behalf of
Embry-Riddle called for far more
than media selection and an aware-
ness of a changing tide in the national
educational trend. Embry-Riddle is,
in the strictest sense of the word, a
by-mail business. With few excep-
tions, the students learn of the school
through advertising, award-winning
brochures and its former students.
The vast majority of new students do
not actually see the institute until
they arrive in Miami to start classes.
Therefore, the soundness of its adver-
tising is the sine qua non for Embry-
Riddle, the importance of which can-
not be overestimated. It is for this
reason that every conceivable motiva-
tional approach must be explored. It
is for this reason that rigidly precise
copy analysis must be constantly
made. It is for this reason that accu-
rate records of responses and conver-
sions of prospects to students must be
maintained at all times.
The prodigious task of compiling all
(Continued on Page 76)















LAND DEVELOPMENT ADVERTISING...


AN IMPORTANT


PART OF THE


FLORIDA PICTURE


Tom Ferris I
Executive Vice President, The Mackle Company


The power of advertising to pro-
duce sales when the right product and
the right appeal are presented in a
forceful campaign has been demon-
strated once again by the Mackle
Company and General Development
Corporation.
When General Development Corpor-
ation, one of Florida's largest land
owners, decided to market its proper-
ties, it called upon the Mackle Com-
pany, which had built up an enviable
reputation for quality, integrity, and
efficiency over a period of half a cen-
tury in the building business.
Together, they conceived the idea
of creating huge new communities,
planned in every detail, projected
years ahead into the future, and
priced within the reach of the average
American family. In order to check
the soundness of their thinking and
the extent of their market, they ran
small keyed advertisements in na-
tional magazines. The results con-
vinced them that there was a tre-
mendous market for good Florida land


if it could be offered to potential cus-
tomers at low cost on easy terms.
With both product and sales
possibilities established, the Mackle
Company and General Development
Corporation embarked on a merchan-
dising and advertising campaign just
as ambitious as the communities them-
selves, and just as thoroughly thought
out and planned.
With an appropriation of approxi-
mately $2,000,000 annually, the Com-
pany concentrated largely on mail
order homesite sales during the 1957-
1958 season with the now famous
theme of "$10 Down, $10 a Month".
Color pages and spreads were used in
national magazines, such as Life,
Look, and the Saturday Evening Post,
in Sunday newspaper supplements
and on the comic pages, all featuring
the Port Charlotte community on
Florida's southwest coast.
During the 1958 -1959 season, the
campaign was continued in national
magazines. The Sunday newspaper
supplements were dropped, and a
color spread on houses was inserted


LOOK AHEAD TO A WONDERFUL LIFE IN PORT ST. LUCIE, FLORIDA


--
'* '1


law


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I ,
iI 1 [ I~ i -I


M


.ii'


,. 7

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f- 1 r1









in Reader's Digest. In addition to Port
Charlotte, there were national adver-
tisements featuring Port St. Lucie
and Sebastian Highlands on the east
coast. A network of sales representa-
tives was established in northern
cities, and advertising material was
prepared for local use on a coopera-
tive basis.
In the current 1959-1960 season,
the copy emphasis has been shifted
from standard homesites to houses
and more expensive waterfront lots.
Branch offices have been opened in
leading Florida cities, each with its
own local campaign in newspapers,
radio, and TV. Special campaigns are
also produced for each of the commu-
nities for use in its local area.
A unique "Walk Into A Whole Life"
prize contest will be held throughout
the state of Florida from February 14
through April 17, featuring a grand
prize of a "New House, New Furni-
ture, New Job".
In the meantime, to stimulate
northern sale of homes, full scale,
Mackle-built model houses have been
opened in Grand Central Station in
New York City, and in Mandel Broth-
ers department store on State Street
in Chicago.
To supply the tremendous volume of
advertising and promotional material
needed to carry on these several cam-
paigns, the advertising agency, Wil-
liam M. Spire, Inc., in Coral Gables,
maintain its own photographic staff
and darkrooms, a special department
to handle local campaigns, and a
special group of artists to prepare
plot plans and other collateral ma-
terial, in addition to the usual adver-
tising agency departments of copy,
art, media, television and radio, etc.
The importance of advertising in
selling is best illustrated by a recent
speech made by Frank Mackle, presi-
dent of General Development Corpo-
ration. Mr. Mackle said, "There's no
substitute for a quality product
backed by good advertising-and no
advertising dollar spent is ever
wasted".











I( )M i DA













r~f~jGD


'. / f 10 F AN IOUR FLORI1DA FuT'WE
JWII COlNFINCE AND PtAEi 01 MIND
Sr il
^^^J^^.j..f^^




















is key to Superior success








Robert S. Hurwitz
Robert S. Hurwitz Advertising


"Success beyond my wildest dreams,"
said Al Brenner, President of Supe-
rior Window Company of Hialeah, a
suburb of Miami, in a recent inter-
view on the growing aluminum busi-
ness in Miami.
Superior announced August 31, 1959,
at the end of the fiscal year that the
consolidated net income, after taxes,
amounted to $121,746 against a net
income for the preceding year of
$52,900.
Advertising has played no small part
in the success of the business which
Brenner founded in 1947. A few years
after opening the doors of Superior
Window Company, a full-time adver-
tising director, Robert S. Hurwitz,
was named and an advertising budget
was established.
In establishing the budget, the adver-
tising director took into account the
company's many active competitors.
He realized that it would be necessary
to tell a full story to alert builders,
architects and homeowners about the
constant flow of new products being
manufactured by the Company.
The advertising copy was geared to
appeal to new distributors and dealers
all over the United States. All copy
was "hard sell" rather than institu-
tional, and even in the brochures, de-
tails of products were used rather
than claims.
In selecting media, the ad director
used 40% of his budget for monthly
direct mail to dealer prospects all over
the United States. Another 10% was
used to prepare newspaper mats and
brochures for distribution to dealers.
Publications such as BUILDING
SUPPLY NEWS, MODERN WIN-


DOWS, FLORIDA BUILDING
JOURNAL, DEALER AIDS, PRO-
GRESSIVE ARCHITECTURE and
other trade journals accounted for an
additional 40% of the total advertis-
ing budget. The final 10% of the
budget was used in such periodicals as
SWEETS CATALOG.
Initially, Superior Window Company
was engaged in the business of pro-
ducing and selling aluminum case-
ment windows. But, from time to
time, they added other related alumi-
num products, and today the company
manufactures and sells a complete
line of residential and commercial
aluminum windows, jalousies and cur-
tain walls. These include casement,
ranch-type, awning-type and projected
windows; glass jalousies and jalousie
doors; window walls and curtain walls
and solar shades.
The newest product to be developed
by Superior is a water purifier to be
manufactured by Superior Water
Purifier Company, a subsidiary of
Superior Window Company. This new
product will be sold to owners of home
pools to be used to purify the water
at a nominal cost. An extensive ad-
vertising program is in the making
for this new product.
As Superior Window Company grew
and the advertising program was ac-
cordingly stepped up, Hurwitz felt the
need of additional technical help and
opened a complete advertising agency
to handle all art and production for
Superior Window Company.
Brenner credits Miami's climate, a
good labor market and a well-planned
advertising program for his outstand-
ing success in Miami.


"HARD


SELL"


* .. .", .


.:ii iL








Nassau Grabs 860% Sales Increase



in Ten Years

Fred Roth, Vice President, Grant Advertising, Inc., Miami


0 #NASSAU

C-D



-cs
1 13
^ *** .: ;


Join the i . .. In

.. 1. : ..i :.,


The philosophy of the Nassau-Baha-
mas Development Board is that travel
is no different from any other busi-
ness. "The three legs on the stool of
success are sales, advertising and
publicity," Development Board Chair-
man Stafford Sands told the 29th
World Travel Congress in Havana
last fall.
Grant Advertising, Inc., Miami, has
been the advertising leg for the south-
ern states in the Nassau success story
for the past ten years. When the
agency first undertook the travel ad-
vertising account, visitors to the Ba-
hamas from Florida and the southern
states were relatively few. Today,
thanks to pinpointed advertising pro-
grams, visitors from Florida exceed
those from any other state by a sub-
stantial margin.
According to records maintained by
visitors' permanent home address,
rather than point of origin, Florida
visitors have increased 500 per cent,
while the 14 states in the Southern ad-
vertising territory show an overall
gain of 350 per cent, and this does
not include the considerable market
of southern visitors from other re-
gions who are attracted to the Ba-
hamas through advertising exposures
in southern media.
Effectiveness of the advertising pro-
gram is measured by sales, and sales
can be reduced to a formula. Each
year the Development Board has in-
creased the expenditure, and each
year the visitor total and dollar re-
ceipts have followed suit, while the
cost per visitor decreased.
From 1950 to 1954, the five-year total
spent in promotion was three and one-
half million dollars. In the next five
years the total nearly tripled, to eight
million dollars. The budget for 1960
will be well over two million dollars,
an increase of 850 per cent over the
1949 expenditure of $236,287.
Sales have increased 860 per cent. In
1949, the Development Board re-
corded 32,018 visitors; during 1959,
the figure was 243,000. Each visitor
spent an average of $200, plus trans-
portation, to enjoy Nassau and the
Out Island resort areas. The 1960
projection is for 275,000 visitors.
In 1949, the cost for obtaining each
visitor, according to the Development
Board, was $10.50. With the tremen-
dous increase in sales volume antici-


pated this year, that cost will be
about $7.30.
The Bahamas are visited by 12 per
cent of the Americans who leave the
North American continent each year.
Mr. Sands estimates that by merely
holding its percentage share of the
travel market, the Bahamas will
reach a level of 375,000 tourists an-
nually in five years' time, and 600,-
000 visitors a year by 1969.
About 20 per cent of the Development
Board budget is invested in advertis-
ing. "Good advertising can't be re-
duced to a formula," emphasizes John
A. Dey, executive vice-president of
Grant-Miami and account supervisor
for the Nassau-Bahamas Development
Board. "Among the most important
factors that have to be considered for
advertising a resort area such as the
Bahamas is media selection and tim-
ing, to reach the type of people who
are in a position to take advantage of
travel opportunities," he said.
"Decision time precedes travel time
by three months or more," Mr. Dey
added. "The average worker knows
by March or April, for example, that
his vacation will be during the last
two weeks of August. Once the family
has decided on going to the mountains
for their vacation, an appeal from the
seashore falls on deaf ears.
"The effectiveness of advertising for
the Nassau Bahamas Development
Board is related to that decision
period. It appeals to one type of
visitor during the winter season and
another for summer travel."
Color, design and copy have also been
stressed in Nassau and the Bahamas
advertising. Ad agency heads, at the
beginning, developed a distinctive
format, a stylized illustration with
"a foreign look". It was the first and
still is the only travel advertising
using second color in run of paper
displays.
The Bahamian flag has been incor-
porated in the new logotype to show
visually that the Bahamas is a foreign
land. New line-treatment illustrations
give sharp black and white impact
and achieve a foreign poster look.
The agency has also created special
literature for the other resort islands
on where-to-stay, fishing and activi-
ties. These Out Islands attracted 19,-
000 visitors during 1959. The goal
this year is 25,000.








9adeia

0 ,t01S-


ELECTROTYPES


NICKEL TYPES
BAKED MATS
COLD MATS
MAKE UPS


GIEGER ELECTRO & MAT SERVICE, INC.


636 S.W. 2nd Avenue
Miami 36, Florida
FRanklin 1-9945


702 Dora Street
Jacksonville 4, Florida
ELgin 3-6552







art


U exhibition

is barometer


for artistic


excellence

San Willig, President
Art directors have two week, Art Directors Club of Greater Miami
prize-winning preview in Buildorama.

TOOT
For preliminary judging, a record 1000 pieces of artwork .L O
were submitted by Miami artists for the Seventh Annual '"' T
Exhibition of Advertising and Editorial Art sponsored by our OOT
group late last fall. TOOT
From this impressive selection, judges picked 158 entries for
awards and public viewing-everything from point-of-pur-
chase displays to stationery. LE(l\\I 1)
All this helps point up, I believe, the greater truth that exist-
ing art facilities in the Dade County area are serving to fill r
the ever-increasing needs for quality art, design, illustration _
and photography.
During the past year, several more national agencies have
opened branch offices in or near Miami; new agencies have
been formed locally; many of the established agencies have
expanded their art facilities and services providing addi-
tional scopes for the clients' broader needs in a thriving
market.
New convention halls and exhibit areas have added to the
need to produce more visual material locally. The healthy
influx of industries to this area means more packaging, more
point-of-sale material, direct mail pieces and promotion for
manufacturers. These many measurements would make it
appear that your expanding art services help reflect the
economy of the local advertising market.
The quality of the work available to advertisers from this
area is being continually up-graded, largely through the
efforts of the individual members in the Art Directors Club.
These men and women are for the most part directly engaged
in the visualization, layout, design and preparation of most
of the advertising which originates from Miami and is seen
throughout the Western Hemisphere.
At the art awards banquet last fall, Garret Orr, president
of the Art Directors Club of New York, had this to say about P-A Nt % -t E R I C / 0
Dade's pool of artistic talent: "In the Greater Miami area,
over one hundred commercial artists contribute a service that
St a t f i t n First place gold seal winners reflect
ranks them among the finest in the nation." good design in advertising art.




















pinpoint you







Rosemary Hoffman, First Research Corp,


An expert is a man who is at least one
hundred miles from home and is carry-
ing a briefcase. Is this fact or fallacy
here in Florida?
Fortunately, it is in many cases fast
becoming fallacy. As a result of this
state's rapidly-growing, widely-recog-
nized economic and business maturity
there is evolving what might be called
a reverse-provincialism; that is, a
realization that it is no longer neces-
sary to look elsewhere for those pro-
fessional and other business services
which Florida businessmen and adver-
tisers require to better appraise and
market their products and services.
Two significant factors appear to be
responsible for this new attitude.
First, through serving well an ever-
increasing number of the country's
leading businesses, Florida organiza-
tions have proved that they have
"come of age", and are qualified to
compete on an even basis with those
in any other section of the U.S.
Just as important is the fact that
Florida's singularly large and unique
in-migration has brought into the
state many highly-qualified profes-
sional and business people who have
worked successfully in some of the
country's nationally-recognized cen-
ters of professional, business and in-
tellectual pursuits.
Take, for example, the case of market
research. It is led, and staffed in
large part, by people who have
brought to this area the benefits of
their previous experience in research,
economics and finance in such centers
as mentioned above. Perhaps that ex-
plains in part the acceptance and
endorsement of Florida professional
services by some of the country's
largest and most important firms lo-
cated in such cities as New York,
Chicago and Detroit, as well as other
34


metropolitan areas where market re-
search is available close at hand.
Who would have thought, ten years
ago, that a Miami firm would be
called upon to conduct market re-
search on frozen orange juice in Syra-
cuse, a bank's corporate image in
New Orleans, refrigerators in Port-
land and Dallas, newspaper adver-
tising readership in Pittsburgh, poodle
beautifiers in Palm Beach, or a
shopping center in Trinidad? Yet,
this is what actually has happened in
the last few years, and a complete
list of these research projects would
show cities in over 45 states.
But, what has been done in market
research for Florida companies, or
for out-of-state firms whose products
or services are marketed in this state?
In the Dade-Broward-Palm Beach
County "Gold Coast" area, market re-
search has played an active and vi-
tally important part in determining
consumer preferences and opinions,
and in market-testing new products,
thereby providing advertisers and
their agencies with practical tools for
their promotional efforts.
Here are a few examples: A housewife
panel, used in a product test for a
tea manufacturer, was asked by First
Research Corporation to give opinions
and preferences as to various sizes of
tea bags; builders were questioned
about ready-mixed concrete; a 100-
member panel of college students was
taken to the beach by the research
firm to make an on-the-spot test of
several suntan lotions; a survey of
new and existing industrial plants
was made for a state agency; visitors
who arrived here by way of various
airlines were surveyed on their travel
preferences for a northeastern travel
agency; and bathers at beaches and
pools were asked about bathing cap
preferences.


Some of the other consumer opinion
and preference surveys which were
made in this area covered automobile
carburetors, beer, cigars, garage doors,
hair straighteners, headache and cold
remedies, heavy construction ma-
chinery, newspaper readership, office
partitions, power mowers, race tracks,
savings and loan associations, soft
drinks, and television use, ownership
and listening habits.
Dealer surveys and store audits were
made in sporting goods, liquor, hard-
ware, department, drug and other
stores.
This is only a general cross-section,
but gives a good idea of the products
and services for which Gold Coast
advertisers and their agencies have
employed market research.
Some of the above-mentioned surveys
have extended into other sections of
the state. Beyond the three-county
complex, Miami research firms work
has also included: a 3-week test by
housewives of several types of frozen
fruit; location surveys for motels
and other tourist facilities and attrac-
tions; supermarket shopping habits
and preferences; political surveys of
national interest; and market research
for citrus product manufacturing and
for packing containers for the agri-
cultural industry in Florida.
A brief look at the case history docket
on market research undertaken in
Florida by First Research Corpora-
tion shows how the information ob-
tained through surveys was put to
practical and effective use:
1. A manufacturer and distributor of
garden supplies wanted to evaluate its
position in the market with respect
to competition, the effectiveness of its
advertising program, and the general
acceptance and consumer opinion of
its various products.
A field survey was conducted among
a comprehensive sample of homeown-
ers within a defined area.
Many conclusions, as well as some
rather surprising discoveries, resulted
from this study. (a) Several opinions
concerning the advertising program
and media, held by the company and
its advertising agency, were substan-
tiated and proven to be correct; some
minor changes resulting from the sur-
vey findings were used to further
reinforce the effectiveness of the pro-
gram; (b) It was found that connota-
tions with brand name and packaging
were not directed at the most profit-
able segment of the company's busi-
ness. Consequently, a long range plan
(Continued on Page 76)

























miami's need for top-fl










Palmer Tyler, Vice President, Grant Advertising, Inc.


Miami's first advertising agency was founded in 1924, and
consisted mainly of a newspaper cartoonist and two fugitive
space salesmen from the Miami Daily News. It got to be quite
an operation during the 1925-26 real estate boom with some
thirty people on the payroll, but quickly reverted to a single
room when the big excitement blew away with the 1926 hurri-
cane.
After that, growth was very gradual. Even as late as 1940,
the bulk of the advertising dollars hereabouts were shared
among four agencies, with most of the personnel doubling in
planning, media, copy, research or what have you. Five to
fifteen people on the staff was about par for the course. Job
opportunities, regardless of skills, were very nearly non-ex-
istent.
After World War II, an almost explosive expansion of popu-
lation and resort facilities began to broaden the needs for
better-type advertising material. For the first time there was
a sufficient work load, quantitatively, to justify a greater
degree of specialization. And bigger, richer hotels and busi-
nesses could afford high enough standards, qualitatively, to
support the higher cost of greater talents.
Today, Miami advertising still suffers from lack of a broad
industrial base. Accounts billing a million-plus a year are
far scarcer here than they are in many smaller but more highly
industrialized areas. Many are of a service or limited-market
nature, requiring a great deal more creative work, which cuts
profit margins substantially.
Nevertheless the field is growing rapidly-in number of ac-
counts and in size of accounts-so that the total gross business
will support a far larger payroll than ever before. Miami
advertisers are growing in sophistication and are gradually
becoming educated away from the false economy of "cheap"
work.
There is a growing use of Miami as a base for export adver-
tising to Latin America, and some evidences that national
advertisers may pick Miami as a good point for "regional"
agencies in decentralization of their advertising programs.


talent growing


The net effect is that, in recent years, management of Miami
agencies has been willing and able to gamble on importing
experienced talent from New York, Chicago and other big-time
centers. But they do not have enough margin to go in for the
type of Madison Avenue-Hollywood operation which too many
pseudo-AE's are today mistaking for the real thing.
Miami agencies can now pay fair salaries for AE's with sound
planning experience who are willing to pitch in and work.
There are few openings, if any, for the Martini-contact type.
Creative ability is a decided plus. Likewise, a working knowl-
edge of markets and media.
In the purely creative areas, there are more openings for good
art men than in copy. The visual artist who backs this talent
with ability to do billable finished art has a definite advantage,
as workloads tend to fluctuate. Good production men can
almost always find steady work.
Specialized jobs in media and research are few and far between.
Ability to double in accounting and billing is usually necessary.
On the other hand, experienced advertising accounting help
at the clerical level is apparently in constant demand.
All of the above is affected by one overriding factor-the basic
appeal of Florida living. Because of it, Florida often has
far more qualified applicants than jobs, not only in advertising
but in almost any field you may mention. Largely because of
this, Miami pay scales are generally lower than in most cities
of comparable size. The applicant must usually balance a
lower salary against how badly he wants to live in Florida. In
effect, he must be willing to accept part of his gold in Florida
sunshine.
If his obligations are such that he can make the necessary
monetary adjustment, he will find many other compensations.
The health benefits of year-round outdoor living and fresh-
food diets, mild-climate economies in clothes and fuel bills, a
world-famed concentration of fabulous fun facilities and above
all the wonderful sense of well being that pervades even the
most prosaic pursuits in Florida will make the living he can
earn in Florida Advertising a very good living indeed.


































miami --


a market


outdoors


* Painted Bulletins,

* 24 Sheet Posters, 6 Sheet Posters


Bill Weiss
Webster Outdoor Advertising

To the advertiser or his agency, out-
door advertising is one of several
major advertising media-vehicles for
carrying a message to a market.
As in the case of other media which
can be used nationally magazines,
newspapers, radio, television-outdoor
advertising must be considered in two
parts. First, there is the medium or
vehicle itself -its form, circulation,
extent of coverage, and type of people
it reaches in terms of ability and will-
ingness to buy. Second, there is the
message which the medium will carry
-its physical requirements, methods
of presentation, special techniques
which increase its effectiveness.
An understanding of both parts of
outdoor advertising is essential if the
advertiser is to realize a maximum
return for this portion of his adver-
tising dollar.
Outdoor can be used to deliver a mes-
sage simultaneously throughout the
country. In this respect, it has the
characteristic of national magazines,
network radio and television.
Like newspapers, spot radio and tele-
vision, outdoor can be used to cover











individual markets, and can be pur-
chased market by market.
At the same time, it is being used on
a national scale, outdoor can be tail-
ored in frequency and coverage to
meet special sales problems which
exist in individual markets within the
national pattern.
But, outdoor is different from all
other media in several respects.
First, it does not "circulate" a mes-
sage to a market. The market "circu-
lates" around the message and be-
cause of this, outdoor is truly a mass
medium. It is exposed to all economic
and social groups.
Second, outdoor delivers its message
to a market in motion, to people on
their way to work, to play, to shop;
making it a unique advertising me-
dium. Surveys have indicated 83.1
per cent of the people go outdoors
daily. While other media deliver their
messages primarily during a period of
indoor activity, outdoor provides an
opportunity to reach these same
people outside the home.
Third, because outdoor speaks to a
market in motion, it must speak
quickly, memorably, and repeatedly.
There is no time for argument or step-
by-step persuasion, thus outdoor ad-
vertising requires a special technique
of presentation. The outdoor adver-
tisement must be to advertising what
the editorial cartoon is to Journalism.


Since outdoor is most often used in
conjunction with other advertising
media, the question arises, "What
function should outdoor perform in
the total advertising plan?" It is im-
possible to make a complete list of
such functions, for they vary by prod-
uct and sales problem. But here are
a few major functions which outdoor
can perform for almost any adver-
tiser:
1. Outdoor can perform a "memor-
able" function. Because of the sim-
plicity of the well-executed outdoor
display, an image of a product can be
delivered which will remain in the
minds of people for a long time. If
this is a favorable image, it can have
a telling effect on sales. The pride of
product ownership expressed in a
man's face, or the beads of condensa-
tion on a cooling bottle of soda, do
more than remind. They register on
the sub-conscious and lie there until
a sudden want needs to be fulfilled.
2. The selling principle of delivering
a message at the time the prospect
recognizes his need for your product
is equally valid in advertising. Auto-
mobile manufacturers and petroleum
marketers have long recognized that
outdoor is a primary medium for
reaching the public when they are be-
hind the wheels of their cars on the
streets and highways of the country.
3. The low cost of outdoor advertising


enables it to be used also as an im-
pulse to purchase. The attention, the
interest, the reason for buying which
may have been stimulated by other
media can often be translated into a
sale if an attractive reminder of the
product is presented to the housewife
on the way to market or near the
point of purchase. Packaged goods ad-
vertisers make considerable use of the
outdoor medium. An example would
be an attractive and appetizing
painted bulletin with a large food cut-
out located near, or on the route to,
a large supermarket.
4. Outdoor advertising is purchased
primarily to cover a market, to expose
a message at high traffic points. But,
because units can be located strategi-
cally, they can be selected to conform
to patterns of distribution within a
market. An example of this would be
the choice of outdoor units in the
proximity of the retail outlet. The
supermarket mentioned earlier is an
example of this. Gasoline companies
have long utilized this advantage of
outdoor by purchasing displays on
thoroughfares where they have dealer
outlets.
In summary, outdoor advertising
might be said to be a national adver-
tising medium with the flexibility of
local media. For, in reality, its na-
tional pattern is a multiplication of
its local coverage.














TUNE IN
WKAT1360
1 r l ay
ta.e I M en xw ejo
tE 9lr- Url~ ti


IT'S SIMPLY-


SIMON


0



0



B
*

*

*

*

*

*


Bus Benches


Because Dade County has the largest
automobile per capital figure of any
comparable market (one car per each
1.75 persons), it can truly be called a
"market on wheels". This fact con-
tributes greatly to the vast usage of
outdoor media in the area.
Bus Bench advertising in the Miami
market has become one of the major
outdoor media. The 2' x 6' bench back
panels are used by large and small
advertisers alike. Copy for these
panels is silk screened, and space is
sold in packages of from 5 to 100
units. Advertisers may secure space
in periods of from 1 month to 2 years.


Bill Pearson,
Bus Benches Co.

Copy is regularly changed or re-
painted each 6 months, or more often
as required. Specific showings may
be arranged, and rotation plans are
available.
Rates vary according to the number of
panels and length of time employed,
amount of copy, etc., but usually aver-
age between $8.00 and $12.00 per
panel per month.
Benches are placed between Hallan-
dale and Homestead which covers all
of Greater Miami, and are located at
legal bus stops on high traffic inten-
sity thoroughfares. Exposure cost of
bus bench advertising is about 310
per 1000.


