America's Swamp

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
America's Swamp the Historical Everglades Grant Project
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Nemmers, John
Taylor, Laurie N.
Publisher:
George A. Smathers Libraries
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida

Notes

Summary:
Purposes and Goals of the Project: The University of Florida proposes a 3-year project to NHPRC that will use cost effective methods to digitize approximately 99,690 pages in six archival collections that document the despoiling of the Everglades and the development of South Florida in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The collections selected for this project document early plans for draining the Everglades in the 1880s and 1890s, the dredging of canals and subsequent development of the destroyed wetlands at the start of the 20th century, as well as early attempts by conservationists to preserve the natural resources of the Everglades. The six Everglades collections are existing holdings of UF. All six collections will be digitized in their entirety, although a small number of boxes will be excluded because they are not within the chronological scope of the project. The collections date from 1854 to 1963, but the bulk of the materials included in this project will date from 1877 to 1929. The year 1929 was selected as an end date because it marks the end of the South Florida land boom and the onset of the Great Depression. The project will reproduce approximately 99,690 page images.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Special and Area Studies Collections
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
System ID:
UF00089457:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




America's Swamp: The Historical Everglades Project

Purposes and Goals of the Project: The University of Florida proposes a 3-year project that will use cost-

effective methods to digitize approximately 99,690 pages in six archival collections that document the despoiling

of the Everglades and the development of South Florida in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The collections

selected for this project document early plans for draining the Everglades in the 1880s and 1890s, the dredging of

canals and subsequent development of the destroyed wetlands at the start of the 20th century, as well as early

attempts by conservationists to preserve the natural resources of the Everglades. The six Everglades collections

are existing holdings of UF. All six collections will be digitized in their entirety, although a small number of

boxes will be excluded because they are not within the chronological scope of the project. The collections date

from 1854 to 1963, but the bulk of the materials included in this project will date from 1877 to 1929. The year

1929 was selected as an end date because it marks the end of the South Florida land boom and the onset of the

Great Depression. The project will reproduce approximately 99,690 page images.


Collection Extent Exclusions Pages
Napoleon B. Broward Papers, 1879-1818 10.75 In. ft. (14 11,465
boxes; 4 vol.)
William Sherman Jennings Papers, 1877- 13.5 In. ft. (29 32,575
1928 boxes; 16 vol.)
May Mann Jennings Papers, 1889-1963 8 In. ft. (23 boxes) 2 boxes dated 22,500
1930-1963
Thomas E. Will Papers, 1893-1938 14 In. ft. (24 boxes) 2 boxes dated 29,800
1930-1937
Arthur E. Morgan Papers, 1912-1954 0.8 In. ft. (2 boxes) 2 files dated 1930- 1,850
1946
James E. Ingraham Papers, 1854-1920 1 In. ft. (2 boxes) 1,500


Total pages: 99,690


All imaging will be completed in the Digital Library Center (DLC), a unit of UF Libraries. For all

digitized materials, METS metadata will be created. In addition to technical and structural data,

descriptive metadata will be imported and repurposed from existing EAD finding aids. An Everglades

homepage will be developed as part of the UFDC's broader digital collection. In practice consistent for all


UF Historical Everglades Project Summary 1










UF digital projects, redundant digital archives are maintained. Following completion of the project,

researchers can enhance discoverability and comprehension of the minimal metadata by contributing

descriptions for objects using a tagging and contribution system.

Significance and Relationship to NHPRC Goals and Objectives: This project directly addresses the

Commission's mission, vision and goals. First, it makes records of historical value and national

significance freely accessible to a wide public audience. The creation of digital surrogates ensures broad

use of materials that certainly enhance our knowledge of the nation's history and culture. Second, the

project promotes the use of the country's documentary heritage. Project staff will work with faculty in

academic units at UF and other educational institutions to ensure that students are aware of and can make

use of these resources. Additionally, the project will be heavily promoted to historians and scholars in

various disciplines. Third, the project guarantees the long term preservation of historical record

collections so that they may be used by generations to come. The valuable historical evidence will be

preserved in digital format, and the original materials also will be benefit from the reduction in physical

handling. Finally, UF will explore and evaluate new methods for cost-effective reproduction of archival

materials.

Plan of Work: Each of the six collections will be processed separately as discrete units so that no co-

mingling of materials can occur. An entire collection will be processed by a specific unit before it moves

into another processing area. The following ordered activities will be used to process each collection:

1. John Nemmers, Flo Turcotte, and Jim Cusick of the Special Collections Department will select

and conduct a folder level review of each collection.

2. John Freund and Cathy Martyniak of the Preservation Department will do an initial conservation

review of the materials making note of any special handling requirements.

3. The collection will be transferred to the Digital Library Center for processing, serving, and

archiving. The normal sequence of activities include: registering materials into the DLC tracking

database, imaging, image processing and quality control, mark-up, data transfer, and archiving.

4. The collection will be returned to the Special Collections Department
UF Historical Everglades Project Summary 2










Products: This digitization project will produce a new Historical Everglades Project homepage providing

access to almost 100,000 new digital objects. In addition, the EAD finding aids for the six archival

collections will be revised to include links to these digital objects. As part of the project, UF will create

and widely disseminate documentation and descriptive information about the project. All documentation,

including workflow and technical specifications, will be included on the project homepage. Project staff

will disseminate information about methodology and outcomes in journal and newsletter articles and via

conference presentations. The homepage also will include an education module that includes lesson plans

and other information for use by teachers and students in the classroom. UF will market the Everglades

project and the education model aggressively using traditional methods such as web site links, press

releases, public presentations, brochures and other promotional giveaways.

Key Personnel:

John Nemmers, Principal Investigator. Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist,

Department of Special and Area Studies Collections, University of Florida Libraries. 352-273-

2766. johnemmi@uflib.ufl.edu

Dr. Laurie Taylor, Co-Principal Investigator. Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center,

University of Florida Libraries. 352-273-2900. lautayl@uflib.ufl.edu

Performance Objectives:

1. Digitize approximately 90,400 pages; 9,040 letterbook pages; and 250 photo prints/negatives.

2. Keep total project costs below $152,750.92.

3. Revise the EAD finding aids for six archival collections to include links to approximately 99,690

digital objects.

4. Create an educational module with at least 3 lesson plans and a guide to related archival

collections and secondary sources


UF Historical Everglades Project Summary 3









America's Swamp: The Historical Everglades Project

"There are no other Everglades in the world. They are, they have always been, one of the
unique regions of the earth, remote, never wholly known... They are unique also in the
simplicity, the diversity, the related harmony of the forms of life they enclose. The miracle
of the light pours over the green and brown expanse of saw grass and of water, shining and
slow-moving below, the grass and water that is the meaning and the central fact of the
Everglades of Florida. It is a river of grass."
Marjory Stoneman Douglas

"Drain that abominable, pestilence-ridden swamp."
Napoleon Bonaparte Broward


Purposes and Goals of the Project

The University of Florida proposes to digitize its most important historical record collections

documenting the despoiling of the Everglades and the development of South Florida in the late

19th and early 20th centuries. The 3-year project will use cost-effective methods to digitize

approximately 99,690 pages in six archival collections, and to make the digital reproductions

freely available on the Internet. The collections selected for this project document early plans for

draining the Everglades in the 1880s and 1890s, the dredging of canals and subsequent

development of the destroyed wetlands at the start of the 20th century, as well as early attempts

by conservationists to preserve the natural resources of the Everglades.



The six collections featured in this project are part of the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History

and the Archives & Manuscripts Unit of the Department of Special & Area Studies Collections

at the University of Florida Libraries (http://www.uflib.ufl/spec). The P.K. Yonge Library is one

of the state's preeminent Floridiana collections, and is a major repository for correspondence,

reports, diaries, maps, explorer's notes and other archival material pertaining to Florida's

environment, the Everglades, conservation, agriculture, geology, wildlife, waterways, and

forestry. The Archives & Manuscripts Unit in Special Collections houses more than 5000 linear

UF Historical Everglades Project 1









feet of historical records dealing with early settlement and development of the state, Florida's

literary heritage, and agricultural and environmental history. It is also the most important

repository for political papers related to Florida, aside from the State Archives.



The natural and political history of the Everglades and development in South Florida is more

than just a state or regional history. The drainage and overdevelopment of the Everglades, the

destruction of the region's fragile and unique ecosystems, and the loss of source water and other

natural resources, are seen by many environmentalists as one of the worst ecological disasters in

the nation's history. The six Everglades collections document the people and culture of the

United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as defined by the country's societal

values, politics, regionalism, development and growth activities, gender- and race-based

discrimination, and the changing attitudes regarding nature. These sources reveal the modern

story of "America's Swamp" from the time when dredgers and canal-builders assaulted it

through calls for establishing a national park.



Interest in draining and "reclaiming" land in the Everglades began as early as the 1880s, but

major drainage activities were not undertaken until the first two decades of the 20th century.

Two Florida Governors, William Sherman Jennings and Napoleon Bonaparte Broward, would

serve as the primary designers and spokespersons for the draining of the Everglades. In 1904

Governor Broward famously promised to create an "Empire of the Everglades." Of course, in

fulfilling this promise the state would have to destroy the ecological systems by dredging,

creating canals, and altering the flow of water in the world's most famed wetlands. Alarmed at

the potential loss of the Everglades several early conservationists, including Florida's May Mann


UF Historical Everglades Project 2









Jennings, began pushing for the preservation of portions of the Everglades.


The drainage work started by Governors Jennings and Broward was of great interest

internationally, and soon real estate dealers and settlers from around the world rushed in to profit

from the project. The land sales boom in South Florida at the start of the 1920s was almost

unprecedented in the history of the world. So was the rapidity with which it had collapsed by the

end of the decade. Two catastrophic hurricanes in 1926 and 1928 effectively ended the boom,

but many people had already declared the drainage program a bust. By the time the Depression

began in 1929, sales had ceased and the state was forced to halt drainage and dredging activities.



Each of the six collections provides unique and valuable historical evidence regarding the

Everglades in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and it is difficult to research early drainage

and conservation efforts without consulting these collections. The papers of Governor Broward

(http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/Broward.htm) and Governor Jennings

(http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/JenningsWilliamS.htm) form the nucleus of the project as

they were the primary architects for the drainage and reclamation project. Jennings started the

project rolling during his term, drumming up widespread support and resolving a myriad of legal

issues, primarily pertaining to land claims made by the Flagler and Plant railroads. However, it

was Broward who became the driving force for the project. His popularity, his larger-than-life

persona, his attention to the smallest details, and his passion for the project, all combined to

make him the perfect man to spearhead the effort. The two Progressive Era southern democrats

were friends and political allies, and their common goals and accomplishments are documented

extensively in their papers.


UF Historical Everglades Project 3











The May Mann Jennings Papers (http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/JenningsMayMann.htm)

complement those of the two Governors because of her advocacy of the drainage project, and

also because of her marriage to Gov. Jennings. However, the real strength of the collection is that

it documents the conservation movement that developed at the start of the 20th century and the

role of disenfranchised women in developing and lobbying for legislation to protect the

environment. Jennings was a leading member of the women's club movement and an influential

social reformer in Florida and nationwide. As president of the Florida Federation of Women's

Clubs in 1915, she spearheaded the effort to establish the Royal Palm State Park, the precursor to

the Everglades National Park. Her tireless campaigns to preserve portions of the Everglades may

seem at odds with her support of the drainage project, but she was representative of many

conservationists of this era who were able to reconcile seemingly conflicting positions. Thus,

Jennings was able to support the drainage program promoted by Broward and her husband at the

same time that she was arguing for the creation of the Royal Palm State Park.



The Papers of Thomas E. Will (http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/Will.htm) provide two

interesting perspectives regarding the Everglades. The first perspective is at the national level as

Will passionately advocated drainage and land development while living in Washington, D.C.

His enthusiasm for the project developed by Governors Broward and Jennings is well

documented in his correspondence, speeches and writings. The second perspective is at a local

level. Between 1912 and 1914, Will purchased land near Lake Okeechobee and began to develop

the region's first planned town, Okeelanta. He exemplifies those thousands of people who bought

into the dream of reclaimed land in South Florida, and who moved to the region only to find that


UF Historical Everglades Project 4









the drainage program was insufficient. The collection is the perfect complement to the papers of

the two Governors because it documents the early failures of the reclamation project, both in

terms of unrealized development and destruction of ecological systems.



The final two collections, although much smaller in size and narrower in scope, certainly round

out and fill in some gaps in the historical evidence presented by the other collections. The Arthur

E. Morgan Papers (http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/morganae.htm) primarily relate to a

controversy that occurred in 1912 when the U.S. House of Representatives held hearings to

investigate the USDA's involvement in promoting land sales in the Everglades, and Morgan

supplied expert analysis of the drainage project as a civil engineer specializing in flood control.

His collection provides a revealing view of the often questionable practices of real estate sellers

and members of both the state and federal governments as enthusiasm for the drainage of the

Everglades swept the country.



The James E. Ingraham Papers (http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/Ingraham.htm) provide the

viewpoint of a businessman who spent most of his career working in Florida for the railroad

tycoons, Henry Flagler and Henry Plant. The effect that Flagler and Plant had on the

development of Florida cannot be underestimated, as they sought to acquire as much land as

possible for expansion of their rail lines and resort cities being developed along the two Florida

coasts. As part of Ingraham's work for the Plant railroad, he conducted a survey through the

Everglades from Ft. Myers to Miami in 1892. The collection includes correspondence and

photographs pertaining to the Everglades, as well as Ingraham's manuscripts regarding the

Flagler and Plant railroads and their role in developing South Florida.


UF Historical Everglades Project 5











The six Everglades collections are existing holdings of UF, and all have been arranged and

described at the folder level with complete finding aids available online (See Appendix A for

finding aids). All six collections will be digitized in their entirety, although a small number of

boxes will be excluded because they are not within the chronological scope of the project. The

collections date from 1854 to 1963, but the bulk of the materials included in this project will date

from 1877 to 1929. The year 1929 was selected as an end date because it marks the end of the

South Florida land boom and the onset of the Great Depression. The project will reproduce

approximately 99,690 page images. Of that number, approximately 9,040 pages are letterbook

pages and 250 are photographic prints.


UF Historical Everglades Project 6


Collection Extent Exclusions Pages
Napoleon B. Broward Papers, 1879- 10.75 In. ft. (14 11,465
1818 boxes; 4 vol.)


William Sherman Jennings Papers, 13.5 In. ft. (29 32,575
1877-1928 boxes; 16 vol.)


May Mann Jennings Papers, 1889-1963 8 In. ft. (23 2 boxes (0.8 In. 22,500
boxes) ft.) dated 1930-
1963
Thomas E. Will Papers, 1893-1938 14 In. ft. (24 2 boxes (0.8 In. 29,800
boxes) ft.) dated 1930-
1937
Arthur E. Morgan Papers, 1912-1954 0.8 In. ft. (2 2 files dated 1,850
boxes) 1930-1946

James E. Ingraham Papers, 1854-1920 1 In. ft. (2 boxes) 1,500



Total pages: 99,690










The significance of the six Everglades collections is demonstrated best by the high number of

researchers who have used the materials. Over the past three years, 58 researchers have requested

these collections: Broward (11 requests); WS Jennings (9); MM Jennings (22); Will (5);

Ingraham (9); Morgan (2). [Note: The Morgan and Will Papers were not fully described online

until 2007-2008.] The collections support research in many disciplines including environmental

history, political science, business history, women's studies, social studies, the history of

transportation, and ethnic studies and race relations. As awareness of and access to these

collections increases, the potential for multi-discipline use increases. Demand for these

collections has grown in recent years, reflecting the national trend of increased scholarly interest

in the Everglades and environmental history. Several books, articles, and Doctoral dissertations

have been completed over the past ten years using these collections. Most recently, Michael

Grunwald authored The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida, and the Politics ofParadise (New

York: Simon & Schuster, 2006), Jack E. Davis and Raymond Arsenault edited Paradise Lost?

The Environmental History ofFlorida (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2005), and

David McCally published The Everglades: An Environmental History (Gainesville: University

Press of Florida, 1999). See Appendix B for scholarship based on research in these collections.



UF holds all of the necessary rights to digitally reproduce those materials created by Broward,

Jennings, Jennings, Ingraham, Morgan, and Will. Each collection was gifted to UF by the

creators or their heirs, and rights were conveyed to the University as part of the gift agreements.

The collections do include materials not created by these individuals, but investigating the terms

of copyright for many of these items would be an impossible task considering the number of

creators involved. Given the date span of this project (1854-1929; bulk: 1890-1915), it is safe to

UF Historical Everglades Project 7









assume that a significant number of the creators have been deceased for over seventy years. The

primary purpose of this digital project is to enhance scholarship. As these papers primarily are

letters, particularly political and business correspondence, UF believes that this project will not

affect the potential market for these documents. The project will include a disclaimer stating as

much, and will include means for copyright holders to request that offending digital objects be

removed.



UF will increase access to these valuable collections by using cost-effective methods to digitize

and disseminate the digital reproductions freely via the Internet. Currently, the six Everglades

collections are available for use by all researchers, but the materials may only be used in the

Reading Room of Special Collections during normal hours of operation. Digital access will

benefit scholars and researchers who are unable to travel to UF to conduct their research. The

collections will be freely available on the Internet as part of the University of Florida Digital

Collections (UFDC) (http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/).



All imaging will be completed in the Digital Library Center (DLC), a unit ofUF Smathers

Libraries. For all digitized materials, Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS)

metadata will be created. Information about metadata used in the UFDC is available at

http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/technical/Metadata/metadata.htm. The METS files will include

technical and structural data about each image, as well as descriptive and administrative

information. No new descriptive metadata will be created for the digital objects. All descriptive

metadata will be imported and repurposed from existing collection-, series-, and folder-level

descriptions in the Encoded Archival Description (EAD) finding aids for the collections. In a few


UF Historical Everglades Project 8









instances, such as when documents have been described at the item level in the finding aids,

item-level descriptions will be available for use with the digital objects.



Discovery of digitized objects in the Everglades collections can occur in several ways: 1) An

Everglades project homepage made available as part ofUF Digital Collections; 2) EAD finding

aids on the P.K. Yonge Library's homepage; 3) EAD finding aids contributed to Archives

Florida (http://palmm.fcla.edu/afl/), a statewide union database of EAD finding aids; 4) MARC

records with linked 856 fields in online catalogs ofUF, WorldCat, etc.; 5) OAI compliant

metadata harvested by digital repositories; and 6) complete electronic packages that are

contributed to other online collections.



The Everglades homepage will be developed as part of the UFDC's broader digital collection

architecture and is based on the open-source Greenstone Digital Library System produced and

maintained by the New Zealand Library Project at the University of Waikato. UFDC utilizes

Greenstone's strength in metadata and indexing and adds an enhanced display, providing an

easier to use interface while retaining the architectural strength of Greenstone. The enhanced

display includes the ability to separate items by collection, subcollection, and holding institution,

and to then present any of these or any combination of these within a customized display [See:

http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/technical/Architecture/architecture.htm]. The Everglades

homepage will include information about the project, an overview of the six Everglades

collections, and links to the EAD finding aids. Discoverability of the digital objects will be

enhanced by a variety of search options. Researchers can search all of the collections

simultaneously from the main project page, or they can search each collection individually, or


UF Historical Everglades Project 9









they can combine two or more collections in their search scope. In addition, all digital objects in

the Everglades collections will be discoverable via the UFDC home page, so researchers will be

able to search them in combination with all of the other digitized materials held by UF and its

partner institutions.



The structure and context of each collection will be apparent to the researcher using the

collections via the Internet. Researchers will have two major means of accessing the digital

objects on the UF web site: 1) by browsing the EAD finding aids online, or 2) by searching the

collections using the UFDC interface. When browsing the EAD finding aid, researchers will be

able to understand the structure and context of the collections as they browse down from the

collection level to the series, folder, and item levels. Each folder or item level description in the

finding aid will include a link that will open all of the digital objects associated with that

component. For those researchers accessing the digital objects via the UFDC web site, each

digital object will be accompanied by the descriptive metadata from the EAD finding aid, as well

a link to the EAD finding aid. In this way, the user should understand easily where a particular

object is located within the hierarchy of its parent collection, and they also will have the ability

to browse the finding aid.



To increase discovery of and access to the six Everglades collections, UF will contribute digital

objects and metadata to the Everglades Digital Library (http://everglades.fiu.edu/). The EDL is a

project of the Everglades Information Network, a collaborative effort of the Florida International

University Libraries, the Florida Center for Library Automation, the Everglades National Park,

and numerous other agencies and research organizations. The EDL was established in 1996 to


UF Historical Everglades Project 10









support research, education, decision making, and information resource management within the

greater Everglades community. Since that time, the project has grown to serve patrons from

around the world with digital collections, the online reference service 'Ask an Everglades

Librarian', and other online information services.



In practice consistent for all UF digital projects, redundant digital archives are maintained. An

in-house DLC archive is created by burning TIFF masters, derivatives, and METS files to gold-

based DVDs, which are retained in environmentally controlled storage (cf. Guidelines at

http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html). Disks and their contents are logged in the DLC

Tracking Database, which queues disks and files for inspection every 3 years and migration

every 10 years or upon format obsolescence. The primary archives is maintained by the Florida

Center for Library Automation (FCLA). Completed by the FCLA in 2005, the Florida Digital

Archive (FDA) (http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/index.htm) is available at no cost to

Florida's public university libraries. The software programmed to support the FDA is modeled

on the widely accepted Open Archival Information System. It is a dark archive and no public

access functions are provided. It supports the preservation functions of format normalization,

mass format migration and migration on request. As the Everglades objects are loaded into the

UFDC for public access, a command in the METS header directs a copy of the files to the

Florida Digital Archive (FDA). The process of forwarding original uncompressed TIFF images

to the FDA is the key component in UF's plan to store, maintain and protect electronic data for

the long term.



Although the primary goal of the project is to increase use of this important documentary


UF Historical Everglades Project 11









heritage, this project also will ensure the continued preservation of these collections. The original

documents will remain open to researchers, but requests for reproductions received from off-site

researchers will be reduced, and there may be a reduction in requests from researchers on

campus as well. A reduction in requests for physical access will result in less handling and a

reduced possibility of risk to the documents.



This project creates exciting new areas of exploration for the UF Libraries. In particular, UF is

interested in investigating new methods of displaying descriptive information online and making

archival descriptions more user-friendly through the use of social networking technology.

Because this project does not include the creation of item-level description metadata, it is ideal

for experimentation involving researcher-contributed metadata. Following completion of the

project, researchers can enhance discoverability and comprehension of the minimal metadata by

contributing descriptions for objects. UF has already begun planning and development for a

tagging and contribution system with an editing or validation structure that would allow for

contributions from authenticated and anonymous users. An editorial system will accept

contributions automatically from approved users, and place all other contributions within an

editorial system where contributions will be vetted and, once approved, will then be added to the

existing metadata. This process allows established researchers to easily contribute their expertise;

new researchers to grow their experience through their contributions; and all others to contribute

in meaningful ways with or without attribution based on their own preferences. In particular, it is

anticipated that these materials will be used in the classroom and an obvious experiment would

involve students contributing item-level descriptions as part of their coursework.


UF Historical Everglades Project 12









Link paths and social tagging can be used to improve navigation of the project pages. UF also

plans to make use of anonymous usage statistics in server log data to identify high-demand

materials in the collections. Once identified, these materials potentially can be "pushed" to users.

Additionally, user search patterns can point to areas of the collection where the high demand

justifies the creation of authoritative item-level descriptive metadata. Likewise, staff can identify

materials with high research value that are under-utilized and develop methods to highlight those

items or otherwise improve their visibility.



Significance and Relationship to NHPRC Goals and Objectives

This project directly addresses the Commission's mission, vision and goals. First, it makes

records of historical value and national significance freely accessible to a wide public audience.

Although these records have been accessible to researchers in previous years, access has been

limited by geographical and operational factors. The creation of digital surrogates ensures broad

use of materials that certainly enhance our knowledge of the nation's history and culture.

Second, the project promotes the use of the country's documentary heritage. Project staff will

work with faculty in academic units at UF and other educational institutions to ensure that

students are aware of and can make use of these resources. Additionally, the project will be

heavily promoted to historians and scholars in various disciplines. Third, the project guarantees

the long term preservation of historical record collections so that they may be used by

generations to come. The valuable historical evidence will be preserved in digital format, and the

original materials also will be benefit from the reduction in physical handling. Finally, UF will

explore and evaluate new methods for cost-effective reproduction of archival materials.


UF Historical Everglades Project 13









Plan of Work

The activities needed to successfully complete this project draw on the expertise of staff in

multiple units of the George A. Smathers Libraries; the involvement of each is indicated below.

Each of the six collections will be processed separately as discrete units so that no co-mingling

of materials can occur. An entire collection will be processed by a specific unit before it moves

into another processing area. The following ordered activities will be used to process each

collection:

1. John Nemmers, Flo Turcotte, and Jim Cusick of the Special Collections Department will

select and conduct a folder level review of each collection.

2. John Freund and Cathy Martyniak of the Preservation Department will do an initial

conservation review of the materials making note of any special handling requirements.

3. The collection will be transferred to the Digital Library Center (DLC) for processing,

serving, and archiving. The normal sequence of digital project activities include:

registering materials into the DLC tracking database, imaging, image processing and

quality control, mark-up, data transfer, and archiving. A more thorough delineation of

these activities may be found in the supplementary attachments: Work Plan and Digital

Materials Preservation Plan.

4. The collection will be returned to the Special Collections Department.

Staff in the Digital Library Center have ten years of experience handling all types of formats, and

all imaging is done in accordance with established professional standards. Specifications for

imaging (i.e., scanning, text, and metadata) are based on digitization specifications for PALMM

Collections (http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/standres.html#guidedig) that, in turn, are based on

the principles and recommendations of Moving Theory into Practice: Digital Imaging for


UF Historical Everglades Project 14









Libraries and Archives (Anne R. Kenney and Oya Y. Rieger [Mountain View, CA : Research

Libraries Group, 2000] http://www.rlg.org/preserv/mtip2000.html) and Cornell University's

Digital Imaging Tutorial (http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/contents.htm).

These specifications are optimized for digital archiving practices as outlined by the Florida

Digital Archive (http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/) and also optimized for data exchange with

or harvesting by other digital libraries such as the U.S. National Science Foundation's National

Science Digital Library (http://www.nsdl.org/), the U.S. Institute for Museum and Library

Services' National Leadership Grant collection (http://imlsdcc.grainger.uiuc.edu/), and OAlster

(http://www.oaister.org/) at the University of Michigan.



Products

This digitization project will produce a new Historical Everglades Project homepage providing

access to almost 100,000 new digital objects. In addition, the EAD finding aids for the six

archival collections will be revised to include links to these digital objects. As part of the project,

UF will create and widely disseminate documentation and descriptive information about the

project. All documentation, including workflow and technical specifications, will be included on

the project homepage. Project staff will disseminate information about methodology and

outcomes in journal and newsletter articles and via conference presentations. All slideshow

presentations will be included in the documentation on the project homepage.



The homepage also will include an education module that includes lesson plans and other

information for use by teachers and students in the classroom. For an example of a similar

education module, see Spanish Colonial St. Augustine: A Resource for Teachers


UF Historical Everglades Project 15









(http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/?s=teachers). The Everglades module will include an historical

timeline, lesson plans, graphic materials, and a guide to primary sources and other secondary

reading materials. UF will market the Everglades project and the education model aggressively

using traditional methods such as web site links, press releases, public presentations, brochures

and other promotional giveaways.


Personnel Qualifications

Project personnel are listed below with brief statements of project responsibilities. Additional

information about each project member, including qualifications and competencies, is available

in the attached resumes. Responsibilities for each team member are described in the Plan of

Work and in supplemental materials.



John Nemmers, Principal Investigator. Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist,

Department of Special and Area Studies Collections, University of Florida Libraries.

Responsible for coordinating selection, conservation assessments, and compiling and

submitting all project reports.

Dr. Laurie Taylor, Co-Principal Investigator. Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library

Center, University of Florida Libraries. Responsible for overseeing all aspects of the

digitization process in the DLC. She will coordinate all project activities with John

Nemmers and other members of the digitization team. She will collaborate on creating an

education module for the project.

Dr. James Cusick. Curator of the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, Department of

Special and Area Studies Collections. Responsible for establishing pre-imaging

procedures, including selection and conservation assessments. He will collaborate on

UF Historical Everglades Project 16









creating an education module for the project.

* Flo Turcotte, Research Services Archivist, Archives and Manuscripts, Department of

Special and Area Studies Collections. Responsible for establishing pre-imaging

procedures, including selection and conservation assessments.

* Lourdes Santamaria-Wheeler, Digital Production Supervisor, Digital Library Center.

Responsible for supervising scanning technicians and overseeing imaging processes

utilizing flatbed and high-speed scanners.

* Jane Pen, Quality Control Unit Head, Digital Library Center. Ensures the quality of the

digital objects and their corresponding structural metadata files. She will supervise

quality control technicians to assure highest quality and rapid throughput of digitizing

products.

* Matthew Mariner, Text Processing Unit Head, Digital Library Center. Supervises all

text processing, archiving and data transfer processes. He will coordinate data transfer for

archival, preservation, and redundancy.

* Cathy Martyniak, Department Chair, Preservation Department. Responsible for

coordinating digital archiving with the Florida Digital Archive (FDA). She also will

inspect materials for preservation concerns prior to imaging.

* John Freund, Conservation Unit Head, Preservation Department. Responsible for

conservation activities. He will evaluate all materials to ensure optimal material quality

for digitization and for long-term preservation.

* Marilyn Ochoa, Assistant Head, Education Library, University of Florida Libraries.

Collaborates on the creation of education modules.


UF Historical Everglades Project 17









Performance Objectives

The project will be evaluated on UF's ability to meet the following performance objectives:

1. Digitize approximately 90,400 pages; 9,040 letterbook pages; and 250 photographic

items.

2. Keep total project costs below $152,750.92.

3. Revise the EAD finding aids for six archival collections to include links to

approximately 99,690 digital objects.


4. Create an educational module with at least 3 lesson plans and a guide to related archival

collections and secondary sources


Following the grant period, the project will be evaluated on several factors that are not linked

to specific numerical performance objectives. Long term success of the project will be

determined, in part, on evaluations and comments submitted by researchers either online or in

Special Collections. Anonymous statistics in server log data will be used to track online

researcher demand over time, and research registration forms in Special Collections will be

used to track on-site researcher demand. Staff also will evaluate the quantity and quality of any

item-level descriptions contributed by researchers using the participatory tagging and

contribution system. This evaluative data will inform future cost-effective digitization

activities.


