• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Downtown landscape and graphics...
 Landscape and graphics program;...
 Importance of housing opportunities...
 Site furniture standards and...
 Street shade trees, shrubs, ground...
 Evaluation and criteria of graphic...
 Assessment and review of existing...
 Graphic communications factors...
 Graphics and the streetscape
 Fabrication materials and...
 Manufacturers and fabricators














Title: Downtown Fort Lauderdale
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089460/00001
 Material Information
Title: Downtown Fort Lauderdale
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Fort Lauderdale Downtown Development Authority
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089460
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Introduction
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Downtown landscape and graphics program objectives
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
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        Page 13
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        Page 15
        Page 16
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        Page 19
    Landscape and graphics program; recommendations
        Page 20
        Page 21
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    Importance of housing opportunities and riverfront development as it relates to downtown growth
        Page 79
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        Page 82
    Site furniture standards and recommendations
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Street shade trees, shrubs, ground cover suitable for city planning
        Page 89
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    Evaluation and criteria of graphic and informational systems
        Page 139
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    Assessment and review of existing graphics and informational systems
        Page 167
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    Graphic communications factors determining visibility of informational systems
        Page 179
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    Graphics and the streetscape
        Page 199
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    Fabrication materials and maintenance
        Page 213
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    Manufacturers and fabricators
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
Full Text









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Contents.


Intro: Background and Purpose


Part I: Downtown Landscape and Graphics Program Objectives

Part II: Existing Conditions and Opportunities

1. Existing land use and building conditions

2. Historic areas/riverfront

3. Traffic circulation and parking

4. Visual character and continuity

Master Improvement Plan: Recommendations

1. Street and sidewalk system

2. Transit system development

3. Improvement of public parking.

4. Building rehabilitation and enhancement of visual appearance.

5. Signage and graphics















Part III: Issues of Concern

1. Future riverfront development

2. Downtown housing development

3. Pedestrian linkages.

4. Future public buildings and expansions.

Part IV: Appendix


1. Furniture and signage cuts. Plant lists.

2. Manufacturer's source list.





6 5i0


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BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE


The Downtown Development Authority of the City of Ft. Lauderdale has undertaken the preparation

of a downtown landscape and graphics program with full recognition that, despite its many assets

and attractions as a place to work, certain aspects of the downtown structure have not been

maintained and upgraded consistent with the level of and development of the community as a whole.

Identifiable adverse influences in the downtown area include the presence of vacant and/or

deteriorating buildings; visually unattractive and sometimes hazardous sidewalk and street

conditions in heavily used areas along Las Olas Boulevard, Southeast Third Avenue and South

Andrews Avenue; a high concentration of vehicular traffic which contributes to congestion and

a lack of pedestrian safety; and other related conditions which have become even more pro-

nounced in recent years.



Increasing competition from suburban shopping malls and nearby community developments offering

complete retail shopping opportunities, providing for business needs and for more convenient

and accessible parking accommodations has challenged not only the level of consumer activity

within the downtown, but the level of private investment in and maintenance of the area within

the sphere of influence of the DDA as well. Downtown revitalization efforts have spurred the

desire for improvements in the visual appearance of streets and sidewalks and the cohesive

development of key pedestrian linkages throughout the downtown area with the intent of

establishing an improved downtown image and identity.












Downtown Development Authority officials, together with a number of aware and interested citizens

in the Downtown Council have recognized the increasing impact that has resulted from the problems

identified above. They have voted to take positive action to improve downtown conditions as current

and future downtown developments occur. The preparation of the LANDSCAPE AND GRAPHICS PROGRAM is

intended to serve as a guide for improvements within the identified area. It represents the establish-

ment of an important program that will encourage and regulate improvement opportunities through a

series of coordinated steps and actions that may be formally adopted as criteria and standards.



This program identifies in summary form existing conditions within the downtown study area and offers

recommendations for improvements to overcome apparent shortcomings. The observations and recommendations

cited throughout this program are the result of meetings and work sessions in which input from a steering

committee consisting of Downtown Development Authority, city and downtown council representatives followed

presentation of the early data-gathering surveys and analysis of the downtown area.



The basic objectives and subsequent recommendations embodied in the LANDSCAPE AND GRAPHICS PROGRAM Plan

include 1) identification of existing conditions and needs 2) development of opportunities and methods

of accomplishing opportunities and 3) discussing related issues of concern which will impact and

contribute to the success of the program.















Accordingly, this program and plan is intended to serve as a statement of the Downtown Development

Authority's adopted objectives and as a guide for future public and private actions in their study

area. The objectives and recommendations cited in this report should be viewed as flexible ones and

they must be continually refined, with consideration for changing downtown conditions.























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DOWNTOWN LANDSCAPE AND GRAPHICS PROGRAM OBJECTIVES



The specific LANDSCAPE AND GRAPHICS PROGRAM objectives considered during the course of this

study include the following:



1. The establishment of detailed components of manufactured and designed street furniture and

signage and graphic systems and the preparation of a manual of recommended plant materials

suitable for installation within the urban environment present in downtown Fort Lauderdale.



2. The development of specific recommendations for an expanded and improved pedestrian circulation

system to afford convenient, safe and attractive access to and throughout the Downtown Develop-

ment Authority's district.



3. The development of a network of attractive and well-planned public streetscape improvements

including sidewalks, plazas, lighting, traffic control elements and building signs, benches,

and the use of plant materials that are designed to provide an attractive and easily-main-

tained setting in which to shop and work.














Another program objective which has been given consideration throughout this study as a related

issue of concern is:



1. The exploration of the potential for attracting and accommodating redevelopment activities

in undeveloped or under-utilized sectors of the downtown area to promote continuity and

vitality throughout this segment of the Ft. Lauderdale community.



EXISTING CONDITIONS AND OPPORTUNITIES



In order to accomplish each of the identified objectives, existing conditions within each study

area were inventoried, studied and evaluated. At the forefront in each evaluation is the relation-

ship of each observation to opportunities for improvement to the downtown environment and overall

identity. Basic findings, conclusions and recommendations include:













1. Improvement of Pedestrian Corridors Relating to Existing Land Use and Building Conditions.



The boundaries encompassed by the Downtown Development Authority's district are characteristic

of those present today in many large and rapidly-growing cities, where outlying developments

present competition to the economic vitality of the Central Business District. As a result,

buildings have been neglected and unoccupied open space exists within the Ft. Lauderdale

downtown district particularly along South Andrews Avenue from Southeast Sixth Street to

Broward Boulevard, and along Southwest Second Street between the Florida East Coast railroad

tracks and Southwest Fifth Avenue. These obviously undesireable conditions in turn make the

"pedestrian" experience between segments of the retail shops along the sidewalks and down-

town office buildings unpleasant, at times hazardous, and may be identified as one of the major

stumbling blocks in the development of a cohesive and attractive downtown core.