Sidewalk Displays

Over 125 sidewalk receptacles are
used for advertising in the Miami
market. These neat, well maintained,
4 sided cans offer a 19" x 34" panel
to advertisers desiring to project their
message to shoppers in the major
shopping areas of the city. All copy
is reproduced on metal plates by silk
screen process. Panels are sold in
lots of 25, 50 and 100 for periods of
one month to a year, and rates range
from $1.50 per panel to $5.50 depend-
ing on number employed and length
of time used.


w

* Taxi-Posters

Full color, traveling Bulletin Board
S moving in the traffic flow, or stan
ing at preferred locations-always
eye level, always easy to see-that
Taxi-Poster Advertising.
The manner in which the advertise
S and the advertisement has been ser
iced, and the availability of standard
* ized posters in many sections of tl
country has placed Taxi-Poster A
vertising in a nationally-recognizi
position, competing for its share
the ever-increasing outdoor adverti
ing budget.
Through the use of this relatively i
expensive medium, institutional ai
merchandising messages can be circ


Arnold Seltzer,
lackson Outdoor Advertising Co.

Is, lated virtually with the crowds on
d- Main Street, almost at the point of
at purchase. The circulation of most
is Taxi-Poster Advertising programs is
quite broad and in an area such as
er ours where the population (perma-
v- nent and visiting) spends most of its
d- time outdoors, the medium compares
he favorably in cost with other outdoor
d- media.
ed Most showings are sold on a weekly
of basis with the rates varying accord-
s- ing to the length of the contract.
The Taxi-Poster had a battle for ac-
n- ceptance. Today it stands on a firm
id footing, boasting a long list of na-
u- tional and regional advertisers.












IBM
L 3 ___
MlILTiNA


rising






Dick Foltz,
Philbin & Coine


The term Bus Advertising embraces
two entirely different media, each
with its own audience, appeals and
uses; each as different from the other
as newspaper advertising differs
from TV.
TRAVELING DISPLAYS are the
signs placed on the outside (sides,
front and rear) of city buses. These
signs are usually silk-screened on
cardboard, which has a life of 60-90
days, or on sheet steel, which will hold
up a year or more. The space is sold
on an annual basis, ranging from $4
to $6 per space per month depending
on size and position. Copy may be
changed as often as every 30 days,
is supplied by the advertiser, and is
posted and maintained by the bus
advertising company.
Like other outdoor media, Traveling
Displays make best use of short copy,
simple illustration and much color.
They are particularly useful for an
institutional approach in advertising.
The average city bus travels some
3000 miles a month; its Traveling
Displays reach pedestrians, motorists
and bus riders day and night, 365
days a year-not only in the crowded
downtown sections, but in residential
neighborhoods and suburban shopping
centers as well.
The last several years have seen the
rise of the King Size Poster, a 2% by
12' masonite panel which fits in a
frame on the side of the bus. Due to
their eye-catching proportions and
standardization of size, King Size
Posters are being used extensively by
national as well as local advertisers.
For the first time, a measurement of
the actual exposure to a typical show-
ing of outside transit posters is now
available. The Alfred Politz Media
Study done in Philadelphia last June
employed new photographic and sam-
pling techniques to arrive at a figure
of 18 million exposures in one month


for a showing of 150 King Size
Posters. This amounts to an average
of at least 4 exposures for every man,
woman and child in the area, and at a
cost of 33 per 1000 exposures.
CAR CARDS are the signs placed
inside city buses to reach the bus
rider. They lend themselves to longer,
explanatory copy, since the average
rider when he steps on a bus is
"locked-up" for a 30 minute ride.
Sizes vary from an 11"x14" space to
an 11"x7' card. 11" by 28" is the
standard car card which costs ap-
proximately $1 per bus per month,
sold on an annual basis. An adver-
tiser may buy a full showing, which
is one card in each bus, a half show-
ing (one card in every other bus) or a
quarter showing (one card in every
fourth bus). Copy, which is either
silk-screened or litho, is supplied by
the advertiser, and may be changed
as often as every 30 days.
It is usually startling for the non-bus-
rider to learn just how many people
ride public transit every day. The


buses of Dade County carry over 5
million one-way fares monthly-men
and women traveling to and from
their jobs, people going shopping, chil-
dren going to and from school and
play. The average rider makes 37
trips a month.
Since this is the only advertising me-
dium which actually takes the cus-
tomer to the point of purchase, car
cards reach people when they are in
a buying mood. And, being what is
termed a "by-product medium" (the
buses do not depend upon advertising
revenue for support) car cards cost
only about 10 per 1000 exposures.
Most recent development for inside-
bus advertising includes the use of
take-one hooks for dispensing coupons.
Over 71% of bus riders are women,
and since working women spend a
minimum of time at home where they
are subject to in-the-home advertising,
car cards become one of the best ways
to reach this increasing working-
woman market.















printing industry ranks fourth in dade







James L. Jones,
Executive Secretary
Printing Industry of Greater Miami, Inc.




Like advertising, the printing industry in Miami has
grown up and out of the competitive reach of other
Southern markets.

Miami now boasts a printing industry that ranks E"l
fourth largest in manufacturing activities in Dade
County. With 278 firms, Miami provides the South's
largest and finest printing facilities. The size and
variety of equipment available here cannot be com-
pared anywhere in the South. Actually, the only work.
that cannot be done in Miami is rotogravure.

So many firms are caused, to a great extent, by the
huge amount of printed tourist promotion that ema- I
nates from here; and so much volume is greatly respon- cF nKrU r_
sible for the general upgrading of the whole industry
as we know it. r
Miami printers, today, offer price and quality that is ... *.
far above the nation's average. They have won many
of the nation's top awards for their craftsmanship, and FLY
have generated a healthy competitiveness among them- sa-
selves that is benefitting all-giving finest quality, ,
efficient servicing, equitable pricing.

Printers have done much to improve their own ethics, .
and promote a practice of approved technical stand-
ards and trade customs within the industry. Members
of the Printing Industry of Greater Miami, Inc., a
non-profit trade association comprised of owners and
managers of printing and allied graphic arts firms in CCUA
the Greater Miami area, are proud to be among the
first to recognize the advantages of mutual cooperation.
Committees in the Association include one on education ,.
that works very closely with the industrial arts de- .
apartments of the Dade County schools in helping to '
develop new talent for the growing field of Graphic .
Arts. Contests and student awards are made every
year by the Association, and it has for the past three 1
years sponsored a Junior Achievement company.
Members of the Printing Industry firmly believe in
the principle of working together with legitimate com-
petitors in their own trade for the protection and
promotion of their industry.













moves Into its second year


By W. Arthur Fielden, President
Greater Miami Association of Advertising Agencies
Well into its second year of existence, the Greater
Miami Association of Advertising Agencies con-
tinues its attempt to bring together into a common
fold those groups engaged in the agency business.

As set forth in the preamble to the GMAAA Stan-
dards of Practice, it is a group of recognized adver-
tising agencies formed to:
a) Help maintain the high standards of the adver-
tising profession;
b) Promote a better understanding and relationship
among advertising agencies, the clients, the vari-
ous branches of the advertising professions, and
the general business public.

Numbering 24 member agencies, the GMAAA is
headed by the following officers: President, W.
Arthur Fielden, Bishopric/Green/Fielden; Vice
President, David Hume, Hume, Smith & Mickel-
berry; Secretary, George Chamberlin, Henry Qued-
nau; Treasurer, Julian Burg, Burg Advertising.

Directors of the association are John Dey, Grant
Advertising; Charles Friedlander, Charles Fried-
lander Advertising; Erwin Harris, Harris & Com-
pany; and Robert Hurwitz, Robert S. Hurwitz
Advertising.

In addition to the Standards of Practice, all
GMAAA agencies subscribe to a Code of Ethics,
based upon the principle that mutual confidence and
respect between agency, clients, media and sup-
P pliers, is the basis of sound operations.

SConfining itself to closed meetings, the business of
> the GMAAA is conducted by its Executive Commit-
i tee, with sub-committees operating under its direc-
n tion. All member agencies have an official delegate
5 to the association; all have one vote on matters that
z z come before the group.
0o
STANDARDS Chartered as a non-profit organization in the State
Sr I of Florida, the GMAAA Constitution sets forth in
uF CODE OF detail the aims and objectives of the group, which
0 ACTICE I S are keynoted as follows:
SETHIS Encouraging the recognition of advertising as an
n z essential element in the free enterprise system of the
American way of life . and . Enhancing the
advertising agency business by fostering favorable
recognition on the part of the business community of
the general public.












TWO


IN A Miami Sponsors Second

ROWNational Essay Contest Winner
ROW



















A highlight of the Advertising Federation of America's 55th
Annual Convention was the award made to Miss Judith Rose
Armayor, winner of AFA's annual essay contest.
Miss Armayor's achievement is specially significant to
Miamians, since she is the second consecutive winner from
Miami Edison Senior High School . the second consecutive
winner to be sponsored by the Advertising Club of Greater
Miami.
Her essay, reprinted right, was one of more than 100,000 en-
tries, and was acclaimed by the various judges to be the
best in the state, the 4th District and the nation.
When she entered the contest, Miss Armayor was a senior
at Miami Edison. She is now a freshman at Wellesley
College. High school achievements for Miss Armayor in-
cluded service as Captain of the Miami Edison Cadette Corps,
Vice President of the National Honor Society, winner of the
Miami Edison School and Dade County "I Speak For Demo-
cracy" contest, recipient of the Elks' Award for "Most
Valuable Student" and winner of the Delta Gamma Award
for "Outstanding Senior Girl." Miss Armayor ranked fourth
highest scholastically in a class of 680 students.
The Advertising Club of Greater Miami conducts the Essay
Contest on the local level. Mrs. Lois Cowart Tanner served
on the State Committee for the contest, and Mrs. Lowis B.
Carlton was Club Chairman.
In recognition of her keen interest and very fine support,
The Advertising Club of Greater Miami last fall bestowed
an Honorary Membership on Mrs. Wilma Holderman, English
teacher at Miami Edison and instructor to the two national
winners. And, for their part in bringing honor to the Adver-
tising Club of Greater Miami, the two national winners,
Judith Rose Armayor and Cynthia Smith were also made
Honorary Members of the Club.











"HOW ADVERTISING



AFFECTS


OUR LIVES"






by
Judith Rose Armayor, 17 years old
Miami Edison Senior High School


Advertising is a vast industry. Here
in America it is more highly devel-
oped and widely used than in any
other country of the world; therefore,
its effects must be similarly wide-
spread. But what are these effects
and what part do they play in our
everyday lives?
The word ADVERTISING brings
many thoughts to our minds. To me,
each letter represents one of the nu-
merous ways in which advertising
affects our daily living.
The first letter A stands for Abun-
dance. Yes, advertising, by stimulat-
ing consumption, and consequently
production, offers us a greater abun-
dance of goods. Because we have
never experienced want, often we do
not realize and appreciate abundance.
Perhaps if we visualize the condi-
tions under which citizens of Com-
munist countries live-with no choice
of products and certainly no abun-
dance-we will value more highly our
system of free enterprise, and the
vital part which advertising plays.
To me, the second letter D represents
Demand. It is advertising, the brightly
colored magazine ads, the public
enlightenment of the qualities of a
product, which creates a demand for
it. As we have learned in Economics,
it is this demand which regulates the
supply of a product, and consequently,
its price. In this manner, advertising
greatly affects our lives, indirectly
controlling the price which we pay
for goods.
The third letter V symbolizes the
Variety which advertising affords.
This is certainly one area in which
all of us are affected. It is difficult
for us to imagine what life would be
like with only one brand of toothpaste,
or one make of car on the market.
Advertising not only offers us inter-
esting variety in the type of product,


but also variety in the price and
quality of product, enabling each of
us to suit his own needs and pocket-
book.
The next letter E represents, to me,
the Employment which advertising
offers. Although some may say,
"Well, this doesn't affect me," it
does directly affect over fifty thou-
sand advertising agents or workers
in advertising agencies and indirectly
affects hundreds of thousands of
printers, artists, writers, etc. So we
can plainly see that the employment
offered by advertising has not only
affected many lives, but even enabled
them to exist.
The fifth letter R brings to my mind
the Recreation that advertising makes
possible for us. Think of the enjoy-
ment that we get from the newspaper
comics, the magazine stories, and, of
course from television programs-all
of which are made possible through
advertising. We may joke a bit at
times about the TV commercials, yet
we all realize that without them we
could not have the recreation pro-
vided by the programs themselves. If
this were to happen, our daily lives
would suffer a great loss in enjoy-
ment.
The T ini advertising stands for the
increased Thrift which it has brought
about. Although some may say that
advertising only persuades them to
spend more money, this is not true.
Because of the competition which it
creates, prices are forced down, thus
enabling us to get the same or better
products for a cheaper price.
The first I in advertising symbolizes
the many Improvements which it has
brought about. I speak mainly of
those improvements in the products
themselves, for this can be considered
as undoubtedly the greatest single
effect of advertising. It has forced
producers into making better quality


products at lower prices, again by
encouraging competition.
The next letter S can be used to repre-
sent the term which generalizes all of
the effects of advertising-the height
of our Standard of Living. Yes, it is
largely because of advertising and its
effect on our economy, that we enjoy
the highest standard of living of any
nation in the world.
The last I is representative of the
American Ideals which advertising
exemplifies. George Norman said,
"You can tell the ideals of a nation
by its advertising." Yes, it is partly
due to the high quality of our adver-
tising that our country is recognized
as one of high ideals.
The N in advertising stands for the
News which it brings to us. The news
which we receive through our daily
newspapers, television and radio
broadcasts, is made possible by ad-
vertisements. Actually, this affects
our lives greatly, for unless we citi-
zens of a democracy, are informed on
current events, we cannot effectively
run our own government.
The final letter G shows the effect
of advertising in providing a Guaran-
tee, a guarantee that any inferior
product will not last long on the
market, a guarantee that products
will have to continue to improve
in order to be successful. And fi-
nally, advertising provides a guaran-
tee that our way of life will remain
one of free enterprise, based on the
actual worth of any product or in-
dividual.
Yes, advertising affects our lives in
many ways. Those which I have
enumerated are only a few, yet they
demonstrate how advantageous these
effects are. Therefore, we should
ever be grateful that we live in a
free and democratic land, one where
advertising has the opportunity to
make life better for us all.















SUN, S













A


SURVEY

ON

TOURISM




By
Frank R. Howell
Local Sales Manager, WTVJ


You have probably heard about
the nightclub comedian, who, unable
to draw a laugh from his audience
said, "I know you are out there be-
cause I can hear you breathing." In-
formation about South Florida tour-
ism is somewhat akin to the nightclub
comedian-we know the tourists are
out there, but we really don't know
too much about them.
Many of our advertisers, both local
and national, have often lamented
the fact that there was no single
source to which they could go for
information regarding the various
aspects of tourism. Since tourism is
one of South Florida's biggest indus-
tries, this lack of information was
lamentable. In order to find out more
about tourism and tourist television
viewing habits, WTVJ commissioned
two separate creative research proj-
ects in March of 1959. The first
project was assigned to Dr. Reinhold
Wolf, Director, Bureau of Economics
and Business Research, University
of Miami. The purpose was to deter-
mine how many television sets there
are in the Gold Coast area which
are available to tourists only, and
where these sets are located. The
second project was done by ARB
Surveys, Inc., an affiliate of the
American Research Bureau. The


purpose of this report was to deter-
mine the general characteristics of
the South Florida tourist and the
level of his exposure to television.
From these reports we were able to
gather a great deal of heretofore un-
known facts about tourists and tour-
ism which we hope will be useful to
advertising agencies and their clients.
The University of Miami Survey
showed us the actual number of ho-
tels, motels, and apartments avail-
able to tourists in the Dade, Palm
Beach, Broward and Monroe County
areas, as follows:
TOURIST-ONLY
ACCOMMODATIONS
County Hotels Motels Apts.
Dade 602 503 22,315
Palm Beach 76 362 7,600
Broward 74 293 12,340
Monroe 12 220 775
TOTAL 764 1,378 43,030
Some five million tourists will visit
South Florida in 1960 using these
facilities and will spend a conserv-
atively estimated 625 million dollars,
a figure, incidentally, which does not
include their transportation costs to
and from South Florida. The combi-
nation of South Florida's permanent
population, together with tourists,
on any average single day produces









a population total greater than that
of Washington, D. C. According
to the WTVJ ARB survey, these
tourists come from all over the Uni-
ted States, as well as Canada and
other foreign countries. Their point
of origin is outlined below:
TOURIST ORIGIN
(By Percentage)


Rank
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.


Census Region
Middle Atlantic -
East North Central _
New England --
South Atlantic -
Canada
West North Central
East South Central
West South Central
Pacific Coast
Other Foreign Places
TOTAL ---


The survey revealed some


South
Florida
--44%
21%
11%
8%
6%
----- 3%
----- 3%
..---.. 2%
-1%

100%
of the


general characteristics of the winter
tourists in that the average size of
the tourist group is 2.4 persons, while
the most recurrent group size is two
persons. While tourists of all ages
visit South Florida, it is significant
to advertisers that 54% are in the
high profit 30-59 year old range,
with the average age being 47.
The fact that the survey was con-
ducted in March is reflected in these
findings, since younger people usu-
ally vacation in Florida during Christ-
mas, Easter, and the summer months.
Like their age, tourist-occupation
appears to represent profit-oppor-
tunity for advertisers. The highest
single grouping is among executives,
professionals, sales people and
skilled workers-an impressive 49%.
Most tourists stay in South Florida
long enough to begin the develop-
ment of "native" spending and liv-
ing patterns.
An overwhelming 52% spend more
than the cursory one week commonly
believed to be the current winter
average. More than one out of three
(34%) spend more than the tradi-
tional two weeks. More than a month
is spent by 20% of them.
Only 7% of our winter tourists are
non-adults-4% children (under 12)
and 3% teenagers. 93% are adults
... 47% of them male, 53% female.
It may surprise some to learn that
53% of the tourists do not stay in
hotels. Also, that more of them stay
in apartments than in motels (20%
in motels, 30% in apartments).
To a larger degree, of course, the


apartment-dwelling visitors tend to-
ward normal living and spending pat-
terns much more than their motel or
hotel counterparts. They also ac-
count for a major share of the long-
term tourists. Nevertheless, hotels
do accommodate 47% of all visitors
-far more than any other single
group of tourist facility. Hotel visi-
tors also account for the majority
of the short-term vacationers.
As a means of travel for a South
Florida vacation, the following is a
breakdown of the most popular
means of travel:
Automobile ____-- 48%
Airlines -....-------... .---- 30%
Train --- 20%
Bus ------- 2%
Of all tourists who travel by com-
mon carrier-train, bus, or plane-
the airlines transport the major
share. Taking common carrier tour-
ists as 100%, airlines bring 58%.
Trains bring 38% and buses bring
4%.
Among all tourists, 12% fly Eastern
Air Lines, 6% National Airlines,
4% Northeast Airlines and 3%
Delta. "Other Air Lines" account
for 5%.
Among tourists who fly, Eastern en-
joys 40% share of the market, Na-
tional 20%, Northeast 13.3% and
Delta 10%. "Other Air Lines" ac-
count for 16.7%.
In order to accommodate the swelling
tide of tourists, the major domestic
airlines are operating 402 daily
flights, 52 of them will be pure jet
flights.
Detailed analysis of the tourist dol-
lar is not available from the survey.
However, general estimates of the
breakdown may be obtained by ap-
plying state averages, provided by
the Florida Development Commission,
to the Gold Coast visitor.
In terms of percentages and total
dollar value, tourist spending will be
in approximately the following pro-
portions during 1960.
ITEM % Millions
Lodging _..--.------------- 24 $150
Groceries, Food,
Beverages -- 29 1811
Clothing and Apparel --- 11 681
Jewelry, Gifts, Souvenirs 3 181
Drugs, Cosmetics, Tobacco,
Photo Supplies .-------- 6 37
Gasoline, Oil, Auto
Maintenance --___ 10 62.
Services (Barbers, Doc-
tors, Laundries, Beauty
Shops) --- ---- 4 25


Amusements
Utilities ---


10 621
3 180


TOTAL _..-----________- 100 $625
The Gold Coast vacationer has ample
opportunity to view television. Nine
out of ten-92%, actually-have a
place to watch television.
Two out of three 66% say they
do watch television. They watch
mainly in their own room or quarters,
47%; with motel or hotel lobby or
recreation room representing the
second principal viewing point, 40%.
"All others" total 13%.
Both surveys produced estimates of
the total number of television sets
available only to tourists. The Bu-
reau estimate is 65,707 tourist-only
sets within the Gold Coast as of July
1, 1959. The ARB estimate is 67,-
865. Both estimates specifically ex-
clude television sets in bars, restau-
rants and "other public places".
Because of the statistical support
each of these estimates provides for
the other, it appears justifiable to
adopt an average estimate of approx-
imately 66,500 tourist-only television
sets within South Florida.
By combining the 66,500 tourist-
only television sets with the perma-
nent residents set count, South Flor-
ida can then boast a total television
set count of 528,600, January, 1960.
As in permanent homes, women tour-
ists do slightly more viewing than
men tourists, except in the post-11
P.M. time period when men and
women viewing levels are equal.
The most popular TV program
categorically among tourists is news
and weather, followed by westerns,
dramas and variety-in that order.
Three times more tourists view the
11 P.M. news and weather.
The tourist views television for con-
siderable lengths of time throughout
the various parts of the day and night
as follows:
TOURIST VIEWING
Time Avg. Viewing
Segment Length (Min.)
Pre-Noon 40:00
Noon 6 P.M. .---_---- 58:00
6 P.M. 11 P.M. .- 62:00
After 11 P.M. -- 42:00
And so, the tourists of South Florida
do view, do listen, do buy. Whether
you sell a product or service with
specific application to tourists only
or sell a general use product or serv-
ice with mass consumption charac-
teristics, it is important for you to
get your share of the tourist dollar.










POINT OF PURCHASE ADVERTISING







Al Wilson, Power-Ful Displays


Point of Purchase Advertising is a
specialized form of display used as a
sales and promotion tool for a specific
line or product. The device must mer-
chandise, not just advertise.
In recent years there has been a tre-
mendous swing to point of purchase
merchandising displays by retail out-
lets which formerly scorned them.
Part of this growth is caused by the
increased number of lines now carried
by most retailers, and the trend to
reduced sales forces as more and more
retail stores move toward self-service
and impulse-purchase type operations.
The importance of point of purchase
display in this situation is immedi-
ately apparent. Crowds flock through
the aisles of the stores, obscuring by
their very numbers much of the mer-
chandise not specifically promoted, on
the spot, by properly designed dis-
plays. Some 80% of sales volume
occurs in 6 or 7 peak hours, and dur-
ing these peak periods it is necessary
to call the attention of the customers
to particular items or lines if they are
to be moved.
Recent studies show that about 33
million women in the United States
wear glasses with which to read, and
another 15 million should wear them.
This means that about 60% of the
women shoppers cannot read price and
copy in which the lettering is less than
% inches high. And, without accu-
rate price and benefit information,
they are slow to buy. Studies also
show that, despite intensive national
advertising campaigns, 70% of the
people who come into stores do not
ask for merchandise by brand names.


Particular products and lines which
are aggressively merchandised by
Point of Purchase Displays will be
noticed at the moment when the pro-
spective purchaser has made up his
mind to buy. This gives impetus to
the total campaign by recalling to
memory the reasons why this particu-
lar product, and no other, is the one
he wants.
The problems inherent in this medium
are somewhat different from those
normally confronted by many adver-
tising agencies, since this is a highly
specialized field. In many cases, the
broad advertising theme is not di-
rectly transferable to effective display
pieces.
Point of Purchase Advertising dis-
plays need not be expensive or compli-
cated, although they often are. They
can be made of a great variety of
materials and in a wide range of sizes.
Many are simply well designed and
carefully produced die-cut pieces, silk
screened for outstanding color attrac-
tion. They may fit in a frame, stand
on a counter, in a window, or be large
enough to stand in an aisle, where
they often contain and display the
merchandise offered for sale. Some
are made of wood, metal, or plastic,
all materials easily made attractive
by the magic of a good silk screen
processor. There are innumerable re-
ports of excellent results, with some
displays stimulating sales increases
up to 600%.
The Point of Purchase designer must
develop skills in analyzing the retail-
(Continued on Page 77)


fI /- A -5/ _-.


~'"~""'
















TO


Don Fischer, Audience Promotion Manager, WCKT


KEY WEST...