UF Historical Everglades Project 18









Digital Preservation Plan

In practice consistent for all UF digital projects, redundant digital archives are maintained. An

in-house DLC archive is created by burning TIFF masters, derivatives, and METS files to gold-

based DVDs, which are retained in environmentally controlled storage (cf. Guidelines at

http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html). Disks and their contents are logged in the DLC

Tracking Database, which queues disks and files for inspection every 3 years and migration

every 10 years or upon format obsolescence. The primary archives is maintained by the Florida

Center for Library Automation (FCLA). Completed by the FCLA in 2005, the Florida Digital

Archive (FDA) (http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/index.htm) is available at no cost to

Florida's public university libraries. The software programmed to support the FDA is modeled

on the widely accepted Open Archival Information System. It is a dark archive and no public

access functions are provided. It supports the preservation functions of format normalization,

mass format migration and migration on request. As the Everglades objects are loaded into the

UFDC for public access, a command in the METS header directs a copy of the files to the

Florida Digital Archive (FDA). The process of forwarding original uncompressed TIFF images

to the FDA is the key component in UF's plan to store, maintain and protect electronic data for

the long term.



[11 As reported in: University of Leeds. Representation and Rendering Project. "Survey and

assessment of sources of information on file formats and software documentation: final report"

(2003) http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uploadeddocuments/FileFormatsreport.pdf







Plan of Work


Time Schedule of Activities


Activity Jan-Mar Apr-Jun Jul-Sep Oct-Dec Jan-Mar Apr-Jun Jul-Sep Oct-Dec Jan-Mar Apr-Jun Jul-Sep Oct-Dec
2009 2009 2009 2009 2010 2010 2010 2010 2011 2011 2011 2011



Selection &
folder review



Conservation
Assessment



Digitization Actions




Hiring & training of imaging & quality control technicians



Record
ingest to Broward/Jennings, M.M./Will Jennings, W.S./lngraham/Morgan
tracking



Imaging Broward/Jennings, M.M./Will Jennings, W.S./lngraham/Morgan



Quality
Control



Package
Markup/
Deployment/
Archiving








Conservation
assessment



Reshelving of
collections



Creation of
home page,
education
modules, and
project
documents


Work Plan 1










Workflow


Selection, preparation & EAD data ingested Dglral.on Digital Package Deployment to
Conservation review into DLC Tracking database Quality Control Final review web servers & digital archiving


Selection, preparation and conservation review
Six collections have been selected for digitization. Special Collections staff (John Nemmers, Flo Turcotte,
and Jim Cusick) will complete a pre-imaging checklist. The staff will physically examine each archival
container to identify potential special-needs materials such as fragile documents, photographic images, etc.
The staff will ensure that the physical arrangement of the folders in each box is identical to the arrangement
described in the EAD finding aid. Special Collections staff will include written notes and instructions for the
DLC staff when delivering materials for digitization. Special Collections staff will use the checklist to "check
out" each archival container prior to imaging. Boxes will be transported to the DLC from Special Collections
after they have been checked out. If a patron requests use of a box while it is in the DLC, the box can be
temporarily retrieved for the patron to use in the Special Collections Reading Room. Prior to digitization, any
items of particular concern will be reviewed by members of the Preservation Department (John Freund and
Cathy Martyniak) and handling requirements will be noted. The Digital Library Center (DLC) is located in
the same building and floor as the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections.

Digitization Actions
Tracking
Once a collection is received by the DLC, the existing EAD finding aid data will be imported into the Digital
Library Tracking Database (DLC Tracking) and repurposed from existing collection-, series-, and
folder-level descriptions for the collections. In a few instances, where individual items are described in the
EAD finding aids, item-level descriptions will be available for use with the digital objects. Descriptive
metadata elements in the existing EAD finding aids that will be repurposed include: Collection Title,
Collection Dates, Collection Originator, Series Title, Series Date, Folder Title, Folder Date(s). For all
digitized materials, national Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) metadata will be
created. The basic METS files are created and enhanced automatically as an individual folder moves through
the digitization chain from this point on.

The DLC Tracking database assigns a unique eight digit Bibliographic Identifier (BibID) to each folder
processed, and that BibID will be used to track the item throughout the digitization process. For example, the
"Business Correspondence 1908-1910" folder from the Thomas E. Will Papers might be assigned
UF00096543. Folders will be retained in their original numbered boxes, temporary BibIDs will be attached to
each folder, and the box will be moved to the digitizing unit.

Imaging
The imaging unit is supervised by Lourdes Santamaria-Wheeler, who has extensive experience in hiring,
training, and supervising student scanners for image capture and enhancement. Scanning technicians will be
hired from grant funds. Technicians will be hired based on their skills and understanding of digital image


Work Plan 2






capture and color correction. Santamaria-Wheeler will supervise and as necessary provide advanced training
to the imaging technicians. All items within folders will be digitized to meet the requirements of the item's
physical format. Photographs will be scanned at 600 dpi, 8 bit grayscale. Individual pages will be scanned on
Copibook or flatbed scanners at minimum of 300 dpi, 24 bit color. The letterbooks will be scanned on
Copibooks at 300 dpi, 24 bit color. Capturing letterbook pages will necessitate that each page is backed with
a blank white sheet to minimize bleed through. The production imaging unit performs initial image review
of all pages, adjusting the image quality as necessary, including adjustment of levels, skew, and contrast.
Advanced image manipulation will be performed as needed and includes level adjustment and color
replacement to minimize the appearance of aging and foxing. Images will be captured as uncompressed TIFF
files (ITU6.0) at 100% scale; the current de facto standard for electronic image archives. Imaging equipment
will be maintained by the production imaging unit. Both flatbed and CopiBook scanners will be calibrated
regularly in order to maintain color fidelity and optimum image results.

Quality Control
After initial scanning and image enhancement discussed above, all aspects of image control and digital
package creation are controlled by the UFDC Toolkit, an integrated software package that controls derivative
image formation, quality control review at the package level, and deployment to the UFDC server. Jane Pen,
head of the Quality Control Unit, hires, trains, and supervises a staff of quality control technicians. Her staff
use Toolkit Pre-QC function which creates jpg, jpg2, and jpg thumbnail images. A second program, the
Quality Control tool, displays thumbnails of each image in sequential order. These images are reviewed.
Errors are noted and returned to the imaging unit for scan/rescan of the pages. If there are no errors, the files
go to the Metadata Control Unit. At this point, the initial METS file contains basic structural and
administrative metadata, as well as the descriptive metadata repurposed from the EAD files.

Digital Package Markup & Deployment
Once quality control has been completed, the digital package moves to the Markup Unit. For this project,
Matt Mariner, the Unit head will train digital package technicians in procedures that ensure all package level
metadata will conform to the national METS, our local extension schemas, and to requirements for serving in
UFDC, preservation in the Florida Digital Archive, and integrating of packages into the Everglades Online
Library. As appropriate, other project and resource specific extension schemas may be created. Users can
view the METS file for any item loaded in UFDC by selecting METSMetadata under the Technical Data
menu on the navigation bar to the left of an item being viewed. With final package approval, the Metadata
Control Unit uses the GoUFD module of the DLC toolkit to initiate the FTPing of the package to the UFDC
server for public access and metadata harvesting, sends the package to the Florida Digital Archive for
preservation archiving, and burns the package to gold-based DVDs for local archival storage. Cathy
Martyniak, head of Preservation, supervises this process. A fuller explanation of the archiving and
preservation is given in the supplementary document "Preservation Plan. "

The above procedures have been used successfully to process more than 1.7 million pages into the UFDC
collections, available at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc

Creation of Home Page, Conservation and Re-shelving
Laurie Taylor (DLC) and John Nemmers will be responsible for creating the project home page, including all
project documentation and resources. Taylor will implement participatory technologies, including the user
contribution system. Jim Cusick, Laurie Taylor, and Marilyn Ochoa will create the education module.

Following digitization, John Freund will review all documents flagged by imaging staff for conservation
assessment and take appropriate measures. John Nemmers will check materials back into Special Collections,
ensuring that boxes and folders are in order, and re-shelving materials.


Work Plan 3









Vita of: John R. Nemmers
Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist
Assistant University Librarian

Work Experience:

University of Florida
George A. Smathers Libraries, Special and Area Studies Collections
From: August 2003 To: Present
Title: Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist
Arranges and describes archival and manuscripts collections and
supervises other department personnel involved in the arrangement
and description process. Writes procedures for the arrangement and
description of archives and manuscripts. Works with web-based
metadata systems, such as EAD and METS, to create online finding-
aids for the department's archival and V/M collections. Creates catalog
records for archives and manuscripts. Reviews catalog records
created by other department personnel. Participates in the public
services program by providing general reference services as well as
advanced reference services for archives and manuscripts. Works with
curators to incorporate and interpret archival materials into exhibits.
Recommends and requests preservation assistance when necessary.

Florida State University
Claude Pepper Library, 636 W. Call Street, Tallahassee, FL
From: August 1998 To: July 2003
Title: Project Archivist
Responsible for the creation and maintenance of finding aid
database for the Claude Pepper Collection. Supervised multi-year
digitization project to provide digital surrogates of materials in the
Pepper Collection and full-text search capabilities to patrons.
Processed manuscript collections, including additions to existing
collections. Assisted in developing outside funding sources for
projects of the Pepper Center and FSU Libraries Special
Collections Department. Developed and created Encoded
Archival Description (EAD) versions of guides to collections.
Supervised preservation/access reformatting projects for
audiovisual and photographic materials in the collection.

Education:

BA in History Florida State University Date: 1996
MS in Library Studies Florida State University Date: 1998
Specialist in Education Florida State University Date: 1998

Publications:

Refereed:

"Testing the Federated Searching Waters: A Usability Study of MetaLib"
(with Marilyn Ochoa, Rae Jesano, Carrie Newsom, Maryellen


Nemmers 1









O'Brien and Paul Victor, Jr.). Journal of Web Librarianship v.1 no. 3
(2007): 47-66.

"Opening Archives: Improving Access to Hidden Archival Collections in
Florida" (with Elizabeth Konzak and Chuck Thomas). Florida
Libraries 49 no. 2 (Fall 2006): 16-19.

"The Usability of Online Archival Resources: The Polaris Project Finding Aid"
(with Burt Altman). American Archivist 64 no. 1 (Spring/Summer
2001): 121-131.

Non-refereed:

Public Services in Special Collections (with Florence Turcotte). SPEC Kit
296 (Washington, D.C.: Association of Research Libraries), 2006.

Best Practice Guidelines for the Implementation of EAD Version 2002 in
Florida Institutions (available at:
http://www.fcla.edu/dlini/OpeningArchives/pdf/FloridaEADguidelines.pdf
), March 2006.

Florida's Political Past: A Guide to Manuscript Collections, Archival Records,
and Other Primary Historical Documents of Florida's Politicians. An
annotated bibliography (available at:
http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/political/flpols.htm), March 2005.

Papers, Speeches, Presentations:

"Archival Description and EAD." Presented at the Society of Florida
Archivists Annual Meeting, May 2006.

"Strategies for the Creation and Maintenance of EAD XML Finding Aids."
Presented at the Society of Florida Archivists Annual Meeting, April
2005.

"Uncovering Buried Treasure: Making Primary Sources Available" (with
Elizabeth Konzak and Chuck Thomas). Presented at the Florida Library
Association Conference, April 2007.


Grants:
2006. "Enhancing Access to the Jeremie Papers." Smathers Libraries Mini
Grants Program. Amount funded: $3,750. Funding dates: November
2006 October 2007. Role: Principal Investigator.

2005. "Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida."
Department of State Division of Library and Information Services -
Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA). Amount funded: $34,000.
Funding dates: October 2005 September 2006. Role: Steering
Committee chair and Regional Trainer.


Nemmers 2









Laurie N. Taylor
Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center
University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL 32611-7007
EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT
Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center, University of Florida Libraries,
Gainesville, FL, May 2007-
Associate Director, Flexible Learning, Division of Continuing Education, University of
Florida, Gainesville,
FL, May 2006-May 2007
Instructor, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL, August 2000-May 2006

SELECTED PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES
Editorial Review Board Member for the International Journal of Gaming and Computer-
Mediated Simulations.

SELECTED REFEREED PUBLICATIONS
Playing the Past: Video Games, History, and Memory, co-edited with Zach Whalen.
Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, forthcoming 2008.
"Bioactive,"in Gaming in Academic Libraries Casebook, co-authored with Sara Russel
Gonzalez, Valrie Davis, Carrie Newsom, Chelsea Dinsmore, Cynthia Frey, and Kathryn
Kennedy. Ed. Amy Harris and Scott Rice. ACRL, forthcoming 2008.
"Snow White in the City: Teaching Fables, Nursery Rhymes, and Revisions in Graphic
Novels." Approaches to Teaching the Graphic Novel. Ed. Stephen E Tabachnick. New
York: MLA, forthcoming 2008.
"Gaming Ethics, Rules, Etiquette and Learning." Handbook of Research on Effective
Electronic Gaming in Education. Ed. Richard E. Ferdig. Information Science Reference,
forthcoming 2008.
"Making Nightmares into New Fairytales: Goth Comics as Children's Literature." The
Gothic in Children's Literature: Haunting the Borders. Eds. Anna Jackson, Karen Coats,
and Roderick McGillis. New York: Routledge, 2008: 195-208.
"Console Wars: Console and Computer Games." The Player's Realm: Studies on the
Culture of Video Games and Gaming. Eds. J. Patrick Williams and Jonas Heide Smith.
Jefferson, NC: McFarland Press, 2007: 223-237.
"Cameras, Radios, and Butterflies: the Influence and Importance of Fan Networks for
Game Studies." Fibreculture Journal 8 (2006).
"Playing in Neverland: Peter Pan Video Game Revisions," collaboratively written with
Cathlena Martin, in J M. Barrie's Peter Pan In and Out of Time: A Children's Classic at
100. Eds. Carole Anita Tarr and Donna White. Scarecrow Press, 2006.
"Positive Features of Video Games," in Handbook of Children, Culture, and Violence.
Eds. Nancy E. Dowd, Dorothy G. Singer, and Robin Fretwell Wilson. Thousand Oaks,
CA: Sage, 2005. 247-265.









"Gaming's Non-Digital Predecessors," collaboratively written with Cathlena Martin, in
The International Digital Media & Arts Association Journal 2.1 (Spring 2005): 25-29.
"Practicing What We Teach: Collaborative Writing and Teaching Teachers to Blog," co-
authored with Cathlena Martin, in Lore: an E-Journalfor Teachers of Writing, Fall
2004.
"Open Source and Academia," co-authored with Brendan Riley, in Computers and
Composition Online. Spring 2004.
"When Seams Fall Apart: Video Game Space and the Player," in Game Studies: the
International Jounral of Computer Game Research 3.2 (Dec. 2003).

SELECTED PRESENTATIONS

"Digital Library Navigation Position Paper" at the Codework Conference, Center for
Literary Computing Workshop. Morgantown, WVU: April 3-6, 2008.
"Choices for Building Digital Libraries" at the College of the Bahamas' Virtual Library
Committee at the College of the Bahamas, Nassau, Bahamas; Mar. 3, 2008.
"File Formats 101" at the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting, in the
PARS Digital Preservation Group Meeting, Philadelphia, PA: Jan. 13, 2007.
"Why Are Comic Books Not Commonly Used in the Classroom? What Subjects Are
Suitable For Comics?" presentation at the "Comics in the Classroom: Understanding the
Educational Uses of Comic Books" Jewish Museum of Florida's Professional
Development Workshop, Miami Beach, FL; Oct. 21, 2007.
"Laws, Ethics, Unwritten Rules, & Etiquette" at the "World Building: Space and
Community" Game Studies Conference, Gainesville, FL; Mar. 1-2, 2007.
"Constructions and Reconstructions of the Gothic" at the MLA Conference, Washington,
DC; Dec. 27-30, 2005.
"Gaming Girls Playing with Power: Possibility Spaces in Game Design and Game Play"
at the Society for Literature and Science Conference, Duke; Oct. 14-17, 2004.










Curriculum Vitae of


James G. Cusick

Curator, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida and
Acting Chair, Department of Special & Area Studies Collections
University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 273-1774
igcusick@ufl.edu

Work Experience

University of Florida George A. Smathers Library

July 2007 to July 2008
Acting (Interim) Chair, Special & Area Studies Collections

1998 to Present
Curator, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History

University of North Florida

1997
Adjunct Professor, classroom lecturer, Introduction to Spanish Colonial History,
Department of History
Adjunct Professor, classroom lecturer, Introduction to North American Indian
Cultures, Department of Anthropology, Sociology and Criminology

Duke University, Perkins Library

1996
Postdoctoral Fellow, assistant bibliographer for Latin American collections, Perkins
Library; archivist/librarian in training, Department of Special
Collections/Government Documents


Education
B.S. in Journalism Northwestern 1981
M.A. in Anthropology UF 1989
Ph.D. in Anthropology UF 1993
Post-Doctorate Duke 1996


Cusick -1









Honors
2004 James J. Horgan Book Award, Florida Historical Society

Publications

2003
The Other War of 1912: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish East
Florida. University Press of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. Reissued 2006 by the University of
Georgia Press.

1991-2000 publications available upon request

Grants

Funded, January 2005. Florida Humanities Council "Landmarks of American History"
award from NEH for teacher workshops in Florida history and supporting web resources,
$11,000 subcontract from NEH/Florida Humanities Council to the Digital Library Center,
UF.

Funded, January 2004. Florida Humanities Council "Landmarks of American History"
award from NEH for teacher workshops in Florida history and supporting web resources,
$12,000 subcontract from NEH/Florida Humanities Council to the Digital Library Center,
UF.

Funded, November 2003. East Florida Papers Calendar Project, grant awarded by the St.
Augustine Foundation, Flagler College, to digitize the card calendar index to this Spanish
colonial collection and to convert it into a searchable online database. Grant writer and
project manager, $5000.

Funded, April-June, 2003. Contract with the National Underground Railroad Freedom
Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, to create a bibliographic database on primary sources
documenting slave escapes and resistance to slavery in Florida, 1650 to 1860, with John
Ingram. Project manager, $12,000 awarded.

Teaching

Lead Instructor, Summer Teacher Workshops, "Spanish St. Augustine," NEH/Florida
Humanities Council Landmarks of America program (2004-2007), Florida Humanities
Council program (2008).


Cusick 2









Vita of: Florence M. Turcotte
Research Services Archivist
Assistant University Librarian

Work Experience:

University of Florida
Department of Special and Area Studies Collections
George A. Smathers Libraries
P. O. Box 117007 Gainesville, FL 32611-7007
From: March 2005 To: Present
Title: Research Services Archivist
Scope of duties:
Participates in the department's public services program by providing
general reference services as well as advanced reference consultation
services for archives and manuscripts, both on-site and in response to
remote queries. Participates in the department's bibliographic instruction
program. Arranges and describes archival and manuscript collections.
Works with web-based metadata systems, such as EAD, to create online
finding-aids for the department's archival and manuscripts collections.
Creates catalog records for archives and manuscripts. Promotes the use
of collections by students, faculty, and scholars through instruction,
exhibits, publications, and other means. Recommends and requests
preservation assistance when necessary.

University of Florida
Department of Special and Area Studies Collections
George A. Smathers Libraries
P. O. Box 117007
Gainesville, FL 32611-7007
From: February 1997 To: March 2005
Title: Senior Library Technical Assistant
Scope of duties:
Responsible for the supervision of 1-2 student assistants, the
transfer and processing of incoming rare book items, stacks
management duties, and maintaining the department's 25
desktop and 2 laptop workstations. Provided comprehensive
reference and other public services at the service desk.

Continuing Education:

Modern Archives Institute, Winter 2006, National Archives and Records Administration,
Washington DC.

A.B.D. Fall 1996-2003. Florida State University, Department of Religion.

Ph.D coursework, 1993-1995. University of Pittsburgh, Department of Religious Studies.

Completed Certificate in Theological and Liturgical Studies, 1986. Georgetown University,


Turcotte 1










School of Summer and Continuing Education.


Publications:
Refereed:

Outreach in Special Collections Librarianship. Chapter in Academic Library
Outreach: Beyond the Campus Walls. Edited by Nancy Courtney. (Westport,
Conn.: Libraries Unlimited, forthcoming, January 2009).



Non-refereed:

The Uncollected Writings of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (Book Review). Edited by
Rodger L. Tarr and Brent E. Kinser. Florida Historical Quarterly: v.85, no. 4
(Spring 2007), p. 274-6.

"Libraries inaugurate Mini Grants Program with Four Awards", Library News,
January 2007.

Public Services in Special Collections. SPEC Kit, with John Nemmers.
(Washington, D.C.: Association of Research Libraries, November, 2006).

The Apocalypse in Art St. Augustine Catholic Dec 1999/Jan 2000: 12.


Turcotte 2






Phone (352) 273-2912
E-mail jpen@uflib.ufl.edu


Jane Pen




EDUCATION


1998-present: Santa Fe Community College, Gainesville, FL
Degree Received AS Spring/2002 GPA 3.9
Major Computer Information Systems Analysis

Classes taken Introduction to computing, Introduction to Internet, Introduction to networking, Microcomputer
architecture, Data processing math, Visual Basic I & II, Programming in C++, Access 2000, Operating system, Excel
2000, PC management, Professional development for Information Technology Students, Document productions
(Microsoft office applications), Adobe Photoshop, Firework, and Web authoring (Dreamweaver/XHTML).

1979-1983: Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan
Degree Bachelor of Arts
Major Educational Media and Library Science
(The highest degree received for library degree in Taiwan at the time was the Bachelor level of studies)


WORK EXPERIENCE

2001-present: Quality Control unit head. Digital Library Center, University ofFlorida
Ensure the quality of the physical units of digitization (TIFF, JPEG and other images) and their corresponding
structural metadata files for digital projects excluding newspaper. Supervise student workers working in the
Quality Control unit. Help streamline processes to assure highest quality and rapid throughput of digitizing
products.

1997-2001: Library assistant. Alachua County Library District, Gainesville, FL
Assisted patrons with information inquiry, resolved account problems and customer services functions, using
SIRSI system. Duties also included office equipment maintenance.

1996-1997: Library reference assistant. Schaumburg High School, Schaumburg, IL
Assisted students/classes with reference inquiry/instruction, helped media center director with material
processing. Also assisted computer lab manager with equipment maintenance.

1988-1996: Cataloger. Follett Library Resources Co., McHenry, IL
Assisted department head with cataloging k-12 materials and bibliographies consulting with school librarians
and other customers. Reduced production cost to over $5000 per budget year by rearranging workflow and
organizing presentation facility.

CERTIFICATION AND MEMBERSHIP

UF Supervisory Challenge certificate 2006
MOUS certificate in Microsoft Excel 2000


Pen- 1










Lourdes Santamaria
2735 SW 35 Place #1806
Gainesville, FL 32608
(786) 423- 4901
lousant(aiuflib.ufl.edu




EDUCATION

2005 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Pursuing Masters of Arts in Museum Studies
1999 2003 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Photography, Minor in Art History Cum Laude

EMPLOYMENT
2005 Scanning Supervisor (Program Assistant), Digital Library Center, Gainesville, FL
Supervision of imaging process and staff using flat bed and high-speed scanners
Preparation of archival and library materials for digital imaging

2003 2004 Digital Technician, Flair Pro Color Lab, Gainesville, FL
Set up digital files for photographic printing, including color correction, image sizing, and digital
manipulations
*Responsible for photographing, researching, describing and listing store inventory on eBay online
auctions

2001 Re-shelving Personnel, Marston Science Library, Gainesville, FL
Re-shelve returned library books in corresponding sections and maintain current inventory lists


EXHIBITIONS

2006 FACC Juried Student Arts Exhibition, University Gallery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Juror:
Bonnie Clearwater, Director and Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, FL.

2006 Intolerance, Center for Visual Arts Gallery, Brookdale Community College, Lincroft, NJ. Juror: Wendell T.
Brooks, Professor, The College of New Jersey

2005 Intolerance, Printmaking Council of New Jersey, Somerville, NJ. Juror: Wendell T. Brooks, Professor, The
College of New Jersey

2004 Women in the Middle: Borders, Barriers, Intersections, UWM Union Art Gallery, Milwaukee, WI. Jurors:
Helen R. Klebesadel, Marianna Nunn, Clarissa Sligh, Gail Tremblay, Flo Oy Wong

2004 Cambridge Art Association National Prize Show, University Place Gallery, Cambridge, MA. Juror: Robert
Fitzpatrick, Pritzker Director, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, IL

2004 Photowork '04, The Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie, NY. Juror: Jennifer Blessing, Curator, Solomon R.


Santamaria 1










Guggenheim Museum New York, NY

2003 Visual AIDS: Postcards From the Edge, Galerie Lelong, New York, NY

2003 Inherited Tourism, The Art Store, Gainesville, FL

2003 FACC Juried Student Arts Exhibition, University Gallery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Juror: Bob
Hanning, Curator, Graphicstudio

2002 Most Food Comes by Boat, Sergio Vega Studio, Gainesville, FL

2002 Empathy: An Exercise in Location, The Art Store, Gainesville, FL

2002 E\L, wii,. But the Bathroom Sink, The Art Store, Gainesville, FL

2002 Digital Works, The Art Store, Gainesville, FL

2001 Sergio's Ocular Migraine, The Ark, Gainesville, FL

2001 Postcards to New York, Macy Gallery, Columbia University, New York, NY

1998 Early Images '98, Borders Gallery, Coral Gables, FL
M-DCPS Juried Photographic Exhibition


Santamaria 2









Matthew C. Mariner
Unit Head, Text Processing
Digital Library Center
George A. Smathers Libraries. University of Florida
P.O. Box 117007
Gainesville, FL 32611-7007 USA
(352) 273-2900
marinermc@.qmail.com

work experience:

2006 Text Unit Head (2007-Present)
Institutional Repository Coordinator (2006-2007)
Digital Library Center, University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL

As Institutional Repository Coordinator:
-Sought content to include in UF Institutional Repository
-Worked with Collection Managers to devise Repository goals and schema
*Processed IR materials using various proprietary DLC software (XML template for processing
metadata; quality control application for pagination and document structure processing)

As Text Unit Head:

*Maintain and supervise the operation of two Optical Character Recognition machines running 6
engines of PrimeOCR software.
*Edit and prepare document metadata according to University of Florida Digital Collections
standards
*Maintain and supervise all loading of materials in UFDC and subsequent error identification and
correction.
-Archiving of each "package" on DVD and Florida Digital Archive via FCLA FTP.

2001-2004 Library Aide- St. Petersburg Public Library, Main; St. Petersburg, FL

-Maintained stacks and shelved books.
-Assisted patrons on information retrieval
-Assisted in Reader's Advisory
-Checked out books to patrons and assisted in fee transactions
-Assisted in maintenance of patron-use computers

Education:
2007- Present: Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
-Master of Science in Information Studies (MSIS): In progress


2004-2006: University of Florida, Gainesville, FL









-Bachelor of Art in English (B.A.): completed

2002-2004: St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, FL
-Associate of Art (A.A.) completed








VITA
Cathleen L. Martyniak
Work (352) 273 2830
Email cathy@uflib.ufl.edu


Work
Experience


1999 Present University of Florida Gainesville, FL
Head, Preservation Department (Assistant University Librarian)
Responsible for administration of Preservation Department staff including binding,
conservation and digital preservation services. Staff levels vary over time. Duties
include:


1998- 1999
Head, Binding Un


University of Florida


Gainesville, FL


Responsible for overall operation of five FTE decentralized binding unit distributed over
eight buildings


1997 1998 Tulane University New Orleans, LA
Head, Preservation Department
Responsible for coordination of three FTE Preservation Department including binding
and conservation programs


1995 1996 University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
Certificate of Advanced Study in Preservation Administration
[Funded by $15,000 1996 University Microfilm Inc. Preservation Fellowship]


1993 1995 University of Pittsburgh
Masters in Library Science
1986 1991 University of Minnesota
Bachelor of Arts, Major in History

NATIONAL SERVICE:

American Library Association (ALA) 1995 current


Pittsburgh, PA

Minneapolis, MN


Association for Library Collection and Technical Services (ALCTS)

Membership Committee, Member 1998-2001, Chair, 2001 2002
Budget and Finance Committee, Member, 2004 current

Preservation and Reformatting Section (PARS)

Preservation Internships Task Force, Member, 1995 1996
Preservation Issues in Small to Mid-sized Libraries Discussion Group,
Chair, 1997 1999
Management Committee, Member, 1998 2000
Reformatting Committee, Member, 2000 2006: Chair 2003 2006


Martyniak 1


Education


Professional
Memberships







Program Planning Task Force, Chair, 2004 2005
Preservation Administrators Discussion Group, Co-chair, 2004 2006
Education Committee, Member 2006 current
Digital Preservation Discussion Group, Co-chair, 2006 current
Digital Preservation Definition Task Force, Co-chair, 2007- current (please see
http://bloas.ala.ora/diaipres.php for details)
DigiPreslist serv creator and administrator (over 1,110 members as of March 2008)
2007- current


LIBRARY SERVICE:

Grant Management Committee, Member, 2003 2005: Chair, 2005 2007: Past Chair
2007-2008
Institutional Repository Task Force, Member, 2004 2005
Library West Collection Preparations Committee, Guest, 2004 current
University of Florida Libraries Faculty Assembly, Member 2005 current
Disaster and Emergency Planning Committee, Chair, 2006 current
Brittle Book Task Force, Chair, 2007- current
Technical Services Alliance 2007 current

Publications Mook, Cathleen L. Conference Report: Analog and Digital Preservation Policy:
Managing Transition. Microform and Imaging Review vol. 34, no. 3, 2005. p. 130

Mook, Cathleen L. and Ben Walker. Providing access and preservation services to
collections in remote storage facilities. Journal ofAccess Services, vol. 2, no. 3, 2004.
53-58. (Refereed)

Mook, Cathleen L. Grant Coordination: SPEC KIT #283. Washington, D.C. Association of
Research Libraries, Office of Leadership and Management Services, 2004.

Grants Participant:

Rewiring Florida's news: Florida Digital Newspaper Library
2005 current
Digital Archiving Manager
Supported by the Library Services and Technology Act, part of the IMLS
Goal: Conversion of the University of Florida's microfilming operations to
fully digital operations
Funding: $199,321 (grant) + $65,671 (cost share) = $264,991

Cataloging and creating digital access to American and British Children's
Literature, 1890-1910.
2006 2009
Digital Archiving Manager
Supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities
Goal: Catalog Children's Literature Titles and make the color portions
accessible globally via digitization


Martyniak -2









John Freund
Preservation Department
Smathers Library
PO Box 117007
Gainesville, Fl 32611

Home:
20567 NW 257th Terrace
High Springs FL 32643

Telephone: (office) 352-273-2835 (cell) 352-316-1259 (home) 386-454-4988
Email iohfreu(i)uflib.ufl.edu

EDUCATION
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. June 1975, BA, Journalism.
San Francisco State, San Francisco, California. College of Design and Engineering.
September, 1984, Certificate, Book Restoration and Binding.