The heaviest concentration of daily activity downtown is located between City Hall on North-

east First Street and the County Courthouse on Southeast Sixth Street, and is bordered by Federal

Highway on the east and South Andrews Avenue on the west. Within this area a considerable amount

of new construction is occurring or is scheduled to begin, for the development of downtown office

buildings, the Central Broward County Library, the Broward County Jail facility, city parking

garage and proposed museum of the arts.












Concurrent with these downtown building developments, improvements to both front and rear facades

of many of the existing structures must be encouraged to establish a coordinated public/private

downtown improvement program. The demonstrated willingness of merchants and property owners to

invest in private improvements will be a major contributing factor to the success of the pro-

gressive and rapidly-changing Central Business District and will provide a base from which to

begin the DOWNTOWN LANDSCAPE AND GRAPHICS PROGRAM improvements.



Improvements to Pedestrian Corridors Relating to Historic Areas and the New River Waterfront



Several buildings of local historic and architectural significance exist within the boundaries

of the study area. They include the New River Inn, home of the Discovery Center, a non-profit

private learning resource center, two historic structures situated immediately west of the

New River Inn which are being presently restored and the King Cromartie Home, situated just

north of the New River Inn. In addition to these historic restoration projects, an office

building on Las Olas Boulevard, dating to 1916 is presently being restored.














Many other historic structures exist, but require interior as well as exterior improvements.

Poorly identified pedestrian and vehicular access routes, the absence of clearly defined parking,

and inadequate sidewalk and street conditions leading to the historic riverfront has limited its

exposure to the downtown district of the Ft. Lauderdale community.



The New River waterfront also suffers from a lack of visual exposure and inadequate and unattract-

ive linkages for pedestrians between the downtown business and retail core and the river. Enhancement

of pedestrian corridors having direct access to the waterfront such as Southeast First Avenue, South-

east Fifth Avenue on both the north and south sides of the New River will encourage the desirable

pedestrian movement. These primary pedestrian linkages can be made highly visible through the use

of identificational and directional signage, widened walkways, framing of distant views of the water-

front area and perhaps daily events such as lunch vendors, an outdoor cafe and noon time public

concerts for downtown employees and shoppers to enjoy.



Presently, the New River waterfront development terminates with Bubier Park located between Southeast

First Avenue and South Andrews Avenue. Future plans call for an extension of this park further west,

when the Andrews Avenue bridge construction is completed. Provisions for continuous movement from

Southeast Fifth Avenue to the New River Inn!Discovery Center will encourage greater use of the













historic waterfront area. This will become a particularly beneficial pedestrian access route when

plans for the Performing Arts Center are further developed within Area A and New River waterfront.




Improvements to Pedestrian Corridors Relating to Traffic Circulation



The importance of maintaining vehicular traffic in the downtown area is emphasized by recognizing

the impact it has on all of the retail shops, offices and other businesses located there. From a

positive perspective, businesses and offices depend primarily on cars, trucks and city buses to

service and transport people into downtown. On a negative note, such traffic often detracts from

the beauty of the area and hinders safe, efficient and convenient access by pedestrians.



Numerous points of pedestrian conflict exist, resulting in difficult and uncomfortable walking

experiences throughout the Central Business District, particularly along Broward Boulevard, Las

Olas Boulevard, Southeast Sixth Street, South Andrews Avenue and Southeast Third Avenue. Several

specific measures to improve pedestrian safety along these routes can be initiated. Such improve-

ments may include :













Standardization of signs, information systems and signals.

Placement of distinctive crosswalk delineations (particularly aimed at driver recognition

of crosswalk zones).

More consistent use of curb cuts for handicapped and the elderly.

Removal of obstacles to motorists' line-of-sight.

Upgrading of street lighting.



Improvements to Pedestrian Corridors Relating to Visual Character and Continuity



With the ever-increasing volumes of traffic and rapidly occurring building in the Central Business

District, an increased effort must be made to insure that a reasonable degree of comfort and safety

is provided for pedestrians moving within the downtown area. Existing street plantings on Las Olas

Boulevard between Southeast Third Avenue and South Andrews Avenue, and along the west side of South

Andrews Avenue between the New River and Broward Boulevard have been poorly maintained. Sidewalks

have been consistently narrowed during street improvements, specifically along South Andrews Avenue

at Las Olas Boulevard, to handle ever increasing volumes of traffic. In addition to these adverse

conditions, many of the commerical blocks literally exhibit more signs than stores, with many of

them extending out over the sidewalk making it difficult to read successive ones. These conditions,














combined with many other distractions both seen and heard by pedestrians, reduce the quality and

appeal of the Central Business District to both shoppers and employees.



Efforts must be directed toward the establishment of a changed pace, character and unique identity

and attractiveness within the downtown to reinforce its desirability as a place to shop and work.

Each motorist becomes a pedestrian before he becomes a customer and therefore must be attracted

by the availability of convenient parking and comfortable, safe and attractive shopping routes.

Widening walk areas such as the Southeast First Avenue corridor leading to the New River waterfront,

together with the introduction of a variety of new pavement textures and colors, a uniform system

of walkwaylighting, well-marked street crossings, placement of benches, trees, signs and any

number of pedestrian-oriented elements would serve to establish a new sense of scale and reduce

the existing overwhelming impact the automobile has in conjunction with the increasing number of

new mid-rise and high-rise buildings.












Importance of Open Spaces and Pedestrian Linkages as They Relate to Downtown Growth



Throughout the course of this study the research efforts have pointed to the fact that substantial

new and adaptive building and development activities are in the forefront of downtown Ft. Lauderdale's

future. These developments will pattern the atmosphere and establish a new identity for those who live,

work, and visit the downtown district.



Development of a new and enjoyable downtown scene can be accomplished through continuous efforts to

improve the built environemnt and in doing so attract new retail and office business and expand itself

as the cultural, financial and governmental center to serve the needs of a rapidly expanding population.



Growth and building development reinforces the need for effectively planned open space systems to

organize use of the area by people, and serve as a major contribution to the overall appearance of down-

town complimentary with surrounding architecture. Future planning and design efforts must provide for

the development of parks, plazas and connecting pedestrian linkages.



The identification of major activity areas "people generators" is the key to isolating desirable

routes for pedestrian movement. Primary emphasis should be directed toward improvement of the following

corridors, within the jurisdiction of the Downtown Development Authority, to promote and enhance

pedestrian circulation.


















. The New River waterfront north and south frontage.

. South Andrews Avenue from Broward Boulevard south to the New River waterfront.

. Pedestrian Mall development along Southeast First Street interfaced with the new

Broward County Library and adjacent Parking Carage facility.

. East Las Olas Boulevard from South Andrews Avenue east to Southeast Third Avenue in

the area of Broward Community College.