OVER 95% OWN TV


In the words of the National Association
of Broadcasters . ."Television broad-
casting is a constantly growing business,
basically local in character, and subject
to strong competition both within the
industry and from other communications
media."
You won't find a manager of a TV oper-
ation in South Florida who won't say
"Amen" to that. In this fastest-growing
area of the United States, television ex-
pands at the same rate as everything
else, in size, in stature, in character.
From a one-station beginning in 1948,
Miami now boasts three network affili-
ates, an outstanding educational station,
and the possibility of a fourth commer-
cial licensee, operating as an independ-
ent. The latter situation is under con-
sideration by the FCC as this is written.
Serving the area from the Palm Beaches
to the Keys and up through the south-
central portion of the state, Miami tele-
vision has now come of age with high-
caliber local programs to supplement the
top-rated presentations from New York
and Hollywood; news departments to
rival the finest in the nation; cultural
and public service programming to cover
area needs; ability to originate the most
of musical extravaganzas or
comp e sports events; the latest
faci les t arry color programs, and
her s 1 innovations which are a
p o elevi n in 1960.
I Sout homes, saturation of
eivers go beyond the 95% point
e t w Id be difficult to find
n age ami without television.
a nt f n shapes and sizes of
isi eiv s has started many
ili t "more-than-one-set"
o rs lan The more compact
o o ev operated by self-con-
aine su lies, have made it con-
ly o take TV to the beach,
oar hip o picnic hammocks and
t the ice n the occasion demands.
959, color receivers sold in
nu i rs t ual total sales of all the
years ^ ing. More than 5000 color
now in use in South Florida,
giving TV viewing a new dimension and
a higher degree of satisfaction. These
color sets have passed the test, so to
speak, and are as devoid of "bugs" as
the average black-and-white set.
As receivers have improved, so have
antennae. TV technicians report that
more new antenna installations have been
made here this year than would have


been dreamed of 12 months ago. These
new antennas have been tailor-made for
the channel situation in this area, and
improve the picture quality by more than
100%. The technicians liken this situa-
tion to the improvement of motor fuels
to suit the new model automobiles.
Miami's crop of television personalities
presents as fine an array as can be found
anywhere. Madison Avenuers continue
to express complete satisfaction with the
available talent in Miami, and find their
needs well satisfied in this regard. A
bumper crop of newcomers is constantly
available from the vast training pro-
grams of state and private universities
of Florida, and more and more young
people seem to be choosing television as a
career for themselves.
In South Florida, as elsewhere, television
as an advertising medium has been used
in the sale of everything from candy to
cultivators. Miami families watch tele-
vision an average of six hours a day,
more time than they spend doing any-
thing else except sleeping or working.
Tourists to the gold coast area give a tre-
mendous "plus" that few regions of the
U.S. can match.
The recent scandals involving the quiz
programs were shocking indeed . to
local station operators fully as much as
to the general public . but the revela-
tions concerned but a tiny fraction of the
total program picture. It may be sur-
prising to some that Miami gets 15.4%
of its programming in the form of dis-
cussion; 6.2% as educational features,
about the same in news programming;
8.4% in general drama; 6% in Westerns
and only 2.8% in action-adventure
dramas.
Most TV stations are keenly aware of
the tremendous responsibility placed
upon them by the wide acceptance of the
medium. They are keenly aware, too,
that they must be concerned with the
maintenance and promotion of good ad-
vertising practices. As members of, or
believers in the Television Code, they
subscribe to non-deception and good taste
in their programming, and the continua-
tion of the free competitive American
system of telecasting. Thus, they make
available to the eyes and ears of the
people they serve the finest programs of
information, education, culture and en-
tertainment.
1960 will probably be television's biggest
year to date-and Miami-area stations
are ready for it.


FROM


PALM BEACH




-1 Im t



"0W1


;oSY


S 'ICA GO


New Yorh Post 6-00*

A.
iv^1 0 ^


THE tSUN


X--Am
--- 5


The Detroit News


Hal Dawson, President
The Dawson Company

If you doubt Miami's attained maturity as an advertising
center, take a look at the number of internationally-known
magazine publishers who employ Miami publishers' repre-
sentatives! Hearst, Time, Inc., Conde Nast, Dell, Fawcett
and many others retain Miami-based personnel to cover
not only Florida, but all Southeast and the Caribbean.
Atlanta, which formerly had a monopoly on this kind of
advertising service, has given much ground to Miami. We
now have the gratifying situation where Miami publishers'
representatives are opening branch offices in Atlanta!
The shift in emphasis seems most logical when one con-
siders that many national advertisers are based here.
Miami is fast becoming recognized as the financial center
of the booming Latin American and Caribbean trade.
Geographically, Miami is the center of an area roughly
bounded by Virginia on the North, Mexico on the West
and Venezuela on the South-the area covered by Miami
magazine advertising representatives.
Recent growth in this Miami branch of the business has
been rapid, but what of the future? It seems to me that
it continues to hold great promise, what with the unques-
tioned expansion of the area and the automatic growth of
the number of publishers' representatives.
Just as important will be the continuing pressure on
publishers' profits which will force them to examine all
phases of their business to discover ways to more effi-
cient operation. One of the more glaring inefficiencies they
will find is the high cost of travelling their own men out
of New York to cover the Southeast.
Publishers who have already taken the profitable step of
employing Miami representatives are acquiring business
at an average overall sales cost of 17%%.
Studies made by the Association of Publishers' Represen-
tatives show that publishers who travel their own men in
areas like ours are shouldering a 33% overall sales cost.
The future as well as the present, therefore, indeed looks
sunny for Miami representatives, as more and more
publishers become aware of these economic facts of pub-
lishing life.


(Sh IBoaon SundaU GL~bte
7Saoi'


FUTURE GOOD

FOR

DADE

PUBLISHERS' REPS


It el e


OgtON SUNDAY HERALD


ENBLIF
















140 NEWSPAPER


LINK MIAMI WITH THE NATION


John N. Brodel, Manager,
Miami Office, Kelly-Smith Company

Dade County is a center for news-
paper representatives offering the
services of national newspapers to
every potential advertiser in the state
of Florida, Bahamas and the Carib-
bean.

National newspaper representative
companies, national newspapers, and
independent representative firms are
"on the scene" to render service for
140 newspapers in 128 markets of 40
states and two Canadian provinces.
The reasons for such ample repre-
sentation is evidenced by pertinent
comments from the industry:

E. F. Corcoran, Pres., Branham Co.
"We feel that the South, and particu-
larly Florida, has moved into a new
economic position, and all indices
point to a continued Florida growth
pattern in an upward curve for many
years to come.
"Another factor which influenced us
to open our Miami office was the
realization that "leisure time" has be-
come a world privilege and, accord-
ingly, a commercial commodity. The
products and services necessary to
supply this group represent BIG
business. We regard Miami as one
of our key offices."

H. W. Beyea, Pres., Hearst Advertis-
ing Service, Inc.
"In 1943, Hearst Advertising Service
established an office in Florida. From
one individual, it has grown to six.
This is our practical expression of
confidence in the growing importance
of Florida as a source of revenue
and a mature community in the prac-
tices of advertising."

F. W. Miller, Pres., Kelly-Smith Co.
"The growing importance of the
Miami and State of Florida market,
plus the ever-groving volume of
business from the Caribbean,
prompted this company to open an
office in Miami in January, 1959,
and it has since been enlarged."


H. W. Mo n
& Schmitt.
"The opening o as

years, we covered tr h of
New York. However, as and
the Greater Miami area the
need for us to have a more th tough
coverage of the area grew, and of
course that can only be done with an
office on the spot, and with a full-
time resident manager. Great as the
growth of the area has been in the
past, I personally look for still greater
growth in the future."
J. H. Glass, Advertising Manager,
The New York News
"The continuing growth of Florida
and, in particular, the Greater Miami
area as a source of advertising rev-
enue, makes it imperative that we
have on-the-spot coverage. Our office,
located in Miami Beach, is part of a
plan for expansion based on the con-
cept of offering] direct service in
areas of advertising concentration."
T. E. Callis, Advertising Director,
The Wall Street Journal
"Our decision to open a Miami adver-
tising sales office was prompted by
the belief that the Southern Florida
area represented a potential that
could only be realized with on-the-
spot representation. Our experience
has been a most satisfactory one, and
is due in part to the growth of the
area itself."

The active part of advertising from
Florida, Bahamas and the Caribbean
requires national newspaper recogni-
tion. Reaction by newspapers has
been to give the necessary service
through frequent personal contacts
possible only by "on the spot" repre-
sentation. Of equal or greater value
is the desire to reach each advertiser
offering a product or service, and to
present him with knowledge of known
and new markets.
Even statistics prove the need for
such presentation. The Florida De-
velopment Commission tabulated a


record total of 5,405,518 vacation
visitors during the first six months
of 1959. This means an expenditure
of perhaps one and one-half billion
dollars of which approximately fifty-
nine percent was spent on retail pur-
chases for apparel, drugs, tobacco,
gasoline, etc., and the balance was
spent in hotels, motels and restau-
rants.
This is large volume business at-
tracted by national newspaper adver-
tising, and still it is not the full
story.
The Florida Development Commission
reports "a total of 336 new industrial
plants and major expansion in Flor-
ida with Dade County in the fore-
front during the first half of 1959."
Here is industrial growth and diver-
sity-chemical, electronic, food, pro-
cessing- two-continent trade, and
more!
Dade alone, one of the 67 Florida
counties, provides good reason for
national newspaper interest.

R. J. Welsh, Director of Dade County
Development Dept., states:
"The United States Census Bureau
has pegged Metropolitan Dade County
as 'first in the nation in the rate of
growth in manufacturing'. This
startling fact is not generally known.
Similarly, few realize that our 2403
Dade County manufacturers sell over
one-third of their products outside
South Florida. Metropolitan Miami's
large and expanding manufacturing
core, with its widespread distribution,
has required national and interna-
tional advertising as an essential in-
gredient for its success."
The facts point up this conclusion:
Each advertiser will need to reach
more new people markets news-
paper audiences. National news-
papers, through their representatives,
supply the necessary information to
provide the impulse toward advertis-
ing, so that more business is gener-
ated and the demand for new cus-
tomers is forcibly enlarged.



























Robert E. Salisbury,
Latin American Publishing Director
Time-Life International


GREATER MIAMI

MARKETING

ADVERTISING


LATIN AMERICA



Toss these seemingly unrelated subjects into a hopper, add a dash of imagina-
tion and you spotlight the following trend of major importance to this area:
GREATER MIAMI-LOGICAL CENTER FOR HANDLING
MARKETING AND ADVERTISING DIRECTED TO LATIN
AMERICA.

THE THEORY
As a newcomer to Miami-recently returned to the U.S.A. after thirteen years'
residence in Latin America-I believe this area has many obvious attributes
that make it the natural center for trade and, of equal importance, promotes
better understanding between the United States and Latin America. Without
attempting to arrange them in order of importance, let me cite a few of these
from the standpoint of trade:
-proximity
-a similar climate to most of Latin America, of particular importance to the
apparel and allied fields.
-an estimated 10% Latin population mix which:
a) makes available a large pool of prospective bilingual employees.
b) provides a made-to-order test market for Spanish copy and merchandising
tactics.
-numerous freight forwarding companies with many years' experience in
handling shipments to and from Latin America.
-unparalleled airline connections, both passenger and freight, to all of Latin
America.
-excellent banking facilities with personnel experienced in Latin American
transactions.
-planned port improvements which will attract substantial shipping interests.
In a non-trade sense or, I would prefer to say, in the interests of better under-
standing between our at times divergent views in the Western Hemisphere, the
advertising fraternity of Greater Miami is many times involved in the projec-
tion of a U.S. corporate image South of the border. Miami agencies have also
undertaken reverse projections such as the recently implemented Cuban cam-
paign which is attempting to improve the Island tourist image in the United
States despite contradictory nationwide headlines.
To conclude the theoretical aspect, this area has a great affinity to Latin Amer-
ica in many other undefined aspects which probably trace back to its origin
as a Spanish possession.

THE FACTS
Many of the largest out-of-state advertisers and media in the United States
now have export and/or Latin American headquarters or promotion offices in
South Florida. A few of these in alphabetical order are:
American Airlines International Petroleum (ESSO)
Carters Ink Pan American World Airways
General Mills (Feed Division) Pearson Pharmacal
Gulf Oil Corp. The New York Times
Hertz Corp. Time-Life International
Intercontinental Hotels Corp. Wall Street Journal
These and the Florida companies interested in the Latin American market can
draw upon a wealth of experience by using any one of the many internationally-
minded local advertising agencies. It also bears mentioning that the out-of-
state advertisers settling in the area have also been responsible for some of the
large northern agencies opening offices in Greater Miami. Granted they com-
pete with the local fraternity, but this, too, has and will continue to contribute
to the steady growth of:
GREATER MIAMI AS THE LOGICAL CENTER FOR LATIN
AMERICAN MARKETING AND ADVERTISING.





















What exactly is Silk Scr








Ralph B. Rose, Rose Poster Printing, Inc.


Fast, inexpensive, versatile, highly
effective . Silk Screen printing is
the newest of the Graphic Arts em-
ployed in modern advertising. And
it's perhaps the least understood by
production men, artists and clients!
The silk screen process can be used
for an infinite number of things: a
small button or object; a photo in
half-tone; sixty foot banners; run in
sections; 4 x 12' signs on any number
of materials including masonite, ply-
wood and sheet metal.
The range is almost endless, for it
includes decals, transit advertising,
bumper strips, menus covers, presen-
tation books and signs for transit
advertising.
In the past, the silk screen process
was confined mostly to short runs.
With the development of fast drying
inks and new printing equipment, the
gap between silk screening and other
processes is fast being closed, both as
regards price and quality.
Here in Florida in the last few years,
silk screening has been used for the
printing of electronic circuits with
ink that is a conductor of electricity.
This enables the circuit manufactur-
ers to simply insert tubes, condenser,
resistors and other components, and
produce the finished instrument. Silk
screening is used to print instrument
panel markings, to print on bottles,
ceramics, plastics, wallpaper, textiles,


art subjects, souvenirs and novelties.
Most work is ordinarily done in poster
ink. Yet, any number of other ve-
hicles can be used, including lacquers,
synthetics, water colors, baked and
porcelain enamels, polyester plastics,
acrylic resins, fluorescents (DayGlo),
and black light. The application of
bronze or silver metallics in a one
coat operation will cause almost any
printer to be envious.
Art work for silk screening can be
prepared in the same manner as for
offset or letter press printing. It isn't
always necessary to deliver a finished
job; in fact, much time and money
can be saved by consulting the silk
screen printer before preparing the
art. A silk screen printer who em-
ploys a skilled stencil cutter can re-
produce a job from pencil layout with
color indications. For example, art
production for a 22 x 28 card should
be worked in actual size. The letter-
ing can be roughed-in in pencil. The
stencil cutter will clean up and do
faster what an artist would generally
spend a lot of time doing in ink.
Small copy should be indicated for
size, set in type, blown up or reduced,
and stripped in. Color illustrations
should be produced to the actual size
in the colors desired. Before proceed-
ing, the artist or production man is
wise to consult the silk screen printer.


Art work for 24's and 30's should be
worked one inch to the foot scale;
can be colored in full, handled as a
pencil drawing, or a pasteup of type
with color indications. The art work
is then projected to actual size and
drawn in by hand, with the picture
or copy cleaned-up and sharpened.
Actual printing of 24 sheets is han-
dled in 10 sections, 30 sheets in 12
sections; and much money can be
saved if the silk screen printer is
consulted for sheeting arrangements
before the poster is designed.
Posters calling for photos in black
and white, duo-tone and four color
process can be done by the silk
screen method equally as well as by
lithography or offset. In silk screen
half-tone printing, a slightly differ-
ent half-tone dot structure is needed,
though sometimes a photo used for
a litho can be enlarged to do a job
on a larger poster. Advertisers who
want to reproduce a color photo or
a beautiful piece of art on an out-
door poster in quantities of 75 to
500 should consider the silk screen
process. For quantities of 500 or
more, lithography is usually cheaper,
because fully automatic reproduction
enters the picture.
Agencies and advertisers alike will
find that Dade County silk screeners
can produce some of the finest work
in the nation!


ing




















public


relations


in


south


florida







Philip E. DeBerard, Jr.
Division Public Relations Manager
Southern Bell Telephone Co.


Public relations practitioners in the Miami area,
long accustomed to being called everything from
"pressagent" to "engineers of consent," were startled
last November to read that a leading business editor
had described them as "a cut above admen in the
communications caste system."
In countless public relations organization meetings,
more of which have been held in Miami than in New
York of late, the term "public relations" is exhaus-
tively- and exhaustingly- defined. It all comes
down, pretty much, to sound policy, enthusiastically
practiced and adequately communicated.
In Dade County as the nation, there are generally
two kinds of P. R. people: those who participate on
the management level that develops sound policy and
then see that it is practiced and communicated
through the many information channels including
advertising; and those who are told by clients or
employers to go and do. A great deal of evidence
indicates there are increasingly more of the former.
This is a good thing, for those who live in the execu-
tive world are discovering that P. R. men are adept
in shaping the corporate image into a big dollar sign.
Public relations people ardently hope the quality is
improving as much as the quantity. The 1950 Miami
telephone directory listed 22 P. R. firms in the yellow
pages. The current edition shows 52 such listings,
many of them grouped under the banners of the
Greater Miami Public Relations Assn. and the
American Public Relations Assn. Two other P. R.
associations are ably represented in Dade: The
Public Relations Society of America and Florida
Public Relations Assn., Biscayne Chapter.
It is noteworthy that two of these groups, PRSA
and APRA, scheduled national conventions in Miami
Beach last fall, and national P. R. awards were
presented to two local agencies.
One measure of the maturity of public relations in
this young community is the generally high regard
which media personnel have for the P. R. contingent.
When they will discuss it seriously, editors and news
directors cheerfully concede they find P. R. represen-
tatives valuable for additional information, and a
means of keeping up with the many and varied
events each day. Public relations people, in turn,
profit by having some of the most highly talented
and skilled newsmen in the world as their severest
critics. All publications' staffs are ready to pounce
on dubious activity of P. R. forces, particularly in
the field of city and county government.
There have long been murmurings about "profes-
sional" status for P. R. The APRA Miamians' event
went so far as to draft proposed legislation that
would certify counselors in the field. Faced with
the spectre of governmental control and the realities
of lobbying the bill through the legislature, the
group allowed the proposal to become and remain
dormant.
But whether or not the P. R. people are ever licensed
or certified, most subscribe to a specific code of
ethics. They work hard to follow the Golden Rule,
though they can look to no organization officers to
print up the vows for hanging on the office wall.
The Miami area public relations man's favorite role
is that of a booster of Florida and Florida business.
Indeed, this objective is virtually the raison d'etre of
the state associations. They have reason to be proud
of their accomplishments, for public relations and its
important tool, publicity, have made immeasurable
contributions to the growth of the state and commu-
nities therein. Advertising has been a lot of help, too.


I









direct

sales

with

direct

mail


Direct Mail Advertising in Dade
County has grown consistently with
the national figures, a gain of at
least 8% over the previous year. It
continues to maintain second place
in total advertising dollar volume
spent throughout the country.
In the Miami area, Direct Mail fa-
cilities are comparable to those of
any major city. Approximately 30
firms, specializing in Direct Mail,
have complete facilities for creating,
producing and handling any promo-
tion problem. Some of these are
members of the two National Trade
organizations, MASA (Mail Adver-
tising Services Association Interna-
tional) and DMAA (Direct Mail
Advertising Association). The com-
plete facilities of both of these
organizations are available through
these local members. It is possible
to obtain information regarding na-
tional campaigns or answers to spe-
cific problems which may be new to
this area, but have been handled in
other areas.
The local Direct Mail firms have
contacts with national mailing list
compilers and national list brokers,
so it is possible to get the names and
addresses of practically any type of
retailer, wholesaler, manufacturer,
income groups and neighborhoods to
meet specific requirements.
To make mailings more attractive,
the local envelope manufacturers
help the entire industry by keeping us
abreast of the new types . every-
thing from the special billboards to
the new and different window en-
velopes that are now accepted by the
U.S. Post Office.
Automation, of course, is taking
its place in Direct Mail advertising
and with the automatic-folding and
inserting machine by Pitney-Bowes
and the four-station automatic in-
serting and mailing machine manu-
factured by Pitney-Bowes and Phil-


ipsburg. The use of automation in
addressing and selectivity of lists can
be accomplished with equipment
manufactured by Addressograph-
Multigraph, Elliott Addressing-to
name just a few.
Due to the tremendous growth of
South Florida, Occupant Mailing is
rapidly becoming a major factor in
neighborhood and area coverage.
This is due in part to its selectivity;
its complete coverage of the area,
and particularly important, because
this is a fast growing area where re-
movals and transients are large in
proportion to the population area.
In many important ways, Direct
Mail Advertising offers unique selec-
tivity and flexibility. Because Direct
Advertising can be directed to spe-
cific individuals or markets, it offers
greater control; it can be made per-
sonal to the point of being confiden-
tial; it suffers no competition from
other advertising and/or editorial;
has no limitations on space and for-
mat; permits greater use of materials
and processes of production; provides
a means for introducing novelty and
realism. Direct Advertising can be
produced according to the needs of
the advertiser's own immediate
schedule; can be controlled for spe-
cific jobs of research; can be dis-
patched for accurate and exact tim-
ing; and provides more thorough
means for the reader to act or buy
through action devices not possible
of employment in other media.
Direct Mail Advertising widens the
influence and increases the power
of all other forms of advertising.
properly coordinated with newspaper,
magazine, television, radio, business
paper, outdoor, car card, window dis-
play and business film promotion,
Direct Mail increases the effective-
ness of these powerful media. Direct
Mail Advertising is the Salesmate-
not the competitor-in today's mod-
ern communication system.


lack Durant, President, Direct Mail Advertising Association of Greater Miami
















Lend A Hand To The Handicapped


It pays economically and in count-
less other ways to help rehabilitate
handicapped persons. According to
J. Caleb Boggs, Governor of Dela-
ware, who delivered the principal ad-
dress at the annual meeting of the
President's committee on the employ-


ment of the physically handicapped,
"In the past five years, 2300 disabled
persons have been satisfactorily em-
ployed, and are presently earning at
a rate of $5,400,000 annually."
The Miami Committee, located at
2600 West Flagler St., is actively
placing Physically Handicapped
people in private industry. It is under
the direction of Harry Russell, who
himself has a bit of a handicap which
only serves to make his excellent work
more believable-he is blind.
In Greater Miami, there are three
organizations, the Lighthouse For
The Blind, Sheltered Workshop, and
Jewish Vocational Service, which are
well-equipped to do your "nuisance
jobs" for you. By patronizing them,
you will not only be doing a charit-
able deed, but you will get your
tedious jobs done quickly, well and
inexpensively.
These organizations do not com-
pete with letter houses, nor do they
encourage work that can be done by
machine.
Their primary service to you is in
folding and collating materials which
cannot be done by machine-the
many pieced, odd-size jobs. They will
package anything that can't be
handled by machine; will glue gim-
micks; will do light industrial work,
and assembly.
For any job that can't be done by
machine, contact one of these agen-
cies for top service, speed, quality
and economy.



















truth in adv


krtising












for printing excellence:




EXCELLENCE OF CRAFTSMANSHIP

VOLUME OF QUALITY PRODUCTION


Tre Cr. SOc ln Fir.a .r.c Ir r h.ar-
pr.nler am'onig 200 lro .; S pnrl..er
SCleI CI V.1 no c % nh .r : n. & r,, I n;r


REPUTATION OF BUSINESS INTEGRITY


THE 1960 EDITION OF "WHO'S WHO
IN GRAPHIC ARTS IN AMERICA" SALUTES:


miami post publishing co.
19J12 N F .* FIRST COUPT AAl.rMI 52 FLOR IDA FRANi.iLN 9-3471


ARTHUR R. MOGGE
INCORPORATED
Adovertsan AfrcX~anact'sin

150 SOUTHEAST 2ND STREET
MIAMI 32, FLORIDA










CHICAGO ST. LOUIS MIAMI
Established 1928


A Proven Philosophy
of Agency Service
Advertising agencies retain
accounts for an average of
two years. Our average is
fourteen.
This record demonstrates the
Arthur R. Mogge philosophy
of agency service:
To become so well-versed
in our clients' fields that
we are considered more as
part of their staffs than as
a separate firm.
To apply the best efforts of
all our executive and crea-
tive personnel on each ac-
count, regardless of billing.
To provide intensive serv-
ice to a select list of clients,
rather than strive for size
alone.
If your advertising requires
an agency dedicated to this
philosophy of service, Arthur
R. Mogge, Inc., invites your
inquiry.

Member of American Association
of Advertising Agencies


;.4 1. r


Do your Photographs bear
this stamp of Quality?
iATlER MIAMI CHAPTER









INC.
Greater Miami Chapter
Professional Photographers
Guild of Florida, Inc.
Clouse Studio
Ernies Studios and Camera
Shops
Hinman Photography
Horizon Studios (Pompano Beach)
Liddle and Kohn
Dave Millspaugh
Photo Arts
Sante Schwarn Shelden, Inc.
(Ft. Lauderdale)
Thibedeau Studio
Tierney and Killingsworth
Bunny Yeager
Consult A/M Directory, or Yellow
Pages for Guild Telephone
listings.


.1.


I


-7


f


i












dynamic Advertising Medium


"Duke" Zimmerman, Sales Manager, WCKR


Radio, the glamour ad medium of
the 1930's and 40's, has become a
dynamic advertising force of many
dimensions. To almost everyone it has
become a daily living habit. It serves
listeners and business people alike.
Businesses, large and small, use it as
a potent means of mass communica-
tion for transmitting their sales mes-
sages.

During the 1950's, the number of
radio sets in actual use has increased
more than 85%, and this phenomenal
growth has primarily been the result
of people creating new places to listen.

Radio had almost attained 100% satu-
ration of homes by the time World
War II halted production of sets; then
following the war, another broadcast
medium started invading the homes in
a big way. Despite the fact that the
cynics said this would kill radio, it
actually speeded up the growth of the
medium. Manufacturers started mak-
ing smaller radio sets and made them
particularly for use in places other
than the living room. It wasn't long
before people discovered "Radio Can
Go Wherever They Go." Take a spin
in your car . glance at your alarm
clock . go to the beach or on a
picnic . take it easy in the den or
in the patio.

Today, whatever you do, wherever you
go, you're close to radio, and in touch
with the World.

The Gold Coast Area of Southeast
Florida (Dade and Broward Coun-
ties) has attained an unusually high
saturation of radio receivers in work-
ing order, and higher than average
listenership both in home and out of
home. According to the latest surveys,
60% of the homes in this area have
more than one radio (not including
automobile radios) and 28% of the


homes have 3 or more sets. The 357,-
000 family units (Sales Management
1959 Survey of Buying Power) in
these two counties own 714,000 home
and portable radios. In addition, ap-
proximately 85% of all automobiles
on the road today are radio-equipped,
and this totals 538,000 automobile
radios in the two counties. Thus there
are over 1%/ million sets or an average
of 3% sets per family.

Because of this broadened scope of
radio, it has grown tremendously in
number of broadcasting stations as
well.

It is a well-known fact that more
people are influenced every day by
the natural sounds of the human voice
than by all the artificial means of
communication ever invented. It is
also well known that the incredible
power of the imagination to create or
re-create any scene or situation in
acceptable form receives its greatest
stimulation from the human voice.

Dade County is now being served by
12 AM Stations and 6 FM Stations.