WORK EXPERIENCE

Head, Conservation Unit.
University of Florida, Smathers Libraries.
Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007
October 1988 to present.

Circulation and Stack Manager/Reference.
Jonsson Library of Government Documents, Stanford University, Palo Alto California.
June 1983 to September 1988.

Instructor, Basic Book Binding and Restoration.
San Francisco State University
San Francisco, California
1983-1984

INTERNSHIPS

Sutro Library
San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA.
September March 1982-83

San Anselmo Theological Seminary, San Anselmo, CA.
October December 1983

Presentations to organizations on book and paper preservation including.
Micanopy Historical Society, Florida State Genealogical Association,
Holy Land Map Project, Society of Florida Archivists and others.


Freund 1










Workshops/ Meetings Attended:
Conservation Of Photographs.
Metropolitan Museum, New York, 1989

Collection Conservation Treatment
Berkeley, California 1991

Advanced Conservation Workshop.
University of Iowa and Center for the Book.
Iowa City, Iowa 1995

Deacidification Reconsidered
National Archives
Washington, DC
March 2000

Climate Notebook Environmental Training
Atlanta Georgia
2001

SOLINET Mold Workshop
Richmond VA
2004

The Changing Book
Transitions in Design, Production and Preservation
University of Iowa
July 2005

SOLINET Hurricane Preparedness Workshop
June 2005


Collections consulted and / or worked with.

Florida Orchid Society Archives, Jay Kislak Collection, Mathison Museum,
Harn Musuem of Art, Florida Museum of Natural History, Majorie Kinnan Rawlings
Society, Lighthouse Museum, Flagler College, State Department of Records, State of
Florida, St. Augustine Historical Society, Micanopy Historical Society, Florida Historical
Society, Zora Neale Hurston Museum, Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine Archives,
Sisters of St. Joseph, St Augustine, Florida.


Freund 2










Marilyn N. Ochoa
321 SE 3rd Street Apt H6
Gainesville, FL 32601
(717) 830-8201 1| marilyn.ochoa@gmail.com

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Gainesville, FL
Assistant Head, Education Library, August 2007-Present
Provide reference desk and reference consultation services at the Education Library
Develop and update instructional and bibliographic guides via websites for general and specialized
audiences concerning library resources. Selected content and developed research guides for five
academic units of the College of Education
Evaluate and select materials for Education Library Reference Collection.
Actively develops and manages collections by evaluating and selecting relevant research and instructional
materials in electronic, print and media formats for the COE, including the examination of approval items
Coordinates with the Head of the Education Library and the Social Science Bibliographer regarding the
reevaluation and cancellation of serial titles
Assists with the evaluation and selection of numerous gift donations, offered to the Education Library
Works with other Education Library or technical services staff regarding materials transfer, withdrawal,
cataloging, preservation, or relocation issues, including for brittle books
Continued working with Digital Library Center on University of Florida Digital Collections user
interface, result and help pages, and usability studies
Develop and implement University of Florida Institutional Review Board protocols and survey
instruments for Endeca library catalog, National Digital Newspaper Project and Chronicling America and
the Digital Library of the Caribbean usability testing
Participate actively in the Libraries' instruction program to teach information literacy skills to graduate
Education, COE ProTeach Program, English Language Institute and other groups, including
undergraduate English classes. Lead tours and participated in other instructional activities in Education
Library.
Developed Library West proposals for Computer Assistance Desk and Library West Presentation Areas.
Assisted with Library West computer imaging. Developed proposal for Education Library Computer
Classroom.
Maintained H&SSS web directories and H&SSS staff page and assisted with the development of Music
Library and Education Library website template
Taught research and information literacy skills, resource evaluation skills, and Web2.0 tools to
interdisciplinary 3-credit honors class (Spring 2008)
Coordinated the Ask A Librarian instant messaging (IM) reference service and provided Florida-wide IM
reference service (Spring 2008)

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Gainesville, FL
Digital Services Librarian, April 2003-August 2007
Humanities and Social Science Reference Librarian, October 2001-April 2003
Provide professional, comprehensive reference service to patrons of the Humanities and Social Sciences
collection in person and through the UF Libraries' and Florida Ask A Librarian virtual reference services
Participate in planning, policy formation and departmental decision-making for electronic reference
services and specialized media computing areas of Library West
Assist with implementation and preparation of new technology initiatives, such as installing new operating
system and other software programs, and managing computers and connectivity


Ochoa- 1










Serve as backup Coordinator for the Libraries' virtual reference service
Coordinate web activities of H&SS Services Department
Evaluate digital resources including MetaLib and the University of Florida Digital Collections
Teach research and information literacy skills to students in undergraduate English classes, lead tours, and
participate actively in other library instruction activities
Prepare and update instructional and bibliographic guides in print and online for general and specialized
audiences concerning library resources
Select print and online-reference works and databases in African American and other areas of
multicultural studies and general humanities and the social sciences areas
Managed email reference for Smathers Libraries, including the QuestionPoint Ask a Librarian service
Maintained and managed Library Instruction Computer Classroom
Taught research and information literacy skills, resource evaluation skills, and HTML to
interdisciplinary 3-credit honors class (Spring 2004 and Spring 2005)
Served as project co-advisor for Science and Engineering Independent Study "Digital Library
System" (grade given counted toward 50% of the final course grade, Fall 2004)


EDUCATION

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Master of Library and Information Science Degree, Graduated August 2001

La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA
Bachelor of Arts Degree, Political Science and English, Graduated cum laude May 1998


HONORS AND PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP

Honors
Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication "Best of the Web" Competition. 2nd Place in
the Creative category for Florida Journalism History Project http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/iour/flihist/. Sponsored
by the Visual Communication and Communication Technology Divisions, Spring 2006
George A. Smathers Libraries' H&SSS Instruction Team Project Staff Recognition Award, December 11, 2003
ACRL National Conference Scholarship Recipient, Spring 2003
Beta Phi Mu, inducted 2002

PUBLICATIONS

Ochoa, Marilyn, Rae Jesano, John Nemmers, Carrie Newsom, Maryellen O'Brien, and Paul Victor. "Testing the
Federated Searching Waters: A Usability Study of MetaLib." Journal of Web Librarianship. 1.3 (Fall 2007): 47-
66.

Reakes, Patrick and Marilyn Ochoa. "A Grassroots Initiative to Facilitate Historical Research: The Florida
Journalism History Project." Technical Services Quarterly. 25.2 (Spring 2007): 57-72.

Cataldo, Tara, LeiLani Freund, Marilyn Ochoa and Marina Salcedo. "Assessing the Information Commons."
Public Services Quarterly. 2.4 (Winter 2007): 23-46.

Ronan, Jana, Patrick Reakes and Marilyn Ochoa. "Application of the Behavioral Guidelines: A Study of Online
Reference Skills." Special issue, College and Undergraduate Libraries. 13.4 (November 2006): 3-30.


Ochoa 2









Position Descriptions for Scanning and QC Technicians


CLASS TITLE: Scanning Technician
Starting Base Pay: $1 1/hour

TYPE OF WORK:
This person captures digital images using flatbed scanners according to project specification, and
performs basic image manipulation.

EXAMPLES OF WORK:
Create digital images using flatbed scanners and appropriate scan software.
Review images against original to assure authentic representation, and correct resolution.
Names, saves, and organizes images according to project specification.
Perform preliminary image correction including skew correction and cropping.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Experience with using PC based computer systems
Willingness to learn scanning software
Ability to handle repetitive tasks
Attention to detail in naming files


CLASS TITLE: Quality Control Technician
Starting Base Pay: $1 1/hour

TYPE OF WORK:
This person does the final quality control on digital images before transmitting to the Mark Up Unit.
Understands and can successfully do all of the tasks of a scan technician and additionally makes image
quality decisions independently. Performs image quality control tasks with minimal supervision.

EXAMPLES OF WORK (not all inclusive):
Create digital images using flat bed scanners and appropriate scan software.
Review images against original to assure authentic representation.
Perform preliminary image correction including skew correction and cropping.
Name and save file accurately as uncompressed TIFF.
Uses the quality control software program to open, correct images, and name files for XML output.
Creates actions in Photoshop to correct image files.
Scans or rescans selected images as necessary and reintegrates into digital packages.
Burns DVDs to create archival files of images using appropriate software.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Experience working with PC-based computer systems.
Extensive familiarity with the procedures used at the DLC.
Working knowledge of Photoshop and Microsoft office applications.
Works well with others.









Budget Narrative


The estimated page count for the six collections is:
90,400 pages
9,040 letterbook pages
250 photo prints/negatives.

Based on experience with test sets, we're building in a 10% reshoot rate for pages, 15% reshoot
for letterbooks, and 15% for photos. Adjusted estimates are:
99,440 pages
10,396 letterbook pages
288 photographic materials.

This estimate assumes use of CopiBook scanner with white sheet backing for letterbooks, and,
use of flatbed scanners for all photographic materials and other pages. Some individual sheets
may withstand sheet feed scanner, based on experience with similar collections, but we will not
count on it. All pages images will be 300 dpi color (24-bit) images. All photographic materials
will be 600 dpi grey-scale (8-bit) images.

Regular Pages:
* $0.25/page scanning +
* $0.25/page image correction/QC +
* $0.03/page mounting/archiving +
* $0.01/page media
Total regular pages @ page unit = $0.54/page
+ @ $1,805.68 data-logging (tracking)
TOTAL REGULAR PAGES = (99,440 x 0.54) + 1,805.68 = $55,503.28

Letterbooks:
* $0.25/page scanning +
* $0.25/page image correction/QC +
* $0.03/page mounting/archiving +
* $0.02/page media
Total Letterbooks @ page unit = $0.55/page
+ @ $35 data-logging (tracking)
TOTAL LETTERBOOKS = (10,396 x 0.55) + 35 = $5,752.80

Photographic Materials:
* $0.40/page scanning +
* $0.25/page image correction/QC +
* $0.03/page mounting/archiving +
* $0.01/page media
Total Photographic Materials @ page unit = $0.69/image
+ @ $71.42 data-logging (tracking)
TOTAL PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIALS = (250 x 0.69) + 71.42 = $243.92


Budget Narrative 1









TOTAL ESTIMATE (DLC) = @ $61,500
+ 10% BUFFER = $ 6,150
TOTAL DIGITIZATION COSTS (DLC) = @ $67,650

The costs above are represented in the Salaries & Wages section of the Budget. In addition, the
budget also includes Supplies and Materials costs. The project will fund the purchase of 5000
Polyester envelopes that will be used to protect fragile documents during and following imaging.

5000 Polyester envelopes (11x14) x $1.00 each = $5,000.00


Budget Narrative 2












Section A

Budget detail for the period from: 01/01/2009 Thru: 12/31/2009

1. Salaries and Wages

Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation Grant Funds (a) ($)


Cost Sharing (b) ($) Total (c) ($)


Cathy Martyniak, Head,
Preservation Department 0.05 FTE $ 2,775.00 $ 2,775.00
Jim Cusick, Curator, P.K.
Yonge Library of Florida
History 0.05 FTE $ 3,148.00 $ 3,148.00
Flo Turcotte, Archivist 0.05 FTE $ 2,186.00 $ 2,186.00
John Freund, Conservator 0.05 FTE $ 2,498.00 $ 2,498.00


Subtotals $ $ 10,607.00 $ 10,607.00





Section A

Budget detail for the period from: 01/01/2010 Thru: 12/31/2010

1. Salaries and Wages

Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation Grant Funds (a) ($) Cost Sharing (b) ($) Total (c) ($)

John Freund, Conservator 0.05 FTE $ 2,573.00 $ 2,573.00
Cathy Martyniak, Head,
Preservation Department 0.05 FTE $ 2,858.00 $ 2,858.00


Subtotals $ $ 5,431.00 $ 5,431.00





Section A

Budget detail for the period from: 01/01/2011 Thru: 12/31/2011

1. Salaries and Wages

Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation Grant Funds (a) ($) Cost Sharing (b) ($) Total (c) ($)

John Freund, Conservator 0.05 FTE $ 2,650.00 $ 2,650.00
Cathy Martyniak, Head,
Preservation Department 0.05 FTE $ 2,944.00 $ 2,944.00


SSubtotals $ $ 5,594.00 $ 5,594.00




Full Text

PAGE 1

UF Historical Everglades Project Summary 1 America's Swamp: The Historical Everglades Project Purposes and Goals of the Project: The University of Florida proposes a 3-year project that will use costeffective methods to digitize approximately 99,690 pages in six archival collections that document the despoiling of the Everglades and the development of South Florida in the late 19th and early 20t h centuries. The collections selected for this project document early plans for drai ning the Everglades in the 1880s and 1890s, the dredging of canals and subsequent development of the destroyed wetla nds at the start of the 20th century, as well as early attempts by conservationists to preserve the natural r esources of the Everglades. The six Everglades collections are existing holdings of UF. All six collections will be di gitized in their entirety, although a small number of boxes will be excluded because they are not within the ch ronological scope of the project. The collections date from 1854 to 1963, but the bulk of the materials included in this project will date from 1877 to 1929. The year 1929 was selected as an end date because it marks the end of the South Florida land boom and the onset of the Great Depression. The project will reprodu ce approximately 99,690 page images. Collection Extent Exclusions Pages Napoleon B. Broward Papers 1879-1818 10.75 ln. ft. (14 boxes; 4 vol.) 11,465 William Sherman Jennings Papers 18771928 13.5 ln. ft. (29 boxes; 16 vol.) 32,575 May Mann Jennings Papers 1889-1963 8 ln. ft. (23 boxes) 2 boxes dated 1930-1963 22,500 Thomas E. Will Papers 1893-1938 14 ln. ft. (24 boxes) 2 boxes dated 1930-1937 29,800 Arthur E. Morgan Papers 1912-1954 0.8 ln. ft. (2 boxes) 2 files dated 19301946 1,850 James E. Ingraham Papers 1854-1920 1 ln. ft. (2 boxes) 1,500 Total pages: 99,690 All imaging will be completed in the Digital Librar y Center (DLC), a unit of UF Libraries. For all digitized materials, METS metadata will be created In addition to technical and structural data, descriptive metadata will be imported and repurposed from existing EAD finding aids. An Everglades homepage will be developed as part of the UFDCs broade r digital collection. In practice consistent for all

PAGE 2

UF digital projects, redundant digital archives are maintained. Following completion of the project, researchers can enhance discoverability and comprehension of the minimal metadata by contributing descriptions for objects using a tagging and contribution system. Significance and Relationship to NHPRC Goals and Objectives: This project directly addresses the Commissions mission, vision and goals. First, it makes records of historical value and national significance freely accessible to a wide public audience. The creation of digital surrogates ensures broad use of materials that certainly enhance our knowledge of the nations history and culture. Second, the project promotes the use of the countrys documentary heritage. Project staff will work with faculty in academic units at UF and other educational institutions to ensure that students are aware of and can make use of these resources. Additionally, the project will be heavily promoted to historians and scholars in various disciplines. Third, the project guarantees the long term preservation of historical record collections so that they may be used by generations to come. The valuable historical evidence will be preserved in digital format, and the original materials also will be benefit from the reduction in physical handling. Finally, UF will explore and evaluate new methods for cost-effective reproduction of archival materials. Plan of Work: Each of the six collections will be processed separately as discrete units so that no comingling of materials can occur. An entire collection will be processed by a specific unit before it moves into another processing area. The fo llowing ordered activities will be u sed to process each collection: 1. John Nemmers, Flo Turcotte, and Jim Cusick of the Special Collections Department will select and conduct a folder level review of each collection. 2. John Freund and Cathy Martyniak of the Preserva tion Department will do an initial conservation review of the materials making note of any special handling requirements. 3. The collection will be transferred to the Dig ital Library Center for processing, serving, and archiving. The normal sequence of activities include : registering materials into the DLC tracking database, imaging, image processing and quality contro l, mark-up, data transfer, and archiving. 4. The collection will be returned to the Special Collections Department UF Historical Everglades Project Summary 2

PAGE 3

Products: This digitization project will produce a new Historical Everglades Project homepage providing access to almost 100,000 new digital objects. In add ition, the EAD finding aids for the six archival collections will be revised to include links to these di gital objects. As part of the project, UF will create and widely disseminate documentation and descriptive information about the project. All documentation, including workflow and technical specifications, will be included on the project homepage. Project staff will disseminate information about methodology and out comes in journal and newsletter articles and via conference presentations. The homepage also will include an education module that includes lesson plans and other information for use by teachers and student s in the classroom. UF will market the Everglades project and the education model aggressively usi ng traditional methods such as web site links, press releases, public presentations, brochures and other promotional giveaways. Key Personnel: John Nemmers, Principal Investigator. Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist, Department of Special and Area Studies Collections, University of Florida Libraries. 352-2732766. johnemm@uflib.ufl.edu Dr. Laurie Taylor Co-Principal Investigator. Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center, University of Florida Libraries. 352-273-2900. lautayl@uflib.ufl.edu Performance Objective s : 1. Digitize approximately 90,400 pages; 9,040 letterbook pages; and 250 photo prints/negatives. 2. Keep total project costs below $152,750.92. 3. Revise the EAD finding aids for six archival coll ections to include links to approximately 99,690 digital objects. 4. Create an educational module with at least 3 lesson plans and a guide to related archival collections and secondary sources UF Historical Everglades Project Summary 3

PAGE 4

America's Swamp: The Historical Everglades Project There are no other Everglades in the world. They are, they have always been, one of the unique regions of the earth, remote, never wholly known... They are unique also in the simplicity, the diversity, the related harmony of the forms of life they enclose. The miracle of the light pours over the green and brown expa nse of saw grass and of water, shining and slow-moving below, the grass and water that is the meaning and the central fact of the Everglades of Florida. It is a river of grass. Marjory Stoneman Douglas Drain that abominable, pestilence-ridden swamp. Napoleon Bonaparte Broward Purposes and Goals of the Project The University of Florida proposes to digitize its most important historical record collections documenting the despoiling of the Everglades and the development of Sout h Florida in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The 3-year projec t will use cost-effectiv e methods to digitize approximately 99,690 pages in six archival collec tions, and to make the digital reproductions freely available on the Internet. The collections se lected for this project document early plans for draining the Everglades in the 1880s and 1890s the dredging of canals and subsequent development of the destroyed wetlands at the star t of the 20th century, as well as early attempts by conservationists to preserve the na tural resources of the Everglades. The six collections featured in this project are part of the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History and the Archives & Manuscripts Unit of the Depa rtment of Special & Area Studies Collections at the University of Florida Libraries ( http://www.uflib.ufl/spec ). The P.K. Yonge Library is one of the state's preeminent Floridiana collections and is a major reposito ry for correspondence, reports, diaries, maps, explorer's notes and ot her archival material pertaining to Florida's environment, the Everglades, conservation, ag riculture, geology, wild life, waterways, and forestry. The Archives & Manuscripts Unit in Special Collections houses more than 5000 linear UF Historical Everglades Project 1

PAGE 5

feet of historical records deali ng with early settlement and deve lopment of the state, Floridas literary heritage, and agricultural and environmental history. It is also the most important repository for political papers related to Florida, aside from the State Archives. The natural and political history of the Everglad es and development in South Florida is more than just a state or regional history. The drainage and overdev elopment of the Everglades, the destruction of the region's frag ile and unique ecosystems, and th e loss of source water and other natural resources, are seen by many environmentalists as one of th e worst ecological disasters in the nation's history. The six Ev erglades collections document the people and culture of the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as defi ned by the countrys societal values, politics, regionalism, development and growth activities, genderand race-based discrimination, and the changing attitudes regard ing nature. These sources reveal the modern story of Americas Swamp from the time wh en dredgers and canal-builders assaulted it through calls for establishing a national park. Interest in draining and reclai ming land in the Everglades be gan as early as the 1880s, but major drainage activities were not undertaken until th e first two decades of the 20th century. Two Florida Governors, William Sherman Jennings and Napoleon Bonaparte Broward, would serve as the primary designers and spokespers ons for the draining of the Everglades. In 1904 Governor Broward famously promised to create an "Empire of the Everglades." Of course, in fulfilling this promise the state would have to destroy the ecological systems by dredging, creating canals, and altering the flow of water in the worlds most famed wetlands. Alarmed at the potential loss of the Everglad es several early conservationists, including Floridas May Mann UF Historical Everglades Project 2

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Jennings, began pushing for the preservation of portions of the Everglades. The drainage work started by Governors Jennings and Broward was of great interest internationally, and soon real esta te dealers and settlers from around the world rushed in to profit from the project. The land sales boom in South Florida at the start of the 1920s was almost unprecedented in the history of the world. So was the rapidity with which it had collapsed by the end of the decade. Two catastrophic hurrica nes in 1926 and 1928 effectively ended the boom, but many people had already declared the draina ge program a bust. By the time the Depression began in 1929, sales had ceased and the state was for ced to halt drainage and dredging activities. Each of the six collections provides unique a nd valuable historical evidence regarding the Everglades in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and it is diffi cult to research early drainage and conservation efforts without consulting these collections. The papers of Governor Broward ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/ spec/pkyonge/Broward.htm ) and Governor Jennings ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec /pkyonge/JenningsWilliamS.htm ) form the nucleus of the project as they were the primary architects for the drainage and reclamation projec t. Jennings started the project rolling during his term, dr umming up widespread support and resolving a myriad of legal issues, primarily pertaining to la nd claims made by the Flagler and Plant railroads. However, it was Broward who became the driving force for the project. His popularity, his larger-than-life persona, his attention to the smallest details, a nd his passion for the project, all combined to make him the perfect man to spearhead the effort. The two Progressive Era southern democrats were friends and political allies, and their common goals and accomplishments are documented extensively in their papers. UF Historical Everglades Project 3

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The May Mann Jennings Papers ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/sp ec/pkyonge/JenningsMayMann.htm) complement those of the two Governors because of her advocacy of the drainage project, and also because of her marriage to Gov. Jennings. Howeve r, the real strength of the collection is that it documents the conservation movement that deve loped at the start of the 20th century and the role of disenfranchised women in developi ng and lobbying for legisl ation to protect the environment. Jennings was a leading member of the women's club movement and an influential social reformer in Florida and nationwide. As president of th e Florida Federation of Women's Clubs in 1915, she spearheaded the effort to estab lish the Royal Palm State Park, the precursor to the Everglades National Park. Her tireless campaigns to preserve portions of the Everglades may seem at odds with her support of the drainage project, but she was representative of many conservationists of this era who were able to reconcile seemingly conflicting positions. Thus, Jennings was able to support th e drainage program promoted by Broward and her husband at the same time that she was arguing for the creation of the Royal Palm State Park. The Papers of Thomas E. Will ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/Will.htm ) provide two interesting perspectives regarding the Everglades. The first perspect ive is at the national level as Will passionately advocated drainage and land development while living in Washington, D.C. His enthusiasm for the proj ect developed by Governors Br oward and Jennings is well documented in his correspondence, speeches and wr itings. The second perspective is at a local level. Between 1912 and 1914, Will purchased land near Lake Okeechobee and began to develop the region's first planned town, Okeelanta. He exemplifies those thousands of people who bought into the dream of reclaimed land in South Florid a, and who moved to the region only to find that UF Historical Everglades Project 4

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the drainage program was insufficient. The collecti on is the perfect complement to the papers of the two Governors because it docu ments the early failures of the reclamation project, both in terms of unrealized development and de struction of ecological systems. The final two collections, although much smaller in size and narrower in scope, certainly round out and fill in some gaps in the historical evid ence presented by the other collections. The Arthur E. Morgan Papers ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/ spec/pkyonge/morganae.htm ) primarily relate to a controversy that occurred in 1912 when the U.S. House of Representatives held hearings to investigate the USDA's involvement in promo ting land sales in the Everglades, and Morgan supplied expert analysis of the dr ainage project as a civil engineer specializing in flood control. His collection provides a revealing view of the often questionable pr actices of real estate sellers and members of both the state and federal governm ents as enthusiasm for the drainage of the Everglades swept the country. The James E. Ingraham Papers ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/Ingraham.htm ) provide the viewpoint of a businessman who spent most of his career working in Florida for the railroad tycoons, Henry Flagler and Henry Plant. The effect that Flagler and Plant had on the development of Florida cannot be underestimated, as they sought to acquire as much land as possible for expansion of their rail lines and reso rt cities being devel oped along the two Florida coasts. As part of Ingrahams work for the Pl ant railroad, he conducte d a survey through the Everglades from Ft. Myers to Miami in 1892. The collection includes correspondence and photographs pertaining to the Everglades, as we ll as Ingrahams manuscripts regarding the Flagler and Plant railroads and their role in developing South Florida. UF Historical Everglades Project 5

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UF Historical Everglades Project 6 The six Everglades collections are existing hold ings of UF, and all have been arranged and described at the folder level with complete finding aids available online (See Appendix A for finding aids). All six collections will be digiti zed in their entirety, al though a small number of boxes will be excluded because they are not within the chronological scope of the project. The collections date from 1854 to 1963, but the bulk of the materials included in this project will date from 1877 to 1929. The year 1929 was selected as an end date because it marks the end of the South Florida land boom and the onset of the Great Depression. The project will reproduce approximately 99,690 page images. Of that num ber, approximately 9,040 pages are letterbook pages and 250 are photographic prints. Collection Extent Exclusions Pages Napoleon B. Broward Papers, 18791818 10.75 ln. ft. (14 boxes; 4 vol.) 11,465 William Sherman Jennings Papers, 1877-1928 13.5 ln. ft. (29 boxes; 16 vol.) 32,575 May Mann Jennings Papers, 1889-1963 8 ln. ft. (23 boxes) 2 boxes (0.8 ln. ft.) dated 19301963 22,500 Thomas E. Will Papers, 1893-1938 14 ln. ft. (24 boxes) 2 boxes (0.8 ln. ft.) dated 19301937 29,800 Arthur E. Morgan Papers, 1912-1954 0.8 ln. ft. (2 boxes) 2 files dated 1930-1946 1,850 James E. Ingraham Papers, 1854-1920 1 ln. ft. (2 boxes) 1,500 Total pages: 99,690

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The significance of the six Everglades collections is demonstrated best by the high number of researchers who have used the materials. Over the past three years, 58 re searchers have requested these collections: Broward (11 requests); WS Jennings (9); MM Jennings (22); Will (5); Ingraham (9); Morgan (2). [Note: The Morgan and Will Papers were not fully described online until 2007-2008.] The collections support research in many disciplines including environmental history, political science, busin ess history, womens studies, so cial studies, the history of transportation, and ethnic studies and race rela tions. As awareness of and access to these collections increases, the potential for multi-discipline use increases. Demand for these collections has grown in recent y ears, reflecting the national trend of increased scholarly interest in the Everglades and environm ental history. Several books, articl es, and Doctoral dissertations have been completed over the past ten years using these collections. Most recently, Michael Grunwald authored The Swamp: The Everglades, Flor ida, and the Politics of Paradise (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2006), Jack E. Davis and Raymond Arsenault edited Paradise Lost? The Environmental History of Florida (Gainesville: University Pr ess of Florida, 2005), and David McCally published The Everglades: An Environmental History (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1999). See Appendix B for scholar ship based on research in these collections. UF holds all of the necessary rights to digita lly reproduce those materi als created by Broward, Jennings, Jennings, Ingraham, Morgan, and Will. Each collection was gifted to UF by the creators or their heirs, and right s were conveyed to the University as part of the gift agreements. The collections do include materials not created by these individuals, but investigating the terms of copyright for many of these items would be an impossible task considering the number of creators involved. Given the date span of th is project (1854-1929; bulk: 1890-1915), it is safe to UF Historical Everglades Project 7

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assume that a significant number of the creators have been deceased for over seventy years. The primary purpose of this digital pr oject is to enhance scholarship. As these papers primarily are letters, particularly political and business correspondence, UF believes that this project will not affect the potential market for these documents. The project will include a disclaimer stating as much, and will include means for copyright holder s to request that offending digital objects be removed. UF will increase access to these valuable collections by using cost-effective methods to digitize and disseminate the digital repr oductions freely via the Internet. Currently, the six Everglades collections are available for use by all researchers, but the materials may only be used in the Reading Room of Special Collections during normal hours of opera tion. Digital access will benefit scholars and researchers who are unable to travel to UF to conduct their research. The collections will be freely available on the Internet as part of the University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC) ( http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/ ). All imaging will be completed in the Digital Li brary Center (DLC), a unit of UF Smathers Libraries. For all digitized materials, Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) metadata will be created. Information about me tadata used in the UFDC is available at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/technical/Metadata/metadata.htm The METS files will include technical and structural data about each image, as well as descriptive and administrative information. No new descriptive metadata will be created for the digital objects. All descriptive metadata will be imported and repurposed from existing collection-, series-, and folder-level descriptions in the Encoded Archival Description (EAD) finding aids for the collections. In a few UF Historical Everglades Project 8

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instances, such as when documents have been described at the item level in the finding aids, item-level descriptions will be availabl e for use with the digital objects. Discovery of digitized objects in the Everglades collections can occur in several ways: 1) An Everglades project homepage made available as part of UF Digital Collections; 2) EAD finding aids on the P.K. Yonge Librarys homepa ge; 3) EAD finding aids contributed to Archives Florida ( http://palmm.fcla.edu/afl/ ), a statewide union database of EAD finding aids; 4) MARC records with linked 856 fields in online catalogs of UF, WorldCat, etc.; 5) OAI compliant metadata harvested by digital repositories; and 6) complete electronic packages that are contributed to other online collections. The Everglades homepage will be developed as part of the UFDCs broader digital collection architecture and is based on the open-source Gr eenstone Digital Library System produced and maintained by the New Zealand Library Project at the University of Waikato. UFDC utilizes Greenstones strength in metada ta and indexing and adds an e nhanced display, providing an easier to use interface while reta ining the architectural strength of Greenstone. The enhanced display includes the ability to separate items by collection, subc ollection, and holding institution, and to then present any of thes e or any combination of these w ithin a customized display [See: http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/techni cal/Architecture/ architecture.htm ]. The Everglades homepage will include information about the project, an overview of the six Everglades collections, and links to the EAD finding aids. Discoverability of the digital objects will be enhanced by a variety of sear ch options. Researchers can search all of the collections simultaneously from the main project page, or th ey can search each collection individually, or UF Historical Everglades Project 9