. Southeast Third Avenue from the County Courthouse north to the New River.

. Southeast Sixth Street from the Courthouse district east to Federal Highway.

. Riverfront areas adjacent to the new Performing Arts Center.

. Development of streetfront plazas and greenspaces coordinated with new and adaptive

building construction should compliment public efforts where proximity and interface

is dictated.

. Pedestrian corridors which may be generated by future housing developments should provide

a link to areas where necessary daily services are available and opportunities for outdoor

recreation exist.













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LANDSCAPE AND GRAPHICS PROGRAM: RECOMMENDATIONS



To permit for a more detailed study of the Downtown Development Authority's area of jurisdiction,

the district has been divided into seven individual study areas. These areas cover the district's

boundaries extending from Northeast Second Street on the north, Federal Highway on the east, Southeast

Sixth Street on the south, and South Andrews Avenue south of the New River and Southwest Fifth

Avenue north of the New River forming the western Boundary.
















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FUTURE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER
TO OCCUR IN AREA A.
DEVELOPMENT IS IN BEGINNING STAGES


PROPOSED HOUSING DEVELOI
(UNDER SEPARATE DDA STUDY)


IMPROVE GENERAL STREET CONDITIONS
FOR ALL STREETS THROUGHOUT AREA A.
(STREET SURFACES, CURBS, PARKING)
SEE TYPICAL SKETCH AREA F


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CROSSWALK ENHANCEMENT |I!i
PEDESTRIAN ROUTE ENHANCEMENT oo CO(oooa
BUS STOP /SHELTER O
DIRECTORY *


ENHANCE CITY BUS STOP LOCATIONS
SEE TYPICAL SKETCH, AREA C














-INCORPORATE UNIFORM STREET
FURNITURE SYSTEM ON SW 2ND
STREET TO THE POST OFFICE
_ ENHANCE PEDESTRIAN CROSSWALKS
--SEE TYPICAL SKETCH, AREA C


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Landscape Architecture
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
The Bugdal Group
Graphic Consultants
Miami, Florida 33126


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AREA A



This study area is physically separated from the Central Business District and downtown core by the

Florida East Coast Railroad right-of-way. Present pedestrian use within the area is light with

the United States Post Office on the corner of Southwest Fourth Avenue and Southwest Second Street

generating the bulk of traffic in the area. Encouraging greater pedestrian use will be a major

factor contributing to the area's economic vitality. Several historically significant structures

located on the New River waterfront just west of the FEC right-of-way have been restored and initial

steps have been taken to develop plans for Ft. Lauderdale's new Performing Arts Center to be located

within Area A.



1. Street and Sidewalk System

a. Revise curb alignment and on-street parking patterns south of Southwest Second Avenue.

(See vignette, Area A).

b. Enhance the walkway along the west side of Southwest Second Avenue between Broward Boulevard

and the New River with the use of walkway lighting, curb cuts and appropriate street tree

plantings.

c. Incorporate street furniture and other amenities, consistent with recommended design stand-

ards, along Southwest Second Street, encouraging pedestrian linkage between the post office

and retail shops to Areas B and C.















2. Signage and Graphic System

a. Provide informational and directional sign systems for pedestrians and vehicles. Encourage

the use of signs to identify the historic riverfront developments and, in the future, Performing

Arts Center events and attractions. Suggested locations for street directories are:

U.S. Post Office

Bus Shelter locations

3. Bus Stops/Shelters

a. Upgrade existing bus stop locations along Broward Boulevard and Southwest Second Street by

incorporating the following amenities:

Shelter protection, where deemed appropriate according to the level of use.

Attractive pavements and visible landscaping.

SLighting.













4. Building Rehabilitation and Visual Continuity

a. Provide a continuous walkway between the New River Inn/Discovery Center and Sou'hwest Fourth

Avenue, in coordination with restoration activities occurring along the riverfront.

b. Promote a program of general clean-up and consolidation of vacant lots and buildings fronting

Southwest Second Street which have not been maintained and have become neighborhood "eyesores".

Benches, trash receptacles, bicycle racks, and other site furnishings consistent

with waiting area uses.

Directional and informational signage systems identifying bus routes and time schedules

as well as community activities and other announcements.




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DEFINE STREET EDGES & PARKING
SEE TYPICAL SKETCH, AREA C


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SCREEN CITY PARKING LOTS USING
HEDGES, TREE PLANTINGS, LOW WALLS
OR FENCES


RENOVATE BUILDING FACADES AND INCORPORATE
STREET FURNITURE SYSTEM AND SIDEWALK
IMPROVEMENTS ON LAS OLAS BOULEVARD AND
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- SEE TYPICAL SKETCH, AREA F






CROSSWALK ENHANCEMEI ,
.SEE TYPICAL SKETCH, AREA C


\-INCORPORATE STREET FURNITURE SYSTEM
ON 2ND STREET INTO THE HISTORICAL
U/ DISTRICT TO ENCOURAGE PEDESTRIAN
USE & SHOPPING ACTIVITY
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SERVICE DRIVE / PEDESTRIAN LINKAGE


KEY
CROSSWALK ENHANCEMENT IIIII
PEDESTRIAN ROUTE ENHANCEMENT cc -
BUS STOP/SHELTER *
DIRECTORY S


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Landscape Architecture
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
The Bugdal Group
Graphic Consultants
Miami, Florida 33126


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AREA B



Study Area B is characteristic of two types of land-use conditions. The area north of Broward

Boulevard is primarily light industrial with small business and commercial outlets fronting North-

west First Avenue. South of Broward Boulevard, small businesses and retail stores are the primary

economic stimulators.

1. Street and Sidewalk System

a. Street and sidewalk improvements must be initiated along Southwest First Avenue and Southeast

Second Street. Recommended improvements include:

Installation of selected varieties of street trees between the sidewalk and street.

Installation of new pavement materials with textures and colors in walkways and on the

street at controlled pedestrian crosswalks.

Placement of benches and other street furnishings and the placement of planters adjacent

to selected storefronts.

b. Southwest First Avenue and Southeast Second Street improvements must link with improvements

implemented in Area A to provide a continuous and uniform pedestrian walking experience through-

out the downtown.



















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c. Consider the modest redevelopment of the alleyway on the east side of Sterling's Mens Store

as a pedestrian linkage with the following components:

Well-screened dumpster storage and organized refuse collection points.

Addition of street furniture, new pavement materials and landscape elements coordinated

with rear building facade improvements and existing landscaping.

d. Revise on-street parking patterns in conjunction with new buffer plantings adjacent to the

railroad tracks north of Broward Boulevard on Northwest Flagler Drive.

2. Signage and Graphic System

a. Simultaneous with street and sidewalk improvements, include the placement of a uniform system

of directional and informational signage for both pedestrians and vehicles.

b. Encourage the use of colorful street banners not only for civic and cultural announcements and

seasonal festivals, but for visual enhancement as well.