They are:



Call Letters
WQAM
WCKR
WGBS
WMBM
WINZ
WVCG
WMIE
WFEC
WAME
WKAT
WSKP
WMET


AM STATIONS
Dial
Position
560 Mi
610 Mi
710 Mi
800 Mi,
940 Mi
1070 Col
1140 Mi


Call Letters
WAFM
WMET
WGBS
WCKR
WWPB
WVCG


FM STATIONS
Dial
Position City
93.1 Miami
93.9 Miami Beach
96.3 Miami
97.3 Miami-MB
101.5 Miami
105.1 Coral Gables


The unique ability of radio to capi-
talize fully on these two potent factors
in advertising and selling has been the
stimulus that has made it grow and
grow and grow in spite of competition
that took its place in the living room
of the home during the early 50s.

Because radio is the entertainment
medium that people can enjoy while
doing other things, it has become the
personal advertising medium. People
now listen individually on their per-
sonal set to the stations and programs
of their choice. Thus it has become
a selective advertising medium
through which advertisers can reach
certain groups and types of people in
large quantities with their advertising
messages.


City
ami
ami-MB
ami
ami Beach
ami
ral Gables
ami


1220 Miami
1260 Miami


1360
1450
1490


Miami Beach
Miami
Miami Beach









of

advertising

facilities


Frum this page forward, you
will find as complete a list
of people and organizations
engaged in some form of
advertising endeavors as it has
been possible to compile. Over
900 questionnaire- were mailed,
and those firms which did not
reply within three weeks were
followed up again. Still,
we recognize the fact that
there are omissions, and for
these we apologize-yet time
did not permit
any further contact.
No charge was made for these
listings, except in the instances
where listing under more than
one category was requested.
We have brought these up
to date as of January 1. 1960.
insofar as information
was available.
Since work on
Advertisinrl 'Mliami 1961
nill be started this Spring,
may we respectfully suggest
that any qualified firms who
were omitted contact Charles
Whitebrook to insure their
inclusion in future issues, and
that any changes in the current
listings also be made in the
same manner as soon
as possible.
T',, Id.rrr lg Cih b
or Griat' I'fria"


ADVERTISING AGENCIES

ADVERTISING ENTERPRISES
5747 SW 8th St MO 6-9564
James T Cummings, Pres
ADVERTISING TRADE SERVICE INC
350 Lincoln Rd MB JE 8-5387
Bernard Tockar
AGEY ADVERTISING
1451 N Bayshore Dr FR 1-4504
Hoite Agey, Pres, M A Bogan, Secy
BAXTER & CRIM ADVERTISING AGENCY INC
230 Almena Av CC HI 8-1749
AlIert R Baxter, Pres, Marie C Baxter. Sec
JEROME BEIGEL ADVERTISING INC
420 Lincoln Rd MB JE 17782
Jerome Beigel, Pres, Marion K Thai, Sec-Treas
BEVIS ASSOCIATES ADVERTISING
1140 Ingraham Bldg FR 9-2696
Marshall E Myler, Gen-Mgr-Copy Chief;
Edward B Hollingsworth, Media Dir-Prod Mgr
Robert W Hills, Art Director
rf ee our ad page 5l
BISCAYNE ADVERTISING AGENCY INC
2138 Biscayne Blvd FR 93491
Alois J Siebein, Pres; Betty A Waddell, VP;
Molly Wlnokur. Sec-Treas
BISHOPRIC/GREEN/FIELDEN/INC
3361 SW 3 Av FR 1-1475
Karl Bishopric, Pres: Jack I Green, Exec VP,
W Arthur Fielden, VP:
Charles H Whitebrook, VP
I' ee our ad in fide lurit .ir er.
BLAKE & OSTROW INC
7630 Biscayne Blvd PL 8-1255-PL 7-6821
Eric A James, Pres
Walter R Blake, VP: Irving Ostrow, Sec-Treas
BOGORAD & EHRHARDT INC ADV
J090 N E 79 St, Suite 207 PL 9-5761
Jerry J Bogorad, Pres; Arthur R Ehrhardt, VP
BURG ADVERTISING INC
Penthouse of the Congress Bldg FR 1-5496
Julian I Burg, Pres & Creative Dir
Ann Schmerer, VP-Geni Mgr
r ef ou. r ad page 60 J
ARTHUR B COHEN ADVERTISING
1301 71 St MB UN 5-9474
COMMERCIAL ADVERTISING CO INC
7 S W 6 St FR 4-3656
Paulette N Lee, Pres: George Feehery, Mgr;
Jack Nolan. Mgr-Fort Lauderdale
CORYELL & ASSOCIATES INC
4563 Ponce de Leon Blvd CC MO 7 7517
James R Coryell, Pres: Stephen J Fisher, AE
DOBIN ADVERTISING INC
4014 Chase Ave MB JE 2.1778
S.See our ad Ipage O0)
JOSH ELLIS ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS
3909 N E 2 Av PL 1 7509
TALLY EMBRY INC
458 Pan American Bank Bldg FR 1-3621
T H Embry, Pres-Owner
(See our od prF 1!2)


PETER FINNEY & CO INC
529 W Flagler St FR 9 6581
Peter Finney, Pres; James Woodman, Ex VP
(See our ad page 60)
CHARLES FRIEDLANDER ADVERTISING INC
2138 Biscayne Blvd FR 1-7631
FRYKMAN ADVERTISING
2347 S W 22 St FR 3-0538
Jchn B Frykman; Conrad T Frykman
T S GILLOTT & ASSOCIATES
5989 S W 8 St MO 6-8130
GORCHOV ADVERTISING INC
350 Lincoln Rd MB JE 8-5521
Sidney Gorchov, Pres Mary Gorchov, Secy
GORDON INTERNATIONAL ADVERTISING
927 Lincoln Rd MB JE 2-2481
GOTTSCHALDT & ASSOCIATES INC
2505 Ponce de Leon Blvd CG HI 4-5739
Allan C Gottschaldt, Pres; K J Goeizer. VP;
Jacqueline E Roban, Secy-Asst Treas;
R W Gottschaldt, Treas
GRANT ADVERTISING INC
201 S W 13 St FR 3-6611
Will C Grant, Pres; John A Dey, Exec VP;
Palmer Tyler, VP-Office Mgr
(Ste o"ur ad page 16)
CHARLES ANTHONY GROSS ADVERTISING AGENCY
INC
American Title Bldg 901 N E 2 Av FR 1.8571
HALPERN & HALPERN ADVERTISING AGENCY
6254 S W 8 St MO 5-2133
Paul D Halpern. Pres: Joan Halpern
HARRIS & CO ADVERTISING INC
Dupont Plaza Center FR 7-1751
Erwin Harris Pres: Charles F Naya, VP;
George Buchanan, VP, C McA. Bowen Treas
i.Sce ior A.i page 1i
L H HARTMAN CO INC
Metropolitan Bank Bldg FR 7.2862
ROBERT K HEADY ADVERTISING INC
7123 Biscayne Blvd PL 4-4876
W RODGER HERNDON ADVERTISING
1517 Alfred I DuPont Bldg FR 1 4485
W Rodger Herndon, Owner; Rodger D Herndon,
Director of Sales
HILL & LINCOLN ADVERTISING INC
623 Brickell Av FR 1-4629
Spencer Hill, Pres; Joseph Lincoln VP:
G Jones Art Direclor
HORENBEIN ADVERTISING AGENCY
231 Plaza Bldg FR 3 7761
Barry Horenbein, Pres; Frank Schulwolf.
Art Director: Buster Abrams, Media Director
HAL HOWARD ADVERTISING
2620 Biscayne Blvd FR 7-3283
CHARLES W HOYT CO INC
Chamber of Commerce Bldg FR 12165
John R McAtee, VP: Violet Graham AE
HUME SMITH MICKELBERRY ADVERTISING INC
126 S E 2 St FR 9.8453
David Hume, Pres: William Mickelberry, VP
ROBERT S HURWITZ ADVERTISING
1775 S W 3 Av FR :-4576


















0


y


..q ,ojo


Y,


/l


'1 ~*:~:.]


/1










RALPH B.


MAKE A


TO ........


ROSE


POSTER

PRINTING


*1 f 0


For the Finest
Silk Screen Printing
For decades, Ralph Rose Poster Printing has designed
and prepared silk screened advertising for some of the
nation's greatest firms. We have pioneered in develop-
ing inks, extenders, techniques and equipment that
have helped bring silk screen printing to its present
high level-a potent force in modern advertising.
We are equipped to give you fast service. Our artists
will create ideas to solve your individual problem. Our
staff is widely experienced in every kind of display and
advertising production. Our equipment is the most
modern, and can handle anything from tiny decals to
24 or 30 sheet billboards. Vivid solid colors and Rose
Four Color Process Printing are available. Specially de-
signed drying equipment speeds job completion.
With our 36 years of experience, you are assured a
superbly planned and executed job-and so economi-
cally you will be amazed. Give us a call-we'll be
happy to help you solve your advertising problem.



~-
s -
CI 12--


I MO 1-1621

/ YOU'VE FOUND

0 THE FINEST IN


DISPLAYS
Plenty of know how on ale
cut and knock-down displays
for effective merchanais.ng.
Large sizes and minimum
quantities can be run eco-
nomically.


CAMPAIGNS AND SHOWS
Try our creative approach to
political ana special cam-
paigns. Posters. cards for
Shows and Fairs a specialty.


RALPH B. ROSE POSTER PRINTING, IN(


BILLBOARDS
Check on the economy of silk
screened outdoor billboards In
poster style as well as Four
Color Process. We are the only
silk screen shop In the south-
eastern states capable of offer-
ing tnis tour color process serv-
ice These posters are printed
In brilliant multiple colors and
fluorescent inks


DECALS
Every size for every purpose -
trucks. winaoas. metal. For in-
door or oulOoor use. Printed In
brillianT. long lasting colors in
any quantity or size.



Mae
Vp^J- (I '' -Ga


--L|, S Ralph B. Rose, Pres.
Fred V. Lavis, Sec. and Treas.
Wally Meier, Acct. Exec.





C. 6875 S. W. 81st Street
Miami, Florida






LOU JACOBS ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS
1775 S W 3 Av FR 1-7836
KEYES, MADDEN & JONES ADVERTISING
Penthouse, Ainsley Bldg FR 1-2507
Dick Stern, VP-Mgr; Harry Goldsmith, Ex VP;
George Henry Smith, AE; Morty Freedman, AE
KNICKERBOCKER ADVERTISING CO INC
6986 Abbott Av MB UN 6-1694
LEEDS ADVERTISING AGENCY
600 Dade Commonwealth Bldg FR 7-2324
LONG ADVERTISING AGENCY
815 W Flagler St FR 4-8169
LIPMAN ADVERTISING CO
9521 East Bay Harbor Dr MB UN 6-0942
Lou Lipman; Herb Lipman; Bob Lipman
MARSCHALK & PRATT
100 Biscayne Blvd South FR 9-2821
George H Giese, Sr., VP;
George Bremser, Jr, Mgr
(See our ad page 18)
MARSHALL PARSONS ASSOCIATES INC
605 Biscayne Blvd FR 9-3132
McMICHAEL ASSOCIATES
299 Alhambra Circle, Rm 317, CG HI 5-1574
MILLCO INC
924 Lincoln Rd MB JE 8-3817
Ezra Millstein, Pres; G Sanderson Knaus, AD;
Lois Vaughn, Asst to Pres
MILLER BACON AVRUTIS & SIMONS INC
1201 Ainsley Bldg FR 9-2882
Sanford Bacon, Pres; Arthur Hi Simons, Secy-
Treas; Hilliard Avrutis, VP; Arthur L Gray, VP
MODERNAGE ADVERTISING AGENCY
7255 N E 4 Av PL 7-0661
Arnold R Weiss, Pres; Alfred Tiber, Art Director
ARTHUR R MOGGE INC
150 S E 2 St FR 1-7686
Arthur R Mogge, Pres; Samuel B Crispin, Mgr;
Jack Nelson, Creative Director
(See our ad page 56)
BEN PATRICK ADVERTISING
2245 N W 21 Ter NE 5-0123


W S PETERSON ADVERTISING AGENCY INC
333 Palermo Av CG HI 4-3021
JAN PLATT ADVERTISING-ART SERVICE
375 Alhambra Circle CG HI 5-3241
HENRY QUEDNAU INC
534 Pan American Bank Bldg FR 1-8643
Henry Quednau, Pres (Tampa);
George Chamberlin, VP-Gen Mgr Miami Office
(See our ad page 16)
LEO JAY ROSEN ASSOC INC
7630 Biscayne Blvd PL 7-8533
SALOX INTERNATIONAL INC
3927 N E 2 Av PL 9-2371
Jere R Salyers, Pres
A I SALTZMAN ADVERTISING & SALES PROMOTION
141 N E 3 Av FR 7-4796
SAUNDERS/WILCOX/BELL INC
69 Merrick Way CG HI 4-7463
Joe Saunders, Pres; Samuel Bell Jr, Secy-Treas;
Billy Wilcox, VP
SAURO ADVERTISING INC
11601 N W 7 Av MU 1-1671
E J SCHEAFFER & ASSOCIATES ADV AGENCY
1101 NI E 79 St PL 4-5568
Edward J Scheaffer, Pres; James P Covalt, VP-
Art Dir; J David Covalt, Prod Mgr; Virginia C
Griffin, Copy Dir
SCHWARTZ/GRAHAM ADVERTISING AGENCY INC
940 Lincoln Rd MB JE 8-5478
A, Jay Schwartz, Pres; Beatrice Graham,
Secy-Treas
SORIN-HALL ADVERTISING INC
1785 N E 123 St PL 8-2515
WILLIAM M SPIRE INC
61 Giralda CG HI 4-8337
William M Spire, Pres; Bruce Roberts, VP-Gen-
Mgr; Curtis C LeWald, VP-Copy Chief; Robert
Oxsalida, VP-Art Dir
(See our ad page 59)
STEINER AND WALL ADVERTISING INC
2890 N W 7th St NE 3-3406
Louis K Steiner, Pres; Dewaine E. Wall, VP


STRAND ADVERTISING
1101 Metropolitan Bank Bldg FR 1-0389
Stuart D Strand, Pres; M L Strand, VP
STUART-SCHWARTZ INC
218 Alcazar CG HI 3-0438
SUN ADVERTISING
4201 S W 8 St HI 4-3566
Morio Nufiez, Dir
J WALTER THOMPSON CO
299 Alhambra Circle CG HI 5-1391
Albert I Cameron, VP-Mgr; Oren S Frost, Art
Dir; Gordon Fletcher, Alfredo Jarrin, Acct Reps
(See our ad page 12)
DICK TROXEL & ASSOCIATES INC
245 S E 1 St FR 4-8451
WADSWORTH & WALKER INC
5807 Ponce de Leon Blvd MO 1-8551
Ralph K Wadsworth, Pres-Treas
(See our ad page 60)
WAKES-SILVERSHEIN-WAKES INC
561 N E 79 St PL 4-1838
Ben Wakes, Pres; Toni Wakes, VP;
(See our ad page 60)



ADVERTISING DISTRIBUTORS
ADVERTISING DISTRIBUTORS OF MIAMI
5 SW 5 St FR 9-4891
COMMERCIAL ADVERTISING CO INC
7 S W 6 St FR 4-3656
Paulette N Lee, Pres; George Feehery, Mgr;
Jack Nolan, Mgr, Ft Laud
FLORIDA FOLDER DISTRIBUTING CO
710-51 St MB UN 6-8528
JACK PECTOR SPECIALTIES CO
996 SW 1 St FR 3-1019
SOUTHERN FOLDER DISTRIBUTING CO INC
208 Almeria Av CG HI 4-8326


We won't try to tell you how
to run your business. But we
will help you find more cus-
tomers for it. Over 100 man-
years of experience in making
people want what our clients
have to sell.


l. BEVIS

ASSOCIATES


advertising
INGRAHAM BUILDING MIAMI FR 9-2696


-72
WILLIAM M. SPIRE. INC.







61 GIRALDA AVE. CORAL GABLES HI 4-8337






r--- ---------------- ---


WADSWORTH

& WALKER, INe.
NEW YORK: 369 Lexington Ave.
MIAMI 46: 5807 Ponce de Leon

A fully recognized national
advertising agency estab-
lished in New York in 1930.

Accounts serviced either in the past or
during the present include:
ARMSTRONG TIRES BUREN WATCHES -
CANDLEWOOD ISLE DEVELOPMENT KEY-
STONE PAINTS THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
MONITOR EASTERN GREYHOUND JANE
ENGEL DRESSES GENERAL CERAMICS -
FRANK EDELEN BUICK MACK TRUCKS -
MONTGOMERY WARD PARC VENDOME -
PARK LANE HOTEL POSTAL LIFE INSUR-
ANCE-PRIDE OF THE FARM CATSUP, SOUPS
AND JELLIES SALTESEA CLAM CHOWDER
TEXACO GASOLINE SULGRAVE HOTEL
J. P. SMITH SHOE CO. OSCAR E.
DOOLY FRANK T. BUDGE "VALSPAR" -
THE MIAMI HERALD WALL-STREETER
SHOE CO.- to mention a few.

L--------_---------






H &NT-IBI MB

BUT

BUSINESSMEN

WHOSE BUSINESS IS

ADVERTISING!





DOBIN
ADVERTISING INC.
ROOSEVELT ,LDO...: ..4014 CHASE AVE.
MIAMI BEACH JE 2-1778

Send for "Tide"
reprint story,
"What It Takes
To Be A
Marketing Ex-
pert!".. the
\ story of
Dobin in
ACTION!

60


ADVERTISING MATS


GIEGER ELECTRO & MAT SERVICE
636 S W 2 Av
(See our ad page 32)
METRO MAT SERVICE
28 N W 20 St
(See our ad page 63)


FR 1-9945

FR 9-4667


ADVERTISING & COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHERS
ACME PHOTO SERVICE
11291 Biscayne Blvd PL 7-3731
Salvatore Maugeri
APEX PHOTOS INC
3204 N Miami Av FR 1-8530
Art Whiteman
MARTIN ARONOW PHOTOGRAPHER
155 Aragon Av CG HI 4-6471
ARTVUE STUDIOS
P 0 Box 1065 CG HI 8-8685
Mark A Levin, Owner
ASSOCIATED PHOTOGRAPHERS
300 S Miami Av FR 3-4774
Arthur Apple, Owner
BROWNES PHOTO CENTRE
7915 N W 22 Av PL 4-8201
C W Browne
CANDID ART PHOTOGRAPHY INC
16509 N E 6 Av NMB WI 7-7341
Art Mayer, Pres
(See our ad page 65)
CLOSE STUDIO
3240 N W 27 Av NE 4-3287
DIXIE PHOTO SERVICE
1807 S W 8 St FR 7-4481
Arthur B Miles, Jr; Francis Fink, Co-Owners
ERNIE'S STUDIO & CAMERA CENTERS
633 N E 125 St PL 7-5775
R B FORDYCE PHOTOGRAPHY
1455 NI W 36 St NE 5-6459
GELBERG-VICTOR PHOTOGRAPHY
605 Lincoln Rd MB JE 1-1000
Mel Victor, Pres; Robert Gelberg, Secy-Treas
HINMAN PHOTOGRAPHY
4 Biscayne Blvd FR 3-6224
Richard E Hinman, Owner;
Carl L Houser, Jr, Mgr
(See our ad page 65)
IRV'S STUDIO AND CAMERA SHOP
361 Opa-locka Blvd MU 8-6041
Irv Saslaw, Owner
WERNER KAHN PHOTOGRAPHY
2511 Collins Av MB JE 1-1872
KAYE AND WEAVER INC
229 N E 65 St PL 9-8221
Hal Kaye, Pres; Harvey Ross, VP
KING PHOTOS
1720 W Flagler St FR 9-2973
Jack Gordon
KENNETH KIPNIS
1540 Washington Av MB JE 8-5319
MIDDLE & KOHN INC
2332 Biscayne Blvd FR 1-7521
Robert Kohn, Mgr
DAVE MILLSPAUGH FASHION
4430 N W 22 Court NE 4-2171
MOSER AND SON
1638 S W 8 St FR 4-5638
PHOTO ARTS
1429 N W 7 Av FR 4-6957
George Trencher; Philip A Feldman
PHOTOGRAPHY BY THORNTON
3226 N W 11 Court NE 3-2385
SINGER STUDIOS INC
5849 Sunset Dr MO 1-5714
SOUTHERN PHOTO PRINT SERVICE
2704 N E 2 Av FR 3-9870
George Trencher, Pres; Robert Kohn, VP
Phil Feldman, Secy
TELE-VISUAL AIDS
3361 S W 3 Av FR 4-7370
Bernard Blynder, Owner


iuriq Advertisinq
INCORPORATED
Penthouse Congress Building
III N.E.2nd Ave., Miami 32,Florida
\hone: FRanklin 1-5496




PETER FINNEY

COMPANY, Inc.



d "Advertising That Sells
I -At a Profit"


529 WEST FLAGLER STREET
MIAMI FRanklin 9-6581








Headquarters for
ADVERTISING CLUB
of GREATER MIAMI
Home of El Centro de las Americas
Coffee House Lounge Bar


FLAEASTSE
SOTEL
FLAGLER ST. AT BISCAYNE BLVD.


SMART ADVERTISERS

USE PSY/COMMUNI/
ECOLOGY.


CALL W/S/W SALES/

VERTISING FOR ALL

DETAILS. PL/4/1838.

.






TIERNEY AND KILLINGSWORTH
1270 N W 29 St NE 5-0787
Ed Killingsworth
UGENT STUDIOS
135 S E 3 Av FR 4-3232
VERNE 0 WILLIAMS
306 N E 38 St FR 1-9813
BUNNY YEAGER
1020 N E 118 St PL 9-3565



ADVERTISING SIGNS
A B C NEON
741-5 St, MB JE 1-0166
W H Busbee
ACE SIGN CO
22 N W 1 Av FR 9-6130
Howard Gurland
ACOLITE SIGN CO
4710 N W 37 Av NE 5-6581
W K Herring, Pres; C L Diffenderfer,
VP-Gen Mgr
ALLIED NOVELTIES INC
930 N W 5 Av FR 9-7803
ATLAS SIGNS
528 Collins Av MB JE 8-3848
Isador Gluckman, Owner
GEORGE W CLEMMONS
608 N W 25 Av NE 4-0694
DADE NEON SIGN & SERVICE CO
16201 State Rd #9 East Dr WI 5-5711
Jack McKee, Owner; Herbert L Fletcher,
Master Elect; E R Dan Daniels, Sales Rep
EDVITO SIGNS
90 N W 54 St PL 8-7025
Ed J Siemianowski, Owner
ELECTRO NEON SIGN CO INC
2955 N W 75 St OX 1-0805
L E Monahan, Pres; Eugene H Webster, VP;
M A Monahan, Secy-Treas
GENERAL SIGN CO
111 S W 17 Av FR 9-1467
Sydney Greene, Owner
HAINES SIGNS
5740 N W 2 Av PL 8-5821
HICKS SIGN SERVICE
1771 N W North River Dr NE 5-7621
THE JENCKS SIGNS
1127-5 St MB JE 8-2144
C H KESINGER
616 N E 2 Av FR 4-5640
LIBERTY SIGNS
241 S W 22 Av FR 1-0357
Joe Perny
MIRROR POSTER PRINTING INC
914 NW 1 Av FR 1-8895
Irving A Spiegel, Pres; Ethel E Spiegel, Treas
MOKA SIGN CO
3428 W Flagler St HI 3-1187
Morris Kaufman, Pres; Mark Kaufman, VP;
Mario Valcarcal, Art Dir;
Carl Mosblack, Display Foreman
NEON SIGN & SERVICE INC
3452 N Miami Av FR 9-6982
Robert L Ward, Pres; Kenneth Shifflett, VP;
Marie Shifflett, Secy-Treas
NEON TUBE LIGHT CORP
5102 S W 8 St HI 3-9851
Chester W Cross, Pres
PIXLEY SIGN SERVICE
432 E 9 St Hlh TU 8-9517
ROSE POSTER PRINTING INC
6875 S W 81 St South Miami MO 1-1621
Ralph B Rose, Pres; Fred V Lavis, Secy-Treas
(See our ad opp. page 59)
C SHARKUS FOR SIGNS
731 Palm Av Hlh TU 7-7861
Charles Sharkus
CLAUDE SOUTHERN CORP
2950 N W 31 Av NE 5-0402
AL WILSON'S POWER-FUL DISPLAYS
100 E 10 Court, Hlh TU 5-1644
YOUNG SIGN CO
1004 N W 36 St NE 5-7021


TOP OF THE

PEDESTAL -J






AERIAL ADVERTISING
BISCAYNE SEAPLANE BASE
11291 Biscayne Blvd PL 1-5848
Joseph W Maugeri; Anthony Maugeri
GOODYEAR BLIMP
MacArthur Causeway FR 9-5976
Capt Vernor Smith
McFADDEN AERIAL ADS
1807 S W 8 St FR 7-4481
RAND SEARCHLIGHT ADVERTISING
3117 N W 27 Av NE 4-3822
SOUTHERN SPECIALTY CO
1807 S W 8 St PL 8-2507
SUN LINE HELICOPTERS INC
1050 MacArthur Causeway FR 7-4191
C W Parkins, Pres; I V Babcock, Chief Pilot;
G A NeSmith, VP Maintenance



AIRPORT & TERMINAL
ADVERTISING
TRANSPORTATION DISPLAYS INC
McAskill Assoc, Reps
4014 Chase Av MB JE 2-1715
L C McAskill, Pres
(See our ad page 68)


ARTISTS SUPPLIES
ART AND FRAME MART
251 SE 1 St FF
Roy R and Olive P Spafford
ART MART
1327B N E 163 St W
Karl H Von Halle
ASSOCIATED ARTISTS
1822 Biscayne Blvd FR
Gerold N. Rowley


1 1-5498

I 7-1949

3-3562


BELL'S ARTIST & PAINT SUPPLIES
2623 Ponce de Leon Blvd CG HI 8-1061
Helen Gerstenfeld
BINDER'S
1160 W Flagler St FR 1-1377
Jerry Litt, Pres
(See our ad page 62)
THE EASEL
16336 W Dixie Highway, NMB WI 5-3871
HANDICRAFT SUPPLY
653 N E 125 St PL 4-2171
K K Hansen; R H Van Kirk
REX ARTIST SUPPLIES INC
2263 S W 37 Av HI 3-6902
Joseph Platt, Pres; Melvin Morris, Mgr



