Title: Chaney course syllabi and related materials
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Title: Chaney course syllabi and related materials
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Language: English
Creator: Chaney, Elsa M.
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POLITICAL SCIENfCE 269
MAJOR APPROACHES TO THE STii DY OF DiTVELOPMHEIlT WITH ATTLUDAITT ASS.TIPTIO1IS
AND CONCEPTS

Types of Approaches to Major Frequent
tho Study of Development Assumptions Concepts

I. Equilibrium Models


A. Behavioral
Kunkel (1970)
Lipset (1967)
IIomans (1961)
Parsons (1960)
Erasmus (1961)
Eisenstadt (1966)


individuals suffer depri-
vations that are contex-
tually determined; behave-_
ior can be changed at any
time, development will
occur through new leaning
experiences.


Modernization, learan-
ing curves, interna-
_,iaation, deprivation
attitudes, values.
rationality, adult
socialization, intra-
generational change.


Ba Psychodynamic
Hagen (1962)
McOlelland (1961)


Early childhood social- Personality, back-
ization largely prede*- hardness, childhood
iines future behavior experiences, status
which may impede innova- withdrawal, inter-
tiveness, cleavage be- generational change5
teen individual behavior modernization.
and current social environ-
ment; development occurs
through new socialization
patterns.


Co Diffusionist/Incrementalist
Rostow (1971) Simplistica dualism-sooie-
Hirsebman (1958) tal cleavage based on de-
Barnett (1953) gree of use of modern
Rogers (1969) technology; development
Hoselitz (1960) occurs through new capital
Levy (1966) and technological inputs


Lindblom
Ande rson


and through governmental
tinkering


Diffusion curves,
rates of change for
ecological units,
lagging sectors, pro-
duetivity, technolo -
gical growth,
modernization.


. -- conflict Models
ZI. GOoLIerC Models


A. Structuralist Non
Marxist
Dahrendorf (1959)
Heilbroner (1963)
Prebisch (1970)


Impossible to predict his Pluralism, conflicts
torical outcomes; no rev- conflict-management,
olutionary upheavals neces-straai means, ends5
sary for development, institutional reform
parties represent class power, structural
interests to seek new dualisms, structural
equilibriums unier Pareto- change.
better solutions; moving
equilibriums, class forma-
tions not related to mode
of production; rate of change
dependent on intensity and
violence of class conflict.


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POLITICAL 3CI1ICJGE 269 Page 2


B. Marxist
Szentes (1971)
Mafeje (1970)
Baran (1957)
Dos Santos (1970)
Sunkel (1972)


Mode of production under- Imperialism, owner-
lies economic actions and ship of the means of
class structure; at level production, coneen-
of social formation vari- ration of resources,
ous classes may be present proletarianization,
depending n group s rela(o class formation,
tionships mo means of class consciousness,
production; if tendency class struggle,
to move to a two-class development.
structure occurs at level
of social relationships,
there will be a change in
the mode of production.
Changes related to inter-
sooietal historical rela-
tionships in the develop-
ment of the mode of produc-
tion.


Prom As Eugene Havens, ethodological Issues
in the Study of Development," Land
Tenure Center, University of Wisconsin,
1972, pp. 256-57.


-c-- I




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