3. Bus Stops/Shelters

a. Provide designated and attractive bus stop/shelter waiting areas along Southwest First Avenue

leading to Las Olas Boulevard (See Area A, Bus Stop/Shelters).

b. Concurrent with future development of the new transit terminal, provide adequate shelter

protection, combined with site amenities and landscape elements to create a pleasant and

attractive terminal station. Walks and streets in the immediate vicinity must be well iden-

tified and refer to the terminal location.












4. Building and Rehabilitation

a. Storefront rehabilitation and facade improvement efforts are recommended along Northwest

First Avenue and Las Olas Boulevard. Improvements must include the following:

Window and door modifications.

Implementation of new building and/or free standing signage.

Provisions for canopies and awnings, or trellises.

b. Undertake exterior improvements for the vacated former Burdines department store and adjacent

parking garage for use as an office building. Improvements must include items such as new

sidewalk pavements and plantings, installation of street furnishings and building facade

improvements.





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AN IMPORTANT PEDESTRIAN
BETWEEN ANDREWS AVENUE
AND 3RD AVENUE


ANDREWS AVE
FACADE IMPROVEME


LAS OLAS PLAZA

IMPORTANT VISUAL LINKS
NEW RIVER WATER FRONT


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LK ENHANCEMENT


ENHANCEMENT 1111
)ESTRIAN ROUTE aoaoWo


BUS STOP/SHELTER
PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN
LINKAGES
DIRECTORY *



Ted Baker Group
Landscape Architecture
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
The Bugdal Group
Graphic Consultants
Miami, Florida 33126


I n









AREA C



Study Area C encompasses the core of the downtown Central Business District where a considerable

amount of new construction is now occurring or scheduled for the development of office buildings,

a new Broward County Jail, central library, museum, county offices and parking facilities. This

study area is recommended as being a key downtown locale for initial landscape and graphic improve-

ments described as part of this program because of the increased level of pedestrian and vehicular

activity expected to occur simultaneously with new downtown growth.

1. Street and Sidewalk System

a. Incorporate street furnishings and placement of selected landscape materials, consistent

with design standards, on South Andrews Avenue and Las Olas Boulevard.

b. Widen pedestrian walkways along South Andrews Avenue and Southeast First Avenue leading

to the riverfront, permitting the planting of a selected variety of street trees, new

pavement materials, walkway lighting, benches and other street furnishings at outdoor

gathering and sitting areas. Providing visual exposure and more inviting routes toward

the riverfront will contribute significantly to the success of the riverfront as a

pedestrian-oriented area and as a continuing compliment to the downtown area.

c. Initiate further study directed toward the possibility of establishing a fully complimented

pedestrian mall on Southeast First Street between South Andrews Avenue and Southeast Third

Avenue. The elimination of on-street parking along Southeast First Street between South-

east Second Avenue and Southeast Third Avenue would permit the widening of the sidewalk







6 6


ft













leading from Southeast Third Avenue to the mall while accommodating traffic circulation at

the east end of Southeast First Street.

d. As new office and other building developments occur downtown, provide mid-block pedestrian

linkages and plaza areas to establish a unified network for downtown pedestrian circulation.

(See Plan, Area C).

e. Several pedestrian/ vehicular conflicts exist in this study area and will most likely be

increasing as downtown growth continues. Incorporate methods to control these conflicts

including standardization of signs and signals, distinctive crosswalk delineation, removal

of obstacles to improve motorists' line-of-sight, increasing levels of light intensity at

intersections used frequently by pedestrians at night, greater use of advance or delayed

green arrow indicators for turning vehicles, and construction of drop curbs at all walks at

all intersections for elderly and handicapped accessibility. Primary intersections requiring

these standard improvements are:

South Andrews Avenue at Broward Boulevard/ Southeast First Street/ Southeast Second

Street/ and Las Olas Boulevard.

Las Olas Boulevard at Southeast First Avenue/ Southeast Third Avenue/ Southeast First

Street/ and Broward Boulevard; Southeast Second Street at Broward Boulevard.













2. Signage and Graphic System

a. Install a uniform system of directional and informational traffic and pedestrian controls

consistent with recommended design standards.

b. Install street directories and informational and educational kiosks for pedestrian use

placed at strategic locations in the downtown district. Selected areas include:

The intersection of South Andrews Avenue and Las Olas Boulevard.

At waiting areas outside the future central library.

SAlong heavily-traveled sidewalks throughout the downtown area.

c. Implement organized and tasteful use of colorful, well-designed street banners along

Las Olas Boulevard and South Andrews Avenue to add to the downtown's vitality and to

announce Ft. Lauderdale civic and cultural events and seasonal attractions.

3. Bus Stops/ Shelters

a. Provided well-identified shaded waiting areas at bus stops along Las Olas Boulevard,

South Andrews Avenue, Broward Boulevard and Southeast Third Avenue. (See Bus Stops/ Shelters,

Area A).































































































.














4. Building Rehabilitation

a. Encourage storefront rehabilitation and improvement efforts by merchants and property

owners along South Andrews Avenue, Las Olas Boulevard and Broward Boulevard. Improvements

must be uniform and consistent with recommended design standards to include window and

door modifications, revised building signage, provisions for overhead covering of canopies,

awnings or trellises, painting and related exterior clean-up improvements. Conformance

with a specified palette of colors and standardized range of letter styles should be

encouraged.

b. Enhance building facades with colorful wall murals to create visually stimulating views for

both pedestrian and motorist appreciation and identification.





































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PROPOSED HOUSING DEVELOPMENT
(UNDER SEPARATE DDA STUDY) I


BANK

ENHANCE CITY BUS SHELTER
LOCATIONS WITH CONTRASTING
SIDEWALK PAVEMENTS D Ii 5 11 a 3 .QJ


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FUTURE HOUSING &
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
(UNDER SEPARATE DDA STUD Y _




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ENHANCE CROSSWALKS AT
INTERSECTIONS ON 2ND
AVENUE, LAS OLAS BOULEVARD,
FEDERAL HIGHWAY AND
BROWARD BOULEVARD


CONTINUE SIDEWALK
ENHANCEMENT TO LAS OLAS
SPECIALTY SHOPPING DISTRICT


\ SCREEN UNSIGHTLY LOADING AREAS
KEY SEEN FROM NORTH RIVER DRIVE

CROSSWALK ENHANCEMENT 11111
PEDESTRIAN ROUTE ENHANCEMENT : .Ca
BUS STOP/SHELTER 0
DIRECTORY 0


Ted Baker Group
Landscape Architecture
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
The Bugdal Group
Graphic Consultants
Miami, Florida 33126








AREA D



The primary east/west street and sidewalk systems within this study area are fairly well maintained

and visually attractive. Las Olas Boulevard, extending west from Las Olas Shopping District has

wide sidewalks and is attractively landscaped however, the need for improvements, such as use

of interesting pavements and street furnishings, does exist. Street surfaces and sidewalk conditions

are good as a result of recent downtown developments.