ASSOCIATIONS
ALPHA DELTA SIGMA
Ed Gegenschatz, Pres FR 4-6292
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ADV AGENCIES
534 Pan American Bank Bldg FR 1-8643
Henry Quednau, Inc; Harris & Co
AMERICAN MARKETING ASS'N
Jim Richards, Pres MO 1-2561 Ext 2351
AMERICAN PUBLIC RELATIONS ASS'N
Bob Daly, Pres FR 4-8321
ART DIRECTORS CLUB OF GREATER MIAMI
Sam Willig, Pres FR 7-1574
DIRECT MAIL ASS'N OF GREATER MIAMI
Jack Durant, Pres FR 3-0274
FLORIDA PUBLIC RELATIONS ASS'N
Biscayne Chapter JE 8-0461
William A Crockett, Jr, Acting Pres
GAMMA ALPHA CHI
Tamara Sherman, Pres HI 3-4939
GREATER MIAMI ASS'N OF ADVERTISING
AGENCIES INC
W Arthur Fielden, Pres FR 1-1475
(See our ad page 20)


ART SUPPLIES FOR

CENTER COMMERCIAL ART
OF THE
SOUTH AND
FREE PMKING FINE ART
*WE DELIVER I


GREATER MIAMI MANUFACTURERS ASS'N
Eloise Perry, Ex Secy
GREATER MIAMI PUBLIC RELATIONS ASS'N
Frank Sumner Wright, Pres FR 4-4144
OUTDOOR ADVERTISING ASS'N OF
GREATER MIAMI
Everett A Clay, Ex Secy TU 8-5252
PRINTING IND OF GREATER MIAMI INC
5384 N Miami Av PL 7-2468
James L Jones, Exec Secy
PRODUCERS' COUNCIL INC
Allen Kern, Pres OX 1-0680
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS GUILD
OF FLORIDA INC
Richard Hinman, Pres FR 3-6224
(See our ad page 56)
PUBLIC RELATIONS SOCIETY OF AMERICA
FLORIDA CHAPTER
Hank Meyer, Pres JE 1-7411
SALES EXECUTIVES CLUB OF GREATER MIAMI
300 Dupont Plaza Center FR 4-3868



COMMERCIAL ARTISTS
ART & DESIGN FOR INDUSTRY
623 Brickell Av FR 7-1574
Sam Willig, Pres; Andrew J Kaufmann, Jr,
THE ART DEPARTMENT INC
4563 Ponce de Leon Blvd MO 7-0132
Jordan Berkowitz; Michael Sisson
WILLIS E BISHOP ADVERTISING ART
4012 Aurora St CG HI 3-2711
FRED J CARAVETTA ADVERTISING ART STUDIO
1260 Coral Way FR 7-2161
CHARLES E CRUME
117 N E 1 Av FR 3-8889
FLORIDA ADVERTISING ART INC
151 Majorca Av HI 4-9827


MIAMI FLORIDA
PHONE FRanklin 1-1377


P type faces
FROM 'MOST EVERY TYPE FAMILY!


monotype composition corp.
719 N.W. 29th STREET MIAMI 37. FLORIDA
NEwton 3-8548


ACE

LETTER

SERVICE

COMPANY

ESTABLISHED 1927

Direct Mail

Advertising

3800 N.E. First Avenue
PLaza 7-4577


addressing mailing lists
mechanical addressing
mailing mimeographing
mechanical inserting
multigraphing printing
robotype






FREITAG STUDIO
2346 Douglas Rd CG HI 6-9784
Hal Freitag, Owner; Ed Tomlinson, Art Dir
GRAPHIC ARTS INC
8365 N E 2 Av PL 7-8429
Seymour Gerber, Pres; Al Isaacson, VP;
Ernest H Burkons, Exec VP
(See our ad page 61)
GREMLIN ART SHOP
1524 N W 79 St PL 8-9653
Eleanor Hanna McCrea, Owner-Designer;
Edward J McCrea, Rep
FRANK JENNINGS ADVERTISING
8163 N E 2 Av PL 7-3981
BILL JOHNSON ADVERTISING ART
320 Miracle Mile CG HI 4-0422
ANTON LOEB STUDIO
1233 Lincoln Rd MB JE 4-2033
Anton Loeb, Art Dir; Frances Loeb, Sales;
Ellen Barry, Treas
MIAMI ART STUDIOS
600 Dade Commonwealth Bldg FR 7-2324
Jack E Leeds, Owner
CHARLES MULLIN-ART STUDIO
167 Alcazar Av CG HI 8-0423
NASSEL BROTHERS
1451 North Bay Shore Dr FR 1-8320
Karl Nassel; Alfred Nassel
DORIS E OTTINGER
5891 Sunset Dr South Miami MO 5-6347
PETE PORTER
6315 N E 2 Av PL 7-2712
SCHALLER-ANGELO
224 Miracle Bldg CG HI 3-9920
HENRY A SCHUBERT ADVERTISING ART
167 Alcazar Av CG HI 5-2851
SENTZ-BOGUSKY
1260 Coral Way FR 1-4286
James Sentz; Al Bogusky
SONED ART STUDIO
208 Biscayne St MB JE 8-1222
Warren Soned




















j TO INCREASE
YOUR BUSINESS:
n Premium Promotion
S* Advertising Specialties
i Direct Mail Campaigns
9 Sales Promotion Consultation
I TOP LEVEL IDEAS BY
| TOP LEVEL IDEA MEN
"Your call brings an expert"
I*
BUSINESS BOOSTERS, Inc.
S NE 4-6660 . NE 3-2647-8
L"a, i i9iiaii99NNaai ]Naa N[][]ai


THE SULLIVAN GROUP
251 S W 17 Av FR 9-2142
John L Sullivan, Pres; Paul L Moore, VP
SYD TAFFAE
802 Professional Bldg FR 3-7832
TOMMY THOMPSON STUDIO
906 Chamber of Comm Bldg FR 3-5043
FRANK VAVRICK ADVERTISING ART
301 Dade Commonwealth Bldg FR 1-8746
WALTER WAGNER
Congress Bldg FR 3-7831



DECALCOMANIA TRANSFERS
AAA BUSINESS BOOSTERS
200 N W 22 Av NE 4-6660
M Berk
(See our ad page 63)
PARKER FLAGS & PENNANTS
1611 S W 32 Av HI 8-8290
SERIGRAPH CORPORATION
2141 N Miami Av FR 1-3366
Joseph J Molkenthin, Pres



DIE CUTTING
FLORIDA DIE CUTTING CO
1311 N W Miami Court FR 3-2875
Louis Yelen, Owner



DIRECTORIES
SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH CO
160 N E 4 St FR 9-0873
Ben B Brown, South Florida Mgr;
Philip E DeBerard, Jr, Division PR Mgr


IF YOU

WANT IT...

We have i00


922 N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami, Fla.


DIRECT MAIL
A B C LETTER SERVICE
2333 N W 8 Av NE 5-8812
Estelle Gropper, Owner; Al H Gropper, Mgr
ACE LETTER SERVICE CO
3800 N E 1 Av PL 7-4577
Sanford Levkoff; Nick Cestari
(See our ad page 62)
ADVERTISING ARTISTS INC
6315 N E 2 Av PL 7-2712
LeRoy Porter, Pres; Dan Mahn, VP;
Morris Kammann, Rep
LOUIS ENTLER ASSOCIATES
1651 N W 34 St NE 5-3737
Louis Entler; Ann Entler
GABLES LETTER SERVICE
158 Valencia Av CG HI 6-6356
Jeane Westerfield; Ralph Berard
MAIL-O-MATIC CORP
4500 N W 2 Av PL 1-2771
Joseph E Schaffel; George F Youngs
MANPOWER INC
72 W Flagler St FR 3-7618
Ray Manning, Branch Mgr
REBA MARTIN INC
4201 N W 2 Av PL 4-2686
UNIVERSAL MATCH CORP
9550 Bay Harbor Terrace UN 5-9985
Joseph Shapiro, Sales Mgr



DISPLAYS
FINANCIAL DISPLAYS INC
296 N E 67 St PL 1-7521
R E Nitzshe, Pres; John M Stoddart
INTERNATIONAL DISPLAYS INC
1775 S W 3 Av FR 1-7836
Bernard Herris, Pres; Louis G Jacobs, Sec-Treas


Low Cost Goodwill Advertising Specialties
Business and Industrial Gifts
Promotional and Premium Items
Exclusive Birthday and Christmas Gift
Selection Program
Desk and Wall Calendars
Grand Opening and Anniversary Souvenirs
Executive and Employee Gifts
Convention and Trade Show Give-Aways


&~ce.


FR 4-6586 FR 4-3443


44wp 4 4adew.:
COLD MATS BAKED MATS
PLASTIC PLATES

P' te :
Plastic Plates
Rubber Plates for
FLEXOGRAPHIC
ROTARY PRTG.

METRO MAT SERVICE, Inc.
28 N.W. 20th Street
FR 9-4667


Ifte' *uirAl gServices!

Glossy Photostats for reproduction up to 18" x 24"
Photolettering for "different" headlines
Glossy screened velox prints in any line screen
Screened film positives, any line, for silk screen
Reproportioning of Art Work and Type
Negatives and Plates for Offset Lithography




1678 CORAL WAY MIAMI 45. FLORIDA

Highland 6-0866


0 = a .

04w=FP46AW"10T






PERFECTION INC
251 N E 69 St PL 4-5726
Howard Branston, Pres; Irving Newman, Ex VP
ROSE POSTER PRINTING INC
6875 S W 81 St MO 1-1621
Ralph B Rose, Pres; Fred C Lavis, Secy
(See our ad opp. page 59)
SPAULDING DISPLAYS
326 N W 8 Av FR 4-8166
VAUGHN PARADES INC
1100 N W South River Dr FR 3-4854
W W Westberry


DISPLAY BUILDERS


ADVERTISING DISPLAYS
150 N W 1 St
Maurey L Ashmann, Pres
ANIMATED DISPLAY CREATORS INC
7301 N E Miami Court
Van A Olkon, Pres-GenI Mgr
GENE BERK INC
200 N W 22 Av
Gene Berk, Pres; Joseph Solomon,
BERKE DISPLAYS INC
1733 N W 20 St
Arthur Berke, Pres; Harold Berke,
BLACK-RALLS DISPLAY CORP
400 S W 22 Av
Arthur C Black, Pres


FR 4-3107

PL 7-5778

NE 5-6082
Secy-Treas
NE 5-5376
VP
HI 4-4431


DISPLAY MATERIALS
ASSOCIATED ARTISTS
1822 Biscayne Blvd FR 3-3562
PAN AM SUPPLY CO
2525 N W 75 St OX 1-0581
Robert M Miller, Pres


TOP-FLIGHT

mODEL & TALEI

CA STInG

twoewRe a 62



ilm anetd a"4,




CALL FR 1-5591


I










IT















a


DISPLAY SERVICE
GROO DISPLAYS INC
111 N W 22 Ave FR 1-3473
Peter J Groo, Pres; Joseph A Groo, VP;
Robert A Koppen, Secy-Treas


ENVELOPE MANUFACTURING
BARKIN ENVELOPE MANUFACTURING CO
2740 S W 28 Lane HI 3-7598
ENVELOPE SHOP
135 N W 36 St PL 8-3829
KNIGHT BROS PAPER CO
3485 N W 65 St OX 1-8320
PAN AMERICAN ENVELOPE CO INC
6700 N W 35 Av OX 1-6730
Abe Birenbaum, Pres; Arnold B Colker, Secy
SOUTHERN ENVELOPE MFGRS INC
240 N E 72 St PL 1-2528
David Goldwasser, Pres; Charles H Held, Jr, VP-
GenI Mgr


EXHIBITS
BUILDORAMA-ARCHITECTS INTERNATIONAL
BUREAU OF BUILDING PRODUCTS
Dupont Plaza Center FR 7-1461
S J McCarthy, Managing Dir; Charles Hughes,
Floor Mgr; Jean Noguerras, Dir-Guest Relations
TROPICAL DISPLAY
4041 N W 28 St NE 4-1032
G Edward Bedinger


FLAGS
AMERICAN FLAGS CO.
2147 S W 8 St FR 4-2612

I 11111111111 1111111111111111111111111111

: -r..l OUTDOOR =
Adveriin Co.
--



6 SHEET POSTERS
In All Major Florida Markets
S 346 N.W. 1st STREET
- MIAMI, FLORIDA -
FR 4-1322

R IIliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiIIIIIIIIIIIIIliiiiiiiiiiii


GOLD STAMPING
MIAMI RULING & BINDING CO
726 N E 1 Av FR 4-3332
Herbert E Reynolds, Owner
SOUTHERN SPECIALTY CO
173 N E 54 St PL 8-2507
Irene Nenno


LABELS
ALISON MFG CO
18120 N W 16 Av NA 1-0752
H Denny Schweiger
STAY FAST LABEL CO
4500 N' W 2 Av PL 9-8432
Joseph E Schaffel; George F Youngs


LETTER SERVICE
AAA LETTER SERVICE
130 N E 2 Av FR 9-0041
ACE LETTER SERVICE CO
3800 N E 1 Av PL 7-4577
Sanford Levkoff; Nick Cestari
(See our ad page 62)
ALNEY LETTER & PRINTING SERVICE
116 N E 6 St FR 7-4421
Milton Balsam, Owner
AUTOMATIC TYPING SERVICE
2508 Biscayne Blvd FR 9-5703
John A Stone
BALL ROBOTYPER LETTER SERVICE
15 N W LeJeune Rd HI 3-3041
Carolyn S Ball, Owner; H C Ball, Mgr
BEACH MIMEOGRAPHING SERVICE
600 Lincoln Rd Bldg MB JE 4-4521
Marguerite Marx; Lillian Marx, Owners







WHO ta Nos



*g g *,RL. '


%o/I "gW feeza 6Wvlf






OUTDOOR
ADVERTISING
COMPANY
MIAMI FLORIDA


~-~s~s~s~s~s?~ss-s~5~29s~~






ELITE LETTER SHOP
917-39 St JE 1-7844
Lucylle G Tiller, Owner
KENDALL LETTER SERVICE
9902 S W 77 Av MO 5-5921
John C Thomas; Sara E Thomas, Owners
THE REAL ESTATE PRESS
Dade Commonwealth Bldg FR 4-1391
George R Guyer, Owner
SUNILAND SECRETARIAL AND LETTER SERVICE
11349 S Dixie Hwy CE 5-0773
Frances E Gardner, Owner
WILLARD LETTER SERVICE
1464 W Flagler St FR 9-4505
Willard S Johnson; Philip A Johnson


LITHOGRAPHERS
ADVERCOLOR PRESS
40 N E 54 St PL 9-0346
William R Konchak, Pres;
Howard P Bankston, VP
ALL MIAMI PRESS INC
991 N W 54 St PL 4-9532
Harold M Rubin, Pres; Irving Rubin, Secy-Treas;
Jack Rubin, VP
GAGER PRINTING & OFFSET
1350 N E 1 Av FR 3-3046
Wilbur L Gager
HIALEAH PUBLISHING & PRINTING CORP
710 E 10 St Hlh TU 8-9744
Alvin Walder, Pres
LIBERTY PRINTING COMPANY
139 San Lorenzo Av CG HI 8-3161
LITHO-ARTS INC
1260 N W 29 St NE 3-8501
Glen B Fewell, Pres; John C Schutt, Sec-Treas
(See our ad page 66)
MERCURY LITHOGRAPHING CO
545 N W 5 St FR 1-6567
Otto Becker, Pres; Edward F Brown, VP


SOUTHERN-MIAMI
PRESS, INC.
V
Printers and Mailers of
OFF-CAMERA
and
AD LIBS
OFFSET LETTERPRESS
SMIMEOGRAPHING MAILING

2366 W. FLAGLER ST.
Phone HI 8-0485




CANDID ART


PHOTOGRAPHY
----- INC. ---
16509 N.E. 6th Avenue
North Miami Beach, Fla.
Phone Wilson 7-7341

the finest in illustrative photography
for the advertising trade.


MIAMI OFFSET CO
3249 N W 38 St NE 3-2571
Emma Morin; Charles Morin
MIAMI POST PUBLISHING CO
1942 N W 1 Ct FR 9-3471
Carl H Westman, Pres; J Winston Anderson, VP
(See our ad page 56)
NATIONAL LITHOGRAPHERS INC
7700 N W 37 Av OX 1-2800
Charles M Leavy, Pres
(See our ad page 32)
NORMAN B SNYDER PRINTING BY OFFSET
400 N W 58 Av MO 1-0500
PRINTING ARTS
1300 N W 29 St NE 5-4441
Jack Teitler; Al Teitler; Jesse Teitler;
Herman Teitler
PUBLISHERS PRESS INC
355 N E 59 St PL 4-5475
Charles Rosenberg, Owner;
John R Copuzelo, Pres
(See our ad page 66)
SERVICE OFFSET PRINTERS
4015 Aurora St CG HI 5-2419
E R Gomez, Owner
SUMMERLAND PHOTO SERVICE
11625 N E 2 Av PL 9-3491
Mr and Mrs E A Beeks, Owners
A 0 WEISS LITHOGRAPH CO INC
2215 N W 2 Av FR 1-8421
Arthur Weiss, Pres; Dan Morley, VP;
Milton Jender, VP; Al Curson, Prod Mgr
(See our ad page 66)



LITHOGRAPHIC PLATES
AMERICAN COLOR OFFSET
2052 N W 2 Av FR 4-3231
Hans Jurgens; Julian Fields, Partners







WHO MAKES


s Oot A a *

a s


BALLAGH PHOTO OFFSET COMPANY
2509 N W 2 Av FR 9-5538
DADE NEGATIVES
2375 N W 5 Av FR 1-0904
Irving Bloomfield, Owner
DIXIE PLATE GRAINING CO
2951 N W 21 Terr NE 5-2494
Robert T Schloemer, Gen Mgr
PHOTO OFFSET PLATE CO INC
2771 S W 22 St HI 3-1825
Charles H Knowles, Pres
PRINTORAMA CORPORATION
310 Aragon Av CG HI 4-7211
Al Bittencourt, Pres; Roal J Lee, VP;
Leland Shepard, Secy
QUALITY NEGATIVE & PLATE CORP
1489 N W 7 Av FR 7-3952



MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS
ANGELICAN PRESS
8131 S W 124 St CE 5-8551
Dr Smythe H Lindsay
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
7225 S W 82 Court FR 1-8331
Roger W Sherman, Editor
FLORIDA BUILDING JOURNAL
3620 N W 7 St HI 4-5749
David Allen Shubow, Publ
GREATER MIAMI CLUBWOMAN
2190 S W 6 St FR 3-1815
GREYHOUND PUBLICATIONS INC
252 N W 29 St FR 3-2601
Stanley W Platkin, Pres;
Mildred A Hopkins, Sec-Treas
INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE PUBLISHING CO INC
400 S W 69 Av MO 7-3649
S F Halos, Pres; S G Halos, Adv Mgr;
H A Hooper, Treas




PI; H T RA H Y
Member, P.P. of A. Inc., and A. S. M. P.

QUALIFIED
COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHERS

Four Biscayne Boulevard
Miami 32, Florida
Tel. FR 3-6224


PHONE NE 4-2693



FLORIDIAN PHOTO ENGRAVING, INC.
710 N. W. 25th St., Miami 37, Florida


MAKERS OF FINE
PRINTING PLATES



24-HOUR SERVICE






McASKILL PUBLISHING CO INC
4014 Chase Av MB JE 4-4715
L C McAskill, Pres-Owner
(See our ad page 68)
ROOM AND FOOD SERVICE
4014 Chase Av MB JE 4-4715
(See our ad page 68)
TV GUIDE MAGAZINE
967 W Flagler St FR 1-1369
Herbert Zucker, Mgr; Betty Jackson, Editor;
Norman Hershon, Adv Mgr; Hugh Crocker,
Circ Mgr
(See our ad page 20)
VISITOR PUBLISHING CO INC
605 Lincoln Rd MB JE 4-2089
Frederick Findeisen, Publisher;
Lois Cowart Tanner, Bus Mgr
(See our ad page 67)
YOUR FLORIDA-CARIBBEAN GUIDE INC-THE GUIDE
303 Alcazar Av CG HI 3-4278
John L Tolomeo, Pres; Jim Marshall, VP
TIME-LIFE INTERNATIONAL
Suite 507 Dupont Plaza Center FR 9-1710
William Shelton, Bur Chief;
Robert E Salisbury, Lat Amer Publ Dir
(See our ad page 70)
TROPICAL LIVING PUBLISHING CO
8131 S W 124 St CE 5-8551
Dr Smythe H Lindsay, Publ;
Douglas B Mclntosh, Asst to Publ;
Evelyn M Savage, Editor; Guion M Lindsay,
Bus Mgr



MARKET RESEARCH
FIRST RESEARCH CORP
186 S W 13 St FR 1-3681
Philip W Moore, Pres; Earl T Van Sciver,
Exec VP; Charles M Bedell, Dir Mktg Research
Div


FLORIDA'S
LARGEST
LITHOGRAPHIC
PLANT
Now operates two
WEB-FED 10-UNIT
LITHOGRAPHIC
PRESSES
in addition to its other
Modern Equipment
*0
For information on how we can help
you with your Printing or
Publication problems
CALL






A.D. EISS
LITHOGRAPH CO., INC.
2215 N.W. 2nd AVE., MIAMI
FRanklin 1-8421


FLORIDA BUSINESS RESEARCH INC
27 Almeria CG HI 5-3683
Hayden G Grieve, Pres; Charles W Wurst,
Research Consultant
A E SIMONS
623 Brickell Av FR 1-3313
Alan Simons, Pres


MICROFILMING
DAKOTA MICROFILM SERVICES
505 W Flagler St
Ross Madden, VP


FR 4-8402


MODELS


CHARM MODELING SCHOOL AND AGENCY
277 Miracle Mile CG HI 4-1340
Edith Applebaum, Owner
CORONET ACADEMY OF MODELING AND AGENCY
10 Biscayne Blvd FR 1-5591
Marion E Johnson, Pres
(See our ad page 64)
LOIE'S SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MODELING
12502 N E 8th Av PL 8-1381
Loie Oxell, Owner
MODELS INTERNATIONAL
16509 N E 6 Av WI 7-7341
Art Mayer; Joan Mayer
PYGMALION INC
3200 Ponce de Leon Blvd CG HI 5-3716
C L "Bobb" Miller, Exec; Terri Miller, Dir;
F A Sansone, Chmn of Board




Litho- Arts
INC.
AND


Litho-Masters
INC.