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they can combine two or more collections in their search scope. In addition, all digital objects in the Everglades collections will be discoverable vi a the UFDC home page, so researchers will be able to search them in combination with all of the other digitized mate rials held by UF and its partner institutions. The structure and context of each collection will be apparent to the researcher using the collections via the Internet. Researchers will have two major means of accessing the digital objects on the UF web site: 1) by browsing the E AD finding aids online, or 2) by searching the collections using the UFDC interface. When br owsing the EAD finding aid, researchers will be able to understand the structure and context of the co llections as they browse down from the collection level to the series, folder, and item levels Each folder or item level description in the finding aid will include a link that will open all of the digital objects associated with that component. For those researchers accessing the digital objects via the UFDC web site, each digital object will be accompanied by the descriptive metadata from the EAD finding aid, as well a link to the EAD finding aid. In this way, the user should unders tand easily where a particular object is located within the hierarchy of its pare nt collection, and they al so will have the ability to browse the finding aid. To increase discovery of and access to the six Everglades collections, UF will contribute digital objects and metadata to the Ev erglades Digital Library ( http://everglades.fiu.edu/) The EDL is a project of the Everglades Information Network, a collaborative effo rt of the Florida International University Libraries, the Florida Center for Li brary Automation, the Everglades National Park, and numerous other agencies and research organizations. The EDL was established in 1996 to UF Historical Everglades Project 10

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support research, education, decision making, and in formation resource management within the greater Everglades community. Since that time, the project has grown to serve patrons from around the world with digital colle ctions, the online reference service 'Ask an Everglades Librarian', and other online information services. In practice consistent for all UF digital project s, redundant digital archives are maintained. An in-house DLC archive is created by burning TIFF masters, derivatives, and METS files to goldbased DVDs, which are retained in envi ronmentally controlled storage (cf. Guidelines at http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html ). Disks and their contents are logged in the DLC Tracking Database, which queues disks and file s for inspection every 3 years and migration every 10 years or upon format obsolescence. The pr imary archives is maintained by the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA). Completed by the FCLA in 20 05, the Florida Digital Archive (FDA) ( http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/index.htm ) is available at no cost to Floridas public university libraries. The software programmed to support the FDA is modeled on the widely accepted Open Archival Information System. It is a dark archive and no public access functions are provided. It supports the preservation functions of format normalization, mass format migration and migra tion on request. As the Everglades objects are loaded into the UFDC for public access, a comm and in the METS header direct s a copy of the files to the Florida Digital Archive (FDA). The process of forwarding original uncompressed TIFF images to the FDA is the key component in UFs plan to store, maintain and protect electronic data for the long term. Although the primary goal of the project is to increase use of this important documentary UF Historical Everglades Project 11

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heritage, this project also will ensure the contin ued preservation of these collections. The original documents will remain open to researchers, but requests for reproductions received from off-site researchers will be reduced, and there may be a reduction in requests from researchers on campus as well. A reduction in requests for phys ical access will result in less handling and a reduced possibility of risk to the documents. This project creates exciting new ar eas of exploration for the UF Li braries. In particular, UF is interested in investig ating new methods of displaying descriptive information online and making archival descriptions more user-friendly through the use of social networking technology. Because this project does not include the creation of item-level desc ription metadata, it is ideal for experimentation involving researcher-contributed metadata. Following completion of the project, researchers can enhan ce discoverability and comprehens ion of the minimal metadata by contributing descriptions for objects. UF ha s already begun planning and development for a tagging and contribution system with an editing or validation structure that would allow for contributions from authenticated and anonym ous users. An editorial system will accept contributions automatically from approved users, and place all other contributions within an editorial system where contributions will be ve tted and, once approved, will then be added to the existing metadata. This process allows established re searchers to easily cont ribute their expertise; new researchers to grow their experience through their contributions ; and all others to contribute in meaningful ways with or wit hout attribution based on their own preferences. In particular, it is anticipated that these materials will be used in the classroom and an obvious experiment would involve students contributing item-level descriptions as part of their coursework. UF Historical Everglades Project 12

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Link paths and social tagging can be used to im prove navigation of the pr oject pages. UF also plans to make use of anonymous usage statistic s in server log data to identify high-demand materials in the collections. Once identified, these ma terials potentially can be "pushed" to users. Additionally, user search patterns can point to areas of the collection where the high demand justifies the creation of authoritative item-level descriptive metadata. Likewise, staff can identify materials with high research value that are under-u tilized and develop met hods to highlight those items or otherwise improve their visibility. Significance and Relationship to NHPRC Goals and Objectives This project directly addresses the Commissions mission, vision and goals. First, it makes records of historical value and national significance freely accessi ble to a wide public audience. Although these records have been accessible to researchers in previous years, access has been limited by geographical and operational factors. The creation of di gital surrogates ensures broad use of materials that certain ly enhance our knowledge of the nations history and culture. Second, the project promotes the use of the coun trys documentary heritage. Project staff will work with faculty in academic units at UF and other educational institutions to ensure that students are aware of and can make use of thes e resources. Additionally, the project will be heavily promoted to historians and scholars in various disciplines. Third, the project guarantees the long term preservation of historical record collections so that they may be used by generations to come. The valuable historical evidence will be pres erved in digital format, and the original materials also will be benefit from th e reduction in physical handling. Finally, UF will explore and evaluate new methods for cost-effective reproducti on of archival materials. UF Historical Everglades Project 13

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UF Historical Everglades Project 14 Plan of Work The activities needed to successfully complete th is project draw on the expertise of staff in multiple units of the George A. Smathers Librarie s; the involvement of each is indicated below. Each of the six collections will be processed sepa rately as discrete units so that no co-mingling of materials can occur. An entire collection wi ll be processed by a specific unit before it moves into another processing area. The following ordered activities will be us ed to process each collection: 1. John Nemmers, Flo Turcotte, and Jim Cusick of the Special Collections Department will select and conduct a folder level review of each collection. 2. John Freund and Cathy Martyniak of the Pr eservation Department will do an initial conservation review of the materials making note of any special handling requirements. 3. The collection will be transferred to the Digital Libr ary Center (DLC) for processing, serving, and archiving. The normal sequence of digital project activities include: registering materials into the DLC tracki ng database, imaging, image processing and quality control, mark-up, data transfer, a nd archiving. A more t horough delineation of these activities may be found in the supplementary attachments: Work Plan and Digital Materials Preservation Plan 4. The collection will be returned to the Special Collections Department. Staff in the Digital Library Center have ten year s of experience handling all types of formats, and all imaging is done in accordance with establis hed professional standards. Specifications for imaging (i.e., scanning, text, and metadata) ar e based on digitization sp ecifications for PALMM Collections ( http://palmm.fcla.edu/stru cmeta/standres.html#guidedig ) that, in turn, are based on the principles and recommendations of Moving Theory into Practi ce: Digital Imaging for

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Libraries and Archives (Anne R. Kenney and Oya Y. Rieg er [Mountain View, CA : Research Libraries Group, 2000] http://www.rlg.org/preserv/mtip2000.html ) and Cornell University's Digital Imaging Tutorial ( http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/contents.htm ). These specifications are optimi zed for digital archiv ing practices as outlined by the Florida Digital Archive ( http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/ ) and also optimized for data exchange with or harvesting by other digital lib raries such as the U.S. Nati onal Science Foundations National Science Digital Library ( http://www.nsdl.org/ ), the U.S. Institute for Museum and Library Services National Leadership Grant collection ( http://imlsdcc.grainger.uiuc.edu/ ), and OAIster ( http://www.oaister.org/ ) at the University of Michigan. Products This digitization project will produce a new Hist orical Everglades Project homepage providing access to almost 100,000 new digital objects. In addition, the EAD finding aids for the six archival collections will be revised to include links to these digital objects. As part of the project, UF will create and widely disseminate documen tation and descriptive information about the project. All documentation, including workflow a nd technical specificati ons, will be included on the project homepage. Project staff will di sseminate information about methodology and outcomes in journal and newsletter articles and via conference presentations. All slideshow presentations will be included in the documentation on the project homepage. The homepage also will include an education module that includes lesson plans and other information for use by teachers and students in the classroom. For an example of a similar education module, see Spanish Colonial St. Augustine: A Resource for Teachers UF Historical Everglades Project 15

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( http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/?s=teachers ). The Everglades module w ill include an historical timeline, lesson plans, graphic materials, and a guide to primary sources and other secondary reading materials. UF will market the Everglades project and the education model aggressively using traditional methods such as web site links press releases, public presentations, brochures and other promotional giveaways. Personnel Qualifications Project personnel are listed below with brief stat ements of project responsibilities. Additional information about each project member, including qualifications and competencies, is available in the attached resumes. Responsibilities for e ach team member are desc ribed in the Plan of Work and in supplemental materials. John Nemmers, Principal Investigator. Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist, Department of Special and Area Studies Coll ections, University of Florida Libraries. Responsible for coordinating selection, conservation assessments, and compiling and submitting all project reports. Dr. Laurie Taylor Co-Principal Investig ator. Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center, University of Florida Libraries. Responsible for overseeing all aspects of the digitization process in the DLC. She will co ordinate all project activities with John Nemmers and other members of the digitizati on team. She will colla borate on creating an education module for the project. Dr. James Cusick Curator of the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, Department of Special and Area Studies Collections. Re sponsible for establishing pre-imaging procedures, including selection and cons ervation assessments. He will collaborate on UF Historical Everglades Project 16

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creating an education m odule for the project. Flo Turcotte, Research Services Archivist, Archives and Manuscripts, Department of Special and Area Studies Collections. Re sponsible for establishing pre-imaging procedures, including selection and conservation assessments. Lourdes Santamaria-Wheeler, Digital Production Supervisor Digital Library Center. Responsible for supervising scanning tec hnicians and overseeing imaging processes utilizing flatbed and high-speed scanners. Jane Pen Quality Control Unit Head, Digital Libr ary Center. Ensures the quality of the digital objects and their corresponding struct ural metadata files. She will supervise quality control technicians to assure highe st quality and rapid throughput of digitizing products. Matthew Mariner, Text Processing Unit Head, Digita l Library Center. Supervises all text processing, archiving and data transfer processes. He will coordinate data transfer for archival, preservation, and redundancy. Cathy Martyniak Department Chair, Preservation Department. Responsible for coordinating digital archiving with the Florida Digital Archive (FDA). She also will inspect materials for preservati on concerns prior to imaging. John Freund, Conservation Unit Head, Preserva tion Department. Responsible for conservation activities. He will evaluate all materials to ensure optimal material quality for digitization and for long-term preservation. Marilyn Ochoa Assistant Head, Education Library, University of Florida Libraries. Collaborates on the creation of education modules. UF Historical Everglades Project 17

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UF Historical Everglades Project 18 Performance Objectives The project will be evaluated on UFs ability to meet the following performance objectives: 1. Digitize approximately 90,400 pages; 9,040 letterbook pages; and 250 photographic items. 2. Keep total project costs below $152,750.92. 3. Revise the EAD finding aids for six archival collections to include links to approximately 99,690 digital objects. 4. Create an educational module with at least 3 lesson plans and a guide to related archival collections and secondary sources Following the grant period, the project will be ev aluated on several factors that are not linked to specific numerical performance objectives Long term success of the project will be determined, in part, on evaluations and comments submitted by researchers either online or in Special Collections. Anonymous statistics in se rver log data will be used to track online researcher demand over time, and research regi stration forms in Special Collections will be used to track on-site researcher demand. Staff also will evaluate the quantity and quality of any item-level descriptions contributed by rese archers using the participatory tagging and contribution system. This evaluative data will inform future cost-effective digitization activities.

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Digital Preservation Plan In practice consistent for all UF digital project s, redundant digital archives are maintained. An in-house DLC archive is created by burning TIFF masters, derivatives, and METS files to goldbased DVDs, which are retained in envi ronmentally controlled storage (cf. Guidelines at http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html ). Disks and their contents are logged in the DLC Tracking Database, which queues disks and file s for inspection every 3 years and migration every 10 years or upon format obsolescence. The pr imary archives is maintained by the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA). Completed by the FCLA in 20 05, the Florida Digital Archive (FDA) ( http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/index.htm ) is available at no cost to Floridas public university libraries. The software programmed to support the FDA is modeled on the widely accepted Open Archival Information System. It is a dark archive and no public access functions are provided. It supports the preservation functions of format normalization, mass format migration and migra tion on request. As the Everglades objects are loaded into the UFDC for public access, a comm and in the METS header direct s a copy of the files to the Florida Digital Archive (FDA). The process of forwarding original uncompressed TIFF images to the FDA is the key component in UFs plan to store, maintain and protect electronic data for the long term. [1] As reported in: University of Leeds. Representation and Rendering Project. Survey and assessment of sources of information on file fo rmats and software documentation: final report (2003) http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uploaded_docum ents/FileFormatsreport.pdf

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Work Plan 1 Plan of Work Time Schedule of Activities Activity Jan-Mar 2009 Apr-Jun 2009 Jul-Sep 2009 Oct-Dec 2009 Jan-Mar 2010 Apr-Jun 2010 Jul-Sep 2010 Oct-Dec 2010 Jan-Mar 2011 Apr-Jun 2011 Jul-Sep 2011 Oct-Dec 2011 Selection & folder review Conservation Assessment Digitization Actions Hiring & training of imaging & quality control technicians Record ingest to tracking Broward/Jenning s, M.M./Will Jennings, W.S./Ingraham/Morgan Imaging Broward/Jenning s, M.M./Will Jennings, W.S./Ingraham/Morgan Quality Control Broward/Jenning s, M.M./Will Jennings, W.S./Ingraham/Morgan Package Markup/ Deployment/ Archiving Broward/Jenning s, M.M./Will Jennings, W.S./Ingraham/Morgan Conservation assessment Reshelving of collections Creation of home page, education modules, and project documents

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Workflow Selection, preparation and conservation review Six collections have been selected for digitization. Special Collections staff (John Nemmers, Flo Turcotte, and Jim Cusick) will complete a pre-imaging checklist The staff will physically examine each archival container to identify potential special-needs material s such as fragile documents, photographic images, etc. The staff will ensure that the physical arrangement of the folders in each box is identical to the arrangement described in the EAD finding aid. Special Collections st aff will include written notes and instructions for the DLC staff when delivering materials fo r digitization. Special Collections sta ff will use the checklist to check out each archival container prior to imaging. Boxes will be transported to the DLC from Special Collections after they have been checked out. If a patron requests use of a box while it is in the DLC, the box can be temporarily retrieved for the patron to use in the Speci al Collections Reading Room Prior to digitization, any items of particular concern will be reviewed by me mbers of the Preservation Department (John Freund and Cathy Martyniak) and handling requirements will be not ed. The Digital Library Cent er (DLC) is located in the same building and floor as the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections. Digitization Actions Tracking Once a collection is received by the DL C, the existing EAD finding aid data will be imported into the Digital Library Tracking Database (DLC Tracking) and repurposed from exis ting collection-, series-, and folder-level descriptions for the collections. In a few instances, where individual items are described in the EAD finding aids, item-level descriptions will be available for use with the digital objects. Descriptive metadata elements in the existing EAD finding aids that will be repurposed in clude: Collection Title, Collection Dates, Collection Originator, Series Title, Series Date, Folder Title, Folder Date(s). For all digitized materials, national Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) metadata will be created. The basic METS files are cr eated and enhanced automatically as an individual folder moves throu the digitization chain gh from this point on. The DLC Tracking database assigns a unique eight digi t Bibliographic Identifier (BibID) to each folder processed, and that BibID will be used to track the ite m throughout the digitization process. For example, the Business Correspondence 1908-1910 folder from the Thomas E. Will Papers might be assigned UF00096543. Folders will be retained in their original num bered boxes, temporary BibIDs will be attached to each folder, and the box will be m oved to the digitizing unit. Imaging The imaging unit is supervised by Lourdes Santamaria -Wheeler, who has extensiv e experience in hiring, training, and supervising student scanners for image cap ture and enhancement. Scanning technicians will be hired from grant funds. Technicians will be hired based on their skills and understanding of digital image Work Plan 2

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Work Plan 3 capture and color correction. Santamar ia-Wheeler will supervise and as necessary provide advanced training to the imaging technicians. All items within folders will be digitized to meet the requirements of the items physical format. Photographs will be scanned at 600 dpi, 8 bit grayscale. Individual pages wi ll be scanned on Copibook or flatbed scanners at mi nimum of 300 dpi, 24 bit color. The letterbooks will be scanned on Copibooks at 300 dpi, 24 bit color. Capturing letterbook page s will necessitate that each page is backed with a blank white sheet to minimize bleed through. The pr oduction imaging unit performs initial image review of all pages, adjusting the image quality as necessary, including adjustment of levels, skew, and contrast. Advanced image manipulation will be performed as needed and includes level adjustment and color replacement to minimize the appearance of aging and foxing. Images will be captured as uncompressed TIFF files (ITU6.0) at 100% scale; the curr ent de facto standard for electronic image archives. Imaging equipment will be maintained by the production imaging unit. Both flatbed and CopiBook scanners will be calibrated regularly in order to maintain color fidelity and optimum image results. Quality Control After initial scanning and image enha ncement discussed above, all aspe cts of image control and digital package creation are controlled by the UFDC Toolkit, an integrated software package that controls derivative image formation, quality control review at the package level, and deployment to th e UFDC server. Jane Pen, head of the Quality Control Unit, hires, trains, and supe rvises a staff of quality c ontrol technicians. Her staff use Toolkit Pre-QC function whic h creates jpg, jpg2, and jpg thumbnail images. A second program, the Quality Control tool, displays thumbnails of each image in sequential order. These images are reviewed. Errors are noted and returned to the imaging unit for scan /rescan of the pages. If th ere are no errors, the files go to the Metadata Control Unit. At this point, the initial METS file contai ns basic structural and administrative metadata, as well as the descrip tive metadata repurposed from the EAD files. Digital Package Markup & Deployment Once quality control has been comple ted, the digital package moves to the Markup Unit. For this project, Matt Mariner, the Unit head will train digital package t echnicians in procedures that ensure all package level metadata will conform to the national METS, our local extension schemas, and to requirements for serving in UFDC, preservation in the Florida Digi tal Archive, and integrating of pa ckages into the Everglades Online Library. As appropriate, ot her project and resource specific extens ion schemas may be created. Users can view the METS file for any item loaded in UFDC by selecting METS Metadata under the Technical Data menu on the navigation bar to the left of an item bei ng viewed. With final packag e approval, the Metadata Control Unit uses the GoUFD module of the DLC toolkit to initiate the FTPing of the package to the UFDC server for public access and metada ta harvesting, sends the package to the Florida Digital Archive for preservation archiving, and burns the package to gold-based DVDs for local ar chival storage. Cathy Martyniak, head of Preservation, su pervises this process. A fuller explanation of th e archiving and preservation is given in the supplementary document Preservation Plan. The above procedures have been used successfully to process more than 1.7 m illion pages into the UFDC collections, available at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc Creation of Home Page, Conservation and Re-shelving Laurie Taylor (DLC) and John Nemmers will be responsib le for creating the project home page, including all project documentation and resources. Taylor will implement participatory technologies, including the user contribution system. Jim Cusick, Laurie Taylor, a nd Marilyn Ochoa will create the education module. Following digitization, John Freund will review all docum ents flagged by imaging staff for conservation assessment and take appropriate measures. John Nemmers will check materials back into Special Collections, ensuring that boxes and folders are in order, and re-shelving materials.

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Vita of : John R. Nemmers Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist Assistant University Librarian Work Experience: University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries, Special and Area Studies Collections From: August 2003 To: Present Title: Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist Arranges and describes archival and manuscripts collections and supervises other department personnel involved in the arrangement and description process. Writes procedures for the arrangement and description of archives and manuscripts. Works with web-based metadata systems, such as EAD and METS, to create online findingaids for the department's archival and V/M collections. Creates catalog records for archives and manuscripts. Reviews catalog records created by other department personnel. Participates in the public services program by providing general reference services as well as advanced reference services for archives and manuscripts. Works with curators to incorporate and interpret archival materials into exhibits. Recommends and requests preservation assistance when necessary. Florida State University Claude Pepper Library, 636 W. Call Street, Tallahassee, FL From: August 1998 To: July 2003 Title: Project Archivist Responsible for the creation and maintenance of finding aid database for the Claude Pepper Collection. Supervised multi-year digitization project to provide digital surrogates of materials in the Pepper Collection and full-text search capabilities to patrons. Processed manuscript collections, including additions to existing collections. Assisted in developing outside funding sources for projects of the Pepper Center and FSU Libraries Special Collections Department. Developed and created Encoded Archival Description (EAD) versions of guides to collections. Supervised preservation/access reformatting projects for audiovisual and photographic materials in the collection. Education: BA in History Florida State University Date: 1996 MS in Library Studies Florida State University Date: 1998 Specialist in Education Florida State University Date: 1998 Publications: Refereed: "Testing the Federated Searching Waters: A Usability Study of MetaLib" (with Marilyn Ochoa, Rae Jesano, Carrie Newsom, Maryellen Nemmers 1

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Nemmers 2 O'Brien and Paul Victor, Jr.). Journal of Web Librarianship v.1 no. 3 (2007): 47-66. Opening Archives: Improving Access to Hidden Archival Collections in Florida (with Elizabeth Konzak and Chuck Thomas). Florida Libraries 49 no. 2 (Fall 2006): 16-19. The Usability of Online Archival Resources: The Polaris Project Finding Aid (with Burt Altman). American Archivist 64 no. 1 (Spring/Summer 2001): 121-131. Non-refereed: Public Services in Special Collections (with Florence Turcotte). SPEC Kit 296 (Washington, D.C.: Association of Research Libraries), 2006. Best Practice Guidelines for the Implementation of EAD Version 2002 in Florida Institutions (available at: http://www.fcla.edu/dlini/OpeningArchi ves/pdf/FloridaEADguidelines.pdf ), March 2006. Florida's Political Past: A Guide to Manuscript Collections, Archival Records, and Other Primary Historical Documents of Florida's Politicians. An annotated bibliography (available at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/political/flpols.htm), March 2005. Papers, Speeches, Presentations: Archival Description and EAD. Presented at the Society of Florida Archivists Annual Meeting, May 2006. Strategies for the Creation and Maintenance of EAD XML Finding Aids. Presented at the Society of Florida Archivists Annual Meeting, April 2005. "Uncovering Buried Treasure: Making Primary Sources Available" (with Elizabeth Konzak and Chuck Thomas). Presented at the Florida Library Association Conference, April 2007. Grants: 2006. Enhancing Access to the Jrmie Papers. Smathers Libraries Mini Grants Program. Amount funded: $3,750. Funding dates: November 2006 October 2007. Role: Principal Investigator. 2005. Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida. Department of State Division of Library and Information Services Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA). Amount funded: $34,000. Funding dates: October 2005 September 2006. Role: Steering Committee chair and Regional Trainer.

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Laurie N. Taylor Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL 32611-7007 EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center, University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL, May 2007Associate Director, Flexible Learning, Division of Continuing Education, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, May 2006-May 2007 Instructor, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, August 2000-May 2006 SELECTED PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES Editorial Review Board Member for the International Journal of Gaming and ComputerMediated Simulations. SELECTED REFEREED PUBLICATIONS Playing the Past: Video Games, History, and Memory, co-edited with Zach Whalen. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, forthcoming 2008. "Bioactive,"in Gaming in Academic Libraries Casebook, co-authored with Sara Russel Gonzalez, Valrie Davis, Carrie Newsom, Chelsea Dinsmore, Cynthia Frey, and Kathryn Kennedy. Ed. Amy Harris and Scott Rice. ACRL, forthcoming 2008. "Snow White in the City: Teaching Fables, Nursery Rhymes, and Revisions in Graphic Novels." Approaches to Teaching the Graphic Novel. Ed. Stephen E Tabachnick. New York: MLA, forthcoming 2008. "Gaming Ethics, Rules, Etiquette and Learning." Handbook of Research on Effective Electronic Gaming in Education. Ed. Richard E. Ferdig. Information Science Reference, forthcoming 2008. "Making Nightmares into New Fairytales: Goth Comics as Children's Literature." The Gothic in Children's Literature: Haunting the Borders. Eds. Anna Jackson, Karen Coats, and Roderick McGillis. New York: Routledge, 2008: 195-208. "Console Wars: Console and Computer Games." The Player's Realm: Studies on the Culture of Video Games and Gaming. Eds. J. Patrick Williams and Jonas Heide Smith. Jefferson, NC: McFarland Press, 2007: 223-237. "Cameras, Radios, and Butterflies: the Influence and Importance of Fan Networks for Game Studies." Fibreculture Journal 8 (2006). "Playing in Neverland: Peter Pan Video Game Revisions," collaboratively written with Cathlena Martin, in J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan In and Out of Time: A Children's Classic at 100. Eds. Carole Anita Tarr and Donna White. Scarecrow Press, 2006. "Positive Features of Video Games," in Handbook of Children, Culture, and Violence. Eds. Nancy E. Dowd, Dorothy G. Singer, and Robin Fretwell Wilson. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2005. 247-265.

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"Gaming's Non-Digital Predecessors," collaboratively written with Cathlena Martin, in The International Digital Media & Arts Association Journal 2.1 (Spring 2005): 25-29. "Practicing What We Teach: Collaborative Writing and Teaching Teachers to Blog," coauthored with Cathlena Martin, in Lore: an E-Journal for Teachers of Writing, Fall 2004. "Open Source and Academia," co-authored with Brendan Riley, in Computers and Composition Online. Spring 2004. "When Seams Fall Apart: Video Game Space and the Player," in Game Studies: the International Jounral of Computer Game Research 3.2 (Dec. 2003). SELECTED PRESENTATIONS "Digital Library Navigation Position Paper" at the Codework Conference Center for Literary Computing Workshop. Morgantown, WVU: April 3-6, 2008. "Choices for Building Digital Libraries" at the College of the Bahamas' Virtual Library Committee at the College of the Bahamas, Nassau, Bahamas; Mar. 3, 2008. "File Formats 101" at the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting, in the PARS Digital Preservation Group Meeting, Philadelphia, PA: Jan. 13, 2007. "Why Are Comic Books Not Commonly Used in the Classroom? What Subjects Are Suitable For Comics?" presentation at the "Comics in the Classroom: Understanding the Educational Uses of Comic Books" Jewish Museum of Florida's Professional Development Workshop, Miami Beach, FL; Oct. 21, 2007. "Laws, Ethics, Unwritten Rules, & Etiquette" at the "World Building: Space and Community" Game Studies Conference, Gainesville, FL; Mar. 1-2, 2007. "Constructions and Reconstructions of the Gothic" at the MLA Conference, Washington, DC; Dec. 27-30, 2005. "Gaming Girls Playing with Power: Possibility Spaces in Game Design and Game Play" at the Society for Literature and Science Conference, Duke; Oct. 14-17, 2004.

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Curriculum Vitae of James G. Cusick Curator, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida and Acting Chair, Department of Special & Area Studies Collections University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 273 1774 jgcusick@ufl.edu Work Experience University of Florida George A. Smathers Library July 2007 to July 2008 Acting (Interim) Chair, Special & Area Studies Collections 1998 to Present Curator, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History University of North Florida 1997 Adjunct Professor, classroom lecturer, Introduction to Spanish Colonial History, Department of History Adjunct Professor, classroom lecturer, Introduction to North American Indian Cultures, Department of Anthropology, Sociology and Criminology Duke University, Perkins Library 1996 Postdoctoral Fellow, assistant bibliographer for Latin American collections, Perkins Library; archivist/librarian in training, Department of Special Collections/Government Documents Education B.S. in Journalism Northwestern 1981 M.A. in Anthropology UF 1989 Ph.D. in Anthropology UF 1993 Post Doctorate Duke 1996 Cusick 1

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Cusick 2 Honors 2004 James J. Horgan Book Award, Florida Historical Society Publications 2003 The Other War of 1912: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish East Florida. University Press of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. Reissued 2006 by the University of Georgia Press. 1991 2000 publications available upon request Grants Funded, January 2005. Florida Humanities Council Landmarks of American History award from NEH for teacher workshops in Florida history and supporting web resources, $11,000 subcontract from NEH/Florida Humanities Council to the Digital Library Center, UF. Funded, January 2004. Florida Humanities Council Landmarks of American History award from NEH for teacher workshops in Florida history and supporting web resources, $12,000 subcontract from NEH/Florida Humanities Council to the Digital Library Center, UF. Funded, November 2003. East Florida Papers Calendar Project, grant awarded by the St. Augustine Foundation, Flagler College, to digitize the card calendar index to this Spanish colonial collection and to convert it into a searchable online database. Grant writer and project manager, $5000. Funded, April June, 2003. Contract with the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, to create a bibliographic database on primary sources documenting slave escapes and resistance to slavery in Florida, 1650 to 1860, with John Ingram. Project manager, $12,000 awarded. Teaching Lead Instructor, Summer Teacher Workshops, Spanish St. Augustine, NEH/Florida Humanities Council Landmarks of America program (2004 2007), Florida Humanities Council program (2008).

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Vita of : Florence M. Turcotte Research Services Archivist Assistant University Librarian Work Experience: University of Florida Department of Special and Area Studies Collections George A. Smathers Libraries P. O. Box 117007 Gainesville, FL 32611-7007 From: March 2005 To: Present Title: Research Services Archivist Scope of duties: Participates in the departments public services program by providing general reference services as well as advanced reference consultation services for archives and manuscripts, both on-site and in response to remote queries. Participates in the department's bibliographic instruction program. Arranges and describes archival and manuscript collections. Works with web-based metadata systems, such as EAD, to create online finding-aids for the department's archival and manuscripts collections. Creates catalog records for archives and manuscripts. Promotes the use of collections by students, faculty, and scholars through instruction, exhibits, publications, and other means. Recommends and requests preservation assistance when necessary. University of Florida Department of Special and Area Studies Collections George A. Smathers Libraries P. O. Box 117007 Gainesville, FL 32611-7007 From: February 1997 To: March 2005 Title: Senior Library Technical Assistant Scope of duties: Responsible for the supervision of 1-2 student assistants, the transfer and processing of incoming rare book items, stacks management duties, and maintaining the department's 25 desktop and 2 laptop workstations. Provided comprehensive reference and other public services at the service desk. Continuing Education: Modern Archives Institute, Winter 2006, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington DC. A.B.D. Fall 1996-2003. Florida State University, Department of Religion. Ph.D coursework, 1993-1995. University of Pi ttsburgh, Department of Religious Studies. Completed Certificate in Theological and Liturgical Studies, 1986. Georgetown University, Turcotte 1

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Turcotte 2 School of Summer and Continuing Education. Publications: Refereed: Outreach in Special Collections Librarianship. Chapter in Academic Library Outreach: Beyond the Campus Walls. Edited by Nancy Courtney. (Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited, forthcoming, January 2009). Non-refereed: The Uncollected Writings of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (Book Review). Edited by Rodger L. Tarr and Brent E. Kinser. Florida Historical Quarterly: v.85, no. 4 (Spring 2007), p. 274-6. Libraries inaugurate Mini Grants Progra m with Four Awards, Library News, January 2007. Public Services in Special Collections. SPEC Kit, with John Nemmers. (Washington, D.C.: Association of Re search Libraries, November, 2006). The Apocalypse in Art St. Augustine Catholic Dec 1999/Jan 2000: 12.