New housing for this study area is proposed for land in the northeast corner and also for the area

south of Southeast Fourth Street just north of North River Drive. (See Plan, Area D). These proposed

developments will generate increased useage of the downtown area and riverfront by pedestrians and

the need for an attractive, safe and inviting pedestrian sidewalk system connecting these housing

developments to the riverfront and downtown. Enhancement of downtown sidewalks is viewed as being

a vital component complimenting downtown growth.

1. Street and Sidewalk System

a. Encourage the use of Southeast Fifth Avenue as a link to the riverfront by providing attractive

sidewalks, walkway lighting and directories identifying riverfront opportunities.














































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b. Improve pedestrian/vehicular conflict points with methods recommended in Street and Sidewalk

System, Area C. Intersections requiring improvements are located at:

Federal Highway and Las Olas Boulevard

Las Olas Boulevard and Southeast Third Avenue

SSoutheast First Street and Southeast Third Avenue

Broward Boulevard and Southeast Third Avenue

Broward Boulevard and Federal Highway

2. Signage and Graphics

a. Expand the uniform downtown signage and graphics system coordinated with that of Area A

incorporating the following elements:

SInformation and directory systems.

Wall murals (opportunities exist along Las Olas Boulevard).

Traffic control signals.

SUse of colorful street banners.

3. Bus Stop/ Shelters

a. Provide well-identified bus waiting areas and shelters along Las Olas Boulevard, Southeast

Third Avenue, Broward Boulevard and Federal Highway implementing the elements as described

in Bus Stops/Shelters in Area A recommendations.


















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EXTEND SIDEWALK & SHADE TREES BETWEEN
DISCOVERY CENTER AND SW 4TH AVE CORNER


CREATE VISUAL LINKS BETWEEN
THE DOWNTOWN AND THE RIVERFRONT


ENHANCE CROSSWALKS & LANDINGS
AT PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE CROSSINGS
ON ANDREWS AVENUE BRIDGE


KEY


CONTINUE DEVELOPMENT OF RIVER
CORRIDOR BETWEEN BUBIER PARK
AND DISCOVERY CENTER PARK


LIMIT VEHICULAR USE OF NORTH AND SOUTH RIVER
DRIVES TO SERVICE VEHICLES AND PEAK TRAFFIC
HOUR USE. ENCOURAGE PEDESTRIAN USE OF THE
RIVERFRONT WITH DEVELOPMENT OF OPEN SPACES
AND LANDSCAPING. INVESTIGATE VACATING STREETS
AND PROVIDING FOR BIRTH BOATS


CROSSWALK ENHANCEMENT 11111
PEDESTRIAN ROUTE ENHANCEMENT llliinuni, n
DIRECTORY .


4ro ecale'


SCREEN GROCERY REAR AND SIDE
LOADING AREAS WITH USE OF PLANT
MATERIALS, FENCES OR WALLS


SIDEWALKS
TO THE RIVERFRONT


WOODED LOT


Ted Baker Group
Landscape Architecture
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
The Bugdal Group
Graphic Consultants
Miami, Florida 33126


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AREA E


Waterfront development along the New River between Southeast Fifth Avenue and Southeast First

Avenue is attractively landscaped, well-lighted, and provides a quiet, meandering walking opportunity

passing some of Ft. Lauderdale's most spectacular boating and marine vessels. The waterfront corridor

is underutilized from the standpoint of pedestrian activity primarily because walkways leading to

this unique downtown feature are not readily identifiable and inviting to visitors.



Several key elements can be identified and specific recommendations made concerning the level of

improvements for the downtown riverfront corridor:

1. Create visual connections between the downtown business district and the waterfront and

encourage pedestrian movement along these corridors. Streets and sidewalks leading to the

riverfront corridor that lend potential to this type of improvement are:

SSouth Andrews Avenue (Upon completion of bridge construction).

SSoutheast First Avenue (North of New River).

Southeast Second Avenue

SSoutheast Third Avenue (South of New River).

SSoutheast Fifth Avenue (North of New River).

2. Permit vehicular use of North and South River Drives only during peak traffic hours and

specified hours for service and deliveries to adjacent businesses.












3. Widen pedestrian walkways and encourage greater use of open space planning to provide pleasant

views of New River.

4. Encourage waterfront recreational activities which will attract visitors and stimulate public

interest in the riverfront.

SDevelop a physical fitness, jogging vita-course for fun and exercise.

Situate outdoor cafes and food vendors catering to downtown visitors and employees.

Expand outdoor music recitals, concerts and poetry readings that are open to the public.

Provide information kiosks, newsstands, riverfront benches, trash receptacles and other

site elements complimentary to the riverfront atmosphere.

5. Continue riverfront development on the north bank between Bubier Park and the New River Inn.

Providing a complete riverfront corridor between Southeast Fifth Avenue and the historic

Riverfront area in Area A will encourage pedestrian use of the corridor as a route between

future riverfront developments.

6. Tie the riverfront corridor with the widest area possible within the community and link it

to other foci of pedestrian activity. New downtown housing developments will generate people -

a key source for the downtown and riverfront's success. With downtown growth continuing as

projected, the area will become an increasingly viable and attractive place to live and work.






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DEFINE PARKING ON SW FLAGLER AVENUE.
IMPROVE GENERAL STREET APPEARANCE
WITH PLANTINGS


KEY

PEDESTRIAN ROUTE ENHANCEMENT oonaononar
DIRECTORY *
PLANTING SCREEN -


IMPROVE SIDEWALK AND STREET
EDGE CONDITIONS
















PROPOSE STREET TREE PLANTINGS
_ON ANDREWS AVENUE














-DEFINE STREET EDGES AND ON-STREET
PARKING ON FLAGLER AVE, SW 1ST AVE,
SW 5TH ST & SW 4TH CT


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Ted Baker Group
Landscape Architecture
Coral Gables, Florida 3313-
The Bugdal Group
Graphic Consultants
Miami, Florida 33126


:I h I/











AREA F

Study area F is primarily light industrial in land use and consists of several large parking lots,

repair garages, boat yards, and businesses having rear loading areas. Several small homes are located

in this area as well. Offices of Florida Power and Light fronting South Andrews Avenue, attracts the

majority of traffic and generates the greater need for employee and visitor parking.