COMBINE
CRAFTS
To give you the
ULTIMATE
QUALITY
in
LITHOGRAPHIC
PRINTING



1260 N.W. 29th St.
NEwton 3-8501


MOTION PICTURE
ADVERTISING
ACADEMY-McLARTY PRODUCTIONS INC
151 Majorca Av CG HI 4-5114
Franz Hartmann, Pres; Willard Jones, Prod Mgr
IDEAL PICTURES INC
55 N E 13 St FR 4-8173
Jack J Spire, Mgr
KAY-LEE INC
5804 Sunset Dr South Miami MO 1-1688
Sid Katz, Pres
BOB LOURIE FILMS INC
887 Palm Av Hlh TU 8-7900



MOTION PICTURE
PRODUCERS
FILM SOUND CENTER INC
1833 Bay Rd, MB JE 8-7269
Howard Warren, Pres; Herbert Bass, VP
REELA FILMS INC
17 N W 3 St FR 4-2108
J Van Hearn, Gen Mgr
RAINBOW PICTURES INC
1540 Levante Av CG MO 5-3524
Walter Resce, Pres; Ocaser Barber, Prod Chief;
Joseph M Lynch, Gen Sales Mgr
SOUNDAC PRODUCTIONS INC
2133 N W 11th Av FR 4-2655
Robert D Buchanan, Pres;
Clarence "Jack" Schleh, Sec-Treas
TELE-VISUAL AIDS
3361 S W 3 Av FR 4-7370
Bernard Blynder, Owner
VIZCAYA PRODUCTIONS INC
30 Alhambra Plaza CG HI 8-7947
J Van Hearn, Exec Producer



publishers

Press Inc.*
Tallahassee, Florida
355 N.E. 59th STREET
MIAMI 37, FLORIDA
PHONE PL 4-5475
for Quality Lithography
call us



Dependable
SERVICE IS YOURS NO
MATTER WHAT TYPE
JOB WE DO FOR YOU
for Personal Service
call us


Quality

PRINTING PAYS ...
Our Phone PL 4-5475







NEWSPAPERS
ALLAPATTAH-EDISON JOURNAL
260 N E 79 St PL 4-5411
ALLAPATTAH PRESS INC
1736 N W 35 St NE 3-2444
CAROL CITY CRIER
4100 N W 183 St NA 4-3251
CITIZENS GUIDE
2146 N E 163 St WI 7-8981
William A Kohler, Publisher
CORAL GABLES-SOUTH MIAMI TIMES
308 Aragon Av CG HI 3-1661
DAILY RACING FORM
2134 N W Miami Court FR 4-8441
Ralph Swanson
DIARIO LAS AMERICAS
4349 N W 36 St TU 8-7521
Francisco Aguirre, Publ; Horacio Aguirre, Ed;
R M Faloon, Com Ptg Mgr; Tom Hill, Adv Mgr
FLORIDA DEMOCRAT INC
216 N E 2 Av FR 1-5360
Milton B Drucker, Bus Mgr
FLORIDA ECHO
315 Professional Bldg FR 3-6595
Carola S Mahrholz, Ed & Publ
HIALEAH-MIAMI SPRINGS JOURNAL
1318 Flamingo Way, Hialeah TU 8-6456
HOME NEWS
300 E 1 Av, Hialeah TU 8-2401
Jay Morton, Pres & Publ
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
120 N E 6 St FR 3-4605
Fred K Shochet, Publ; Leo Mindlin, Exec News
Ed; Selma M Thompson, Asst to the Publ
LABOR CITIZEN
1242 N E 163 St WI 5-4571
MIAMI BEACH SUN
1753 Alton Rd MB JE 4-2181
Parks Rusk, Ed-Publ; Dan J Cronin, Mng Ed
MIAMI BEACH TIMES
1428 Alton Rd MB JE 8-1436
James P Wendler, Ed & Bus Mgr
MIAMI HERALD
200 S Miami Av FR 3-4411
John S Knight, Ed-Publ; James L Knight, Gen
Mgr; Arthur J Gucker, Bus Mgr; George Beebe,
Mgr Ed
MIAMI NEWS
1001 N W 7 St FR 4-6211
Russell E Scofield, Adv Dir; Burton L Baetz,
Retail Adv Mgr; Carl S Harold, Gen Adv Mgr;
Natalie Sternback, Classified Adv Mgr
MIAMI REVIEW
25 S W 2 Av FR 7-3721
G A Coup, Pres; R J Coup, VP
MIAMI TIMES
6740 N W 15 Av OX 1-0421
Garth C Reeves, Mgr Ed
NORTH DADE CITIZENS GUIDE
2146 N E 164 St WI 7-8981
William Kohler, Owner-Publ
NORTH DADE PUBLICATIONS INC
1210 Ali Baba Av Op-lka MU 8-8655
Michael Gallat, Jr, Gen Mgr
NORTH DADE JOURNAL
260 NE 79 St PL 4-5411
NORTH MIAMI BEACH NEWS POST
335 N E 167 St WI 7-3233
PANORAMA
1819 West Av MB JE 8-4341
Milton Lee, Publ; Lee Shapiro, Ed
THE PERRINE PRESS
6801 S W 81 St MO 7-0323
Edgar F Seney, Ed-Owner Publ; Pat H Seney,
Assoc Ed; N Bradford Mack, Prod Mgr;
W L Short, Adv Mgr
TIMES-GUIDE
308 Aragon Av CG HI 3-1661
John T Watters, Publ; William von Maurer, Ed;
William G Ward, Bus Mgr
TOWN & COUNTRY REPORTER
6801 S W 81 St MO 6-8652
Edgar F Seney, Ed-Owner Publ; Pat H Seney,
Assoc Ed; N Bradford Mack, Prod Mgr;
W L Short, Adv Mgr
THE CATHOLIC VOICE
6301 Biscayne Blvd PL 4-2561


NEWSPAPER
REPRESENTATIVES
ROBERT C BEVIS & COMPANY
241 Minorca Av CG HI 4-1503
(See our ad page 68)
THE BRANHAM COMPANY
496 N E 29 Terr FR 9-4685
Dante A Gattoni, Mgr;
Mildred E Gattoni, Asst Mgr
KELLY-SMITH COMPANY
121 S E 1 St FR 7-3332
John N Brodel, Mgr; Irwin Rissman
THE LEONARD COMPANY
311 Lincoln Rd MB JE 8-6614
Leonard Adler, Pres
(See our ad page 71)
McASKILL HERMAN AND DALEY INC
4014 Chase Av MB JE 2-1715
Leon C McAskill, Pres; Hal Herman, VP;
G Fred Daley, VP
(See our ad page 70)
MALONEY REGAN & SCHMITT INC
213 N E 2 Av FR 3-6148
Pat Bohan, Mgr
NEW YORK NEWS
407 Lincoln Rd, MB JE 2-2468
Stuart Sagona, Rep
NEW YORK TIMES
Dupont Plaza Center FR 9-1601
Hubbell Young, So Adv Mgr
STORY BROOKS & FINLEY INC
200 S Miami Av FR 3-4411
Stephen Czufin
WALL STREET JOURNAL
150 S W 2 St FR 3-2609
Joseph T Estes, Mgr; Ted G Vallas
(See our ad page 71)
HAL WINTER CO
7136 Abbott Av MB UN 5-2661
(See our ad page 69)



OUTDOOR ADVERTISING
ATLANTIC SIGN & OUTDOOR ADVERTISING
227 N E 65 St FR 3-5434
Charles Reiner
BUS BENCHES CO
707 Dupont Plaza Center FR 3-3371
William T Pearson, Exec VP
CORKERN OUTDOOR ADVERTISING CO
1105 N W 27 Av NE 4-2238
Jim Corkern Boozer, Owner
DONNELLY ADVERTISING CORP OF FLORIDA
1790 N W 54 St OX 1-8221
Robert F Cochrane, VP-Gen Mgr
(See our ad inside back cover)
E B ELLIOTT ADVERTISING CO
252 N W 29 St FR 4-0511
E B Elliott, Jr, Pres; Bill Graham, Sales Mgr
EMPIRE ADVERTISING CO OF FLA INC
346 NW 1 St FR 4-1322
J W "Peppy" Scrofani, Plant Mgr
(See our ad page 64)
FLUTIE OUTDOOR ADVERTISING
252 N W 29 St FR 3-0005
Emil Flutie, Sr; Albert Flutie; Emil Flutie, Jr;
JACKSON OUTDOOR ADVERTISING CO
3011 N W 62 St OX 1-2280
A F Seltzer
JAMES BROS ADVERTISING INC
797 E Okeechobee Rd Hlh TU 8-5182
James "Jimmy" James, Pres
MIAMI TRANSIT CO-THE MAMI BEACH
RAILWAY CO
P 0 Box 3581 FR 7-3641
OUTDOOR ADVERTISING SERVICE
1231 N W 44 St NE 5-6670
William Skinner
PHILBIN & COINE
914 N W 1 Av FR 4-4539
Dick Foltz, South Fla Rep
ROSE POSTER PRINTING INC
6875 S W 81 St MO 1-1621
Ralph B Rose, Pres; Fred V Lavis, Sec-Treas
(See our ad opp. page 59)


-----------------
Now in their Twenty-eighth Year





THE

Guest

Bo I


Established
1932

TCkestige, .auagaaines
IOF FLORIDA'S GOLD COAST

IThe Visitor and Guest Book reach
the world's greatest concentration
of class buying power.
Ten Issues Published Semi-monthly
from December thru April.
For a Sample Copy of the Visitor
and Guest Book Write to
VISITOR PUBLISHING CO.
605 Lincoln Road a Miami Beach, Fla.

67


IN MIAMI BEACH SINCE 1926
MENUS
BOOKLETS ENVELOPES
MAGAZINES
FOLDERS LAYOUTS
BUSINESS FORMS
4-COLOR PRINTING
647 WASHINGTON AVE. JE 8-0336









TNft WEK


one sure way
to sell
the TOURIST
We receive more insertion orders from
recognized advertising agencies than
ALL other local tourist publications com-
bined.


ROOM & FOOD SERVICE
MAGAZINE
100% coverage of Florida's
Hotel and Motel Market
S. with a BONUS circulation of over
1000 members of the Fla. Restaurant
Assoc. plus Caribbean Hotels and Mo-
tels.
PUBLISHING
McASKILL COMPANY,INC.


NO

You can tel
to the over
People moni

MI

S INTERN/

AIRP

S A Limitec

J of Di

Is Avai

S Qualified

Aflilia,
TRANSPORTATIOt

For full de

-McASKILL


W* *

I your story
1,000,000
thly who use

AMI

NATIONAL


ORT!


I Number

splays
lable to
Advertisers

ted with
N DISPLAYS, INC.

tails, contact
ASSOCIATES
AIRPORT ADVTG.


4014 CHASE AVE., MIAMI BEACH . JE 4-4715
.............................................................................................................


...........................................................................


FLORIDA FUN
229-5 St MB
E Alfred Rowen; Joseph Kamelhar;
Richard Rowen, Partners


JE 8-5963


PHOTOCOPYING &
PHOTOSTATS
ADVER-STAT INC
936 W Flagler St FR 9-8904
Everett Gum, Pres; Roland W Chang, VP
ENFIELD'S MIAMI PHOTO INC
1339 Biscayne Blvd FR 3-7676
Henry Enfield, Pres; Kurt Enfield, VP-Treas;
Paul Enfield, Secy
FLEXO ART & PHOTOGRAPH CORP
125 N E 11 St FR 4-8476
Norman C Alkema, Pres
REPRO INC
1678 Coral Way HI 6-0866
Ed Behrman, Pres
(See our ad page 63)
T-SQUARE MIAMI BLUE PRINT CO
635 S W 1 Av FR 9-4501
Fawdrey A S Molt, Pres;
Robert Gebing, Gen Mgr


PHOTO ENGRAVING
BEACH ENGRAVING
1753 Alton Rd MB JE 1-9815
BIRMY PHOTO ENGRAVING CO
1152 N E 1 Av FR 1-2765
E L Birmingham, Jr, Pres


CLAUDE SOUTHERN CORP
3950 N W 31 Av NE 5-0402
M M Kraus, Pres; H H Sheppard, VP;
M M Dilloff, Secy
TELERAMA INC
1 Lincoln Rd Bldg MB JE 4-2139
WEBSTER OUTDOOR ADVERTISING CO
120-150 N W 54 St PL 8-8711
W C Webster, Gen Mgr
(See our ad page 64)



PAPER MANUFACTURERS &
WHOLESALE
AAA ECONOMY CONTAINER MANUFACTURING CO
89 N E 27 St FR 3-0736
Henry Gibson, Owner
ASSOCIATED ARTISTS
1822 Biscayne Blvd FR 3-3562
Garold N Rowley, Owner
ATLANTIC PAPER CO
837 W Flagler St FR 9-7673
Maurice S Brody, Pres; William F Meier, Jr
BELL PAPER CO INC
6899 N E 4 Av PL 7-2411
Stuart Winston, Pres; Meyer Robbins, Treas
EVERGLADE PAPER CO
7100 N W 36 St NE 4-9781
FLAMINGO PAPER PRODUCTS INC
1084 E 31 St, Hlh OX 1-4641
Edward K Swing, Jr, Pres;
Robert E Fishback, VP
KNIGHT BROTHERS PAPER CO
3485 N W 65 St OX 1-8320
John L Woods, Bd Chmn; Jack A Knight, Pres;
Claude T Cason, VP; Turner Knight, Jr, Asst
Br Mgr
SWEET PAPER SALES CORP
6800 N W 37 Av OX 1-8759
Samuel Scheck, Pres; Ira I Scheck, VP;
Henrietta Scheck, Sec-Treas



PARTY SUPPLIES, MAGIC
& NOVELTIES






ENGRAVERS INC
233 NE 1 St FR 3-6651
Olen W Todd, Pres; Peter Duschen, Sales Mgr;
Nelson Eidenire, Superintendent
(See our ad back cover)
FLORIDIAN PHOTO ENGRAVING INC
710 N W 25 St NE 4-2693
Vito M Perrone, Pres; Arthur F Dark, VP;
Carl H Larson, Sec-Treas
(See our ad page 65)
GRAPHIC ARTS PHOTO ENGRAVING CO
1040 W Flagler St FR 1-0257
(See our ad page 61)
MIAMI PHOTO ENGRAVERS
151 Majorca Av CG HI 5-2511
Oscar E (Gene) Bramblett, Jr
(See our ads pages 63, 64, 65, 67, 72)
REX ENGRAVING CO INC
65 N W 6 St FR 3-5843
SERVICE PHOTO ENGRAVING CO
49 N W 22 St FR 3-2455
WRIGLEY ART ENGRAVING CO INC
122 N E 6 St FR 4-7330

PHOTOGRAPHIC MURALS
PHOTOGRAPHIC MURALS


THE FILM ART CORP
150 N W 1 St
Maurey L Ashmann


FR 4-3107


PLASTIC & RUBBER PLATES


METRO MAT SERVICE
28 N W 20 St
Matty Weinstein, Pres


FR 94667


POSTER PRINTERS
ROSE POSTER PRINTING INC
6875 S W 81 St MO 1-1621
Ralph B Rose, Pres; Fred V Lavis, Sec-Treas
(See our ad opp. page 59)



PRESS CLIPPING SERVICE
FLORIDA CLIPPING SERVICE
P 0 Box 10278, Tampa 8-3843
E C Frick, Owner; Russell Kay, Gen Mgr



PRINTERS
THE ADPRESS
446 S W 8 St FR 9-9022
Charles Adler; Stanley J Adler; Joseph H Snyder
ALLAPATTAH PRESS INC
1736 NI W 35 St NE 3-2444
ALLAPATTAH STATIONERS INC
3407 N W 17 Av NE 5-4495
Emory E Weaver, Pres; E Ellwood Weaver,
Sales Mgr; John B Weaver, Pur Agt
ATLANTIC PRINTERS INC
647 Washington Av MB JE 8-0336
Charles F Rysdon, Pres; Edward E Deegan,
Sec-Treas; J Edw Twombly, Assoc
(See our ad page 67)
BARNETTS
228 N E 59 St PL 4-3457
Paul Barnett, Pres; Sol Schreiber, Secy
BEACH OFFSET & PRINTING SERVICE
600 Lincoln Rd MB JE 2-2868
Claire Wilder, Owner
BOND PRESS
1730 Alton Rd MB JE 8-2195
Ted Selevan


i ihanhs to



I G



SE-X-


f True, Woman
S .


6 sions, Motion
S lustrated, Ca
S Specialized B
Christian Hei
Church Buildi
6 Town and C
6 Super Markel
Catholic Buil
6 Catholic Edu
6 Homiletic &



SHALE
S 1006 Langf
S MIAMI 32
* FRanklir
SFRanklir


I
4
4

-t
4
t
4
4
4)
4i


Many Jine F7riends in the

Our Family Is

-R-O-W-I-N-G
and We're


P-A-N-D-I-N-G


Representing America's most progres-
sive publishers, we are fortunate in
being able to keep abreast of all phases
of merchandising and marketing. Our
information is constantly revised to keep
it timely and up-to-date.
Why not invite us to tell you more
about the top-flight publications we can
put to work producing profitable results
. .. regardless of the size of your bud-
get?
Feel free to write or call collect our
office nearest you.


PRINTUP and Associates


ord Building
, FLORIDA
1 9-2668
n 1-6545


1401 Peachtree St., N.E.
ATLANTA 9, GEORGIA
TRinity 5-0373


In Advertising . .

S.. RELATIVITY

IS NO THEORY...
.. it's a fact! More than that, it's the basis on which all newspapers
and magazines must qualify for representation by the HAL WINTER
COMPANY. This is so because it is the relativity of Results to Cost
which makes any advertising medium a wise or an unwise investment.
In this respect, while the publications represented by the HAL
WINTER COMPANY may not, in all cases, be the "biggest" from the
standpoint of circulation, in their particular areas or fields, we have
selected these properties because factual considerations suggest, that,
on the relativity of Results to Cost, each and all will prove "best" for
you, the advertiser. Perhaps the easiest way to appraise our standards
is to consider a publication in the role of a salesman. Basically any
salesman is a "transmitter" of a sales message. What, then, makes
one salesman better than another? The ability to knock on a greater
number of doors? Certainly not! The sales message? Of course!
This must intelligently appraise your "product" or hotel. But, all
things being equal, it is the ability of a salesman or publication to not
only knock on a door... but get into the living room, deliver the
message with such telling influence and conviction that positive
action results. That makes the big difference between salesmen
and between publications. That's Productivity . and Productivity
at a low selling cost is, and will continue to be, the common
denominator of each and every publication represented by
the HAL WINTER COMPANY
7450 OCEAN TERRACE MIAMI BEACH UN 5-2661
REPRESENTING: New York Post, Chicago Sun Times, Washington
Post, Boston Herald, Chicago Daily News, St. Paul Pioneer Press,
Toronto Globe and Mail, Montreal Gazette, Miami News, Travel
Agent, Coronet, Mademoiselle, Living, All-Florida, Modern Bride.