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Pen 1 Phone (352) 273-2912 E-mail jpen@uflib.ufl.edu Jane Pen EDUCATION 1998-present: Santa Fe Community College, Gainesville, FL Degree Received AS Spring/2002 GPA 3.9 Major Computer Information Systems Analysis Classes taken Introduction to computing, Introduction to Internet, Introduction to networking, Microcomputer architecture, Data processing math, Visual Basic I & II, Programming in C++, Access 2000, Operating system, Excel 2000, PC management, Professional development for Information Technology Students, Document productions (Microsoft office applications), Adobe Photoshop, Firework, and Web authoring (Dreamweaver/XHTML). 1979-1983: Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan Degree Bachelor of Arts Major Educational Media and Library Science (The highest degree received for library degree in Taiwan at the time was the Bachelor level of studies) WORK EXPERIENCE 2001-present: Quality Control unit head. Digital Library Center, University of Florida Ensure the quality of the physical units of digitization (TIFF, JPEG and other images) and their corresponding structural metadata files for digital projects excluding newspaper. Supervise student workers working in the Quality Control unit. Help streamline processes to assure highest quality and rapid throughput of digitizing products. 1997-2001: Library assistant. Alachua County Library District, Gainesville, FL Assisted patrons with information inquiry, resolved account problems and customer services functions, using SIRSI system. Duties also included office equipment maintenance. 1996-1997: Library reference assistant. Schaumburg High School, Schaumburg, IL Assisted students/classes with reference inquiry/instruc tion, helped media center director with material processing. Also assisted computer lab manager with equipment maintenance. 1988-1996: C ataloger. Follett Library Resources Co., McHenry, IL Assisted department head with cataloging k-12 materials and bibliographies consulting with school librarians and other customers. Reduced production cost to over $5000 per budget year by rearranging workflow and organizing presentation facility. CERTIFICATION AND MEMBERSHIP UF Supervisory Challenge certificate 2006 MOUS certificate in Microsoft Excel 2000

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Santamaria 1 Lourdes Santamara 2735 SW 35 Place #1806 Gainesville, FL 32608 (786) 423 4901 lousant@uflib.ufl.edu EDUCATION 2005 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Pursuing Masters of Arts in Museum Studies 1999 2003 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Photography, Minor in Art History Cum Laude EMPLOYMENT 2005 Scanning Supervisor (Program Assistan t), Digital Library Center, Gainesville, FL Supervision of imaging process and staf f using flat bed and high-speed scanners Preparation of archival and library materials for digital imaging 2003 2004 Digital Technician Flair Pro Color Lab, Gainesville, FL Set up digital files for photographic printing, including color correction, image sizing, and digital manipulations Responsible for photographing, researching, describ ing and listing store inventory on eBay online auctions 2001 Re-shelving Personnel, Marst on Science Library, Gainesville, FL Re-shelve returned library books in corresponding sections and maintain current inventory lists EXHIBITIONS 2006 FACC Juried Student Arts Exhibition University Gallery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Juror: Bonnie Clearwater, Director and Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, FL. 2006 Intolerance Center for Visual Arts Gallery, Brookdale Comm unity College, Lincroft, NJ. Juror: Wendell T. Brooks, Professor, The College of New Jersey 2005 Intolerance Printmaking Council of New Jersey, Somerville, NJ. Juror: Wendell T. Brooks, Professor, The College of New Jersey 2004 Women in the Middle: Borders, Barriers, Intersections UWM Union Art Gallery, Milwaukee, WI. Jurors: Helen R. Klebesadel, Marianna Nunn, Clarissa Sligh, Gail Tremblay, Flo Oy Wong 2004 Cambridge Art Association National Prize Show University Place Gallery, Cambridge, MA. Juror: Robert Fitzpatrick, Pritzker Director, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, IL 2004 Photowork The Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie, NY. Ju ror: Jennifer Blessing, Curator, Solomon R.

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Santamaria 2 Guggenheim Museum New York, NY 2003 Visual AIDS: Postcards From the Edge Galerie Lelong, New York, NY 2003 Inherited Tourism The Art Store, Gainesville, FL 2003 FACC Juried Student Arts Exhibition University Gallery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Juror: Bob Hanning, Curator, Graphicstudio 2002 Most Food Comes by Boat Sergio Vega Studio, Gainesville, FL 2002 Empathy: An Exercise in Location The Art Store, Gainesville, FL 2002 Everything But the Bathroom Sink The Art Store, Gainesville, FL 2002 Digital Works, The Art Store, Gainesville, FL 2001 Sergios Ocular Migraine The Ark, Gainesville, FL 2001 Postcards to New York Macy Gallery, Columbia University, New York, NY 1998 Early Images Borders Gallery, Coral Gables, FL M-DCPS Juried Photographic Exhibition

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Matthew C. Mariner Unit Head, Text Processing Digital Library Center George A. Smathers Libraries. University of Florida P.O. Box 117007 Gainesville, FL 32611-7007 USA (352) 273-2900 marinermc@gmail.com work experience : 2006 Text Unit Head (2007-Present) Institutional Repository Coordinator (2006-2007) Digital Library Center, University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL As Institutional Repository Coordinator : Sought content to include in UF Institutional Repository Worked with Collection Managers to devise Repository goals and schema Processed IR materials using various proprietary DLC software (XML template for processing metadata; quality control application for pagination and document structure processing) As Text Unit Head : Maintain and supervise the operation of two Optical Character Recognition machines running 6 engines of PrimeOCR software. Edit and prepare document metadata according to University of Florida Digital Collections standards Maintain and supervise all loading of materials in UFDC and subsequent error identification and correction. Archiving of each "package" on DVD and Florida Digital Archive via FCLA FTP. 2001-2004 Library AideSt. Petersburg Public Library, Main; St. Petersburg, FL Maintained stacks and shelved books. Assisted patrons on information retrieval Assisted in Reader's Advisory Checked out books to patrons and assisted in fee transactions Assisted in maintenance of patron-use computers Education: 2007Present: Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL Master of Science in Information Studies (MSIS): In progress 2004-2006: University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

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Bachelor of Art in English (B.A.): completed 2002-2004: St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, FL Associate of Art (A.A.) completed

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VITA Cathleen L. Martyniak Work (352) 273 2830 Email cathy@uflib.ufl.edu Work Experience 1999 Present University of Florida Gainesville, FL Head, Preservation Department (Assistant University Librarian) Responsible for administration of Preservation Department staff including binding, conservation and digital preservation servic es. Staff levels vary over time. Duties include: 1998 1999 University of Florida Gainesville, FL Head, Binding Unit Responsible for overall operation of five FTE decentralized binding unit distributed over eight buildings 1997 1998 Tulane University New Orleans, LA Head, Preservation Department Responsible for coordination of three FTE Preservation Department including binding and conservation programs Education 1995 1996 University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA Certificate of Advanced Study in Preservation Administration [Funded by $15,000 1996 University Microf ilm Inc. Preservation Fellowship] 1993 1995 University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA Masters in Library Science 1986 1991 Universi ty of Minnesota Minneapolis, MN Bachelor of Arts Major in History Professional Memberships NATIONAL SERVICE: American Library Association (ALA) 1995 current Association for Library Colle ction and Technical Services (ALCTS) Membership Committee, Member 1998-2001, Chair, 2001 2002 Budget and Finance Committee, Member, 2004 current Preservation and Reformatting Section (PARS) Preservation Internships Task Force, Member, 1995 1996 Preservation Issues in Small to Mi d-sized Libraries Discussion Group, Chair, 1997 1999 Management Committee, Member, 1998 2000 Reformatting Committee, Member, 2000 2006: Chair 2003 2006 Martyniak 1

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Martyniak 2Program Planning Task Force, Chair, 2004 2005 Preservation Administrators Discussion Group, Co-chair, 2004 2006 Education Committee, Member 2006 current Digital Preservation Discussion Group, Co-chair, 2006 current Digital Preservation Definition Task Force, Co-chair, 2007current (please see http://blogs.ala.org/digipres.php for details) DigiPres list serv creator and administrator (over 1,110 members as of March 2008) 2007current LIBRARY SERVICE: Grant Management Committee, Member, 2003 2005: Chair, 2005 2007: Past Chair 2007-2008 Institutional Repository Ta sk Force, Member, 2004 2005 Library West Collection Preparations Committee, Guest, 2004 current University of Florida Libraries Facu lty Assembly, Member 2005 current Disaster and Emergency Planning Committee, Chair, 2006 current Brittle Book Task Force, Chair, 2007current Publications Mook, Cathleen L. Conference Report: Analog and Digital Preservation Policy: Managing Transition. Microform and Imaging Review vol. 34, no. 3, 2005. p. 130 Mook, Cathleen L. and Ben Walker. Providing access and preservation services to collections in remote storage facilities. Journal of Access Services, vol. 2, no. 3, 2004. 53-58. (Refereed) Mook, Cathleen L. Grant Coordination: SPEC KIT #283. Washington, D.C. Association of Research Libraries, Office of Leadership and Management Services, 2004. Grants Participant: Rewiring Floridas news: Florida Digital Newspaper Library 2005 current Digital Archiving Manager Supported by the Library Services and Technology Act, part of the IMLS Goal: Conversion of the University of Florida's microfilming operations to fully digital operations Funding: $199,321 (grant) + $65,671 (cost share) = $264,991 Cataloging and creating digital access to American and British Childrens Literature, 1890-1910. 2006 2009 Digital Archiving Manager Supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities Goal: Catalog Childrens Literature Titles and make the color portions accessible globally via digitization

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John Freund Preservation Department Smathers Library P O Box 117007 Gainesville, Fl 32611 Home: 20567 NW 257th Terrace High Springs FL 32643 Telephone: (office) 352-273-2835 (cel l) 352-316-1259 (home) 386-454-4988 Email johfreu@uflib.ufl.edu EDUCATION University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. June 1975, BA, Journalism. San Francisco State, San Francisco, California. College of Design and Engineering. September, 1984, Certificate, Book Restoration and Binding. WORK EXPERIENCE Head, Conservation Unit. University of Florida, Smathers Libraries. Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007 October 1988 to present. Circulation and Stack Manager/Reference. Jonsson Library of Government Documents, St anford University, Palo Alto California. June 1983 to September 1988. Instructor, Basic Book Bi nding and Restoration. San Francisco State University San Francisco, California 1983-1984 INTERNSHIPS Sutro Library San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA. September March 1982-83 San Anselmo Theological Seminary, San Anselmo, CA. October December 1983 Presentations to organizations on boo k and paper preservation including. Micanopy Historical Society, Florid a State Genealogical Association, Holy Land Map Project, Society of Florida Archivists and others. Freund 1

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Freund 2 Workshops/ Meetings Attended: Conservation Of Photographs. Metropolitan Museum, New York, 1989 Collection Conservation Treatment Berkeley, California 1991 Advanced Conservation Workshop. University of Iowa and Center for the Book. Iowa City, Iowa 1995 Deacidification Reconsidered National Archives Washington, DC March 2000 Climate Notebook Environmental Training Atlanta Georgia 2001 SOLINET Mold Workshop Richmond VA 2004 The Changing Book Transitions in Design, Pr oduction and Preservation University of Iowa July 2005 SOLINET Hurricane Preparedness Workshop June 2005 Collections consulted and / or worked with. Florida Orchid Society Archives, Ja y Kislak Collection, Mathison Museum, Harn Musuem of Art, Florida Museum of Natural History, Majorie Kinnan Rawlings Society, Lighthouse Museum, Flagler College, State Department of Records, State of Florida, St. Augustine Historic al Society, Micanopy Historical Society, Florida Historical Society, Zora Neale Hurston Museum, Cat holic Diocese of St. Augustine Archives, Sisters of St. Joseph, St Augustine, Florida.

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Marilyn N. Ochoa 321 SE 3rd Street Apt H6 Gainesville, FL 32601 (717) 830-8201 || marilyn.ochoa@gmail.com PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Gainesville, FL Assistant Head, Education Library, August 2007-Present Provide reference desk and reference cons ultation services at the Education Library Develop and update instructional and bibliographic guides via websites for general and specialized audiences concerning library resources. Selected content and developed research guides for five academic units of the College of Education Evaluate and select materials for Edu cation Library Reference Collection. Actively develops and manages collections by evalua ting and selecting relevant research and instructional materials in electronic, print and media formats for the COE, including the examination of approval items Coordinates with the Head of the Education Library and the Social Science Bibliographer regarding the reevaluation and cancellation of serial titles Assists with the evaluation and selection of numerous gift donations, offered to the Education Library Works with other Education Library or technical services staff regarding materials transfer, withdrawal, cataloging, preservation, or relocation issues, including for brittle books Continued working with Digital Library Center on University of Florida Digital Collections user interface, result and help pages, and usability studies Develop and implement University of Florida In stitutional Review Board protocols and survey instruments for Endeca library catalog, National Dig ital Newspaper Project and Chronicling America and the Digital Library of the Caribbean usability testing Participate actively in the Libraries instruction progr am to teach information literacy skills to graduate Education, COE ProTeach Program, English La nguage Institute and ot her groups, including undergraduate English classes. Lead tours and participated in other instructional activities in Education Library. Developed Library West proposals for Computer Assi stance Desk and Library West Presentation Areas. Assisted with Library West computer imaging. Developed proposal for Education Library Computer Classroom. Maintained H&SSS web directories and H&SSS staff pa ge and assisted with the development of Music Library and Education Library website template Taught research and information literacy skills, resource evaluation skills, and Web2.0 tools to interdisciplinary 3-credit honors class (Spring 2008) Coordinated the Ask A Librarian instant messaging (IM ) reference service and provided Florida-wide IM reference service (Spring 2008) University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Gainesville, FL Digital Services Librarian, April 2003-August 2007 Humanities and Social Science Reference Librarian, October 2001-April 2003 Provide professional, comprehensive reference servic e to patrons of the Humanities and Social Sciences collection in person and through the UF Libraries an d Florida Ask A Librarian virtual reference services Participate in planning, policy formation and de partmental decision-making for electronic reference services and specialized media computing areas of Library West Assist with implementation and preparation of new technology initiatives, such as installing new operating system and other software programs, and managing computers and connectivity Ochoa 1

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Ochoa 2 Serve as backup Coordinator for the Libraries virtual reference service Coordinate web activities of H&SS Services Department Evaluate digital resources including MetaLib and the University of Florida Digital Collections Teach research and information literacy skills to student s in undergraduate English classes, lead tours, and participate actively in other library instruction activities Prepare and update instructional and bibliographic gu ides in print and online for general and specialized audiences concerning library resources Select print and online reference works and databases in African American and other areas of multicultural studies and general humanities and the social sciences areas Managed email reference for Smathe rs Libraries, including the QuestionPoint Ask a Librarian service Maintained and managed Library Instruction Computer Classroom Taught research and information literacy skills, resource evaluation skills, and HTML to interdisciplinary 3-credit honors class (Spring 2004 and Spring 2005) Served as project co-advisor for Science and E ngineering Independent Study Digital Library System (grade given counted toward 50% of the final course grade, Fall 2004) EDUCATION University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA Master of Library and Information Sc ience Degree, Graduated August 2001 La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA Bachelor of Arts Degree, Political Science and English, Graduate d cum laude May 1998 HONORS AND PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP Honors Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Comm unication "Best of the Web" Competition. 2nd Place in the Creative category for Florida Journalism History Project http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/jour/fljhist/ Sponsored by the Visual Communication and Communication Technology Divisions, Spring 2006 George A. Smathers Libraries H&SSS Instruction Te am Project Staff Recognition Award, December 11, 2003 ACRL National Conference Scholarship Recipient, Spring 2003 Beta Phi Mu, inducted 2002 PUBLICATIONS Ochoa, Marilyn, Rae Jesano, John Nemmers, Carrie Newsom Maryellen OBrien, and Paul Victor. Testing the Federated Searching Waters: A Usability Study of MetaLib. Journal of Web Librarianship. 1.3 (Fall 2007): 4766. Reakes, Patrick and Marilyn Ochoa. A Grassroots Initiativ e to Facilitate Historical Research: The Florida Journalism History Project. Technical Services Quarterly. 25.2 (Spring 2007): 57-72. Cataldo, Tara, LeiLani Freund, Ma rilyn Ochoa and Marina Salcedo. Assessing the Information Commons. Public Services Quarterly 2.4 (Winter 2007): 23-46. Ronan, Jana, Patrick Reakes and Mar ilyn Ochoa. Application of the Behavioral Guidelines: A Study of Online Reference Skills. Special issue, College and Undergraduate Libraries 13.4 (November 2006): 3-30.

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Position Descriptions for Scanning and QC Technicians CLASS TITLE: Scanning Technician Starting Base Pay: $11/hour TYPE OF WORK: This person captures digital images using flatbe d scanners according to project specification, and performs basic image manipulation. EXAMPLES OF WORK: Create digital images using flatbed sca nners and appropriate scan software. Review images against original to assure authentic repres entation, and correct resolution. Names, saves, and organizes images according to project specification. Perform preliminary image correction in cluding skew correction and cropping. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Experience with using PC based computer systems Willingness to learn scanning software Ability to handle repetitive tasks Attention to detail in naming files CLASS TITLE: Quality Control Technician Starting Base Pay: $11/hour TYPE OF WORK: This person does the final quality control on digital im ages before transmitting to the Mark Up Unit. Understands and can successfully do all of the tasks of a scan techni cian and additionally makes image quality decisions independently. Performs image qua lity control tasks with minimal supervision. EXAMPLES OF WORK ( not all inclusive): Create digital images using flat bed s canners and appropriate scan software. Review images against original to assure authentic representation. Perform preliminary image correction in cluding skew correction and cropping. Name and save file accura tely as uncompressed TIFF. Uses the quality control software program to open, correct images, and name files for XML output. Creates actions in Photoshop to correct image files. Scans or rescans selected images as necessary and reintegrates into digital packages. Burns DVDs to create archival files of images using appropriate software. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Experience working with PC-based computer systems. Extensive familiarity with the procedures used at the DLC. Working knowledge of Photoshop and Microsoft office applications. Works well with others.

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Budget Narrative The estimated page count for the six collections is: 90,400 pages 9,040 letterbook pages 250 photo prints/negatives. Based on experience with test sets, we're building in a 10% reshoot rate for pages, 15% reshoot for letterbooks, and 15% for photos Adjusted estimates are: 99,440 pages 10,396 letterbook pages 288 photographic materials. This estimate assumes use of CopiBook scanner with white sheet backing for letterbooks, and, use of flatbed scanners for all photographic mate rials and other pages. Some individual sheets may withstand sheet feed scanner, based on expe rience with similar collections, but we will not count on it. All pages images wi ll be 300 dpi color (24-bit) im ages. All photographic materials will be 600 dpi grey-sca le (8-bit) images. Regular Pages: $0.25/page scanning + $0.25/page image correction/QC + $0.03/page mounting/archiving + $0.01/page media Total regular pages @ pa ge unit = $0.54/page + @ $1,805.68 data-logging (tracking) TOTAL REGULAR PAGES = (99,440 x 0.54) + 1,805.68 = $55,503.28 Letterbooks: $0.25/page scanning + $0.25/page image correction/QC + $0.03/page mounting/archiving + $0.02/page media Total Letterbooks @ page unit = $0.55/page + @ $35 data-logging (tracking) TOTAL LETTERBOOKS = (10,396 x 0.55) + 35 = $5,752.80 Photographic Materials: $0.40/page scanning + $0.25/page image correction/QC + $0.03/page mounting/archiving + $0.01/page media Total Photographic Materials @ page unit = $0.69/image + @ $71.42 data-logging (tracking) TOTAL PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERI ALS = (250 x 0.69) + 71.42 = $243.92 Budget Narrative 1

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Budget Narrative 2 TOTAL ESTIMATE (DLC) = @ $61,500 + 10% BUFFER = $ 6,150 TOTAL DIGITIZATION COSTS (DLC) = @ $67,650 The costs above are represented in the Salaries & Wages section of the Budget. In addition, the budget also includes Supplies and Materials cost s. The project will fund the purchase of 5000 Polyester envelopes that will be used to protect fragile document s during and following imaging. 5000 Polyester envelopes (11x14) x $1.00 each = $5,000.00

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Section A Budget detail for the period from: 01/01/2009 Thru: 12/31/2009 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation Grant Funds (a) ($) Cost Sharing (b) ($) Total (c) ($) Cathy Martyniak, Head, Preservation Department 0.05 FTE 2,775.00 $ 2,775.00 $ Jim Cusick, Curator, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History 0.05 FTE 3,148.00 $ 3,148.00 $ Flo Turcotte, Archivist 0.05 FTE 2,186.00 $ 2,186.00 $ John Freund, Conservato r 0.05 FTE 2,498.00 $ 2,498.00 $ Subtotals $ 10,607.00 $ 10,607.00 $ Section A Budget detail for the period from: 01/01/2010 Thru: 12/31/2010 1 Salaries and Wages 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation Grant Funds (a) ($) Cost Sharing (b) ($) Total (c) ($) John Freund, Conservato r 0.05 FTE 2,573.00 $ 2,573.00 $ Cathy Martyniak, Head, Preservation Department 0.05 FTE 2,858.00 $ 2,858.00 $ Subtotals $ 5,431.00 $ 5,431.00 $ Section A Budget detail for the period from: 01/01/2011 Thru: 12/31/2011 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation Grant Funds (a) ($) Cost Sharing (b) ($) Total (c) ($) John Freund, Conservato r 0.05 FTE 2,650.00 $ 2,650.00 $ Cathy Martyniak, Head, Preservation Department 0.05 FTE 2,944.00 $ 2,944.00 $ Subtotals $ 5,594.00 $ 5,594.00 $


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0008945700001datestamp 2009-02-18setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title America's Swampdc:creator Nemmers, JohnTaylor, Laurie N.dc:subject University of Florida. ( LCSH )dc:publisher George A. Smathers Librariesdc:date 2008dc:type Archivaldc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00089457&v=00001dc:source University of Floridadc:language Englishdc:coverage North America -- United States of America -- Floridadc:rights All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida



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UF Historical Everglades Project Summary 1 America's Swamp: The Historical Everglades Project Purposes and Goals of the Project: The University of Florida proposes a 3-year project that will use costeffective methods to digitize approximately 99,690 pages in six archival collections that document the despoiling of the Everglades and the development of South Florida in the late 19th and early 20t h centuries. The collections selected for this project document early plans for drai ning the Everglades in the 1880s and 1890s, the dredging of canals and subsequent development of the destroyed wetla nds at the start of the 20th century, as well as early attempts by conservationists to preserve the natural r esources of the Everglades. The six Everglades collections are existing holdings of UF. All six collections will be di gitized in their entirety, although a small number of boxes will be excluded because they are not within the ch ronological scope of the project. The collections date from 1854 to 1963, but the bulk of the materials included in this project will date from 1877 to 1929. The year 1929 was selected as an end date because it marks the end of the South Florida land boom and the onset of the Great Depression. The project will reprodu ce approximately 99,690 page images. Collection Extent Exclusions Pages Napoleon B. Broward Papers 1879-1818 10.75 ln. ft. (14 boxes; 4 vol.) 11,465 William Sherman Jennings Papers 18771928 13.5 ln. ft. (29 boxes; 16 vol.) 32,575 May Mann Jennings Papers 1889-1963 8 ln. ft. (23 boxes) 2 boxes dated 1930-1963 22,500 Thomas E. Will Papers 1893-1938 14 ln. ft. (24 boxes) 2 boxes dated 1930-1937 29,800 Arthur E. Morgan Papers 1912-1954 0.8 ln. ft. (2 boxes) 2 files dated 19301946 1,850 James E. Ingraham Papers 1854-1920 1 ln. ft. (2 boxes) 1,500 Total pages: 99,690 All imaging will be completed in the Digital Librar y Center (DLC), a unit of UF Libraries. For all digitized materials, METS metadata will be created In addition to technical and structural data, descriptive metadata will be imported and repurposed from existing EAD finding aids. An Everglades homepage will be developed as part of the UFDCs broade r digital collection. In practice consistent for all

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UF digital projects, redundant digital archives are maintained. Following completion of the project, researchers can enhance discoverability and comprehension of the minimal metadata by contributing descriptions for objects using a tagging and contribution system. Significance and Relationship to NHPRC Goals and Objectives: This project directly addresses the Commissions mission, vision and goals. First, it makes records of historical value and national significance freely accessible to a wide public audience. The creation of digital surrogates ensures broad use of materials that certainly enhance our knowledge of the nations history and culture. Second, the project promotes the use of the countrys documentary heritage. Project staff will work with faculty in academic units at UF and other educational institutions to ensure that students are aware of and can make use of these resources. Additionally, the project will be heavily promoted to historians and scholars in various disciplines. Third, the project guarantees the long term preservation of historical record collections so that they may be used by generations to come. The valuable historical evidence will be preserved in digital format, and the original materials also will be benefit from the reduction in physical handling. Finally, UF will explore and evaluate new methods for cost-effective reproduction of archival materials. Plan of Work: Each of the six collections will be processed separately as discrete units so that no comingling of materials can occur. An entire collection will be processed by a specific unit before it moves into another processing area. The fo llowing ordered activities will be u sed to process each collection: 1. John Nemmers, Flo Turcotte, and Jim Cusick of the Special Collections Department will select and conduct a folder level review of each collection. 2. John Freund and Cathy Martyniak of the Preserva tion Department will do an initial conservation review of the materials making note of any special handling requirements. 3. The collection will be transferred to the Dig ital Library Center for processing, serving, and archiving. The normal sequence of activities include : registering materials into the DLC tracking database, imaging, image processing and quality contro l, mark-up, data transfer, and archiving. 4. The collection will be returned to the Special Collections Department UF Historical Everglades Project Summary 2

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Products: This digitization project will produce a new Historical Everglades Project homepage providing access to almost 100,000 new digital objects. In add ition, the EAD finding aids for the six archival collections will be revised to include links to these di gital objects. As part of the project, UF will create and widely disseminate documentation and descriptive information about the project. All documentation, including workflow and technical specifications, will be included on the project homepage. Project staff will disseminate information about methodology and out comes in journal and newsletter articles and via conference presentations. The homepage also will include an education module that includes lesson plans and other information for use by teachers and student s in the classroom. UF will market the Everglades project and the education model aggressively usi ng traditional methods such as web site links, press releases, public presentations, brochures and other promotional giveaways. Key Personnel: John Nemmers, Principal Investigator. Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist, Department of Special and Area Studies Collections, University of Florida Libraries. 352-2732766. johnemm@uflib.ufl.edu Dr. Laurie Taylor Co-Principal Investigator. Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center, University of Florida Libraries. 352-273-2900. lautayl@uflib.ufl.edu Performance Objective s : 1. Digitize approximately 90,400 pages; 9,040 letterbook pages; and 250 photo prints/negatives. 2. Keep total project costs below $152,750.92. 3. Revise the EAD finding aids for six archival coll ections to include links to approximately 99,690 digital objects. 4. Create an educational module with at least 3 lesson plans and a guide to related archival collections and secondary sources UF Historical Everglades Project Summary 3

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America's Swamp: The Historical Everglades Project There are no other Everglades in the world. They are, they have always been, one of the unique regions of the earth, remote, never wholly known... They are unique also in the simplicity, the diversity, the related harmony of the forms of life they enclose. The miracle of the light pours over the green and brown expa nse of saw grass and of water, shining and slow-moving below, the grass and water that is the meaning and the central fact of the Everglades of Florida. It is a river of grass. Marjory Stoneman Douglas Drain that abominable, pestilence-ridden swamp. Napoleon Bonaparte Broward Purposes and Goals of the Project The University of Florida proposes to digitize its most important historical record collections documenting the despoiling of the Everglades and the development of Sout h Florida in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The 3-year projec t will use cost-effectiv e methods to digitize approximately 99,690 pages in six archival collec tions, and to make the digital reproductions freely available on the Internet. The collections se lected for this project document early plans for draining the Everglades in the 1880s and 1890s the dredging of canals and subsequent development of the destroyed wetlands at the star t of the 20th century, as well as early attempts by conservationists to preserve the na tural resources of the Everglades. The six collections featured in this project are part of the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History and the Archives & Manuscripts Unit of the Depa rtment of Special & Area Studies Collections at the University of Florida Libraries ( http://www.uflib.ufl/spec ). The P.K. Yonge Library is one of the state's preeminent Floridiana collections and is a major reposito ry for correspondence, reports, diaries, maps, explorer's notes and ot her archival material pertaining to Florida's environment, the Everglades, conservation, ag riculture, geology, wild life, waterways, and forestry. The Archives & Manuscripts Unit in Special Collections houses more than 5000 linear UF Historical Everglades Project 1

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feet of historical records deali ng with early settlement and deve lopment of the state, Floridas literary heritage, and agricultural and environmental history. It is also the most important repository for political papers related to Florida, aside from the State Archives. The natural and political history of the Everglad es and development in South Florida is more than just a state or regional history. The drainage and overdev elopment of the Everglades, the destruction of the region's frag ile and unique ecosystems, and th e loss of source water and other natural resources, are seen by many environmentalists as one of th e worst ecological disasters in the nation's history. The six Ev erglades collections document the people and culture of the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as defi ned by the countrys societal values, politics, regionalism, development and growth activities, genderand race-based discrimination, and the changing attitudes regard ing nature. These sources reveal the modern story of Americas Swamp from the time wh en dredgers and canal-builders assaulted it through calls for establishing a national park. Interest in draining and reclai ming land in the Everglades be gan as early as the 1880s, but major drainage activities were not undertaken until th e first two decades of the 20th century. Two Florida Governors, William Sherman Jennings and Napoleon Bonaparte Broward, would serve as the primary designers and spokespers ons for the draining of the Everglades. In 1904 Governor Broward famously promised to create an "Empire of the Everglades." Of course, in fulfilling this promise the state would have to destroy the ecological systems by dredging, creating canals, and altering the flow of water in the worlds most famed wetlands. Alarmed at the potential loss of the Everglad es several early conservationists, including Floridas May Mann UF Historical Everglades Project 2