1. Street and Sidewalk System

a. Revise curb-alignments and on-street parking patterns on Southwest Flagler Avenue and provide

buffer planting strips along the FEC Railroad right-of-way. Buffer plantings will serve to

reduce noise from passing trains and screen the rear loading areas and garages which can be

seen from Southeast Sixth Street and Southwest Second Avenue.

b. Recommend resurfacing of Southwest Fifth Street and upgrading of sidewalk conditions leading

from FPL parking lots on Southwest First Avenue to building entrances.

c. Upgrade sidewalk conditions on the east side of Southwest First Avenue.

d. Screen unsightly rear loading and storage areas throughout the area with the use of fences,

walls and planting materials.

2. Bus Stops/Shelters

a. Provide well-identified and attractive bus waiting areas along South Andrews Avenue (See

Area A, Bus Stop/Shelters).
















3. Signage and Graphics

a. In conjunction with recommended street and sidewalk improvements, include the placement of

a uniform system of signage and directories encouraging pedestrian use of the New River water-

front and South Andrews Avenue bridge crossings to Bubier Park.

4. Building Rehabilitation

a. Storefront rehabilitation and improvements are recommended for South Andrews Avenue from

Southeast Sixth Street to the South Andrews Avenue bridge. Improvements must emphasize the

following:

Upgrading of building signage.

Painting and/or upgrading of building exteriors.

Installation of a selected species of street trees for shade and interest.

Accomplishment of a general clean-up and consolidation of unsightly vacant buildings.

SInstallation of drop curbs at sidewalk/street intersections for elderly and handi-

capped accessibility.
































































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IMPROVE ANDREWS AVE
SIDEWALK CONDITIONS


INCORPORATE STREET FURNITURE
SYSTEM THROUGHOUT
COURTHOUSE AND COUNTY
OFFICE AREAS












0 no ecale


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DEFINE STREET PAVEMENT AND WALK
EDGES ON SE 5TH AVE, SE 5TH CT
AND SE 1ST AVE

KEY

CROSSWALK ENHANCEMENT 1111
PEDESTRIAN ROUTE ENHANCEMENT LnD ci:a
BUS STOP/SHELTER *
DIRECTORY 0


Ted Baker Group
Landscape Architecture
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
The Bugdal Group
Graphic Consultants
Miami, Florida 33126








AREA G



This study area exhibits heavy volumes of traffic throughout the day due to extensive public use

of the courthouse, county offices and police station. Much of the congestion in the Southeast

Sixth Street/ Southeast Third Avenue area during peak traffic hours is occurring because the

South Andrews Avenue bridge is under construction forcing the Southeast Third Avenue bridge to

absorb increased levels of traffic volume.



Parking accommodations in the courthouse and county office areas are attractively landscaped

however, narrow sidewalks lined with utility poles and parking meters, and poorly defined cross

walk zones and bus stops contribute to uncomfortable walking routes to and from offices through-

out the area.



Construction of the new Broward County Jail is scheduled to begin in the near future and will

be located directly north of the courthouse placing additional emphasis on pedestrian and

vehicular movements.

1. Street and Sidewalk System

a. Improve pedestrian safety at the Southeast Sixth Street/ Southeast Third Avenue intersection.

Use special pavements and colors to identify crosswalks.

Provide drop curbs along sidewalks and at street intersections.

Incorporate the use of a delayed indicator for turning vehicles, allowing pedestrians















to clear the intersection crosswalk before traffic movement begins.

Remove obstacles in motorists' line-of-sight.

b. Provide street furniture and amenities, consistent with design standards, on Southeast

Sixth Street and Southeast Third Avenue throughout the area.

c. Upgrade sidewalk conditions along the east side of Southeast Third Avenue leading from

Broward County Courthouse to the New River waterfront. Plant selected varieties of trees,

provide walkway lighting, benches and other street furnishings to create inviting routes

towards the south riverfront for visitors and employees.

d. Permit vehicular use of South River Drive only during peak traffic hours. Encourage

pedestrian use of theDrive with the development of plaza areas and widened sidewalks.

2. Signage and Graphics

a. Install a uniform system of directional and informational signage consistent with design

standards.

b. Encourage the use of colorful street banners along Southeast Third Avenue and Southeast

Sixth Street to add vitality and to announce upcoming cultural attractions, festivals

and seasonal events.

3. Bus Stops/ Shelters

a. Provide well-designated and attractive bus waiting areas at locations on Southeast Third

Avenue. (See Area A, Bus Stops/ Shelters).


















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East Las Olas Boulevard/South Andrews Avenue
Landscape and Graphics Concept Plan


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SOUTHEAST 2ND AVENUE


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Landscape and Graphics Concept Plan
Landscape and Graphics Concept Plan


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East Las Olas Boulevard/South Andrews Avenue
Landscape and Graphics Concept Plan


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Importance of Housing Opportunities and Riverfront Development as it Relates to Downtown Growth


In order to formulate the components of the Downtown Landscape and Graphics Program, cursory

analysis' of existing land uses throughout the seven study areas were undertaken by the consultant

team. Each block was reviewed both on-site and through walking and "windshield" tours and

in office review sessions. Several related issues and concerns outgrowth beyond the main

objective of this report continued to surface as vital planning issues which were not approach-

ing their potential for development.



Continued emphasis on programs designed to encourage new opportunities for housing and river-

front development as a direct supporting role to downtown Ft. Lauderdale's growth must continue

to be actively programmed. An affordable variety of housing types in areas close to the down-

town will not only provide support to retail and commercial interests, but to downtown entertain-

ment and cultural events, restaurants, churches and government functions. Carefully programmed

efforts for both restoration and construction of new housing in and adjacent to downtown districts

have successfully redirected the decline of many cities in this last decade. Proposed downtown

facilities such as the Central Broward County Library, the Performing Arts Center, office build-

ings, a museum and a hotel require year-round support and new housing developments will contribute

to this need and to a potential excitement and vitality in the downtown area. Housing opportunities

may take various forms relating to income levels and include mid-rise and high-rise projects for









downtown core parcels and townhouse and garden apartment type dwellings located in outlying

residential neighborhoods.


The continued rehabilitation of existing homes in areas where neighborhood deterioration is

evident should be actively promoted along with related street, open space, recreational and

other improvements. Control and conversion of commercial areas, where appropriate, through desired

land use practices, zoning code enforcement and related actions is a vital factor to aid in

prevention of further blighting influences throughout the downtown core and its adjacent

residential neighborhoods.



New River Waterfront Development


In conjunction with the development of housing in the downtown environs the New River Water-

front should continue to be developed to its fullest potential. The New River presents a

unique downtown resource in close proximity to places of work and the downtown area's increasing

number of cultural amenities.



Several items may be included in an action program undertaken to develop an exciting and attractive

waterfront area:

Enhance pedestrian corridors leading to the riverfront to encourage greater

visibility and use.













. Limit the use of vehicular traffic on North and South River Drive to peak morning

and evening traffic hours.

SSelect future housing locations that will correspond and directly stimulate river-

front activities. Provide strong links between housing developments and the down-

town core and riverfront.