-FFF----------


publications :
I's Day, True Confes-
Picture, Mechanics II-
valier, Detective and
ooks.
raid (and Protestant
ngs and Equipment).
country.
t Merchandising.
ding & Maintenance.
:ator.
Pastoral Review.


~~~CII(CIILLCCLIII*~~C~CICCI(I~C~CCIIC~L






BOULEVARD PRINTERS
9816 N W 7 Av PL 1-6469
W C "Bill" Taylor, Owner; E M "Betty" Taylor
BROWER PRESS INC
12365 W Dixie Hwy PL 4-2517
Kenneth C Brower, Pres;
David L Brower, VP
CENTER PRINTING CO INC
1044 N W 54 St PL 4-4589
C C Crosby, Sr, Pres; C C Crosby, Jr, Sec-Treas;
Juaneta H Crosby, VP
COLONIAL PRESS OF MIAMI INC
3265 N W 37 St NE 5-8366
Vincent D'Amato, Pres;
Joseph D'Amato, Sec-Treas
COMMERCIAL PRESS
635 N W 10 St FR 1-8639
D E Eddinger; R C Hardwick
THE DAVIS PRINTER
230 N W 14 St FR 9-4922
John H Davis, Owner; Inez K Davis, Co-Owner
DIXIE PRINTERS
425 S W 17 Av FR 4-2534
Horace S Snyder
DUDLEY & FARTHING PRINTERS
& LITHOGRAPHERS
820 5 St MB JE 8-4508
E E Farthing, Owner
FALCO PRINTING INC
6045 N E 2 Av PL 8-3751
H B Faucette, Pres;
Henry B Faucette, Jr, Sec-Treas
FOLSOM PRINTER
900 LeJeune Rd HI 8-9389
THE FRANKLIN PRESS INC
928 S W 10 St FR 3-8306
W P Mooty, Pres-Treas; F F Domnick, VP;
M M Mooty, Secy
G & K PRINTING
632 S W 22 Av HI 6-2822
Michael J Kelly; Franklin P Gehrig
H & W B DREW CO
306 Bird Rd CG HI 5-3619


MARKETS
Are


PEOPLE!
Here are over 3,500,-
000 of them! Are they
getting your message?
NEW YORK
Herald Tribune
COLUMBUS (Ohio)
Dispatch
INDIANAPOLIS
Star and News
MINNEAPOLIS
Star and Tribune
DES MOINES
Register and Tribune
BUFFALO
Courier Express
TORONTO
Telegram
WASHINGTON
Star
PROVIDENCE
m Journal-Bulletin
Represented by
McASKILL, HERMAN
& DALEY, Inc.
4014 Chase Avenue Miami Beach
Phone: JE 2-1715


1


THE GOLDEN PRESS
2916 S W 8 St HI 6-2020
J 0 & William T Golden
THE LEO J GOLDMAN GRAPHIC ARTS STUDIO
2655 S W 25 Av HI 6-0852
Leo J Goldman; Dorothy C Goldman
HANNAU COLOR PRODUCTIONS
605 Lincoln Rd MB JE 8-2923
J & J STATIONERS INC
2605 N W 2 Av FR 1-5425
Joe Dorf, Pres
JEFFCO PRINTING
180 N W 54 St PL 8-5062
Jack Hill
KARMARC PRINTERS & STATIONERS
6240 S W 8 St MO 6-4009
Frank Parness, Owner
KAUFMAN PRESS
924 N E 2 Av FR 4-3587
KELLS PRESS
123 San Lorenzo Av CG HI 4-0845
Carl Justice, Owner; Ida L Nally, Mgr
PAUL A KUEHN PRINTING
886 N E 79 St PL 4-2794
LEE PRINTING CO
4905 N W 17 Av NE 5-3552
F A Scharber
LLOYD PRINTING CORP
1800 N Miami Av FR 4-8413
I Harlan Lloyd, Pres
McMURRAY PRINTERS
2134 n W Miami Court FR 4-8441
Ralph Swanson
MIAMI POST PUBLISHING CO
1942 N W 1 Court FR 9-3471
Carl H Westman, Pres; J Winston Anderson, VP
(See our ad page 56)
MOON PRESS
2157 N W 36 St NE 5-5824


AFFORD PRINTING SERVICE
427 E 9 St, Hlh


TU 8-2635


Nothing but the Best

for Florida Advertisers:
0


PARKER ART PRINTING ASSN
303 Alcazar Av CG HI 3-4276
PATTERSON PRESS
127 Almeria Av CG HI 3-5435
M L Patterson, Owner; Polly Patterson, Mgr
PERSONALLY YOURS PRESS
1815 Purdy Av MB JE 1-7367
PIONEER PRESS
7913 N W 7 Av PL 9-6551
Louis Birnbaum, Owner
PRINTCRAFTERS
830 E 1 Av Hlh TU 8-2335
L J Murphy, Pres; Robert S Murphy, VP-Mgr;
Don Craver, Sales Mgr; John D Murphy, Treas
RAINBOW PRESS INC
2834 N Miami Av FR 4-8010
RAYMAX PRESS
460 Palm Av Hlh TU 8-8636
Fred J North, Pres
RE-PRO PRINTING SERVICE
16340 W Dixie Hwy WI 5-1972
George Little, Owner
ROYAL PRINTERS
2253 Coral Way HI 3-3063
J Griffin Rountree; John E Royal, Partners
STAR PRINTING SERVICE
1331 S W 8 St FR 3-0932
Levino Valentini, Owner
SOUTHERN-MIAMI PRESS INC
2366 W Flagler St HI 8-0485
(See our ad page 65)
STEELE PRINTING CO
458 N W 79 St PL 4-2291
TRU-PRINT
405 N W 26 St FR 1-7639
WEISZ PRINTING
436 Espanola Way MB JE 8-7601
Samuel Weisz


WILLIAMS PRINTING CO
3458 Main Hwy
Roy L Williams, Thelma


HI 3-0622
M Williams, Owners


American Legion Magazine
American Motel
American Restaurant
Bride's Magazine
Dell Comics
Dell Men's Group


Dell Modern Group
House & Garden
House & Home
Ingenue
Represented By Sports Illustrated

0awso0 company
Chamber of Commerce Building
Miami 32 Tel. FR 3-8847


IIFE EN ESPRDnL's
SnEW CARIBE
Your First Class Roi
First Class Traveler
Circulation Base: 100-]
Average issue readershi
For more information, write or call:

ROBERT E. S5
Dupont Plaza Cent
Miami 32, Florida


ERH EDITIOn
ute to reach
*s to Miami
110,000 ABC net paid.
p: 750,000.


ILISBURV
er, Suite 507
FRanklin 9-1710


I























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a q 00 M a- ~- ~- __ -- - __ __- - -- -_ - - -M -- L


-- -- ----' ~ --'-' -'-" ~ ~" ~ -"" ~ -'-" ~


I







PRINTING INK
INTERCHEMICAL CORP
3535 N W 60 St NE 3-6571
Gordon Brackett, Mgr



PUBLIC RELATIONS
COUNSELORS
JOHN T BILLS ASSOCIATES
2917 Seminole St HI 4-4061
DALY PUBLIC RELATIONS
1002 Seybold Bldg FR 4-8321
THE STEPHEN J FLYNN CO INC
86 Merrick Way CG HI 4-6241
Stephen J Flynn, Pres; Phillip Becker, Exec VP
W BILL GLICK ASSOCIATES
1 Lincoln Rd Bldg MB JE 4-2139
HAGGARD & MARCHNER
78 E 6 St Hlh TU 7-3400
Tom Haggard; Russ Marchner
PETER F HELLER & ASSOCIATES
1101 Lincoln Rd MB JE 1-1885
Peter F Heller, Pres; Martha R Heller, VP
HOD PUBLIC RELATIONS
770 S W 47 Av HI 4-5281
LEE HOWARD ADVERTISING CO INC
1 Lincoln Rd Bldg MB JE 1-1609
Lee Howard, Pres;
Anthony P. Nicodema, Ill, Secy
JEFFERSON SHAW & SMITH
210 Roper Bldg FR 7-2591
Tom Jefferson; Charles A Shaw; Ray Smith
JOSEPH KANTER ASSOCIATES
623 Brickell Av FR 7-4475
KASHUK ASSOCIATES
924 Lincoln Rd MB JE 8-6267
Jay E Kashuk; Lew Kashuk, Partners
JUNE KELLER PUBLIC RELATIONS
724 Dade Commonwealth Bldg FR 3-8139
June Keller. Owner
WOODY KEPNER ASSOCIATES INC
3361 S W 3 Av FR 9-1895
Woody Kepner, Pres; Jack I Green, VP;
Palma Kepner, Secy; Karl Bishopric, Treas
LEYSHON ASSOCIATES OF FLA INC
509A Ainsley Bldg FR 4-0623
George E Pickard, Exec VP; G Ralph Kiel, VP
WALLACE MacCORY ASSOCIATES
Congress Bldg FR 9-4035
HANK MEYER ASSOCIATES INC
407 Lincoln Rd MB JE 1-7411
Hank Meyer, Pres; Jack Waugh, VP
MILLER BACON AVRUTIS & SIMONS INC
1201 Ainsley Bldg FR 9-2882
Sanford Bacon, Pres; Hilliard Avrutis, VP;
Arthur H Simons, Sec-Treas; Arthur L Gray, VP
STUART G NEWMAN
1900 Purdy Av MB JE 1-0807
RICHARD OSBORNE ASSOCIATES INC
901 N E 2 Av FR 3-8785


PAN AMERICAN PUBLIC RELATIONS LTD
231 Plaza Bldg FR 3-7761
Sandy M Pitofsky, Chmn of the Bd;
Chris Cross, Pres; Barry Horenbein, VP
Southern Operations
PENINSULA PROMOTIONS INC
2301 N E 171 St NMB WI 7-3201
Daniel D Diefenbach, Pres;
Dorothee Ann Hoppen, Sec-Treas
RAY REDMAN & ASSOCIATES
1370 Washington Av MB JE 4-4797
Ray Redman, Pres; Jean R Biblo, VP;
Isabelle Redman, Sec-Treas
JACK ROSS
2555 Collins Av MB JE 1-9910
J ROBERT ROWLEY & ASSOCIATES INC
529 W Flagler St FR 3-3603
RICHARD RUNDELL ASSOCIATES INC
Dupont Bldg FR 1-6145
VENN COLE & ASSOCIATES INC
721 Dupont Plaza Center FR 7-2594
Robert G Venn, Pres; Julian Cole, VP;
Ruth E Blower, AE; Bud Dailey, AE
FRANK SUMNER WRIGHT
Dade Commonwealth Bldg FR 4-4144

, ,- ; .-. :: . . ,

PUBLICITY SERVICE
CORYELL & ASSOCIATES INC
4563 Ponce de Leon Blvd CG MO 7-7517
James R Coryell, Pres; Stephen J Fisher, AE
WOODY KEPNER ASSOCIATES INC
3361 S W 3 Av FR 9-1895
Woody Kepner, Pres; Jack I Green, VP;
Palma Kepner, Secy; Karl Bishopric, Treas
WELCOME WAGON INC
161 Aragon Av CG HI 8-4994
Florence M Rood, Supr of Dade County;
Lou Hart, State Rep



PUBLISHERS
AERO NEWS
P 0 Box 48-116 TU 7-7345
J A Brite, Ed-Publ
AMERICAS PUBLISHING CO
4349 N W 36 St TU 8-7521
ARRICK & GRAY
3328 S W 23 Terrace HI 3-7077
Lewis Gray, Arlene A Gray
COCONUT GROVE PUBLISHING CO
3440 Main Hwy CGr HI 5-1761
S D Haynsworth
FLORIDA ARCHITECTURE INC
122 N E 39 St PL 8-0886
Frederick Findeisen, Pres;
E Channing Trafford, VP
THE FLORIDA GROCER
300 E 1 Av Hlh TU 8-2401
Jay Morton, Publ-Ed; Louis A Perrone, Adv Mgr;
Walter G Carter, NY Adv Rep


sell...
discerning business executives
and high income consumers in
the publication they depend upon
for guidance


wv- s 3


MIAMI OFFICE-150 S.E. 2nd St.
Phone FR 3-2609


PLAYBOY





represented by
Southeast Advertising
Sales
Roy S. McCune
Chamber of Commerce Bldg.
Miami, Florida
Telephone: FRanklin 1-2103


'311 LINCOLN RD..MIAMI BEACH, FLA.
* BALTIMORE SUN
* BOSTON GLOBE
DALLAS NEWS
DETROIT NEWS
KANSAS CITY STAR
LOS ANGELES TIMES
MEMPHIS COMMERCIAL APPEAL
MILWAUKEE JOURNAL
MONTREAL LA PRESS
NEWARK NEWS
NEW ORLEANS TIMES-PICAYUNE
NEW YORK MIRROR
PHILADELPHIA BULLETIN
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH


Publishers' Representatives
of Florida
CLARENCE BRACEY

Representing
Field & Stream Boating Industry
Boats Popular Gardening

Bradenton Herald Daytona Beach News-
Journal Ft. Lauderdale News Ft.
Myers News-Press Gainesville Sun *
Lakeland Ledger Orlando Sentinel-Star
St. Augustine Record Sarasota Herald-
Tribune-Journal Tallahassee Democrat
1219 Hendricks Ave. P.O. Box 5476
Jacksonville 7, Fla. Ph. FL 9-4443


FLORIDA'S TOP MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS' REPRESENTATIVES
Representing
BUILDING SPECIALTIES KELLOGG GROUP RETIREMENT LIFE
CATHOLIC BUILDING & Railroad Employee Magazines RUDDER
MAINTENANCE OFFICIAL CLUB PUBLICATIONS SWIMMING POOL AGE
FURNITURE SOUTH 18 of the Nation's Outstand- TURNPIKE TRAVELERS GUIDE
GOLF ing Social and Athletic Club WESTERN AVIATION
Magazines.
Also Associated with WEAVER, Incorporated, Atlanta, Ga.-Tyler, Texas
representing: HOUSE BEAUTIFUL'S PRACTICAL GARDENER
ARGOSY BUILDING MANUAL SUNSET
BRIDE & HOME 120 HOUSES & PLANS TOURIST COURT JOURNAL
HOUSE BEAUTIFUL NAHB JOURNAL OF
HOMEBUILDING

RAY RICKLES AND COMPANY (NOT INC.
Chamber of Commerce Bldg.
Miami 32, Florida Phone FR 1-0376






HANNAU COLOR PUBLICATIONS
605 Lincoln Rd MB JE 8-2923
Hans W Hannau, Owner; Vadah W Swords,
Prod Mgr; Ralph E Herz, Sales Mgr
LARSON'S INC
158 Giralda Av CG HI 4-0576
L W Larson, Pres; Gardnar Mulloy, VP
MIAMI BEACH SUN
1753 Alton Rd MB JE 4-2181
Parks Rusk, Ed-Publ; Dan J Cronin, Mng Ed
NATIONAL BANKING AD SERVICE
17070 Collins Av MB WI 5-3101
J Lester; Martin Lewis
R L POLK & CO
63 N E 40 St PL 4-4454
W N Leigh, (Richmond, Va) Div Sales Mgr;
Charles A Lumbley, Sales Mgr
SCHEAFFER NATIONAL PUBLISHERS
6801 Collins Av MB UN 6-1984


SOUTHERN BEVERAGE JOURNAL
327 Alcazar CG HI 6-0819
Marvin Levin, Pres; Bernard Hill, VP;
Jane Levin, Sec-Treas
TROPICANA PUBLISHERS
2190 S W 6 St FR 1-8721
Julius Naiman, Owner


PUBLISHERS
REPRESENTATIVES


AMERICAN AVIATION PUBLICATIONS
208 Almeria Av CG
R H Hager, Reg Mgr
J BERNARD CASHION & ASSOCIATES
Chamber of Commerce Bldg


HI 4-8326

FR 1-9941


THE DAWSON CO
1206 Chamber of Commerce Bldg FR 3-8847
Harold L Dawson, Owner;
Don L Uhlenhopp, Assoc
(See our ad page 70)
HALE PRINTUP & ASSOCIATES
121 S E 1 St FR 9-2668
(See our ad page 69)
HEARST ADVERTISING SERVICE INC
9550' Bay Harbor Ter MB UN 5-5726
Howard C Boone, Mgr; Samuel Kay,
Travel & Resort Mgr
SY KAPLAN ASSOCIATES
8701 Collins Av MB UN 5-0351
(See our ad page 71)
ROY S McCUNE
Chamber of Comm Bldg FR 1-2103
(See our ad page 71)
METROPOLITAN PUBLISHERS REPRESENTATIVES
1690 Alton Rd MB JE 8-0436
Joel S Meltzer







0 ,,


yl I l' II
oI\O'


RADIO, FLORIDA
CYPRESS GARDENS

Repr, sntd by

The On-ina S-,rn H. p Rprie ve
FLORIDA BROADCASTING DIVISION OF KSTP, INC.


W Q A M


RADIO 1 IN MIAMI*

560 on your dial



*Pulse-Trendex-Hooper
< H.-A^. .L-L~i-L.L>.~b..Afj*

0
o for total selling in

0
o DAYTONA BEACH

0
o Buy Total Coverage...
0

0
o News-Journal Papers
Morning Evening Sunday
0 Represented Nationally By Word-Griffith Co. Inc.
0 Publishers' Representatives of Florida, Clarence Bracey


o RADIO STATION
o WNDB AM-FM


0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0
0






RAY RICKLES & CO
Chamber of Commerce Bldg FR 1-0376
Ray Rickles; Maurice Gable; William Millett;
Martha Wade
(See our ad page 71)
SOUTHEAST ADVERTISING SALES
Chamber of Commerce Bldg FR 1-2103
Roy S McCune, Exec VP
WEAVER INC
Chamber of Commerce Bldg FR 1-0376
Ray Rickles, Mgr
(See our ad page 71)
HAL WINTER CO
7136 Abbott Av MB UN 5-2661
(See our ad page 69)


RADIO BROADCASTING
STATIONS
COMMUNITY SERVICE BROADCASTERS-WMET
814-1 St MB JE 8-0411
Richard B Baker, Gen Mgr-Exec VP
WAM-E BROADCASTING CO
Chamber of Commerce Bldg FR 3-5533
Ted Wilson, Gen Mgr; Murry Woroner, Sta Mgr;
Fred Hohl, Program Dir; Stan Brown, Chief Engr
WAFM BAYFRONT BROADCASTING CORP
Congress Bldg FR 7-1641
Richard L Lapidus, Gen Mgr; C Russell Lea,
Chief Engr; Clinton C Wells, Sales Mgr;
Jacques Donnet, Program Dir
WCKR-BISCAYNE TELEVISION CORP
1401 N Bay Causeway PL 1-6692
Owen F Uridge, Mgr; L L "Duke" Zimmerman,
Sales Mgr; Dan Valentine, Program Dir;
John Hiser, Promotion Dir
(See our ad page 14)
WFAB RADIO
1775 S W 3 Av FR 1-5531
Lou Jacobs



To make sure of
complete saturation,
part of your budget
should be placed
on South Florida's
only Spanish language
radio station . .
serving the 107,000
Spanish speaking,
permanent residents
in this market.



WMIE-RADIO

1140 On Your Dial

1448 N.W. 36TH ST.

NEwton 5-2447


RADIO STATION WFEC
350 Ni E 71st St PL 1-7534
Harry Trenner, Pres; Bert Noble, Gen Mgr
RADIO MIAMI WGBS
1605 Biscayne Blvd FR 9-2401
Bernard E Neary, Mng Dir; Earn Elber, Program-
Prom Dir; Norman A Palmer, Nat'l A E
WINZ RADIO STATION
Biscayne Terrace Hotel FR 1-6641
Rex Rand, Pres; Robert E Mitchell, VP-Gen Mgr
(See our ad page 73)
RADIO STATION WKAT
1759 N Bay Rd MB JE 1-5711
A Frank Katzentine, Pres;
Fred W Wagenvoord, Exec VP
RADIO STATION WMBM
Causeway Terminal, MB JE 1-5586
R W Rounsaville, Pres; S A Wade, Treas;
A C Kaufman, VP
WMIE RADIO STATION
139 N E 1 St FR 3-5556
E D Rivers, Sr, Pres; Jack Nobles, Mgr;
Douglas Hatton, Program Dir; Ann Kaufman,
Continuity-Traffic Dir
(See our ad page 73)
WQAM-STORZ BROADCASTING CO
1723 duPont Bldg FR 4-6121
Todd Storz, Pres; Jack L Sandier, VP-Gen Mgr;
Charlie Murdock, Program Dir;
Lewis C Jamieson, Local Sales Mgr
(See our ad page 72)
RADIO STATION WSKP
420 S W 2 Av FR 1-1585
Bill O'Neil; Charles V Hunter
RADIO STATION WWPB-FM
422 S W 2 Av FR 3-7405
Paul Brake, Owner-Mgr Engr; Paul Keefe,
Asst Mgr; John Cash, Program Dir
WVCG AM-FM
377 Alhambra Circle CG HI 8-7411
George W Thorpe, Pres-Gen Mgr;
Warren Blackmon, VP; Tim Carney, VP Sales





WINZ

WAS FIRST
IN ALL THREE
NEILSON REPORTS
MADE DURING 1959
Your Message Will Reach
the Top Buying Audience
in the Greater Miami
Market When You Buy












50,000 Watts
Penthouse Music and News
Biscayne Terrace Hotel 24 Hours
FR 1-6641 Miami. Florida a day


SALES RESULTS


WPST-TV Channel 10
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY
X ABC. NETWORK






BROADCASTERS'
REPRESENTATIVES
GUY ZWAHLEN
2135 S W 26 St HI 3-2121


RECORDING STUDIOS
ART RECORDS
1224 N W 119th St MU 8-8022
Harold E Doane, Pres-Gen Mgr
FRED BERNEY'S RECORDING STUDIO
2377 Coral Way HI 4-2021
CRITERIA RECORDING CO
1755 N E 149 St WI 7-4691
M L Emerman, Owner; Lon Norman, Musical Dir
DUKOFF INTERNATIONAL SOUND CORP
1625 Bay Rd MB JE 8-0676
Robert Dukoff, Pres; Anita Dukoff, VP
STEREOPHONIC INC
1138 N E 2 Av FR 1-8350
Frank Linale, Pres; Pat Cerone, Chief Engr
VOICE INC
5810 W Flagler St MO 1-3164
James C Rowe, Pres


RUBBER STAMPS
A A RUBBER STAMP CO
12446 N E 6 Court PL 1-8036
Harold F Eglie
ACE CORPORATE SEAL & STAMP CO
132 N E 2 Av FR 4-7747
Richard Friedman, Pres
BIRK INC
2710 Ponce de Leon Blvd CG HI 8-7675
Sydney N Birk, Pres; Isabel M Birk, Sec-Treas


DADE PRINTING & STAMP WORKS INC
709 N E 1st Av FR 4-5845
Mary Grayce Murray, Pres
GABLES STATIONERS
129 Giralda AV CG HI 8-6046
Sol Schreiber, Owner
IDEAL STAMP WORKS
6026 N W 7 Av PL 4-0211
SUPERIOR STAMP & SEAL WORKS
613 N E 1 Av FR 4-1034
Charles F Merz; Margaret I Merz


SIGNS AND PAINTS
JOE ROY SIGNS & PAINT SUPPLIES
6742 W Flagler St MO 7-2711



SILK SCREEN PRINTING
FLORIDA SCREEN PRINTING
1735 N W 28 St NE 4-8191
FLORART FLOCK PROCESS INC
2147 S W 8 St FR 3-1949
W R Cunningham, Pres
MacLAREN DISPLAY ADVERTISING
2331 S W 32 Av HI 6-7313
C N MacLaren
MULTICOLOR SCREEN PRINTING CO
640 S W 22 Av HI 4-0846
George R Grey, Owner
ROSE POSTER PRINTING INC
6875 S W 81 St S Miami MO 1-1621
Ralph B Rose, Pres; Fred J Lavis, Secy-Treas
(See our ad opp. page 59)
SCREEN ART POSTERS INC
4590 E 10 Ct Hlh MU 8-2801
Paul Gallat


FR 4-5527


-1 foremost
in distinguished
advertising typography



NORMAN





ALL WE KNOW IS


SPECIALTIES
LOUIS BAIDA SPECIALTIES INC
922 N E 2 Av FR 4-6586
Louis Baida, Pres; Anne Baida, VP;
Don Linder, Off Mgr
(See our ad page 63)
H F & L N BITTERLICH
2309 S W 62 Court MO 1-1208
H F Bitterlich
BROWN & BIGELOW
304 Bird Rd HI 4-6144
BUSINESS BOOSTERS INC
200 N W 22 Av NE 4-6660
Milt Berk
(See our ad page 63)
BERT GILBERT
Chamber of Commerce Bldg and
1101 Lincoln Rd MB JE 4-4747
H & J ADVERTISING & NOVELTY CO
3282 S W 7th St HI 6-6794
Cliff Home, Owner
SANFORD JAY PRODUCTS
1644 N W 17 Av NE 5-4707
Sanford Jay Mandell, Pres
THE KING COMPANY
147 Giralda Av CG HI 3-7835
HERB LINDEN ADVERTISING SPECIALTIES
331 Sinbad Av Opa-locka MU 1-1251
J L LEWIS DISTRIBUTING CO
874 W 71 Place Hlh TU 7-3080
LION MATCH CO INC
1780 S W 14 St FR 4-7709
Al M Band, Dist Mgr
MANLEE PRODUCTS CO
7630 Biscayne Blvd PL 9-9071
Leo H Bernstein, Pres;
Emanuel Seman, Sec-Treas
MAYNARD CO
42 S E 8 St FR 3-6479
JOHN R PARKE ADVERTISING SPECIALTIES
689 N E 79 St PL 4-3398
John R Parke; Ray L Forsythe
RANDY POLANSKY ADVERTISING SPECIALTIES
12305 N E 6 Av PL 7-5412
JOHN M SILVER
1652 N E 123 St PL 1-1783
John M Silver; Leonard J Silver
SAMUEL SOLOMON, JR
2013 S W 1 St HI 3-0723
SOUTHERNi SPECIALTY CO
173 N E 54 St PL 8-2507
Irene Nenno
VIOLA ADVERTISING SPECIALTIES
P 0 Box 25 MB JE 8-0564
M G Viola, Sales Mgr


STEEL DIE ENGRAVING
HILCRAFT ENGRAVING CO
116 N E 6 St FR 3-4634
(See our ad page 75)
MIAMI ENGRAVING CO
245 N E 37 St FR 3-3166


WE MAKE
STATS, TOO


FRanklin 3-7341


JACK SHAFFER
626 N.W. 6th Ave. Miami
*and how to use it!


1 --1


[G


19C







NARUP ENGRAVING CO
74 N E 74 St PL 8-4435
J Fred Narup, Pres; P Ronald Narup, VP;
Emily E Narup, Sec-Treas



TELEVISION
WCKT-BISCAYNE TELEVISION CORP-CHANNEL 7
1401 N Bay Causeway PL 1-6692
Niles Trammel, Pres-Gen Mgr; Charles Kelly,
Sta Mgr; R L Fidlar, Sales Dir
(See our ad page 14)
WPST-TV-CHANNEL 10
2075 Biscayne Blvd FR 1-6501
Walter Koessler, Gen-Mgr; Eleanor Larsen,
Pro Dir; Bob Hanna, Natl Sales Mgr;
Jack Allen, Retail Sales Mgr
(See our ad page 73)
WTHS-TV CHANNEL 2
1410 N E 2 Av FR 4-7281
Vernon Bronson, Sta Mgr-Dir; Fred Fischer,
Prod Supvr; John Felton, Program Dir;
Herb Evans, Chief Engineer
WTVJ-TV CHANNEL 4
316 N Miami Av FR 4-6262
Lee Ruwitch, Exec VP-Gen Mgr; Frank Howell,
Local Sales Mgr; Bill Brazzil, VP in Chg of
Sales; Ken Bagwell, Nat'l Sales Mgr
(See our ad page 18)



THEATRICAL
AMERICAN GENERAL ENTERTAINMENT
235 Lincoln Rd MB JE 2-1851
Fred Costa, Gen Mgr
ART GORDON AGENCY INC
407 Lincoln Rd MB JE 2-2414
RAY DIDO ENTERTAINMENT CONSULTANT
235 Lincoln Rd MB JE 8-0255
SYD LEONARD ATTRACTIONS
235 Lincoln Rd MB JE 1-3118
HERBERT MARKS TALENT AGENCY INC
600 Lincoln Rd Bldg MB JE 4-2119
SY RICH THEATRICAL AGENCY
235 Lincoln Rd MB JE 1-7421
BURTON E VAN DEUSEN SHOW PRODUCTIONS
3240 N W 27 Av NE 4-7222
Burton E Van Deusen, Owner; Howard Ross,
Associate



THERMOGRAPHERS
PIONEER ANNOUNCEMENTS INC
25 N E 25 St FR 9-7000
Henrietta Jawbowitz, Pres;
Jacob H Jawbowitz, Treas
SOUTHERN ANNOUNCEMENT INC
247 N E 59 St PL 8-1974
David Don, Pres







10 ft ttS1 ALL 4,?0000





q..* %
PHOTOENGRAVINGo.


TRANSLATIONS
ROBERT C BEVIS & CO INT'L PUBLISHERS
241 Minorca Av CG HI 4-1503
Robert C Bevis, Jr, Pres; Winifred H Bevis,
Sec-Treas; Sr Evelio Gil, Mgr Latin American
Div



TRANSPORTATION
ADVERTISING
MIAMI TRANSIT CO-THE MIAMI BEACH
RAILWAY CO
P 0 Box 3581 FR 7-3641
William D Pawley, Owner; Octavio Cuevas,
Exec VP; Wallace Pawley, Dir Bus Card Adv
JACKSON OUTDOOR ADVERTISING CO
3011 N W 62 St OX 1-2280
A F Seltzer
PHILBIN & COINE
914 N W 1 Av FR 4-4539
Dick Foltz, Florida Rep


TROPHIES
CAMPUS FRATERNITY SHOP
5811 Ponce de Leon Bvd CG
Richard Cashman, Owner
HALPERTS TROPHIES
140 N E 2 Av
NATIONAL DISTRIBUTING CO
1751 W Flagler St
B L Berkey; Lou Gill
REISLER BROS SPORT SHOP
427 Washington Av MB
MR T INC
1658 N E 123 St
Archie Retchin, Treas-Mgr
JOHN WILLIAMS TROPHIES
135 S E 3 St


MO 7-8332


9-1265

1-6473

8-1344

8-2573


"OUR SPEAKER TONIGHT 15 ONE OF THE WORLD
FOREMOST AUTHORITIES ON DOG FOOD."


(-.TL(V (VryY


~T1'TF1[ 7:4


116 N.E. SIXTH STREET MIAMI 32, FLORIDA


TYPING SERVICE
ADELPHI ACCOUNTING SECRETARIAL & MAIL
SERVICE
500 N E 79 St PL 4-8254
Lester Rosenthal, Owner
CARRIE JANE McGAREY
536 Seybold Bldg FR 4-1246
Carrie Jane McGarey, Public Steno
SANDS SECRETARIAL SERVICE
260-95 St Surfside UN 5-7616
Miriam G Sands



TYPOGRAPHERS
ADVERTISING TYPOGRAPHY INC
626 N W 6 Av FR 3-7341
Jack Shaffer
(See our ad page 74)
ALLAPATTAH PRESS INC
1736 N W 35 St NE 3-2444
Chet Addington, Pres
MIAMI TYPESETTING CO
2015 N W 1 Av FR 4-8591
Frank and Russ Streifert
MONOTYPE COMPOSITION CORP
719 N W 29 St NE 3-8548
S Gurwitz, Pres; C Speropoulos, Sec-Treas;
J Ruchlin, VP
(See our ad page 62)
NORMAN TYPOGRAPHIC SERVICE
249-251 S W 17 Av FR 4-5527
Norman J Feldman, Owner
(See our ad page 74)
ROLLINS & BARNES TYPESETTING INC
208 N W 28 St FR 9-1230
TRADE TYPESETTERS
501 S W 8 St FR 9-5161
WRIGHTSON TYPESETTING INC
219 N W 24 St FR 9-1202
William F Wrightson, Pres; Frank R Evans, VP
(See our ad page 74)


rr -
- -A

10 Z
-A
0


U )

CC



K Z

w
-,,

0
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0







Pin Point Your Market
(Continued from page 34)

to change brand name, in order to
develop the most important connota-
tions, was put into effect.
2. A bank's advertising department
had several questions for which an-
swers could be obtained only through
public opinion survey and market re-
search: (a) How could the bank
measure the effectiveness and results
of each of its advertising media?
(b) What were peoples' opinions and
ideas of this bank and of its competi-
tors, and (c) What were peoples'
habits and practices in using financial
services in the area?
A comprehensive field survey was
conducted over a period of four
months among householders and busi-
nessmen.
The survey results not only provided
the bank's desired answers to their
questions, but also developed valuable
sales information for a number of the
bank's departments. Further, these
survey results were made a valuable
part of planning of the bank's current
advertising program, substantiated
some previous ideas and opinions, and
developed much new and unusual in-
formation which was useful in prepa-
ration of copy and selection of media.
For its long range programs, the
bank's management obtained much
valuable and unforeseen information
for its employee relations and public
relations programs, as well as practi-
cal, factual data on habits and opin-
ions of the banking public within that
area.

3. A major oil company, because of the
extremely competitive situation in
Florida, required a comprehensive
study of all its marketing activities
within the state.

A number of surveys were put into
effect simultaneously: (a) A man-
agement study to analyze the per-
formance and effectiveness of the
company's sales organization; (b) A
survey of company relations with
service station operators, including
both the client and competitors; (c) A
gasoline purchasers' consumer survey,
to determine public attitude and opin-
ion of the company and its products,
as well as to find out the relative
effectiveness of advertising programs
of the various gasoline marketing
companies in Florida; (d) A survey
of commercial consumers (truck fleet
operators, taxi and bus companies) in
order to find opportunities for further


development of this phase of the busi-
ness; and (e) A statistical survey of
total gasoline sales in individual coun-
ties, which was compared with client's
and competitors' sales to measure re-
gional effectiveness of sales activities,
and to uncover areas for extra effort
and improvement.
As a result of this study, the company
has substantially reoriented its mar-
keting activities within the state, has
revised its sales organization, has in-
creased and changed its advertising
program, and has made a number of
major changes in its approach to spe-
cific sales problems. The company is
using the completed study throughout
the eastern part of the U.S. as a guide
to effective marketing operations, and
a great many of the recommendations
which resulted from this study are
being put into effect in other of the
company's sales territories.
4. A manufacturer of bedding found
it advisable to evaluate statistically
its competitive position in certain
urban sections of the state. It was
the general opinion that this company
was out-selling all of its competitors,
but the company had no factual data
on this. If this were true, the com-
pany and its advertising agency felt
that this fact would provide an ex-
cellent basis upon which to inaugurate
a new advertising program.
Over a four-week period, research