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Jennings, began pushing for the preservation of portions of the Everglades. The drainage work started by Governors Jennings and Broward was of great interest internationally, and soon real esta te dealers and settlers from around the world rushed in to profit from the project. The land sales boom in South Florida at the start of the 1920s was almost unprecedented in the history of the world. So was the rapidity with which it had collapsed by the end of the decade. Two catastrophic hurrica nes in 1926 and 1928 effectively ended the boom, but many people had already declared the draina ge program a bust. By the time the Depression began in 1929, sales had ceased and the state was for ced to halt drainage and dredging activities. Each of the six collections provides unique a nd valuable historical evidence regarding the Everglades in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and it is diffi cult to research early drainage and conservation efforts without consulting these collections. The papers of Governor Broward ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/ spec/pkyonge/Broward.htm ) and Governor Jennings ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec /pkyonge/JenningsWilliamS.htm ) form the nucleus of the project as they were the primary architects for the drainage and reclamation projec t. Jennings started the project rolling during his term, dr umming up widespread support and resolving a myriad of legal issues, primarily pertaining to la nd claims made by the Flagler and Plant railroads. However, it was Broward who became the driving force for the project. His popularity, his larger-than-life persona, his attention to the smallest details, a nd his passion for the project, all combined to make him the perfect man to spearhead the effort. The two Progressive Era southern democrats were friends and political allies, and their common goals and accomplishments are documented extensively in their papers. UF Historical Everglades Project 3

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The May Mann Jennings Papers ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/sp ec/pkyonge/JenningsMayMann.htm) complement those of the two Governors because of her advocacy of the drainage project, and also because of her marriage to Gov. Jennings. Howeve r, the real strength of the collection is that it documents the conservation movement that deve loped at the start of the 20th century and the role of disenfranchised women in developi ng and lobbying for legisl ation to protect the environment. Jennings was a leading member of the women's club movement and an influential social reformer in Florida and nationwide. As president of th e Florida Federation of Women's Clubs in 1915, she spearheaded the effort to estab lish the Royal Palm State Park, the precursor to the Everglades National Park. Her tireless campaigns to preserve portions of the Everglades may seem at odds with her support of the drainage project, but she was representative of many conservationists of this era who were able to reconcile seemingly conflicting positions. Thus, Jennings was able to support th e drainage program promoted by Broward and her husband at the same time that she was arguing for the creation of the Royal Palm State Park. The Papers of Thomas E. Will ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/Will.htm ) provide two interesting perspectives regarding the Everglades. The first perspect ive is at the national level as Will passionately advocated drainage and land development while living in Washington, D.C. His enthusiasm for the proj ect developed by Governors Br oward and Jennings is well documented in his correspondence, speeches and wr itings. The second perspective is at a local level. Between 1912 and 1914, Will purchased land near Lake Okeechobee and began to develop the region's first planned town, Okeelanta. He exemplifies those thousands of people who bought into the dream of reclaimed land in South Florid a, and who moved to the region only to find that UF Historical Everglades Project 4

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the drainage program was insufficient. The collecti on is the perfect complement to the papers of the two Governors because it docu ments the early failures of the reclamation project, both in terms of unrealized development and de struction of ecological systems. The final two collections, although much smaller in size and narrower in scope, certainly round out and fill in some gaps in the historical evid ence presented by the other collections. The Arthur E. Morgan Papers ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/ spec/pkyonge/morganae.htm ) primarily relate to a controversy that occurred in 1912 when the U.S. House of Representatives held hearings to investigate the USDA's involvement in promo ting land sales in the Everglades, and Morgan supplied expert analysis of the dr ainage project as a civil engineer specializing in flood control. His collection provides a revealing view of the often questionable pr actices of real estate sellers and members of both the state and federal governm ents as enthusiasm for the drainage of the Everglades swept the country. The James E. Ingraham Papers ( http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/Ingraham.htm ) provide the viewpoint of a businessman who spent most of his career working in Florida for the railroad tycoons, Henry Flagler and Henry Plant. The effect that Flagler and Plant had on the development of Florida cannot be underestimated, as they sought to acquire as much land as possible for expansion of their rail lines and reso rt cities being devel oped along the two Florida coasts. As part of Ingrahams work for the Pl ant railroad, he conducte d a survey through the Everglades from Ft. Myers to Miami in 1892. The collection includes correspondence and photographs pertaining to the Everglades, as we ll as Ingrahams manuscripts regarding the Flagler and Plant railroads and their role in developing South Florida. UF Historical Everglades Project 5

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UF Historical Everglades Project 6 The six Everglades collections are existing hold ings of UF, and all have been arranged and described at the folder level with complete finding aids available online (See Appendix A for finding aids). All six collections will be digiti zed in their entirety, al though a small number of boxes will be excluded because they are not within the chronological scope of the project. The collections date from 1854 to 1963, but the bulk of the materials included in this project will date from 1877 to 1929. The year 1929 was selected as an end date because it marks the end of the South Florida land boom and the onset of the Great Depression. The project will reproduce approximately 99,690 page images. Of that num ber, approximately 9,040 pages are letterbook pages and 250 are photographic prints. Collection Extent Exclusions Pages Napoleon B. Broward Papers, 18791818 10.75 ln. ft. (14 boxes; 4 vol.) 11,465 William Sherman Jennings Papers, 1877-1928 13.5 ln. ft. (29 boxes; 16 vol.) 32,575 May Mann Jennings Papers, 1889-1963 8 ln. ft. (23 boxes) 2 boxes (0.8 ln. ft.) dated 19301963 22,500 Thomas E. Will Papers, 1893-1938 14 ln. ft. (24 boxes) 2 boxes (0.8 ln. ft.) dated 19301937 29,800 Arthur E. Morgan Papers, 1912-1954 0.8 ln. ft. (2 boxes) 2 files dated 1930-1946 1,850 James E. Ingraham Papers, 1854-1920 1 ln. ft. (2 boxes) 1,500 Total pages: 99,690

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The significance of the six Everglades collections is demonstrated best by the high number of researchers who have used the materials. Over the past three years, 58 re searchers have requested these collections: Broward (11 requests); WS Jennings (9); MM Jennings (22); Will (5); Ingraham (9); Morgan (2). [Note: The Morgan and Will Papers were not fully described online until 2007-2008.] The collections support research in many disciplines including environmental history, political science, busin ess history, womens studies, so cial studies, the history of transportation, and ethnic studies and race rela tions. As awareness of and access to these collections increases, the potential for multi-discipline use increases. Demand for these collections has grown in recent y ears, reflecting the national trend of increased scholarly interest in the Everglades and environm ental history. Several books, articl es, and Doctoral dissertations have been completed over the past ten years using these collections. Most recently, Michael Grunwald authored The Swamp: The Everglades, Flor ida, and the Politics of Paradise (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2006), Jack E. Davis and Raymond Arsenault edited Paradise Lost? The Environmental History of Florida (Gainesville: University Pr ess of Florida, 2005), and David McCally published The Everglades: An Environmental History (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1999). See Appendix B for scholar ship based on research in these collections. UF holds all of the necessary rights to digita lly reproduce those materi als created by Broward, Jennings, Jennings, Ingraham, Morgan, and Will. Each collection was gifted to UF by the creators or their heirs, and right s were conveyed to the University as part of the gift agreements. The collections do include materials not created by these individuals, but investigating the terms of copyright for many of these items would be an impossible task considering the number of creators involved. Given the date span of th is project (1854-1929; bulk: 1890-1915), it is safe to UF Historical Everglades Project 7

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assume that a significant number of the creators have been deceased for over seventy years. The primary purpose of this digital pr oject is to enhance scholarship. As these papers primarily are letters, particularly political and business correspondence, UF believes that this project will not affect the potential market for these documents. The project will include a disclaimer stating as much, and will include means for copyright holder s to request that offending digital objects be removed. UF will increase access to these valuable collections by using cost-effective methods to digitize and disseminate the digital repr oductions freely via the Internet. Currently, the six Everglades collections are available for use by all researchers, but the materials may only be used in the Reading Room of Special Collections during normal hours of opera tion. Digital access will benefit scholars and researchers who are unable to travel to UF to conduct their research. The collections will be freely available on the Internet as part of the University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC) ( http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/ ). All imaging will be completed in the Digital Li brary Center (DLC), a unit of UF Smathers Libraries. For all digitized materials, Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) metadata will be created. Information about me tadata used in the UFDC is available at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/technical/Metadata/metadata.htm The METS files will include technical and structural data about each image, as well as descriptive and administrative information. No new descriptive metadata will be created for the digital objects. All descriptive metadata will be imported and repurposed from existing collection-, series-, and folder-level descriptions in the Encoded Archival Description (EAD) finding aids for the collections. In a few UF Historical Everglades Project 8

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instances, such as when documents have been described at the item level in the finding aids, item-level descriptions will be availabl e for use with the digital objects. Discovery of digitized objects in the Everglades collections can occur in several ways: 1) An Everglades project homepage made available as part of UF Digital Collections; 2) EAD finding aids on the P.K. Yonge Librarys homepa ge; 3) EAD finding aids contributed to Archives Florida ( http://palmm.fcla.edu/afl/ ), a statewide union database of EAD finding aids; 4) MARC records with linked 856 fields in online catalogs of UF, WorldCat, etc.; 5) OAI compliant metadata harvested by digital repositories; and 6) complete electronic packages that are contributed to other online collections. The Everglades homepage will be developed as part of the UFDCs broader digital collection architecture and is based on the open-source Gr eenstone Digital Library System produced and maintained by the New Zealand Library Project at the University of Waikato. UFDC utilizes Greenstones strength in metada ta and indexing and adds an e nhanced display, providing an easier to use interface while reta ining the architectural strength of Greenstone. The enhanced display includes the ability to separate items by collection, subc ollection, and holding institution, and to then present any of thes e or any combination of these w ithin a customized display [See: http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/techni cal/Architecture/ architecture.htm ]. The Everglades homepage will include information about the project, an overview of the six Everglades collections, and links to the EAD finding aids. Discoverability of the digital objects will be enhanced by a variety of sear ch options. Researchers can search all of the collections simultaneously from the main project page, or th ey can search each collection individually, or UF Historical Everglades Project 9

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they can combine two or more collections in their search scope. In addition, all digital objects in the Everglades collections will be discoverable vi a the UFDC home page, so researchers will be able to search them in combination with all of the other digitized mate rials held by UF and its partner institutions. The structure and context of each collection will be apparent to the researcher using the collections via the Internet. Researchers will have two major means of accessing the digital objects on the UF web site: 1) by browsing the E AD finding aids online, or 2) by searching the collections using the UFDC interface. When br owsing the EAD finding aid, researchers will be able to understand the structure and context of the co llections as they browse down from the collection level to the series, folder, and item levels Each folder or item level description in the finding aid will include a link that will open all of the digital objects associated with that component. For those researchers accessing the digital objects via the UFDC web site, each digital object will be accompanied by the descriptive metadata from the EAD finding aid, as well a link to the EAD finding aid. In this way, the user should unders tand easily where a particular object is located within the hierarchy of its pare nt collection, and they al so will have the ability to browse the finding aid. To increase discovery of and access to the six Everglades collections, UF will contribute digital objects and metadata to the Ev erglades Digital Library ( http://everglades.fiu.edu/) The EDL is a project of the Everglades Information Network, a collaborative effo rt of the Florida International University Libraries, the Florida Center for Li brary Automation, the Everglades National Park, and numerous other agencies and research organizations. The EDL was established in 1996 to UF Historical Everglades Project 10

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support research, education, decision making, and in formation resource management within the greater Everglades community. Since that time, the project has grown to serve patrons from around the world with digital colle ctions, the online reference service 'Ask an Everglades Librarian', and other online information services. In practice consistent for all UF digital project s, redundant digital archives are maintained. An in-house DLC archive is created by burning TIFF masters, derivatives, and METS files to goldbased DVDs, which are retained in envi ronmentally controlled storage (cf. Guidelines at http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html ). Disks and their contents are logged in the DLC Tracking Database, which queues disks and file s for inspection every 3 years and migration every 10 years or upon format obsolescence. The pr imary archives is maintained by the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA). Completed by the FCLA in 20 05, the Florida Digital Archive (FDA) ( http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/index.htm ) is available at no cost to Floridas public university libraries. The software programmed to support the FDA is modeled on the widely accepted Open Archival Information System. It is a dark archive and no public access functions are provided. It supports the preservation functions of format normalization, mass format migration and migra tion on request. As the Everglades objects are loaded into the UFDC for public access, a comm and in the METS header direct s a copy of the files to the Florida Digital Archive (FDA). The process of forwarding original uncompressed TIFF images to the FDA is the key component in UFs plan to store, maintain and protect electronic data for the long term. Although the primary goal of the project is to increase use of this important documentary UF Historical Everglades Project 11

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heritage, this project also will ensure the contin ued preservation of these collections. The original documents will remain open to researchers, but requests for reproductions received from off-site researchers will be reduced, and there may be a reduction in requests from researchers on campus as well. A reduction in requests for phys ical access will result in less handling and a reduced possibility of risk to the documents. This project creates exciting new ar eas of exploration for the UF Li braries. In particular, UF is interested in investig ating new methods of displaying descriptive information online and making archival descriptions more user-friendly through the use of social networking technology. Because this project does not include the creation of item-level desc ription metadata, it is ideal for experimentation involving researcher-contributed metadata. Following completion of the project, researchers can enhan ce discoverability and comprehens ion of the minimal metadata by contributing descriptions for objects. UF ha s already begun planning and development for a tagging and contribution system with an editing or validation structure that would allow for contributions from authenticated and anonym ous users. An editorial system will accept contributions automatically from approved users, and place all other contributions within an editorial system where contributions will be ve tted and, once approved, will then be added to the existing metadata. This process allows established re searchers to easily cont ribute their expertise; new researchers to grow their experience through their contributions ; and all others to contribute in meaningful ways with or wit hout attribution based on their own preferences. In particular, it is anticipated that these materials will be used in the classroom and an obvious experiment would involve students contributing item-level descriptions as part of their coursework. UF Historical Everglades Project 12

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Link paths and social tagging can be used to im prove navigation of the pr oject pages. UF also plans to make use of anonymous usage statistic s in server log data to identify high-demand materials in the collections. Once identified, these ma terials potentially can be "pushed" to users. Additionally, user search patterns can point to areas of the collection where the high demand justifies the creation of authoritative item-level descriptive metadata. Likewise, staff can identify materials with high research value that are under-u tilized and develop met hods to highlight those items or otherwise improve their visibility. Significance and Relationship to NHPRC Goals and Objectives This project directly addresses the Commissions mission, vision and goals. First, it makes records of historical value and national significance freely accessi ble to a wide public audience. Although these records have been accessible to researchers in previous years, access has been limited by geographical and operational factors. The creation of di gital surrogates ensures broad use of materials that certain ly enhance our knowledge of the nations history and culture. Second, the project promotes the use of the coun trys documentary heritage. Project staff will work with faculty in academic units at UF and other educational institutions to ensure that students are aware of and can make use of thes e resources. Additionally, the project will be heavily promoted to historians and scholars in various disciplines. Third, the project guarantees the long term preservation of historical record collections so that they may be used by generations to come. The valuable historical evidence will be pres erved in digital format, and the original materials also will be benefit from th e reduction in physical handling. Finally, UF will explore and evaluate new methods for cost-effective reproducti on of archival materials. UF Historical Everglades Project 13

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UF Historical Everglades Project 14 Plan of Work The activities needed to successfully complete th is project draw on the expertise of staff in multiple units of the George A. Smathers Librarie s; the involvement of each is indicated below. Each of the six collections will be processed sepa rately as discrete units so that no co-mingling of materials can occur. An entire collection wi ll be processed by a specific unit before it moves into another processing area. The following ordered activities will be us ed to process each collection: 1. John Nemmers, Flo Turcotte, and Jim Cusick of the Special Collections Department will select and conduct a folder level review of each collection. 2. John Freund and Cathy Martyniak of the Pr eservation Department will do an initial conservation review of the materials making note of any special handling requirements. 3. The collection will be transferred to the Digital Libr ary Center (DLC) for processing, serving, and archiving. The normal sequence of digital project activities include: registering materials into the DLC tracki ng database, imaging, image processing and quality control, mark-up, data transfer, a nd archiving. A more t horough delineation of these activities may be found in the supplementary attachments: Work Plan and Digital Materials Preservation Plan 4. The collection will be returned to the Special Collections Department. Staff in the Digital Library Center have ten year s of experience handling all types of formats, and all imaging is done in accordance with establis hed professional standards. Specifications for imaging (i.e., scanning, text, and metadata) ar e based on digitization sp ecifications for PALMM Collections ( http://palmm.fcla.edu/stru cmeta/standres.html#guidedig ) that, in turn, are based on the principles and recommendations of Moving Theory into Practi ce: Digital Imaging for

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Libraries and Archives (Anne R. Kenney and Oya Y. Rieg er [Mountain View, CA : Research Libraries Group, 2000] http://www.rlg.org/preserv/mtip2000.html ) and Cornell University's Digital Imaging Tutorial ( http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/contents.htm ). These specifications are optimi zed for digital archiv ing practices as outlined by the Florida Digital Archive ( http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/ ) and also optimized for data exchange with or harvesting by other digital lib raries such as the U.S. Nati onal Science Foundations National Science Digital Library ( http://www.nsdl.org/ ), the U.S. Institute for Museum and Library Services National Leadership Grant collection ( http://imlsdcc.grainger.uiuc.edu/ ), and OAIster ( http://www.oaister.org/ ) at the University of Michigan. Products This digitization project will produce a new Hist orical Everglades Project homepage providing access to almost 100,000 new digital objects. In addition, the EAD finding aids for the six archival collections will be revised to include links to these digital objects. As part of the project, UF will create and widely disseminate documen tation and descriptive information about the project. All documentation, including workflow a nd technical specificati ons, will be included on the project homepage. Project staff will di sseminate information about methodology and outcomes in journal and newsletter articles and via conference presentations. All slideshow presentations will be included in the documentation on the project homepage. The homepage also will include an education module that includes lesson plans and other information for use by teachers and students in the classroom. For an example of a similar education module, see Spanish Colonial St. Augustine: A Resource for Teachers UF Historical Everglades Project 15

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( http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/?s=teachers ). The Everglades module w ill include an historical timeline, lesson plans, graphic materials, and a guide to primary sources and other secondary reading materials. UF will market the Everglades project and the education model aggressively using traditional methods such as web site links press releases, public presentations, brochures and other promotional giveaways. Personnel Qualifications Project personnel are listed below with brief stat ements of project responsibilities. Additional information about each project member, including qualifications and competencies, is available in the attached resumes. Responsibilities for e ach team member are desc ribed in the Plan of Work and in supplemental materials. John Nemmers, Principal Investigator. Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist, Department of Special and Area Studies Coll ections, University of Florida Libraries. Responsible for coordinating selection, conservation assessments, and compiling and submitting all project reports. Dr. Laurie Taylor Co-Principal Investig ator. Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center, University of Florida Libraries. Responsible for overseeing all aspects of the digitization process in the DLC. She will co ordinate all project activities with John Nemmers and other members of the digitizati on team. She will colla borate on creating an education module for the project. Dr. James Cusick Curator of the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, Department of Special and Area Studies Collections. Re sponsible for establishing pre-imaging procedures, including selection and cons ervation assessments. He will collaborate on UF Historical Everglades Project 16

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creating an education m odule for the project. Flo Turcotte, Research Services Archivist, Archives and Manuscripts, Department of Special and Area Studies Collections. Re sponsible for establishing pre-imaging procedures, including selection and conservation assessments. Lourdes Santamaria-Wheeler, Digital Production Supervisor Digital Library Center. Responsible for supervising scanning tec hnicians and overseeing imaging processes utilizing flatbed and high-speed scanners. Jane Pen Quality Control Unit Head, Digital Libr ary Center. Ensures the quality of the digital objects and their corresponding struct ural metadata files. She will supervise quality control technicians to assure highe st quality and rapid throughput of digitizing products. Matthew Mariner, Text Processing Unit Head, Digita l Library Center. Supervises all text processing, archiving and data transfer processes. He will coordinate data transfer for archival, preservation, and redundancy. Cathy Martyniak Department Chair, Preservation Department. Responsible for coordinating digital archiving with the Florida Digital Archive (FDA). She also will inspect materials for preservati on concerns prior to imaging. John Freund, Conservation Unit Head, Preserva tion Department. Responsible for conservation activities. He will evaluate all materials to ensure optimal material quality for digitization and for long-term preservation. Marilyn Ochoa Assistant Head, Education Library, University of Florida Libraries. Collaborates on the creation of education modules. UF Historical Everglades Project 17

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UF Historical Everglades Project 18 Performance Objectives The project will be evaluated on UFs ability to meet the following performance objectives: 1. Digitize approximately 90,400 pages; 9,040 letterbook pages; and 250 photographic items. 2. Keep total project costs below $152,750.92. 3. Revise the EAD finding aids for six archival collections to include links to approximately 99,690 digital objects. 4. Create an educational module with at least 3 lesson plans and a guide to related archival collections and secondary sources Following the grant period, the project will be ev aluated on several factors that are not linked to specific numerical performance objectives Long term success of the project will be determined, in part, on evaluations and comments submitted by researchers either online or in Special Collections. Anonymous statistics in se rver log data will be used to track online researcher demand over time, and research regi stration forms in Special Collections will be used to track on-site researcher demand. Staff also will evaluate the quantity and quality of any item-level descriptions contributed by rese archers using the participatory tagging and contribution system. This evaluative data will inform future cost-effective digitization activities.

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Digital Preservation Plan In practice consistent for all UF digital project s, redundant digital archives are maintained. An in-house DLC archive is created by burning TIFF masters, derivatives, and METS files to goldbased DVDs, which are retained in envi ronmentally controlled storage (cf. Guidelines at http://palmm.fcla.edu/strucmeta/tiff.html ). Disks and their contents are logged in the DLC Tracking Database, which queues disks and file s for inspection every 3 years and migration every 10 years or upon format obsolescence. The pr imary archives is maintained by the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA). Completed by the FCLA in 20 05, the Florida Digital Archive (FDA) ( http://www.fcla.edu/digitalArchive/index.htm ) is available at no cost to Floridas public university libraries. The software programmed to support the FDA is modeled on the widely accepted Open Archival Information System. It is a dark archive and no public access functions are provided. It supports the preservation functions of format normalization, mass format migration and migra tion on request. As the Everglades objects are loaded into the UFDC for public access, a comm and in the METS header direct s a copy of the files to the Florida Digital Archive (FDA). The process of forwarding original uncompressed TIFF images to the FDA is the key component in UFs plan to store, maintain and protect electronic data for the long term. [1] As reported in: University of Leeds. Representation and Rendering Project. Survey and assessment of sources of information on file fo rmats and software documentation: final report (2003) http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uploaded_docum ents/FileFormatsreport.pdf

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Work Plan 1 Plan of Work Time Schedule of Activities Activity Jan-Mar 2009 Apr-Jun 2009 Jul-Sep 2009 Oct-Dec 2009 Jan-Mar 2010 Apr-Jun 2010 Jul-Sep 2010 Oct-Dec 2010 Jan-Mar 2011 Apr-Jun 2011 Jul-Sep 2011 Oct-Dec 2011 Selection & folder review Conservation Assessment Digitization Actions Hiring & training of imaging & quality control technicians Record ingest to tracking Broward/Jenning s, M.M./Will Jennings, W.S./Ingraham/Morgan Imaging Broward/Jenning s, M.M./Will Jennings, W.S./Ingraham/Morgan Quality Control Broward/Jenning s, M.M./Will Jennings, W.S./Ingraham/Morgan Package Markup/ Deployment/ Archiving Broward/Jenning s, M.M./Will Jennings, W.S./Ingraham/Morgan Conservation assessment Reshelving of collections Creation of home page, education modules, and project documents

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Workflow Selection, preparation and conservation review Six collections have been selected for digitization. Special Collections staff (John Nemmers, Flo Turcotte, and Jim Cusick) will complete a pre-imaging checklist The staff will physically examine each archival container to identify potential special-needs material s such as fragile documents, photographic images, etc. The staff will ensure that the physical arrangement of the folders in each box is identical to the arrangement described in the EAD finding aid. Special Collections st aff will include written notes and instructions for the DLC staff when delivering materials fo r digitization. Special Collections sta ff will use the checklist to check out each archival container prior to imaging. Boxes will be transported to the DLC from Special Collections after they have been checked out. If a patron requests use of a box while it is in the DLC, the box can be temporarily retrieved for the patron to use in the Speci al Collections Reading Room Prior to digitization, any items of particular concern will be reviewed by me mbers of the Preservation Department (John Freund and Cathy Martyniak) and handling requirements will be not ed. The Digital Library Cent er (DLC) is located in the same building and floor as the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections. Digitization Actions Tracking Once a collection is received by the DL C, the existing EAD finding aid data will be imported into the Digital Library Tracking Database (DLC Tracking) and repurposed from exis ting collection-, series-, and folder-level descriptions for the collections. In a few instances, where individual items are described in the EAD finding aids, item-level descriptions will be available for use with the digital objects. Descriptive metadata elements in the existing EAD finding aids that will be repurposed in clude: Collection Title, Collection Dates, Collection Originator, Series Title, Series Date, Folder Title, Folder Date(s). For all digitized materials, national Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) metadata will be created. The basic METS files are cr eated and enhanced automatically as an individual folder moves throu the digitization chain gh from this point on. The DLC Tracking database assigns a unique eight digi t Bibliographic Identifier (BibID) to each folder processed, and that BibID will be used to track the ite m throughout the digitization process. For example, the Business Correspondence 1908-1910 folder from the Thomas E. Will Papers might be assigned UF00096543. Folders will be retained in their original num bered boxes, temporary BibIDs will be attached to each folder, and the box will be m oved to the digitizing unit. Imaging The imaging unit is supervised by Lourdes Santamaria -Wheeler, who has extensiv e experience in hiring, training, and supervising student scanners for image cap ture and enhancement. Scanning technicians will be hired from grant funds. Technicians will be hired based on their skills and understanding of digital image Work Plan 2 I

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Work Plan 3 capture and color correction. Santamar ia-Wheeler will supervise and as necessary provide advanced training to the imaging technicians. All items within folders will be digitized to meet the requirements of the items physical format. Photographs will be scanned at 600 dpi, 8 bit grayscale. Individual pages wi ll be scanned on Copibook or flatbed scanners at mi nimum of 300 dpi, 24 bit color. The letterbooks will be scanned on Copibooks at 300 dpi, 24 bit color. Capturing letterbook page s will necessitate that each page is backed with a blank white sheet to minimize bleed through. The pr oduction imaging unit performs initial image review of all pages, adjusting the image quality as necessary, including adjustment of levels, skew, and contrast. Advanced image manipulation will be performed as needed and includes level adjustment and color replacement to minimize the appearance of aging and foxing. Images will be captured as uncompressed TIFF files (ITU6.0) at 100% scale; the curr ent de facto standard for electronic image archives. Imaging equipment will be maintained by the production imaging unit. Both flatbed and CopiBook scanners will be calibrated regularly in order to maintain color fidelity and optimum image results. Quality Control After initial scanning and image enha ncement discussed above, all aspe cts of image control and digital package creation are controlled by the UFDC Toolkit, an integrated software package that controls derivative image formation, quality control review at the package level, and deployment to th e UFDC server. Jane Pen, head of the Quality Control Unit, hires, trains, and supe rvises a staff of quality c ontrol technicians. Her staff use Toolkit Pre-QC function whic h creates jpg, jpg2, and jpg thumbnail images. A second program, the Quality Control tool, displays thumbnails of each image in sequential order. These images are reviewed. Errors are noted and returned to the imaging unit for scan /rescan of the pages. If th ere are no errors, the files go to the Metadata Control Unit. At this point, the initial METS file contai ns basic structural and administrative metadata, as well as the descrip tive metadata repurposed from the EAD files. Digital Package Markup & Deployment Once quality control has been comple ted, the digital package moves to the Markup Unit. For this project, Matt Mariner, the Unit head will train digital package t echnicians in procedures that ensure all package level metadata will conform to the national METS, our local extension schemas, and to requirements for serving in UFDC, preservation in the Florida Digi tal Archive, and integrating of pa ckages into the Everglades Online Library. As appropriate, ot her project and resource specific extens ion schemas may be created. Users can view the METS file for any item loaded in UFDC by selecting METS Metadata under the Technical Data menu on the navigation bar to the left of an item bei ng viewed. With final packag e approval, the Metadata Control Unit uses the GoUFD module of the DLC toolkit to initiate the FTPing of the package to the UFDC server for public access and metada ta harvesting, sends the package to the Florida Digital Archive for preservation archiving, and burns the package to gold-based DVDs for local ar chival storage. Cathy Martyniak, head of Preservation, su pervises this process. A fuller explanation of th e archiving and preservation is given in the supplementary document Preservation Plan. The above procedures have been used successfully to process more than 1.7 m illion pages into the UFDC collections, available at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc Creation of Home Page, Conservation and Re-shelving Laurie Taylor (DLC) and John Nemmers will be responsib le for creating the project home page, including all project documentation and resources. Taylor will implement participatory technologies, including the user contribution system. Jim Cusick, Laurie Taylor, a nd Marilyn Ochoa will create the education module. Following digitization, John Freund will review all docum ents flagged by imaging staff for conservation assessment and take appropriate measures. John Nemmers will check materials back into Special Collections, ensuring that boxes and folders are in order, and re-shelving materials.

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Vita of : John R. Nemmers Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist Assistant University Librarian Work Experience: University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries, Special and Area Studies Collections From: August 2003 To: Present Title: Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist Arranges and describes archival and manuscripts collections and supervises other department personnel involved in the arrangement and description process. Writes procedures for the arrangement and description of archives and manuscripts. Works with web-based metadata systems, such as EAD and METS, to create online findingaids for the department's archival and V/M collections. Creates catalog records for archives and manuscripts. Reviews catalog records created by other department personnel. Participates in the public services program by providing general reference services as well as advanced reference services for archives and manuscripts. Works with curators to incorporate and interpret archival materials into exhibits. Recommends and requests preservation assistance when necessary. Florida State University Claude Pepper Library, 636 W. Call Street, Tallahassee, FL From: August 1998 To: July 2003 Title: Project Archivist Responsible for the creation and maintenance of finding aid database for the Claude Pepper Collection. Supervised multi-year digitization project to provide digital surrogates of materials in the Pepper Collection and full-text search capabilities to patrons. Processed manuscript collections, including additions to existing collections. Assisted in developing outside funding sources for projects of the Pepper Center and FSU Libraries Special Collections Department. Developed and created Encoded Archival Description (EAD) versions of guides to collections. Supervised preservation/access reformatting projects for audiovisual and photographic materials in the collection. Education: BA in History Florida State University Date: 1996 MS in Library Studies Florida State University Date: 1998 Specialist in Education Florida State University Date: 1998 Publications: Refereed: "Testing the Federated Searching Waters: A Usability Study of MetaLib" (with Marilyn Ochoa, Rae Jesano, Carrie Newsom, Maryellen Nemmers 1

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Nemmers 2 O'Brien and Paul Victor, Jr.). Journal of Web Librarianship v.1 no. 3 (2007): 47-66. Opening Archives: Improving Access to Hidden Archival Collections in Florida (with Elizabeth Konzak and Chuck Thomas). Florida Libraries 49 no. 2 (Fall 2006): 16-19. The Usability of Online Archival Resources: The Polaris Project Finding Aid (with Burt Altman). American Archivist 64 no. 1 (Spring/Summer 2001): 121-131. Non-refereed: Public Services in Special Collections (with Florence Turcotte). SPEC Kit 296 (Washington, D.C.: Association of Research Libraries), 2006. Best Practice Guidelines for the Implementation of EAD Version 2002 in Florida Institutions (available at: http://www.fcla.edu/dlini/OpeningArchi ves/pdf/FloridaEADguidelines.pdf ), March 2006. Florida's Political Past: A Guide to Manuscript Collections, Archival Records, and Other Primary Historical Documents of Florida's Politicians. An annotated bibliography (available at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/political/flpols.htm), March 2005. Papers, Speeches, Presentations: Archival Description and EAD. Presented at the Society of Florida Archivists Annual Meeting, May 2006. Strategies for the Creation and Maintenance of EAD XML Finding Aids. Presented at the Society of Florida Archivists Annual Meeting, April 2005. "Uncovering Buried Treasure: Making Primary Sources Available" (with Elizabeth Konzak and Chuck Thomas). Presented at the Florida Library Association Conference, April 2007. Grants: 2006. Enhancing Access to the Jrmie Papers. Smathers Libraries Mini Grants Program. Amount funded: $3,750. Funding dates: November 2006 October 2007. Role: Principal Investigator. 2005. Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida. Department of State Division of Library and Information Services Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA). Amount funded: $34,000. Funding dates: October 2005 September 2006. Role: Steering Committee chair and Regional Trainer.