SExpand passive as well as active recreational opportunities adjacent to the river-

front.

. Recommend the addition of a riverfront physical fitness, jogging and vita-course in

the area to be developed located between Bubier Park and the New River Inn.

SEmphasize use of the riverfront by pedestrians. Implementation of walkway lighting,

benches, trash receptacles, informational and educational directories, signage and

colorful banners will contribute to the identity of the area and promote new

activities.

STie new developments, such as the Performing Arts Center and Broward County Jail to

the riverfront. Develop new public plazas and open spaces which focus strongly on

the river, emphasizing its unique views.





34


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SITE FURNITURE STANDARDS AND RECOMMENDATIONS



1. Benches and Seat Walls

a. Use of bench backs and arms for support are recommended to provide support to the user.

b. Fasten benches securely to the ground plane to prevent unauthorized removal.

c. Recommended bench height: 17 inches.

d. Recommended bench depth: 16 inches.

e. Recommended bench back height: 13-15 inches.

f. Recommended bench material: Pressure-treated wood with natural wood finish.

g. Recommended seat wall height: 18-24 inches.

h. Recommended seat wall depth: 12 inches minimum.

2. Trash Receptacles

a. Provide container openings 30 to 36 inches from the ground plane.

b. Receptacles should be one-hand operable and retain or resist fires.

c. Securely anchor containers to the ground plane or secure to a sturdy post.

d. Place containers in easily accessed locations.

e. Use of acontainerwith an enclosed removable liner for easy emptying of contents

is recommended.

f. Use of a covered or semi-covered container is recommended.

g. Recommended materials: Concrete with exposed aggregate finish.










3. Drinking Fountains

a. Use of a cantilevered bowl with an 8 to 12 inch arm is recommended for public use

and handicapped users.

b. Use of a lever-type handle on the bowl side or rim is preferred. Use foot pedals for

fountain operation only in conjunction with the bowl side lever-type handles.

c. Recommended bubbler height: 31-33 inches.

d. Recommended material: Concrete with exposed aggregate finish.

4. Bollards

a. Recommended minimum height: 24 inches.

b. Recommended minimum spacing: 23 inches.

c. Recommended materials: Concrete, wood, aluminum

5. Drop Curbs

a. Warp walkway down to common level with the street.

b. Use pavement textures to alert pedestrians to grade changes. (i.e. heavy broom-finished

concrete or exposed aggregate).

c. Recommended minimum width of ramp: 36 inches of usable surface (does not include

sloping sides).

d. Recommended maximum slope of ramp: 17% (not less than 1:6).








6. Tree Guards

a. Installation of tree grates to protect tree nursery root systems and to add aesthetic

improvements is recommended.

b. Minimum tree grate size: 4 ft. x 4 ft. (5 ft. x 5 ft. or 6 f t. x 6 ft. grates are

recommended).

c. Recommended material: Cast iron. Heavy weight is recommended for use in areas used by

vehicles.

7. Bicycle Storage Racks

a. Supply bicycle racks in heavy use areas such as parks, shopping malls, schools, plazas,

and activity centers.

b. Locate bicycle racks in areas of continuous surveillance, convenient to bicycle routes.

c. Firmly anchor storage racks to the ground plane.

d. Provide for chain or cable bicycle locks.

8. Bus Shelters

a. Transparent shelter side walls are recommended for views of approaching buses.

b. Incorporate graphic and communicative systems, maps, and bus information routes into

shelter systems.

c. Provide lighting for night use.

d. Recommend use of a contemporary-looking bus shelter.

e. Recommended materials: Tinted plexi-glass..and aluminum.














9. Kiosks

a. Incorporate items such as drinking fountains, newspaper stands, information, directory

systems, and lighting into kiosk structures.

b. Locate kiosks in heavily used areas such as at busy corners, along pedestrian malls

and public plazas.

c. Use of transparent protective coverings are recommended for protection of posted

announcements and information.

10. Lighting

a. Street lighting must conform to FPL standards.

b. Recommended lamp types: Mercury Vapor, Metal Halide.

c. Recommended street light height: 20 to 30 feet

d. Recommended pedestrian lighting height: 12 to 18 feet.

11. Pavements

a. Use of several pavement types which interface well are recommended for downtown use to

add variety and interest for pedestrians.

b. Recommended pavement materials: brick, concrete, colored concrete, precast concrete pavers.














12. Planters

a. Recommend use of durable, non-staining materials.

b. Planters should be heavy enough to prevent unauthorized removal yet light enough to

be relocated by maintenance crews.

c. Recommended minimum height: 24 inches

d. Recommended materials: Concrete or exposed aggregate.

13. Wall Murals/City Art/Sculpture

a. Recommend use of materials resisting weather wear, or that are replaceable, such as

tile or canvas.













































































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STREET SHADE TREES SUITABLE FOR CITY PLANTING.





ITEM MATURE
NO. PLANT NAME SIZE EXPOSURE MOISTURE PROCUREMENT SPECIFICATIONS



BOTANICAL NAME H STEM CHARACTERISTICS
COMMON NAME H OR REMARKS
W p4i W PA r M C| < ili 0,"*"^"^


STREET/SHADE TREES
SUITABLE FOR CITY PLANTING


Bursera simarouba
(Gumbo Limbo)

Cassia fistula
(Golden Shower)


Coccoloba diversifolia
(Floridana)
(Pigeon Plum)

Conocarpus erecta (sericeE
(Silver Buttonwood)

Citharexylum fruiticosum
(Fiddlewood)


Cordia sebestena
(Geiger Tree) F

Delonix regia
(Royal Poinciana)

Jacaranda acutifolia
(Jacaranda)

Lysiloma bahamensis
(Wild Tamarind)

Nectandra coriacea
(Lancewood)


40'


35'



30'



)30'


30'




25'


50'


50'


12' 8'


10' 6'



12' 6'



12' 9'


10' 6'


12' 7'


16' 10'


10' 6'


31" 5'


B&B


B&B



B&B



B&B


B&B




B&B


B&B


B&B






B&B


Single stem


Purchase female species


Single stem


Leaf caterpillars may
defoliate tree in the
fall; tree rejuvenates
quickly.


Purchase female
Orange flowers.


species.