workers interviewed bedding depart-
ment buyers in a comprehensive
sample of retail furniture and depart-
ment stores, and obtained accurate in-
formation in each store as to the rela-
tive sales of various brands.

The survey proved, without a doubt,
that the client company was the
leader in its field. As a result of the
survey, (a) The company prepared a
comprehensive advertising program
based on the fact that its sales were
above those of any competitor in these
markets; (b) Detailed information ob-
tained from this survey concerning
percentage of leadership and accept-
ance by dealers was further used as a
basis for persuasive selling of the
manufacturer's product at dealer con-
ventions; and (c) Additional detailed
information obtained from the survey
gave sales management of the com-
pany valuable knowledge of seasonal
characteristics of the sales of its own
products, to be plotted against sales
of all competitors' products in the
regional markets studied by the re-
search firm.


It Pays To Set Your Clock Ahead
(Continued from page 27)

inquiry totals and recording them, on
the basis of coded coupon keys, is
handled by the agency. In this way,
the significance of changes in head-
line, in copy, in layout can be ascer-
tained and capitalized upon. The
quest for big-return-low-cost ads is a
continuing one at B/G/F. Copy-test-
ing helps to narrow the field down to
ads that are "most likely to continue
to succeed". These ads are then run
and re-run-for as long as they con-
tinue to pay their own way. When the
returns start to dwindle, the ads are
cast aside to be replaced by other ads
that have concomitantly been going
through the same wringing-out proc-
ess. The results are recorded on the
basis of the ad that produced them-
not on the basis of the publication
used, for the media scheduled at this
time is a soundly established one.
Except for periodic spot checks on the
pulling power of an individual publi-
cation, the measuring of the effective-
ness of the individual ad, rather than
of the medium employed is the pre-
dominant task.
On the basis of the copy-testing, the
slant of the ad is varied. When a
highly emotional approach is indi-
cated as the most effective one, ads
such as the prize-winning "WHAT'S
LINDA LACKING?" advertisement
are created. When cold facts are
bringing in results at lowest cost, the
agency will switch to unemotional
presentation of the school's facilities.
When deep motivational research
studies indicate that the national cli-
mate is such that the desire for secur-
ity is of greatest concern to young
men, the ads will emphasize how much
an Embry-Riddle education can be
worth in terms of future security and
income. (See the "HIGH PAY, SE-
CURITY, ADVANCEMENT" ad.) If
m. r. reveals that social acceptability
is a dominant yearning, the appeal
indicated in its ad headlined, "Beware
the danger of becoming the 'Square
peg in a round hole' will be used.
That these ads have gained recogni-
tion is a certainty. Embry-Riddle is
the largest aeronautical institute in
America today with thousands of
graduates in key positions throughout
the aircraft industry. It trains execu-
tive and commercial pilots-with in-
strument and multi-engine ratings-
aeronautical engineers, and airframe
and powerplant technicians. The
school offers a Bachelor of Adminis-
tration in Aviation Administration
with a Business Pilot Course in coop-
eration with the University of Miami.
Embry-Riddle has nearly 1,000 stu-
dents enrolled-coming from all 50
States and dozens of foreign lands.
And recognition has come to the con-
tinuing advertising campaigns in the
Miami Art Directors' Awards Compe-
titions. In addition, two Embry-
Riddle brochures have taken top






awards in these same competitions.
The "WHAT'S LINDA LACKING?"
advertisement was immortalized by
the U. S. Air Force Recruiting Serv-
ice when it employed the same ap-
proach in its recruiting campaign.
For Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Insti-
tute, the agency relationship has been
a happy one. It has seen its enroll-
ment grow . holding firm even
through periods of national recession.
It has seen the ratio of business to
advertising budget grow-despite in-
creasing competition and rising media
costs. It has seen itself become one of
the nation's must successful by-mail
businesses-despite the fact that the
"product" it sells through the mail is
an extremely high-ticket one as con-
trasted with the conventional $2 to $5
by-mail item. It has seen itself estab-
lished on a healthy, broad base-as
contrasted with the booming but pre-
carious post-war years.
And for the agency, too, the relation-
ship has been a happy one . the
happiest relationship an advertising
agency can enjoy. It has helped an
advertiser-perhaps a small one by
some standards-invest its advertis-
ing dollar wisely, and has seen this
advertising bear fruit. B/G/F has
the immeasurable satisfaction of
knowing it has done its job well.


.. "



Point of Purchase
(Continued from page 46)
ers' needs. This is particularly true
today, since one manufacturer's brand
of merchandise may be only a small
part of a large and varied inventory.
In most cases, the manufacturer of
the particular product is the one who
is most concerned with the proper
presentation of his goods. A Point of
Purchase Advertising display can set
up a complete selling department in
a small area, frequently furnished
with its own stock. Here, special at-
tention is called to this merchandise,
setting it out from the other competing
lines and products. At the very point
of sale, it shouts for attention in a
loud, clear voice.
The objective of the retailer, manu-
facturer and point of sale merchan-
diser here is identical, in that all are
joined to make sure that the prospec-
tive purchaser will choose this par-
ticular piece of merchandise.
Good Point of Purchase Advertising
does this job every day. Don't let this
powerful sales tool receive less of your
attention than its proven results show
it deserves.


':: .. -


The engraver, bank teller, the adver-
tising man are indeed concerned with
ethics, but with individual ethics. If
an individual believes in himself and
in a code of ethics, he respects himself.
He will automatically shun deceit and
deception no matter what his profes-
sion or calling. This principle, of
course, applies to advertising, perhaps
in even greater degree than to other
activities. Advertising does reach
mass and individual audiences with
sales and inspirational messages. It,
therefore, clearly has the responsi-
bility for presenting information hon-
estly and, indeed, honorably. The fact
is that people in advertising do adhere

YOUR ADVERTISING FREEDOMS
Advertising's vital economic function
as mover of goods is being threat-
ened by a rash of punitive tax pro-
posals and restrictions.
Revenue-hungry cities and states
would like to balance their budgets
through discriminatory imposts on
advertising.
Members of certain legitimate busi-
nesses and professions are facing
threats of advertising prohibitions in
many states.
Harsh Federal restrictions on certain
media-principally outdoor advertis-

YOUR PUBLIC IMAGE
A rising trend of unjust propaganda
is reducing the effectiveness of ad-
vertising and undermining the confi-
dence of the American buying public.
Careless practitioners in the profes-
sion are giving advertising a bad
name.
The true economic importance of ad-


to ethical standards. They are indeed
part of the fabric of human society
and are no different than the audi-
ences reached by the advertisements
they have a hand in. Those individuals
who misuse the function of advertis-
inging and engraving or any other
human calling are to be exposed and
prevented from further dishonesty.
So, a matter of ethics is really a mat-
ter of individual adherence to an ethi-
cal code of conduct. The thoughtful
man will therefore not confuse the
dishonesty, as practiced by a few, with
the specific function of any human
activity, whether it be engraving,
banking or-advertising.


ing-endanger all segments of ad-
vertising.
Internal Revenue Service rulings
against advertising as legitimate tax-
deductible business expense are
threatening. Business' right to deduct
dealers' advertising allowances prior
to reckoning the base for manufac-
turers' excise tax has already been
denied.
Every proposal to tax or restrict ad-
vertising affects YOU directly or in-
directly. These bans and levies cost
you money and threaten business.


vertising is frequently misunderstood
and is often not respected by the
public.
These conditions, creating disregard
and a growing climate of hostility
against advertising, are making your
advertising dollars less productive
than they could be if public trust
were higher.


LLf "llliI a
The 1959 AFA Convention in Minneapolis found Miamians: Sue Szuch, Mrs.
Wilma Holderman, Paul Greenaway and Lois and Charles Whitebrook, having
a wonderful time.


Individual Ethics in Advertising











Advertising Federation of America
New York Office


I'.


PRESIDENT AND
GENERAL MANAGER
Mr. James S. Proud
250 West 57th Street
New York 19, N. Y.


DIRECTOR OF
CLUB SERVICES
Mrs. Ruth Gardner
250 West 57th Street
New York 19, N. Y.


FIRST DISTRICT
Elliott J. Barnett
The Hartford Times
10 Prospect Street
Hartford 1, Conn.
SECOND DISTRICT
Alfred P. Rexford
R. W. Rexford Co., Inc.
115 N. Camac Street
Philadelphia 7, Pennsylvania
THIRD DISTRICT
Mildred Alexander
W.T.A.R.-TV
720 Boush Street
Norfolk, Virginia


Lervy sweet, uiovernor
of the Fourth District.


GOVERNOR ------

1ST LIEUT. GOVERNOR

2ND LIEUT. GOVERNOR
78


District Governors
FIFTH DISTRICT EIGHTH DISTRICT
William W. Kight Richard Wells
Kight Advertising, Inc. Badger Carton Company
118 N. Third Street 5431 N. 27th Street
Columbus 15, Ohio Milwaukee, Wisconsin
SEVENTH DISTRICT NINTH DISTRICT
Clayton Coss6 Donald M. Clark
Dora-Clayton Agency Security Mutual Life Ins.
Mortgage Guarantee Bldg. 711 Trust Building
Atlanta 3, Georgia Lincoln, Nebraska
Washington Office TENTH DISTRICT
Dale Buckner
Donald J. Wilkins Buckner & Associates
Vice President, in Charge of Box 1386
Washington AFA Office Lubbock, Texas
1320 G. Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.



Who's Who in Fourth District

Directory of Officers, Director, of Fourth
District, and Member Clubs for 1959-1960
Compiled by
ROYAL H. RAY
Editor, Sunshine News

DISTRICT OFFICERS
Mrs. Elizabeth Sweet, Bill Sweet Pump Co., 1530 14th St., S.,
St. Petersburg 5
Paul Greenaway, Florida Power & Light Company, P. O. Box 3100,
Miami 30
Peter Schaal, Orlando Adv. Co., P. O. Box 140, Orlando






SECRETARY _- _-_
TREASURER ---_ ....

CORRESP. SECRETARY ...


LOUIS BENITO
EARL J. MASON _
DON BARBOUR ------


Ft. Lauderlale ------
Jacksonville -----
Lakeland

St. Petersburg (Men) ---

Miami --------- -
Orlando
Tampa ------


"Advertising Advertising"


Advertising Week -----



Budget _______________ --


Constitution and By-Laws --
Club Achievement ---



Essay Contest -----




Festival of Florida Products


Job Placement -----


Legislative _



New Clubs _



Nominating

On-To-Ft. Lauderdale --


_Peter Larkin, Peter Larkin Agency, 3132 N. E. 9th St., Ft. Lauderdale
Joseph D. Kelly, Chamber of Commerce, 604 Hogan St.,
Jacksonville 2
__Mrs. Odette Patterson, First Federal Savings & Loan Association,
Fourth and Central, St. Petersburg
PAST GOVERNORS
__Louis Benito Advertising, P. O. Box 3402, Tampa, Florida.
_Wall Street Journal, Walton Building, Atlanta 3, Georgia.
_Barbour Truck Ads, Inc., P. O. Box 1245, Orlando, Florida.
DISTRICT DIRECTORS
Louis J. Fifer, First Federal Savings & Loan Association.
Miss Betty Tway, This Week In Jacksonville, 6403 Wesleyan Road
__Bill Schroeter, Adv. Director, Publix Markets, P. O. Box 440.
Richard L. Ashe, Com. Photographer, 2111/2 S. Tennessee Ave.
Ellis Clark, St. Petersburg Times
Joe Griffith, Griffith Advertising Agency, P. O. Box 52
William M. Crockett, Jr., Counsellors, Inc., Langford Building.
Tom Bonneville, Dan Bagley Adv. Specialties, P. O. Box 1882.
W. H. Fritts, WGTO Radio Station, 3211 Swann Avenue.
Paul Jones, WTVT Radio Station, P. O. Box 1198.
DISTRICT COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN
__Bradley Yeager, Chairman, Citizens National Bank, St. Petersburg.
Miss Sydney Ann Stoner, WSUN-TV, St. Petersburg.
William Porter, Lakeland Ledger, Box 981.
David G. Wade, Prosser Press, Jacksonville.
Manny Eisfeld, Tally Embry, Inc., Pan American Bldg., Miami.
Ellis Clark, St. Petersburg Times.
Solon Sutherland, P. O. Box 981, Lakeland.
Joseph M. Byrd, Ft. Lauderdale Daily News, 320 S. E. First Ave.
Sybil Bonner, WFGA-TV, 1070 E. Adams St., Jacksonville.
__Ruth L. McWilliams, Griffith Adv. Agency, St. Petersburg.
Joseph D. Kelly, Chamber of Commerce, Jacksonville.
Peter Schaal, Orlando Advertising Co., P. O. Box 140.
_-Ellis Clark, St. Petersburg Times
Richard Ashe, Com. Photographer,. P. O. Box 110, Lakeland.
Horace Scott, 1660 S. W. 23rd St., Miami 45.
Odette Patterson, First Federal Savings & Loan, St. Petersburg.
Hilda Yoakley, Your Shopping Guide, 2708 Cambridge, Lakeland.
Ed A. Koester, Jr., 527 E. Church St., Jacksonville.
Lois Tanner, Visitor Publishing Co., 605 Lincoln Road, Miami 39.
June Connor, 5501 Central Avenue, Tampa 4.
Duke Zimmerman, WCKR, 1401 N. Bay Causeway.
Mrs. Euva Hood, 318 N. Kentucky, Lakeland.
W. B. Lennen, First Nat'l Bank, 225 E. Las Olas, Ft. Lauderdale.
Martha Dearing, H. & W. B. Drew, Box 270, Jacksonville.
_.Sam Garrison, Sottile Banking Group, 250 S. E. First St., Miami 30.
Bill Schroter, Publix Markets, Box 440, Lakeland.
D. M. McCormick, Winn-Dixie, Box 440, Tampa 1.
Hal Creighton, 699 S. W. 2nd Ave., Ft. Lauderdale.
Richard I. Simpson, Union Trust Co., St. Petersburg.
Ben Miller, Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, Jacksonville.
Dan Bagley, Jr., P. O. Box 2008, Lakeland.
Earl deFlorin, Eastern Air Lines, 118 W. Adams, Jacksonville.
-Frank Jaffe, Ainsley Building, Miami 32.
Beth McNeely, Rutland's, Box 1035, St. Petersburg.
Claude Goddard, Outdoor Signs, Box 321, Lakeland.
R. L. Bowles, WFTL, P. O. Box 131, Ft. Lauderdale.
John A. Bunker, 1628 San Marco, Jacksonville.
Paul Greenaway, Florida Power & Light Co., Box 3100, Miami 30.
Bob Hildreth, 2501 Ponce de Leon, Coral Gables 34.
Howard W. Cann, Jr., WLAK, Box 1211, Lakeland.
Hugo Wagenseil, 1530 S. Ocean Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale.
Henry Carver, H. & W. B. Drew Co., 30 W. Bay St., Jacksonville.
Louis Benito, Louis Benito Advertising, 507 Morgan St., Tampa.
Don Barbour, Barbour Truck Ads, Box 1245, Orlando.
Dr. Royal H. Ray, Florida State University, Tallahassee.
Joseph D. Kelly, C. of C., 604 Hogan St., Jacksonville.






Publicity




Resolutions _____--



Scholarship -----


Speakers Bureau --



Sunshine News ---

Sustaining Memberships



FOURTH DISTRICT


Ed Frick, Florida Newspaper News, Box 10278, Tampa 9.
Virginia DeLaney, P. 0. Box 11267, St. Petersburg.
Bob Ensslin, Sears, P. O. Box 2032, Tampa 1.
Ed Gegenschatz, First Federal Savings & Loan, Miami.
Deane Hart, Publix Market, Box 440, Lakeland.
Bob Lynch, WKTX, P. O. Box 1328, Atlantic Beach.
Ralph Wadsworth, Wadsworth & Walker, 5807 Ponce de Leon,
Coral Gables.
Louis J. Fifer, First Federal Savings & Loan, Ft. Lauderdale.
Ellis Clark, St. Petersburg Times, St. Petersburg.
Don Barbour, Barbour Truck Ads, P. O. Box 1245, Orlando.
Duke Zimmerman, WCKR, 1401 N. Bay Causeway, Miami.
Jack Pridgen, Florida Citrus Mutual, Lakeland.
Roland Hagedorn, Allstate Ins., P. O. Box 11267, St. Petersburg.
Hal Herman, 1205 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach 39.
Bob Edrington, WTVT, Box 1198, Tampa.
Max Kimbrell, WGTO, Cypress Gardens.
C. Lamar Dean, Shands Poster Service, 81 Broad St., Jacksonville.
Dr. Royal H. Ray, Chairman, Advertising, Communications and Public
Relations, School of Business, Florida State University
Joseph Estes, Jr., Wall Street Journal, 150 S. E. 2nd St., Miami.
Don Barbour, Barbour Truck Ads., P. O. Box 1245, Orlando.
Charles Whitebrook, 3361 S. W. 3rd Ave., Miami 45.
Dan N. Harrell, Florida Ford Tractor, Box 1258, Jacksonville.


CONVENTION, AFA ---- BEACH CLUB HOTEL, FT. LAUDERDALE May 12, 13, 14, 15.
Co-Chairmen: William Doyle, Gold Coast Publications, Box 53, Ft. Lauderdale.
Peter Larkin, Peter Larkin Agy., 3132 N. E. 9th St., Ft. Lauderdale.

President -----Charles Corsi, Charles Corsi Advertising Agency.
1st Vice President ------Lyman McGrath, Radio Station WMJF.
2nd Vice President -------------- John Callahan, Commercial Bank.
Secretary-Treasurer ---- Robert Burhans, Burhans Office Equipment.


Jack Akin ___
James Bosang
Martha Chandl
Ann Hicks ___
Houston Lawin
Fred Steadmar
S. G. Wooten

Presid i ent ..
Vice President
Secretary -
Treasurer -

R. L. Bowles
Joseph Byrd
Roy P. Homerd
George Pugh
William W. Sta
Don W. Velsey

President
Vice President
Secretary -
Treasurer


er

Lg
r l_


Directors
-----WESH-TV.
-----First Atlantic National Bank.
----- Martha Candler Women's Apparel.
.---- Radio Station WQXW.
.---- Daytona International Speedway.
-- --- Daytona Beach News-Journal.


S...Gil S.ay'... l.., Gil SSayward Associate, 25 W\. Broward Blvd.
-------- W. B. Lennan, First National Bank, 225 East Las Olas.
------- Peter Larkin, Peter Larkin Agency, 3132 N. E. 9th Street.
------ -- W. S. Doyle, Gold Coast Publications, 101 N. Andrews Avenue.
Directors
W-------- WIL, 132 East Las Olas Blvd.
----- ---- Daily News, 320 S. E. First Avenue.
ing -----Sears, Roebuck & Co., 901 N. Federal Hwy.
East Coast Advertising, 429 S. W. 1st Avenue.
rr----_ Daily News, 320 S. E. First Avenue.
Gil Sayward Associates, 25 W. Broward.

...... ..... ...-- .. iss Betty Tway. This 1 'eek In Jiacksonville, 64103 W esleyan Road.
------ Jack Kaufman, Jacobs Jewelry, 204 Laura Street.
_------- Eloise Tucker, Bacon, Hartmen & Vollbrecht, First Fed. Sav. Bldg.
-------- E. A. Koester, Jr., Douglas Printing Co., 527 East Church St.


Sybil Bonner
Ira Capps -
John Cummings
Martha Dearing
Robert Lynch
Ben Miller
Grace Moran
80


Directors
WFGA-TV, 1070 E. Adams Street.
Sears, Roebuck & Co., 532 West Forsyth Street.
WFGA-TV, Channel 12, 1071 E. Adams.
H. & W. B. Drew Co., P. O. Box 270.
WKTX, P. O. Box 1328, Atlantic Beach, Florida.
Atlantic Coast Line RR, 300 W. Forsyth Street.
Dennis, Parsons & Cook, Lynch Bldg., Room 530.







President ---
1st Vice President
2nd Vice President
Secretary-Treasurer

Dan Bagley
Max Kimbrell
Herb Roller
Morris Schifi --
C. C. Sherwood
Solon Southerland
Hilda Yoakley -


President
Vice President -
Secretary --
Treasurer ---

Don Barbour
Ellis Lavin ---
Ed McCarthy
Mrs. Emily Tatich

President ---
1st Vice President
2nd Vice President
3rd Vice President
Treasurer
Secretary

Tom Guthrie
Martin Loos ----.----
Dayton Saltsman
Knox Strachen
Jack Whetstone
Bradley Yeager --.
V
President
Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer --

Madeline Aspinwall
Amy Bravo
Wilma Brown
Marvette Carter -
Ruth L. McWilliams
Mrs. Emily Nelson
Elizabeth Sweet -

President
1st Vice President
2nd Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer ---

Douglas Daniels
Robert Edrington
G. William Gray, Jr.
Charles G. Mullen
Virgil S. Price .
John R. Ulmer


ADVERTISING CLUB OF LAKELAND
..-Richard L. Ashe, Com. Photographer, P. O. Box 110.
.-- Wm. Schroeter, Publix Markets, P. O. Box 440.
Ed Cole, Florida Food Machinery, P. O. Box 1713.
Pat Hazelett, Maas Brothers, Lakeland, Florida.
Directors
P. O. Box 2008.
Radio Station WGTO, Cypress Gardens.
Polk Theater, 121 S. Florida Avenue.
Schiff's Interiors, 103 W. Main Street.
P. O. Box 1211, Radio Station WLAK.
-.._..P. O. Box 981, Lakeland Ledger.
Your Shopping Guide, 2708 Cambridge.
ADVERTISING CLUB OF ORLANDO
Tom Bonneville, T & H Company, P. O. Box 1882.
.---- Betty Arwood, Radio Station WHOO.
.----- Bruce Webb, D. G. Daniels, Inc.
----. Mildred Lavin, Central Title & Trust Company.


Directors
Barbour Truck Ads, 100 S. Main.
Ivey's of Orlando, 1 South Orange.
Corner Cupboard, 46 Weber St.
Dickson-Ives Company, 2 South Orange.


ADVERTISING CLUB OF ST. PETERSBURG (Men)
..- -------. Joseph Griffith, Griffith Advertising Agency, P. O. Box 52.
-- Roland Hagedorn, Allstate Insurance Co., 1355 Snell Isle Blvd.
--- Edwin Frizen, McIntyre's Ladies Apparel, P. O. Box 1084.
.William Sheeley, National Airlines, 45 4th Street, N.
- Leo Honore, Photo-Gelatine Printing, 2129 14th St., N.
--- Jack O'Brien, Cemeterian, P. O. Box 3983.
Directors
Director of News Bureau, Florida Power Corporation.
-.....__...Nutrilite Food Supplement, 1428 Country Club Rd., N.
--- Radio Station WSUN.
(Address not available).
----- St. Petersburg Independent, 2726 45th Street, N.
...-...------- Citizens National Bank.
OMEN'S ADVERTISING CLUB OF ST. PETERSBURG
.--- ---- Odette Patterson, First Federal Savings, P. O. Box 1509.
.---...-.--. Ann Randolph, P. K. Smith & Co., 326 Central Avenue.
----a- n- Roxanne Ten-Haagen, St. Petersburg Times, Times Building.
..---------.Ann Detloff, Willson-Chase Dept. Store, Central at 3rd St.
Directors
..- ------..... Webb's City, Advertising Dept., 9th Street, South.
St. Petersburg Independent, 1st Avenue at 4th Street, South.
------.Ruthland's Dept. Store, Central at 5th Street.
---------Alfred L. Lino and Associates, 1327 9th Street.
Griffith Advertising Agency, P. O. Box 52.
- Florida Power Corp., 5th Street & 1st Avenue, South.
Bill Sweet Pump Company, 1530 14th Street, South.
THE TAMPA ADVERTISING CLUB
----- Wilfred H. Fritts, WGTO, Cypress Gardens.
---Robert F. Ensslin, Sears, Roebuck.
----- --Henry M. Allen, Radio Station WFLA.
------.-- Arlene J. Ballinger, Louis Benito Advertising.
....----- -June Connor, 5501 Central Avenue (4).
Directors
.D. G. Daniels, Inc., 1818 12th Avenue.
.---WTVT, P. O. Box 1198.
Louis Benito Advertising, 507 Morgan St.
-Florida Grower Press, P. O. Box 150.
-Tampa Electric Co.
-- -First Federal Savings & Loan, 4108 DeLeon Avenue.


:- --- -- -- -







ADVERTISERS' INDEX


AAA Business Boosters
Ace Letter Service --
Advertising Typography
Atlantic Printers ---


Bevis Assoc. ----- 59
Baida, Louis ----- 63
Bevis, Robert C. and Co. -----..... 68
Binders Art ------------ 62
Bishopric/ Green/Fielden,
Inc. -- Inside Front Cover
Burg Advertising ---- 60
C
Candid Art Photography, Inc. ...- 65
Colorgraphic Photo Engravers, Inc. 75
Coronet Model Agency ---.-. ..----.- 64

D
Dawson Co. 70
Dobin Advertising, Inc. --- 60
Donnelly Advertising
Inside Back Cover

E


Embry, Tally, Inc.
Empire of Florida
Engravers, Inc. _


Peppy Outdoor -----
Playboy Magazine
Printup, Hale and Assoc. --
Professional Photographers Guild
Publishers Press, Inc. ---
Publishers Reps. of Florida --------

Q
Quednau, Inc. -
R
Rose, Ralph, Poster Printing
Opposite page
Rickles, Ray and Co. ---
Repro, Inc. -------

S
Spire, William, Advertising -
South Miami Press ----
T
Thompson, J. Walter and Co. .---
Time-Life-International -
TV Guide -----.----------


--- 64
Back Cover


Finney, Peter and Co., Inc. -----
Florida Power and Light -
Floridian Photo-Engraving, Inc.

G
Geiger Electro Mat Service
GMAAA -------
Grant Advertising ---
Graphic Arts Inc. -


Harris and Co.
Hilcraft Engravers
Hinman Photography


Leonard Co.
Litho-Arts


Marschalk and Pratt --- 18
McAllister Hotel ------ 60
McAskill Assoc. ---- 68
McAskill, Herman and Daley, Inc. 70
McCune, Roy S. 71
Metro Mat Service -- 63
Miami Photo-Engraving 63, 64, 65, 67,
72, 75
Miami Post Publishing Co. 56
Mogge, Arthur --------- 56
Monotype Compositions Corp. ..---- 62

N
National Lithographers, Inc. 32
Norman Typographic Service .....--- 74
82


V
64 Visitor Publishing Co.
71,
69 W
56 WCKT-WCKR -----
66 WGTO (Cypress Gardens)
71 WINZ
WMIE -------
16 WNDB and Daytona Beacon
News Journal ---------
WPST-TV Channel 10 --
WQAM Storz Broadcasting Co.
71 WTVJ-TV Channel 4 ---
63 Weiss, A. D., Lithograph Co., Inc.
Wadsworth and Walker, Inc.
59 Wakes-Silvershein-Wakes, Inc.
65 Wall Street Journal --
Weaver, Inc.
12 Webster Outdoor Advertising Co.
70 Winter, Hal, Co. -----
20 Wrightson Typesetting, Inc. ..--


WITHDRAWN FROM

MILLS MEMORIAL LIBRARY





When your message is
displayed outdoors -

,A^A,).4d 1


0


OF THE PEOPLE COMPRISING THE
MIAMI METROPOLITAN* MARKET WILL
SEE IT AT LEAST 11 TIMES A MONTH


I r/DonnellyCAd


OUTDOOR POSTER ADVERTISING


*Includes residents of Dade County.









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,.
imk S


for the SOUTH


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a Dow-Chemco powderless etcher help us to further our aim
to make better plates for better printing, from the
simplest zinc line cuts to the finest deep-etched copper
four-color plates for national magazine advertising.


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