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Laurie N. Taylor Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL 32611-7007 EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center, University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL, May 2007Associate Director, Flexible Learning, Division of Continuing Education, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, May 2006-May 2007 Instructor, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, August 2000-May 2006 SELECTED PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES Editorial Review Board Member for the International Journal of Gaming and ComputerMediated Simulations. SELECTED REFEREED PUBLICATIONS Playing the Past: Video Games, History, and Memory, co-edited with Zach Whalen. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, forthcoming 2008. "Bioactive,"in Gaming in Academic Libraries Casebook, co-authored with Sara Russel Gonzalez, Valrie Davis, Carrie Newsom, Chelsea Dinsmore, Cynthia Frey, and Kathryn Kennedy. Ed. Amy Harris and Scott Rice. ACRL, forthcoming 2008. "Snow White in the City: Teaching Fables, Nursery Rhymes, and Revisions in Graphic Novels." Approaches to Teaching the Graphic Novel. Ed. Stephen E Tabachnick. New York: MLA, forthcoming 2008. "Gaming Ethics, Rules, Etiquette and Learning." Handbook of Research on Effective Electronic Gaming in Education. Ed. Richard E. Ferdig. Information Science Reference, forthcoming 2008. "Making Nightmares into New Fairytales: Goth Comics as Children's Literature." The Gothic in Children's Literature: Haunting the Borders. Eds. Anna Jackson, Karen Coats, and Roderick McGillis. New York: Routledge, 2008: 195-208. "Console Wars: Console and Computer Games." The Player's Realm: Studies on the Culture of Video Games and Gaming. Eds. J. Patrick Williams and Jonas Heide Smith. Jefferson, NC: McFarland Press, 2007: 223-237. "Cameras, Radios, and Butterflies: the Influence and Importance of Fan Networks for Game Studies." Fibreculture Journal 8 (2006). "Playing in Neverland: Peter Pan Video Game Revisions," collaboratively written with Cathlena Martin, in J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan In and Out of Time: A Children's Classic at 100. Eds. Carole Anita Tarr and Donna White. Scarecrow Press, 2006. "Positive Features of Video Games," in Handbook of Children, Culture, and Violence. Eds. Nancy E. Dowd, Dorothy G. Singer, and Robin Fretwell Wilson. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2005. 247-265.

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"Gaming's Non-Digital Predecessors," collaboratively written with Cathlena Martin, in The International Digital Media & Arts Association Journal 2.1 (Spring 2005): 25-29. "Practicing What We Teach: Collaborative Writing and Teaching Teachers to Blog," coauthored with Cathlena Martin, in Lore: an E-Journal for Teachers of Writing, Fall 2004. "Open Source and Academia," co-authored with Brendan Riley, in Computers and Composition Online. Spring 2004. "When Seams Fall Apart: Video Game Space and the Player," in Game Studies: the International Jounral of Computer Game Research 3.2 (Dec. 2003). SELECTED PRESENTATIONS "Digital Library Navigation Position Paper" at the Codework Conference Center for Literary Computing Workshop. Morgantown, WVU: April 3-6, 2008. "Choices for Building Digital Libraries" at the College of the Bahamas' Virtual Library Committee at the College of the Bahamas, Nassau, Bahamas; Mar. 3, 2008. "File Formats 101" at the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting, in the PARS Digital Preservation Group Meeting, Philadelphia, PA: Jan. 13, 2007. "Why Are Comic Books Not Commonly Used in the Classroom? What Subjects Are Suitable For Comics?" presentation at the "Comics in the Classroom: Understanding the Educational Uses of Comic Books" Jewish Museum of Florida's Professional Development Workshop, Miami Beach, FL; Oct. 21, 2007. "Laws, Ethics, Unwritten Rules, & Etiquette" at the "World Building: Space and Community" Game Studies Conference, Gainesville, FL; Mar. 1-2, 2007. "Constructions and Reconstructions of the Gothic" at the MLA Conference, Washington, DC; Dec. 27-30, 2005. "Gaming Girls Playing with Power: Possibility Spaces in Game Design and Game Play" at the Society for Literature and Science Conference, Duke; Oct. 14-17, 2004.

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Curriculum Vitae of James G. Cusick Curator, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida and Acting Chair, Department of Special & Area Studies Collections University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 273 1774 jgcusick@ufl.edu Work Experience University of Florida George A. Smathers Library July 2007 to July 2008 Acting (Interim) Chair, Special & Area Studies Collections 1998 to Present Curator, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History University of North Florida 1997 Adjunct Professor, classroom lecturer, Introduction to Spanish Colonial History, Department of History Adjunct Professor, classroom lecturer, Introduction to North American Indian Cultures, Department of Anthropology, Sociology and Criminology Duke University, Perkins Library 1996 Postdoctoral Fellow, assistant bibliographer for Latin American collections, Perkins Library; archivist/librarian in training, Department of Special Collections/Government Documents Education B.S. in Journalism Northwestern 1981 M.A. in Anthropology UF 1989 Ph.D. in Anthropology UF 1993 Post Doctorate Duke 1996 Cusick 1

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Cusick 2 Honors 2004 James J. Horgan Book Award, Florida Historical Society Publications 2003 The Other War of 1912: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish East Florida. University Press of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. Reissued 2006 by the University of Georgia Press. 1991 2000 publications available upon request Grants Funded, January 2005. Florida Humanities Council Landmarks of American History award from NEH for teacher workshops in Florida history and supporting web resources, $11,000 subcontract from NEH/Florida Humanities Council to the Digital Library Center, UF. Funded, January 2004. Florida Humanities Council Landmarks of American History award from NEH for teacher workshops in Florida history and supporting web resources, $12,000 subcontract from NEH/Florida Humanities Council to the Digital Library Center, UF. Funded, November 2003. East Florida Papers Calendar Project, grant awarded by the St. Augustine Foundation, Flagler College, to digitize the card calendar index to this Spanish colonial collection and to convert it into a searchable online database. Grant writer and project manager, $5000. Funded, April June, 2003. Contract with the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, to create a bibliographic database on primary sources documenting slave escapes and resistance to slavery in Florida, 1650 to 1860, with John Ingram. Project manager, $12,000 awarded. Teaching Lead Instructor, Summer Teacher Workshops, Spanish St. Augustine, NEH/Florida Humanities Council Landmarks of America program (2004 2007), Florida Humanities Council program (2008).

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Vita of : Florence M. Turcotte Research Services Archivist Assistant University Librarian Work Experience: University of Florida Department of Special and Area Studies Collections George A. Smathers Libraries P. O. Box 117007 Gainesville, FL 32611-7007 From: March 2005 To: Present Title: Research Services Archivist Scope of duties: Participates in the departments public services program by providing general reference services as well as advanced reference consultation services for archives and manuscripts, both on-site and in response to remote queries. Participates in the department's bibliographic instruction program. Arranges and describes archival and manuscript collections. Works with web-based metadata systems, such as EAD, to create online finding-aids for the department's archival and manuscripts collections. Creates catalog records for archives and manuscripts. Promotes the use of collections by students, faculty, and scholars through instruction, exhibits, publications, and other means. Recommends and requests preservation assistance when necessary. University of Florida Department of Special and Area Studies Collections George A. Smathers Libraries P. O. Box 117007 Gainesville, FL 32611-7007 From: February 1997 To: March 2005 Title: Senior Library Technical Assistant Scope of duties: Responsible for the supervision of 1-2 student assistants, the transfer and processing of incoming rare book items, stacks management duties, and maintaining the department's 25 desktop and 2 laptop workstations. Provided comprehensive reference and other public services at the service desk. Continuing Education: Modern Archives Institute, Winter 2006, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington DC. A.B.D. Fall 1996-2003. Florida State University, Department of Religion. Ph.D coursework, 1993-1995. University of Pi ttsburgh, Department of Religious Studies. Completed Certificate in Theological and Liturgical Studies, 1986. Georgetown University, Turcotte 1

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Turcotte 2 School of Summer and Continuing Education. Publications: Refereed: Outreach in Special Collections Librarianship. Chapter in Academic Library Outreach: Beyond the Campus Walls. Edited by Nancy Courtney. (Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited, forthcoming, January 2009). Non-refereed: The Uncollected Writings of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (Book Review). Edited by Rodger L. Tarr and Brent E. Kinser. Florida Historical Quarterly: v.85, no. 4 (Spring 2007), p. 274-6. Libraries inaugurate Mini Grants Progra m with Four Awards, Library News, January 2007. Public Services in Special Collections. SPEC Kit, with John Nemmers. (Washington, D.C.: Association of Re search Libraries, November, 2006). The Apocalypse in Art St. Augustine Catholic Dec 1999/Jan 2000: 12.

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Pen 1 Phone (352) 273-2912 E-mail jpen@uflib.ufl.edu Jane Pen EDUCATION 1998-present: Santa Fe Community College, Gainesville, FL Degree Received AS Spring/2002 GPA 3.9 Major Computer Information Systems Analysis Classes taken Introduction to computing, Introduction to Internet, Introduction to networking, Microcomputer architecture, Data processing math, Visual Basic I & II, Programming in C++, Access 2000, Operating system, Excel 2000, PC management, Professional development for Information Technology Students, Document productions (Microsoft office applications), Adobe Photoshop, Firework, and Web authoring (Dreamweaver/XHTML). 1979-1983: Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan Degree Bachelor of Arts Major Educational Media and Library Science (The highest degree received for library degree in Taiwan at the time was the Bachelor level of studies) WORK EXPERIENCE 2001-present: Quality Control unit head. Digital Library Center, University of Florida Ensure the quality of the physical units of digitization (TIFF, JPEG and other images) and their corresponding structural metadata files for digital projects excluding newspaper. Supervise student workers working in the Quality Control unit. Help streamline processes to assure highest quality and rapid throughput of digitizing products. 1997-2001: Library assistant. Alachua County Library District, Gainesville, FL Assisted patrons with information inquiry, resolved account problems and customer services functions, using SIRSI system. Duties also included office equipment maintenance. 1996-1997: Library reference assistant. Schaumburg High School, Schaumburg, IL Assisted students/classes with reference inquiry/instruc tion, helped media center director with material processing. Also assisted computer lab manager with equipment maintenance. 1988-1996: C ataloger. Follett Library Resources Co., McHenry, IL Assisted department head with cataloging k-12 materials and bibliographies consulting with school librarians and other customers. Reduced production cost to over $5000 per budget year by rearranging workflow and organizing presentation facility. CERTIFICATION AND MEMBERSHIP UF Supervisory Challenge certificate 2006 MOUS certificate in Microsoft Excel 2000

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Santamaria 1 Lourdes Santamara 2735 SW 35 Place #1806 Gainesville, FL 32608 (786) 423 4901 lousant@uflib.ufl.edu EDUCATION 2005 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Pursuing Masters of Arts in Museum Studies 1999 2003 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Photography, Minor in Art History Cum Laude EMPLOYMENT 2005 Scanning Supervisor (Program Assistan t), Digital Library Center, Gainesville, FL Supervision of imaging process and staf f using flat bed and high-speed scanners Preparation of archival and library materials for digital imaging 2003 2004 Digital Technician Flair Pro Color Lab, Gainesville, FL Set up digital files for photographic printing, including color correction, image sizing, and digital manipulations Responsible for photographing, researching, describ ing and listing store inventory on eBay online auctions 2001 Re-shelving Personnel, Marst on Science Library, Gainesville, FL Re-shelve returned library books in corresponding sections and maintain current inventory lists EXHIBITIONS 2006 FACC Juried Student Arts Exhibition University Gallery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Juror: Bonnie Clearwater, Director and Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, FL. 2006 Intolerance Center for Visual Arts Gallery, Brookdale Comm unity College, Lincroft, NJ. Juror: Wendell T. Brooks, Professor, The College of New Jersey 2005 Intolerance Printmaking Council of New Jersey, Somerville, NJ. Juror: Wendell T. Brooks, Professor, The College of New Jersey 2004 Women in the Middle: Borders, Barriers, Intersections UWM Union Art Gallery, Milwaukee, WI. Jurors: Helen R. Klebesadel, Marianna Nunn, Clarissa Sligh, Gail Tremblay, Flo Oy Wong 2004 Cambridge Art Association National Prize Show University Place Gallery, Cambridge, MA. Juror: Robert Fitzpatrick, Pritzker Director, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, IL 2004 Photowork The Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie, NY. Ju ror: Jennifer Blessing, Curator, Solomon R.

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Santamaria 2 Guggenheim Museum New York, NY 2003 Visual AIDS: Postcards From the Edge Galerie Lelong, New York, NY 2003 Inherited Tourism The Art Store, Gainesville, FL 2003 FACC Juried Student Arts Exhibition University Gallery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Juror: Bob Hanning, Curator, Graphicstudio 2002 Most Food Comes by Boat Sergio Vega Studio, Gainesville, FL 2002 Empathy: An Exercise in Location The Art Store, Gainesville, FL 2002 Everything But the Bathroom Sink The Art Store, Gainesville, FL 2002 Digital Works, The Art Store, Gainesville, FL 2001 Sergios Ocular Migraine The Ark, Gainesville, FL 2001 Postcards to New York Macy Gallery, Columbia University, New York, NY 1998 Early Images Borders Gallery, Coral Gables, FL M-DCPS Juried Photographic Exhibition

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Matthew C. Mariner Unit Head, Text Processing Digital Library Center George A. Smathers Libraries. University of Florida P.O. Box 117007 Gainesville, FL 32611-7007 USA (352) 273-2900 marinermc@gmail.com work experience : 2006 Text Unit Head (2007-Present) Institutional Repository Coordinator (2006-2007) Digital Library Center, University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL As Institutional Repository Coordinator : Sought content to include in UF Institutional Repository Worked with Collection Managers to devise Repository goals and schema Processed IR materials using various proprietary DLC software (XML template for processing metadata; quality control application for pagination and document structure processing) As Text Unit Head : Maintain and supervise the operation of two Optical Character Recognition machines running 6 engines of PrimeOCR software. Edit and prepare document metadata according to University of Florida Digital Collections standards Maintain and supervise all loading of materials in UFDC and subsequent error identification and correction. Archiving of each "package" on DVD and Florida Digital Archive via FCLA FTP. 2001-2004 Library AideSt. Petersburg Public Library, Main; St. Petersburg, FL Maintained stacks and shelved books. Assisted patrons on information retrieval Assisted in Reader's Advisory Checked out books to patrons and assisted in fee transactions Assisted in maintenance of patron-use computers Education: 2007Present: Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL Master of Science in Information Studies (MSIS): In progress 2004-2006: University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

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Bachelor of Art in English (B.A.): completed 2002-2004: St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, FL Associate of Art (A.A.) completed

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VITA Cathleen L. Martyniak Work (352) 273 2830 Email cathy@uflib.ufl.edu Work Experience 1999 Present University of Florida Gainesville, FL Head, Preservation Department (Assistant University Librarian) Responsible for administration of Preservation Department staff including binding, conservation and digital preservation servic es. Staff levels vary over time. Duties include: 1998 1999 University of Florida Gainesville, FL Head, Binding Unit Responsible for overall operation of five FTE decentralized binding unit distributed over eight buildings 1997 1998 Tulane University New Orleans, LA Head, Preservation Department Responsible for coordination of three FTE Preservation Department including binding and conservation programs Education 1995 1996 University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA Certificate of Advanced Study in Preservation Administration [Funded by $15,000 1996 University Microf ilm Inc. Preservation Fellowship] 1993 1995 University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA Masters in Library Science 1986 1991 Universi ty of Minnesota Minneapolis, MN Bachelor of Arts Major in History Professional Memberships NATIONAL SERVICE: American Library Association (ALA) 1995 current Association for Library Colle ction and Technical Services (ALCTS) Membership Committee, Member 1998-2001, Chair, 2001 2002 Budget and Finance Committee, Member, 2004 current Preservation and Reformatting Section (PARS) Preservation Internships Task Force, Member, 1995 1996 Preservation Issues in Small to Mi d-sized Libraries Discussion Group, Chair, 1997 1999 Management Committee, Member, 1998 2000 Reformatting Committee, Member, 2000 2006: Chair 2003 2006 Martyniak 1

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Martyniak 2Program Planning Task Force, Chair, 2004 2005 Preservation Administrators Discussion Group, Co-chair, 2004 2006 Education Committee, Member 2006 current Digital Preservation Discussion Group, Co-chair, 2006 current Digital Preservation Definition Task Force, Co-chair, 2007current (please see http://blogs.ala.org/digipres.php for details) DigiPres list serv creator and administrator (over 1,110 members as of March 2008) 2007current LIBRARY SERVICE: Grant Management Committee, Member, 2003 2005: Chair, 2005 2007: Past Chair 2007-2008 Institutional Repository Ta sk Force, Member, 2004 2005 Library West Collection Preparations Committee, Guest, 2004 current University of Florida Libraries Facu lty Assembly, Member 2005 current Disaster and Emergency Planning Committee, Chair, 2006 current Brittle Book Task Force, Chair, 2007current Publications Mook, Cathleen L. Conference Report: Analog and Digital Preservation Policy: Managing Transition. Microform and Imaging Review vol. 34, no. 3, 2005. p. 130 Mook, Cathleen L. and Ben Walker. Providing access and preservation services to collections in remote storage facilities. Journal of Access Services, vol. 2, no. 3, 2004. 53-58. (Refereed) Mook, Cathleen L. Grant Coordination: SPEC KIT #283. Washington, D.C. Association of Research Libraries, Office of Leadership and Management Services, 2004. Grants Participant: Rewiring Floridas news: Florida Digital Newspaper Library 2005 current Digital Archiving Manager Supported by the Library Services and Technology Act, part of the IMLS Goal: Conversion of the University of Florida's microfilming operations to fully digital operations Funding: $199,321 (grant) + $65,671 (cost share) = $264,991 Cataloging and creating digital access to American and British Childrens Literature, 1890-1910. 2006 2009 Digital Archiving Manager Supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities Goal: Catalog Childrens Literature Titles and make the color portions accessible globally via digitization

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John Freund Preservation Department Smathers Library P O Box 117007 Gainesville, Fl 32611 Home: 20567 NW 257th Terrace High Springs FL 32643 Telephone: (office) 352-273-2835 (cel l) 352-316-1259 (home) 386-454-4988 Email johfreu@uflib.ufl.edu EDUCATION University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. June 1975, BA, Journalism. San Francisco State, San Francisco, California. College of Design and Engineering. September, 1984, Certificate, Book Restoration and Binding. WORK EXPERIENCE Head, Conservation Unit. University of Florida, Smathers Libraries. Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007 October 1988 to present. Circulation and Stack Manager/Reference. Jonsson Library of Government Documents, St anford University, Palo Alto California. June 1983 to September 1988. Instructor, Basic Book Bi nding and Restoration. San Francisco State University San Francisco, California 1983-1984 INTERNSHIPS Sutro Library San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA. September March 1982-83 San Anselmo Theological Seminary, San Anselmo, CA. October December 1983 Presentations to organizations on boo k and paper preservation including. Micanopy Historical Society, Florid a State Genealogical Association, Holy Land Map Project, Society of Florida Archivists and others. Freund 1

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Freund 2 Workshops/ Meetings Attended: Conservation Of Photographs. Metropolitan Museum, New York, 1989 Collection Conservation Treatment Berkeley, California 1991 Advanced Conservation Workshop. University of Iowa and Center for the Book. Iowa City, Iowa 1995 Deacidification Reconsidered National Archives Washington, DC March 2000 Climate Notebook Environmental Training Atlanta Georgia 2001 SOLINET Mold Workshop Richmond VA 2004 The Changing Book Transitions in Design, Pr oduction and Preservation University of Iowa July 2005 SOLINET Hurricane Preparedness Workshop June 2005 Collections consulted and / or worked with. Florida Orchid Society Archives, Ja y Kislak Collection, Mathison Museum, Harn Musuem of Art, Florida Museum of Natural History, Majorie Kinnan Rawlings Society, Lighthouse Museum, Flagler College, State Department of Records, State of Florida, St. Augustine Historic al Society, Micanopy Historical Society, Florida Historical Society, Zora Neale Hurston Museum, Cat holic Diocese of St. Augustine Archives, Sisters of St. Joseph, St Augustine, Florida.

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Marilyn N. Ochoa 321 SE 3rd Street Apt H6 Gainesville, FL 32601 (717) 830-8201 || marilyn.ochoa@gmail.com PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Gainesville, FL Assistant Head, Education Library, August 2007-Present Provide reference desk and reference cons ultation services at the Education Library Develop and update instructional and bibliographic guides via websites for general and specialized audiences concerning library resources. Selected content and developed research guides for five academic units of the College of Education Evaluate and select materials for Edu cation Library Reference Collection. Actively develops and manages collections by evalua ting and selecting relevant research and instructional materials in electronic, print and media formats for the COE, including the examination of approval items Coordinates with the Head of the Education Library and the Social Science Bibliographer regarding the reevaluation and cancellation of serial titles Assists with the evaluation and selection of numerous gift donations, offered to the Education Library Works with other Education Library or technical services staff regarding materials transfer, withdrawal, cataloging, preservation, or relocation issues, including for brittle books Continued working with Digital Library Center on University of Florida Digital Collections user interface, result and help pages, and usability studies Develop and implement University of Florida In stitutional Review Board protocols and survey instruments for Endeca library catalog, National Dig ital Newspaper Project and Chronicling America and the Digital Library of the Caribbean usability testing Participate actively in the Libraries instruction progr am to teach information literacy skills to graduate Education, COE ProTeach Program, English La nguage Institute and ot her groups, including undergraduate English classes. Lead tours and participated in other instructional activities in Education Library. Developed Library West proposals for Computer Assi stance Desk and Library West Presentation Areas. Assisted with Library West computer imaging. Developed proposal for Education Library Computer Classroom. Maintained H&SSS web directories and H&SSS staff pa ge and assisted with the development of Music Library and Education Library website template Taught research and information literacy skills, resource evaluation skills, and Web2.0 tools to interdisciplinary 3-credit honors class (Spring 2008) Coordinated the Ask A Librarian instant messaging (IM ) reference service and provided Florida-wide IM reference service (Spring 2008) University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Gainesville, FL Digital Services Librarian, April 2003-August 2007 Humanities and Social Science Reference Librarian, October 2001-April 2003 Provide professional, comprehensive reference servic e to patrons of the Humanities and Social Sciences collection in person and through the UF Libraries an d Florida Ask A Librarian virtual reference services Participate in planning, policy formation and de partmental decision-making for electronic reference services and specialized media computing areas of Library West Assist with implementation and preparation of new technology initiatives, such as installing new operating system and other software programs, and managing computers and connectivity Ochoa 1

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Ochoa 2 Serve as backup Coordinator for the Libraries virtual reference service Coordinate web activities of H&SS Services Department Evaluate digital resources including MetaLib and the University of Florida Digital Collections Teach research and information literacy skills to student s in undergraduate English classes, lead tours, and participate actively in other library instruction activities Prepare and update instructional and bibliographic gu ides in print and online for general and specialized audiences concerning library resources Select print and online reference works and databases in African American and other areas of multicultural studies and general humanities and the social sciences areas Managed email reference for Smathe rs Libraries, including the QuestionPoint Ask a Librarian service Maintained and managed Library Instruction Computer Classroom Taught research and information literacy skills, resource evaluation skills, and HTML to interdisciplinary 3-credit honors class (Spring 2004 and Spring 2005) Served as project co-advisor for Science and E ngineering Independent Study Digital Library System (grade given counted toward 50% of the final course grade, Fall 2004) EDUCATION University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA Master of Library and Information Sc ience Degree, Graduated August 2001 La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA Bachelor of Arts Degree, Political Science and English, Graduate d cum laude May 1998 HONORS AND PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP Honors Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Comm unication "Best of the Web" Competition. 2nd Place in the Creative category for Florida Journalism History Project http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/jour/fljhist/ Sponsored by the Visual Communication and Communication Technology Divisions, Spring 2006 George A. Smathers Libraries H&SSS Instruction Te am Project Staff Recognition Award, December 11, 2003 ACRL National Conference Scholarship Recipient, Spring 2003 Beta Phi Mu, inducted 2002 PUBLICATIONS Ochoa, Marilyn, Rae Jesano, John Nemmers, Carrie Newsom Maryellen OBrien, and Paul Victor. Testing the Federated Searching Waters: A Usability Study of MetaLib. Journal of Web Librarianship. 1.3 (Fall 2007): 4766. Reakes, Patrick and Marilyn Ochoa. A Grassroots Initiativ e to Facilitate Historical Research: The Florida Journalism History Project. Technical Services Quarterly. 25.2 (Spring 2007): 57-72. Cataldo, Tara, LeiLani Freund, Ma rilyn Ochoa and Marina Salcedo. Assessing the Information Commons. Public Services Quarterly 2.4 (Winter 2007): 23-46. Ronan, Jana, Patrick Reakes and Mar ilyn Ochoa. Application of the Behavioral Guidelines: A Study of Online Reference Skills. Special issue, College and Undergraduate Libraries 13.4 (November 2006): 3-30.

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Position Descriptions for Scanning and QC Technicians CLASS TITLE: Scanning Technician Starting Base Pay: $11/hour TYPE OF WORK: This person captures digital images using flatbe d scanners according to project specification, and performs basic image manipulation. EXAMPLES OF WORK: Create digital images using flatbed sca nners and appropriate scan software. Review images against original to assure authentic repres entation, and correct resolution. Names, saves, and organizes images according to project specification. Perform preliminary image correction in cluding skew correction and cropping. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Experience with using PC based computer systems Willingness to learn scanning software Ability to handle repetitive tasks Attention to detail in naming files CLASS TITLE: Quality Control Technician Starting Base Pay: $11/hour TYPE OF WORK: This person does the final quality control on digital im ages before transmitting to the Mark Up Unit. Understands and can successfully do all of the tasks of a scan techni cian and additionally makes image quality decisions independently. Performs image qua lity control tasks with minimal supervision. EXAMPLES OF WORK ( not all inclusive): Create digital images using flat bed s canners and appropriate scan software. Review images against original to assure authentic representation. Perform preliminary image correction in cluding skew correction and cropping. Name and save file accura tely as uncompressed TIFF. Uses the quality control software program to open, correct images, and name files for XML output. Creates actions in Photoshop to correct image files. Scans or rescans selected images as necessary and reintegrates into digital packages. Burns DVDs to create archival files of images using appropriate software. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Experience working with PC-based computer systems. Extensive familiarity with the procedures used at the DLC. Working knowledge of Photoshop and Microsoft office applications. Works well with others.