Purchase female species






ITEM MATURE
NO. PLANT NAME SIZE EXPOSURE MOISTURE -PROCUREMENT SPECIFICATIONS



BOTANICAL NAME < STEM CHARACTERISTICS
COMMON NAME > > W P < o -a OR REMARKS


Piscidia piscipula
(Jamaica Dogwood)

Pongamia pinnata
(Pongam)

Quercus virginiana
(Live Oak)

Simarouba glauca
(Paradise Tree)



Swietwnia mahagoni
(Mahogany)

Tabebuia pallida
(Pink Trumpet)

Tamarindus indica
(Tamarind)


PALMS SUITABLE FOR
CITY PLANTING


Arecastrum romanzoffianun
(Queen Palm)

Cocos nucifera sp.
(Dwarf Golden Malayan
Coconut)
(Dwarf Green Malayan
Coconut)


30' ct20'


W5'ct20'


10' 3"


9'














3'ct


B&B


Cont
B&B

Cont
B&B

Cont
B&B



B&B


B&B


B&B







B&B


3'ct B&B


/Do not grasp trunk bas
to remove root ball
from cont. Lay tree o
side, slide off cont.
stand tree in place.


* a i I I I L






ITEM MATURE
NO. PLANT NAME SIZE EXPOSURE MOISTURE PROCUREMEN CIFICATION

BOTANICAL NAME STEM CHARACTERISTICS
COMMON NAME OR REMARKS
SS H H M H
_______________~~ 9q^^ ~ g^ 0l S___a_


Sabal Palmetto
(Sabal Palm)

Thrinax floridana
(Jamaica Thatch Palm)

Roystonea elata
(Royal Palm)


SHRUBS SUITABLE FOR
CITY PLANNING

Chrysobalanus icaco
(Red Tip Coco Plum)

Coccolobis Uvifera
(Seagrape)

Cocculus Laurifolius
(Snail seed)



Conocarpus erecta
(Green Buttonwood)

Dodonaea viscosa
(Varnish-leaf)


Jasminum (simplicifolia)
gracile
(Australian Jasmine)

Murraya paniculata Lake-
view
(Lakeview Jasmine)


80'112'


100'122'


15' 12'


30' 40'


30' 25'



25' 25'


15' 10'


12' 10'


X


X


x







x



x


x



x
X





X
X


X



X


X



X



X


24"118"


24" 15"


3' 2'


3' 2'


16" 20"


30" 24"


1-10'
ct

8'


10'


B&B


B&B


B&B







LI"
>ot
lia.

10"
aot
lia.
10"
)ot
dia.
11"
pot
dia.
11"
pot
dia.

10%"
pot
dia,

10i%"
Bot
dia.


10' clearwood







3 plants per pot



3 plants minimum






Multi-stem/full to
Ground








ITEM MATURE
NO. PLANT NAME SIZE EXPOSURE MOISTURE ROCIREMENT SPECIFY CATIONS

BOTANICAL NAME STEM CHARACTERISTICS

COMMON NAME OR REMARKS
U W W < = P = O EA
M- o Z C5 -,4 > z E-4 11 W0 < Z 14
W PL4 :) W > WU PL4 < 4 0O
S M~~~~~9 -41fi 3 S MUEi _____ ^


Nerium oleander
(Dwarf Oleander)





Russellia esquisetiforms
(Fire cracker Plant)


Sophora tomentosa
(Necklace Pod)




Triphasia trifolia
(Lime-Berry)


GROUND COVERS SUITABLE
FOR CITY PLANNING

Asparagus sprengeri
(Asparagus-Fern)


Lantana depressa
(Dwarf Lantana)


Liriope muscari
(Lily-turf)


Nephrolepis bostoniersis
(Boston Fern)


48' 1-- IX


6"









12"


10"
pot
dia.



6"
pot
dia.


11"
pot
dia.

11"
pot
dia.


6"
pot
dia.

6"
pot
dia.


6"
pot
dia.
6"
pot
dia.


3 plants minimum due
to the toxic nature
of this plant, care
should be used in its
location.


10 bibs per clump


.,.....






ITEM MATURE
NO. PLANT NAME SIZE EXPOSURE MOISTURE PROCUREMENT SPECIFICATIONS

BOTANICAL NAME STEM CHARACTERISTICS
COMMON NAME I OR REMARKS
W P 1-42 W a4 > P 4 0 4l HC


Ophiopogon japonica
(Mondo Grass)

Rhoeo bermudiana
(Dwarf Oyster Plant)


Wedelia trilobata
(Wedelia)


12"I---


6"
pot
dia.
6"
pot
dia.


15 bibs per clump


4 heads minimum



Rooted cuttings


2' ---












NAME: Bursera simaruba (Gumbo Limbo)

TYPE: Deciduous tree; native

MATURE SIZE: 40 ft. x 30 ft. spread

RESISTANCE: Drought resistant

SOIL: No special requirements

FERTILIZATION: No special requirements once established

WATERING: No special requirements once established

PRUNING: Remove dead, damaged or diseased wood

INSECTS, PESTS & DISEASE: Caterpillars

NOTES: Requires little attention once established














NAME: Cassia fistula (Golden Shower)

TYPE: Semi-evergreen tree

MATURE SIZE: 35 ft. x 20 ft. spread

RESISTANCE:

SOIL: No special requirement. Does best in fertile, well-drained soils.

FERTILIZATION: Four times a year (deep root).

WATERING: No special requirements once established

PRUNING: Remove dead, damaged or diseased wood

INSECTS, PESTS & DISEASE: None

NOTES: Purchase female species only.
Beautiful yellow blooms in late spring and early summer













NAME: Citharexylum fruiticosum (Fiddlewood)

TYPE: Medium-sized evergreen tree with spreading crown from erect
branches; native.

MATURE SIZE: 30 ft. x 15 ft. spread

RESISTANCE:

SOIL: Fairly fertile soil

FERTILIZATION: Twice a year

WATERING: Not necessary after establishment, but should be watered during droughts.

PRUNING: Remove dead,damaged or diseased wood.

INSECTS, PESTS & DISEASE: Leaf caterpillars may defoliate entire tree for 2 to 4 weeks
in the fall, but trees will rejuvenate quickly.

NOTES: Flowers intermittently throughout the year with 4"-6" fragrant white flowers.
Has been used as a hedge.













NAME: Coccoloba diversifolia floridana (Pigeon Plum)

TYPE: Evergreen tree; native

MATURE SIZE: 30 ft. x 18 ft. spread

RESISTANCE:

SOIL: Fairly fertile soil, though will grow in sand

FERTILIZATION: Three times a year

WATERING: No special requirements once established

PRUNING: Remove dead, damaged or diseased wood

INSECTS, PESTS & DISEASE: Pith-borers

NOTES:












NAME: Conocarpus erecta sericea (Silver Buttonwood)

TYPE: Large shrub to tree; evergreen; native

MATURE SIZE: 30 ft. x 25 ft. spread

RESISTANCE:

SOIL: Will grow in rocky limestone soil, but will do better in a good planting soil

FERTILIZATION: Twice a year

WATERING: Needs frequent watering. Will grow with roots standing in brackish water.

PRUNING: Remove dead, damaged or diseased wood

INSECTS, PESTS & DISEASE: Sooty mold

NOTES: Overhead watering can cause sooty mold.




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