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Budget Narrative The estimated page count for the six collections is: 90,400 pages 9,040 letterbook pages 250 photo prints/negatives. Based on experience with test sets, we're building in a 10% reshoot rate for pages, 15% reshoot for letterbooks, and 15% for photos Adjusted estimates are: 99,440 pages 10,396 letterbook pages 288 photographic materials. This estimate assumes use of CopiBook scanner with white sheet backing for letterbooks, and, use of flatbed scanners for all photographic mate rials and other pages. Some individual sheets may withstand sheet feed scanner, based on expe rience with similar collections, but we will not count on it. All pages images wi ll be 300 dpi color (24-bit) im ages. All photographic materials will be 600 dpi grey-sca le (8-bit) images. Regular Pages: $0.25/page scanning + $0.25/page image correction/QC + $0.03/page mounting/archiving + $0.01/page media Total regular pages @ pa ge unit = $0.54/page + @ $1,805.68 data-logging (tracking) TOTAL REGULAR PAGES = (99,440 x 0.54) + 1,805.68 = $55,503.28 Letterbooks: $0.25/page scanning + $0.25/page image correction/QC + $0.03/page mounting/archiving + $0.02/page media Total Letterbooks @ page unit = $0.55/page + @ $35 data-logging (tracking) TOTAL LETTERBOOKS = (10,396 x 0.55) + 35 = $5,752.80 Photographic Materials: $0.40/page scanning + $0.25/page image correction/QC + $0.03/page mounting/archiving + $0.01/page media Total Photographic Materials @ page unit = $0.69/image + @ $71.42 data-logging (tracking) TOTAL PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERI ALS = (250 x 0.69) + 71.42 = $243.92 Budget Narrative 1

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Budget Narrative 2 TOTAL ESTIMATE (DLC) = @ $61,500 + 10% BUFFER = $ 6,150 TOTAL DIGITIZATION COSTS (DLC) = @ $67,650 The costs above are represented in the Salaries & Wages section of the Budget. In addition, the budget also includes Supplies and Materials cost s. The project will fund the purchase of 5000 Polyester envelopes that will be used to protect fragile document s during and following imaging. 5000 Polyester envelopes (11x14) x $1.00 each = $5,000.00

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Close Form Previous[11 ........ Print Page J AboutOMS Number: 4040-0004 Expiration Date:0113112009ApplicationforFederalAssistanceSF-424 Version 0216.CongressionalDistrictsOf: ,a.ApplicantIFL-006I'b.Program/ProjectIFL-006IAttachanadditional list of Program/Project Congressional Districts if needed.I IIAddAttachment II DeleteAttachment Ilr ViewAttachment I 17.ProposedProject:,a.Start Date:101/01/20091'b.EndDate:112/31/2011118.EstimatedFunding($):'a.FederalI74,906.141,b.ApplicantI77,844.781'c.StateI0.001'd.LocalI0.001'e.OtherI0.001'f.Program IncomeI0.001'g.TOTALI152,750.921, 19. IsApplicationSubjecttoReviewByStateUnderExecutiveOrder12372Process?D a.Thisapplicationwasmade available to the Stateunderthe ExecutiveOrder12372Processfor review onII [8] b. Programissubject to E.O.12372buthasnot been selected by the State for review. D c. Programisnot covered by E.O. 12372. 20. IstheApplicantDelinquentOnAnyFederalDebt?(If"Yes",provideexplanation.)DYes [8] NoIExplanation I 21.'Bysigningthisapplication,Icertify(1)tothestatementscontainedinthelistofcertifications"and(2)thatthestatementshereinaretrue,completeandaccuratetothebestofmyknowledge.Ialsoprovidetherequiredassurances"andagreetocomplywithanyresultingtermsifIacceptanaward.I amawarethatanyfalse,fictitious,orfraudulentstatementsorclaimsmaysubjectmetocriminal,civil,oradministrativepenalties.(U.S. Code,Title218,Section1001) [8] "IAGREE" The list of certifications and assurances, or an internet site where you may obtain this list,iscontainedinthe announcement or agency specific instructions.AuthorizedRepresentative:Prefix:IMr.I' First Name:IBrianIMiddle Name:I I, Last Name:Iprind1eISuffix:I I, Title:IAssociateDirectorofResearchI'TelephoneNumber:1352-392-35161Fax Number:1352-846-1839I, Email:Iprind1e@ufl.eduI, SignatureofAuthorized Representative:ICompletedbyGrants.gov upon submission.I'DateSigned:ICompletedbyGrants.gov upon submission.IAuthorized for Local Reproduction Standard Form 424 (Revised 10/2005) Prescribed by OMS CircularA-102

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Close Form Next Print PageIAboutNARANEHBudgetPeriod:1Previous PeriodProjectDirector ,-----------, Prefix*First NameIJohn i=============:::::;----------J Middle Name1 i=============:::::::!....--------------------, *Last NameINemmers Suffix IL---J *Applicant OrganizationluniversitYofFlorida*Requested Grant Period Thru:1 12/31/2011Reset Entries I *Requested Grant Period From:1/01/2009If this is a revised budget, indicate application/grant number:1 _Thethree-column budget has been developed fortheconvenienceofthose applicants who wishtoidentify the project costs that will be chargedtoFederal funds and those that will be cost shared,Themethodofcost computation should clearly indicate howthetotal charge for each budget item was determined,SECTION A*Budget detail for the period from:101/01/2009*Thru:112/31/2009When the proposed grant period is eighteen months or longer, project expenses for each twelve-month period are tobelisted separately,1.Salaries andWagesProvide the names and titlesofthe principal project personnel. For support staff, include the titleofeach position and indicateinbrackets the numberofpersons who willbeemployedinthat capacity, For persons employed onanacademic year basis, list separately any salary charge for work done outside the academic year.*NamefTitleofPosition No.*MethodofCostComputationGrantFunds(a)($)CostSharing(b)($)Total (c) ($)LourdesSantamarie-Wheelerf0,10FTE1 1ScanningSupervisorJanePen,QualityControlUnitHead0,10FTE1 1MatthewMariner,TextUnitHead0,05FTE1 1LaurieTaylorfDigitalProjectsI 10' 05FTEIIILibrarian3,279,03,279,03,456,03,456,01,640,01,640,02,350,02,350,0II13,530,0II9,020,010,607,010,607,021,332,043,882,0OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/09 '--9_,_02__,_--''-_ '-------'11'--__'--1_3_,_53__,_--''-_SUBTOTALS 1'-2_2_,_55_0_,_0--'0 11'-_OMS Approval No, 3095-0013 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009IscanningTechnicians11_2 1,375 FTE($l1/hr) I-Q_U_al_i_t_Y_C_o_n_t_ro_l_Te_C_h_n_iC_i_a_n_s-1:210.25FTE($11/hr)SeeOverflowDocumentNA Form 17001 (Rev, 1-93)

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Close Form Previous ........ Print Page AboutNARANEHBudgetPeriod:1Reset Entries2.FringeBenefitsIf more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base.7,006.56Total (c)($)7,006.56Cost Sharing (b)($)Grant Funds(a)($)21,232.00_____ ---J============ =====1SUBTOTALS7,006.561 Salary Base($)0/0of0/0of0/0of*Rate [3c::::::::J c::::::::J 3.ConsultantFeesInclude payments for professional and technical consultants and honoraria.*Name or Type of Consultant No. of Days on Project Daily Rate of Compensation($)Grant Funds (a)($)Cost Sharing (b)($)Total (c)($) IIL-------J----------------------============iIIL-------J -----------------IIL-------J-----------------------============iIIL-------J ------------------SUBTOTALS1 _4.TravelForeach trip, indicate the numberofpersons traveling, the total days they willbeintravel status, and the total subsistence and transportation costs for that trip. \/\/hen a project will involve the travelofa numberofpeopletoa conference, institute, etc., these costs maybesummarizedonone linebyindicating the pointoforigin as "various." All foreign travel mustbelisted separately.*FromITo#Subsistence Costs($)Transportation Costs=($)Grant Funds (a)($)CostSharing(b)($) 1c=Jc=J--------L-_========== 1c=Jc=J--------L-_ =========Ic=Jc=J--------L-_ 1c=Jc=J--------L-_ =========Ic=Jc=J--------L-_ 1c=Jc=J ---------c=Jc=J::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::='_--------------#=numberofpersons*=totaltraveldaysSUBTOTALS1 '-_OMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date:01131/2009NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93) OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date:6/30109

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Close FormNARAReset Entries5.Suppliesand MaterialsPrevious11 ........... N ... e ... xt ................ BudgetPeriod:1Print PageIIAboutNEHInclude consumable supplies, materialstobeusedinthe project and itemsofexpendable equipment (i.e., equipment items costing less than $5,000 and with an estimated useful lifeofless than a year). ItemPolyesterenvelopesfllx14Basis/Method of Cost Computation$1.00eachGrant Funds(a)($)5,000.00Cost Sharing(b)($)Total(c)($)5,000.01========================---------------------,1================---------------,1==========================----------------J 1========================--------------J 1========================--------------J 1========================--------------J 1-----------------J 6.ServicesSUBTOTALS_____5_,0_0_0_.0_011 5,_0_0_0._0--'01 Include the costofduplication and printing, long distance telephone calls, equipment rental, postage, and other services relatedtoproject objectives that are not included under other budget categories orinthe indirect cost pool. For subcontracts, provideanitemizationofsubcontract costs as an attachmentonthe summary page.*ItemOMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009 NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93)Basis/Method of Cost Computation SUBTOTALS Grant Funds(a)($)Cost Sharing(b)($)Total(c)($)OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/09

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Close FormNARAReset Entries7.OtherCostsPrevious111 ...............N...,ext...............l BudgetPeriod:1Print Page I AboutNEHInclude participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchasesof$5,000 or more per unit, training costs and registration fees, and other items not previously listed. Please note that "miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refertothe budget instructions for the restrictiononthe purchaseofpermanent equipment.*ItemBasis/MethodofCostComputationSUBTOTALSGrantFunds (a)($)CostSharing (b)($)Total (c) ($)8.Total DirectCostsTotal Direct Costs (Add SubtotalsofItems 1to7)Grant FundsOMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009 NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93)_____2_7_,_55_0_"_0 11'-2_8_,3_3_8_" 5_611'-5_5_,8_8_8_"5_61OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/09

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Close Form Previous Print Page I AboutNARANEHBudgetPeriod:1Reset Entries9.IndirectCostsThis budget item applies only to institutional applicants. If indirect costs aretobechargedtothis project, CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOXBELOWand provide the information requested. Refer to the budget instructions for explanationofthese options.DCurrent indirect cost rate(s) has/have been negotiated with federal agency (Complete items A andB).DIndirect cost proposal has been submittedtoa federal agency but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the nameofthe agencyinitem A and show proposed rate(s) and base(s), and the amount(s)ofindirect costsinitemB).DIndirect cost proposal willbesenttothe Agency if application is funded. (Provideanestimateinitem Bofthe rate that willbeused and indicate the base against which it willbecharged and the amountofindirect costs). [g] Applicant chooses to use a rate nottoexceed 10%ofdirect costs, less distorting items,uptoa maximum chargeof$5000 per year. (Under itemB,enter the proposed rate, the base against which the rate willbecharged, and the computationofindirect costs or $5000 per year, whichever value is less).DApplicant is a sponsorship (umbrella) organization and choosestochargeanadministrative feeof5%oftotal direct costs. (Complete ItemB.)ItemA.NameofFederal Agency DateofAgreement1 --' Item B." Base(s)($)"Rate(%)Grant Funds (a)($)Cost Sharing(b)($)Total (c)($) 1----5-5-,8-8-8.-5'611--------2,794.4311------2-,7-9-4-.4-31 c=J1 IIIII c=J1 IIIII"SUBTOTALSI2,794.43112,794.431*Total Project Costs Grant Funds(a)($)*Total Project CostsCostSharing(b)($)*Total Project Costs Total(c)($)10. TotalProjectCosts(Direct and Indirect) for budget period.______2_7_,5_5_0_.0_0113_1_,1_3_2_. 9_911'-5_8_,_68_2_._991OMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009 NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93) OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/09Next Period

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Close Form Next Print PageIAboutNARANEHBudgetPeriod:2Previous PeriodProjectDirector ,-----------, Prefix*First NameIJohn i=============:::::;----------J Middle Name1 i=============:::::::!....--------------------, *Last NameINemmers Suffix IL---J *Applicant OrganizationluniversitYofFlorida*Requested Grant Period Thru:1 12/31/2011Reset Entries I *Requested Grant Period From:1/01/2009If this is a revised budget, indicate application/grant number:1 _Thethree-column budget has been developed fortheconvenienceofthose applicants who wishtoidentify the project costs that will be chargedtoFederal funds and those that will be costshared>Themethodofcost computation should clearly indicate howthetotal charge for each budget item was determined>SECTION A*Budget detail for the period from:101/01/2010*Thru:112/31/2010When the proposed grant period is eighteen months or longer, project expenses for each twelve-month period are tobelisted separately>1.Salaries andWagesProvide the names and titlesofthe principal project personnel. For support staff, include the titleofeach position and indicateinbrackets the numberofpersons who willbeemployedinthat capacity> For persons employed onanacademic year basis, list separately any salary charge for work done outside the academic year.*NamefTitleofPosition No.*MethodofCostComputationGrantFunds(a)($)CostSharing(b)($)Total (c) ($)LourdesSantamarie-Wheelerf0>10FTE1 1ScanningSupervisorJanePen,QualityControlUnitHead0>10FTE1 1MatthewMariner,TextUnitHead0>05FTE1 1LaurieTaylorfDigitalProjectsI 10> 05FTEIIILibrarian3,377>03,377>03,560>03,560>01,689>01,689>0 2,421. 02,421. 0II13,530>0II9,020>0 5,431. 05,431. 016,478>039,028>0OMSNumber:3136-0134Expiration Date:6/30/09 '--9_,_02__>_--''-_ '-------'11'--__'--1_3_,_53__>_--''-_SUBTOTALS 1'-2_2_,_55_0_>_0--'0 11'-_OMSApprovalNo>3095-0013Expiration Date:01/31/2009IscanningTechnicians11_2 1>375 FTEl$l1/hr) I-Q_U_al_i_t_Y_C_o_n_t_ro_l_Te_C_h_n_iC_i_a_n_s-1:210.25FTE($11/hr)SeeOverflowDocumentNAForm17001(Rev>1-93)

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Close Form Previous ........ Print Page AboutNARANEHBudgetPeriod:2Reset Entries2.FringeBenefitsIf more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base.5,437.74Total (c)($)5,437.74Cost Sharing (b)($)Grant Funds(a)($)16,478.00_____ ---J============ =====1SUBTOTALS5,437.741 Salary Base($)0/0of0/0of0/0of*Rate [3c::::::::J c::::::::J 3.ConsultantFeesInclude payments for professional and technical consultants and honoraria.*Name or Type of Consultant No. of Days on Project Daily Rate of Compensation($)Grant Funds (a)($)Cost Sharing (b)($)Total (c)($) IIL-------J----------------------============iIIL-------J -----------------IIL-------J-----------------------============iIIL-------J ------------------SUBTOTALS1 _4.TravelForeach trip, indicate the numberofpersons traveling, the total days they willbeintravel status, and the total subsistence and transportation costs for that trip. \/\/hen a project will involve the travelofa numberofpeopletoa conference, institute, etc., these costs maybesummarizedonone linebyindicating the pointoforigin as "various." All foreign travel mustbelisted separately.*FromITo#Subsistence Costs($)Transportation Costs=($)Grant Funds (a)($)CostSharing(b)($) 1c=Jc=J--------L-_========== 1c=Jc=J--------L-_ =========Ic=Jc=J--------L-_ 1c=Jc=J--------L-_ =========Ic=Jc=J--------L-_ 1c=Jc=J ---------c=Jc=J::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::='_--------------#=numberofpersons*=totaltraveldaysSUBTOTALS1 '-_OMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date:01131/2009NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93) OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date:6/30109

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Close FormNARAReset Entries5.Suppliesand MaterialsPrevious11 ........... N ... e ... xt ................ BudgetPeriod:2Print PageIIAboutNEHInclude consumable supplies, materialstobeusedinthe project and itemsofexpendable equipment (i.e., equipment items costing less than $5,000 and with an estimated useful lifeofless than a year). Item6.ServicesBasis/Method of Cost Computation SUBTOTALS Grant Funds(a)($)Cost Sharing(b)($)Total(c)($)Include the costofduplication and printing, long distance telephone calls, equipment rental, postage, and other services relatedtoproject objectives that are not included under other budget categories orinthe indirect cost pool. For subcontracts, provideanitemizationofsubcontract costs as an attachmentonthe summary page.*ItemOMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009 NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93)Basis/Method of Cost Computation SUBTOTALS Grant Funds(a)($)Cost Sharing(b)($)Total(c)($)OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/09

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Close FormNARAReset Entries7.OtherCostsPrevious111 ...............N...,ext...............l BudgetPeriod:2Print Page I AboutNEHInclude participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchasesof$5,000 or more per unit, training costs and registration fees, and other items not previously listed. Please note that "miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refertothe budget instructions for the restrictiononthe purchaseofpermanent equipment.*ItemBasis/MethodofCostComputationSUBTOTALSGrantFunds (a)($)CostSharing (b)($)Total (c) ($)8.Total DirectCostsTotal Direct Costs (Add SubtotalsofItems 1to7)Grant FundsOMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009 NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93)_____2_2_,_55_0_"_0 11'-2_1_,9_1_5_" 7_411'-4_4_,4_6_5_"7_41OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/09

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Close Form Previous Print Page I AboutNARANEHBudgetPeriod:2Reset Entries9.IndirectCostsThis budget item applies only to institutional applicants. If indirect costs aretobechargedtothis project, CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOXBELOWand provide the information requested. Refer to the budget instructions for explanationofthese options.DCurrent indirect cost rate(s) has/have been negotiated with federal agency (Complete items A andB).DIndirect cost proposal has been submittedtoa federal agency but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the nameofthe agencyinitem A and show proposed rate(s) and base(s), and the amount(s)ofindirect costsinitemB).DIndirect cost proposal willbesenttothe Agency if application is funded. (Provideanestimateinitem Bofthe rate that willbeused and indicate the base against which it willbecharged and the amountofindirect costs). [g] Applicant chooses to use a rate nottoexceed 10%ofdirect costs, less distorting items,uptoa maximum chargeof$5000 per year. (Under itemB,enter the proposed rate, the base against which the rate willbecharged, and the computationofindirect costs or $5000 per year, whichever value is less).DApplicant is a sponsorship (umbrella) organization and choosestochargeanadministrative feeof5%oftotal direct costs. (Complete ItemB.)ItemA.NameofFederal Agency DateofAgreement1 --' Item B." Base(s)($)"Rate(%)Grant Funds (a)($)Cost Sharing(b)($)Total (c)($) 1----4-4-,4-6-5.-7'411--------2,223.2911------2-,2-2-3-.2-91 c=J1 IIIII c=J1 IIIII"SUBTOTALSI2,223.29112,223.291*Total Project Costs Grant Funds(a)($)*Total Project CostsCostSharing(b)($)*Total Project Costs Total(c)($)10. TotalProjectCosts(Direct and Indirect) for budget period.______2_2_,5_5_0_.0_0112_4_,1_3_9_._311'--4_6_,_68_9_._031OMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009 NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93) OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/09Next Period

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Close Form Next Print PageIAboutNARANEHBudgetPeriod:3Previous PeriodProjectDirector ,-----------, Prefix*First NameIJohn i=============:::::;----------J Middle Name1 i=============:::::::!....--------------------, *Last NameINemmers Suffix IL---J *Applicant OrganizationluniversitYofFlorida*Requested Grant Period Thru:1 12/31/2011Reset Entries I *Requested Grant Period From:1/01/2009If this is a revised budget, indicate application/grant number:1 _Thethree-column budget has been developed fortheconvenienceofthose applicants who wishtoidentify the project costs that will be chargedtoFederal funds and those that will be costshared>Themethodofcost computation should clearly indicate howthetotal charge for each budget item was determined>SECTION A*Budget detail for the period from:101/01/2011*Thru:112/31/2011When the proposed grant period is eighteen months or longer, project expenses for each twelve-month period are tobelisted separately>1.Salaries andWagesProvide the names and titlesofthe principal project personnel. For support staff, include the titleofeach position and indicateinbrackets the numberofpersons who willbeemployedinthat capacity> For persons employed onanacademic year basis, list separately any salary charge for work done outside the academic year.*NamefTitleofPosition No.*MethodofCostComputationGrantFunds(a)($)CostSharing(b)($)Total (c) ($)LourdesSantamarie-Wheelerf0>10FTE1 1ScanningSupervisorJanePen,QualityControlUnitHead0>10FTE1 1MatthewMariner,TextUnitHead0>05FTE1 1LaurieTaylorfDigitalProjectsI 10> 05FTEIIILibrarian3,479>03,479>0 3,667>00113,667>01,739>01,739>02,493>02,493>0II13,530>0II9,020>05,594>05,594>016,972>039,522>0OMSNumber:3136-0134Expiration Date:6/30/09 '--9_,_02__>_--''-_ '-------'11'--__'--1_3_,_53__>_--''-_SUBTOTALS 1'-2_2_,_55_0_>_0--'0 11'-_OMSApprovalNo>3095-0013Expiration Date:01/31/2009IscanningTechnicians11_2 1>375 FTEl$l1/hr) I-Q_U_al_i_t_Y_C_o_n_t_ro_l_Te_C_h_n_iC_i_a_n_s-1:210.25FTE($11/hr)SeeOverflowDocumentNAForm17001(Rev>1-93)

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Close Form Previous ........ Print Page AboutNARANEHBudgetPeriod:3Reset Entries2.FringeBenefitsIf more than one rate is used, list each rate and salary base.5,600.76Total (c)($)5,600.76Cost Sharing (b)($)Grant Funds(a)($)16,972.00_____ ---J============ =====1SUBTOTALS5,600.761 Salary Base($)0/0of0/0of0/0of*Rate [3c::::::::J c::::::::J 3.ConsultantFeesInclude payments for professional and technical consultants and honoraria.*Name or Type of Consultant No. of Days on Project Daily Rate of Compensation($)Grant Funds (a)($)Cost Sharing (b)($)Total (c)($) IIL-------J----------------------============iIIL-------J -----------------IIL-------J-----------------------============iIIL-------J ------------------SUBTOTALS1 _4.TravelForeach trip, indicate the numberofpersons traveling, the total days they willbeintravel status, and the total subsistence and transportation costs for that trip. \/\/hen a project will involve the travelofa numberofpeopletoa conference, institute, etc., these costs maybesummarizedonone linebyindicating the pointoforigin as "various." All foreign travel mustbelisted separately.*FromITo#Subsistence Costs($)Transportation Costs=($)Grant Funds (a)($)CostSharing(b)($) 1c=Jc=J--------L-_========== 1c=Jc=J--------L-_ =========Ic=Jc=J--------L-_ 1c=Jc=J--------L-_ =========Ic=Jc=J--------L-_ 1c=Jc=J ---------c=Jc=J::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::='_--------------#=numberofpersons*=totaltraveldaysSUBTOTALS1 '-_OMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date:01131/2009NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93) OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date:6/30109

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Close FormNARAReset Entries5.Suppliesand MaterialsPrevious11 ........... N ... e ... xt ................ BudgetPeriod:3Print PageIIAboutNEHInclude consumable supplies, materialstobeusedinthe project and itemsofexpendable equipment (i.e., equipment items costing less than $5,000 and with an estimated useful lifeofless than a year). Item6.ServicesBasis/Method of Cost Computation SUBTOTALS Grant Funds(a)($)Cost Sharing(b)($)Total(c)($)Include the costofduplication and printing, long distance telephone calls, equipment rental, postage, and other services relatedtoproject objectives that are not included under other budget categories orinthe indirect cost pool. For subcontracts, provideanitemizationofsubcontract costs as an attachmentonthe summary page.*ItemOMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009 NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93)Basis/Method of Cost Computation SUBTOTALS Grant Funds(a)($)Cost Sharing(b)($)Total(c)($)OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/09

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Close FormNARAReset Entries7.OtherCostsPrevious111 ...............N...,ext...............l BudgetPeriod:3Print Page I AboutNEHInclude participant stipends and room and board, equipment purchasesof$5,000 or more per unit, training costs and registration fees, and other items not previously listed. Please note that "miscellaneous" and "contingency" are not acceptable budget categories. Refertothe budget instructions for the restrictiononthe purchaseofpermanent equipment.*ItemBasis/MethodofCostComputationSUBTOTALSGrantFunds (a)($)CostSharing (b)($)Total (c) ($)8.Total DirectCostsTotal Direct Costs (Add SubtotalsofItems 1to7)Grant FundsOMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009 NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93)_____2_2_,_55_0_"_0 11'-2_2_,5_7_2_" 7_611'-4_5_,1_2_2_"7_61OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/09

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Close FormNARAReset Entries9.IndirectCostsPrevious BudgetPeriod:3Print Page I AboutNEHThis budget item applies only to institutional applicants. If indirect costs aretobechargedtothis project, CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOXBELOWand provide the information requested. Refer to the budget instructions for explanationofthese options.DCurrent indirect cost rate(s) has/have been negotiated with federal agency (Complete items A andB).DIndirect cost proposal has been submittedtoa federal agency but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the nameofthe agencyinitem A and show proposed rate(s) and base(s), and the amount(s)ofindirect costsinitemB).DIndirect cost proposal willbesenttothe Agency if application is funded. (Provideanestimateinitem Bofthe rate that willbeused and indicate the base against which it willbecharged and the amountofindirect costs). [g] Applicant chooses to use a rate nottoexceed 10%ofdirect costs, less distorting items,uptoa maximum chargeof$5000 per year. (Under itemB,enter the proposed rate, the base against which the rate willbecharged, and the computationofindirect costs or $5000 per year, whichever value is less).DApplicant is a sponsorship (umbrella) organization and choosestochargeanadministrative feeof5%oftotal direct costs. (Complete ItemB.)ItemA.NameofFederal Agency DateofAgreement1 --' Item B. Rate(%) Base(s)($)Grant Funds (a)($)Cost Sharing(b)($)Total (c)($) 1----4-5-,1-2-2.-7'6112,256.141111------2-,2-5-6-.1-4 1 c=J1 II11===11I c=J1 IIIIIII'SUBTOTALS12_,2_5_6_.1_411II2,256.141*Total Project Costs Grant Funds(a)($)*Total Project CostsCostSharing(b)($)*Total Project Costs Total(c)($)10. TotalProjectCosts(Direct and Indirect) for budget period.OMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009 NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93)______2_4_,8_0_6_.1_4112_2_,5_7_2_. 7_611'-4_7_,_37_8_._9INext PeriodOMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/09

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Close FormNARASection BSUMMARYBUDGETPreviousBudgetPrint PageIIAboutNEHTransferfromSectionAthetotalcosts(columnC)foreachcategoryofprojectexpense.Whentheproposedgrantperiodiseighteenmonthsorlonger,projectexpensesforeachtwelve-monthperiodareto be listedseparately.*First Year From1/01/2009*Second Year From1/01/2010*Third Year From1/01/2011*1.SalariesandWages($)*2.FringeBenefits($)*3.ConsultantFees($)*4.Travel($)*5.SuppliesandMaterials($)*6.Services($)*7.OtherCosts($)*8.TotalDirectCosts(Items1-7)($)*9.IndirectCosts($)*TotalProjectCosts(Direct&Indirect)($)*First Year Thru1 12/31/2009*Second Year Thru*Third Year Thru1 12/31/20101 12/31/2011TOTAL COSTS FOR ENTIRE GRANT PERIOD43,8820001139,02800011 39,52200011122,43200017,006056115,437074 5,60007618,0450061II II5,000000115,0000001II II55,8880561144,46507411 45,12207611145,47700612,794043112,22302911 2,256014117,273086158,6820991146,68900311 47,37809011152,7500921PROJECT FUNDING FOR THE ENTIREGRANTPERIOD1.Indicatetheamountofoutrightand/orFederalmatchingfundsthatisrequested.2.Indicatetheamountofcashcontributionsthatwill bemadebytheapplicantandcashandin-kindcontributionsmadebythirdpartiestosupportprojectexpensesthatappearin thebudget.Cashgiftsthatwill be raised toreleasefederalmatchingfundsshouldbeincludedunder"Third-partycontributions."(Consulttheprogramguidelinesforinformationoncostsharingrequirements.)Whenaprojectwillgenerateincomethatwill beusedduringthegrantperiodtosupportexpenseslisted inthebudget,indicatetheamountofincomethatwill beexpendedonbudgetedprojectactivities.IndicatetheamountofactualoranticipatedawardsfromotherFederalagenciesforthisprojectandthisgrantperiodonly.3.TotalProjectFundingshouldequalTotalProjectCosts.* 1.GrantFundsRequestedOutright($)74,9060141FederalMatching($)I00001TotalFunding($)=====7=4='=90=6=01=41*2.CostSharingApplicant'sContributions($)Third-PartyContributions($)ProjectIncome($)OtherFederalAgencies($)TOTALCOSTSHARING($)3.TOTALPROJECT FUNDING (Total FederalFunding+TotalCostSharing)77,844078100001 00001 0000177,8440781152,7500921AdditionalBudgetInformationILB_Ud_g_A_t_t_ac_h_o_P_d_f11AddAttachmentIIIDelete Attachmentll ViewAttachment I OMS Approval No. 3095-0013 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009 NA Form 17001 (Rev. 1-93) OMS Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/09

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Section A Budget detail for the period from: 01/01/2009 Thru: 12/31/2009 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation Grant Funds (a) ($) Cost Sharing (b) ($) Total (c) ($) Cathy Martyniak, Head, Preservation Department 0.05 FTE 2,775.00 $ 2,775.00 $ Jim Cusick, Curator, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History 0.05 FTE 3,148.00 $ 3,148.00 $ Flo Turcotte, Archivist 0.05 FTE 2,186.00 $ 2,186.00 $ John Freund, Conservato r 0.05 FTE 2,498.00 $ 2,498.00 $ Subtotals $ 10,607.00 $ 10,607.00 $ Section A Budget detail for the period from: 01/01/2010 Thru: 12/31/2010 1 Salaries and Wages 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation Grant Funds (a) ($) Cost Sharing (b) ($) Total (c) ($) John Freund, Conservato r 0.05 FTE 2,573.00 $ 2,573.00 $ Cathy Martyniak, Head, Preservation Department 0.05 FTE 2,858.00 $ 2,858.00 $ Subtotals $ 5,431.00 $ 5,431.00 $ Section A Budget detail for the period from: 01/01/2011 Thru: 12/31/2011 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation Grant Funds (a) ($) Cost Sharing (b) ($) Total (c) ($) John Freund, Conservato r 0.05 FTE 2,650.00 $ 2,650.00 $ Cathy Martyniak, Head, Preservation Department 0.05 FTE 2,944.00 $ 2,944.00 $ Subtotals $ 5,594.00 $ 5,594.00 $

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Appendix A Finding Aids A Guide to the Napoleon Bonaparte Broward Papers University of Florida Smathers Libraries Special and Area Studies Collections August 2004 Descriptive Summary Provenance: Broward, Napoleon Bonaparte Title: Napoleon Bonaparte Broward Papers Dates: 1879-1918 Bulk dates: 1904-1910 Extent: 10.75 linear ft. 14 Boxes Identification: MS 9 Biographical/Historical Note Napoleon Bonaparte Broward was born in Duval County, Flor ida, in 1857. Throughout his young life he worked in various positions on farms, in logging camps, and on steamboats. As the ow ner of a steam tug, The Three Friends he earned a reputation smuggling guns to Cuban revolutio naries prior to the Spanish-American War. Broward held various public positions, serving as sheriff of Duval County, on the Jacksonville city council, in the Florida House of Representatives (1901), and on the St ate Board of Health (1901-1904). He served one term as Governor of Florida, from 1905 to 1909. As Governor, he was instru mental in the drainage of the Everglades and encouraged development in South Florida. Following his gubenatoria l term, he was elected U.S. Senator in 1910 but died before taking office. Scope and Content The Broward Papers date from 1879 to 1918, but the bulk of the papers coincide with the gubernatorial term from 1905 to 1909. The major subject covered in the collection is the drainage of the Everglades and the development of South Florida lands. Additional topics include real estate, race relations, education, labor unions, liquor, taxes, transportation, waterways, railways, and Broward's campaigns for Governor and the U.S. Senate. The collection is comprised of incoming and outgoing correspondence, speec hes, news clippings, campaign material, photographs (including images of dredging operations), legislative material, and legal documents. There are a small number of articles, pamphlets, circulars, and other publications pertaining to the drainage of the Everglades, dredging equipment, forestry, sugar, and waterways. In addition to the incoming and outgoing correspondence, there are four bound letterbooks containing letters written by Brow ard in 1905-1909. Correspondents include numerous real estate developers, business leaders, representatives of st ate and federal agencies, and Florida politicians such as William Sherman Jennings. Full finding aid available at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu /spec/pkyonge/Broward.htm Appendix A 1

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A Guide to the William Sherman Jennings Papers University of Florida Smathers Libraries Special and Area Studies Collections March 2008 Descriptive Summary Provenance: Jennings, William Sherman, 1863-1920 Title: William Sherman Jennings Papers Dates: 1877-1928 Abstract: Papers relating to Florida Governor William S. Jennings, his political and business dealings, and to his role in the drainage of the Everglades. Extent: 13.5 linear feet. (29 boxes and 16 volumes) Identification: Ms 58 Biographical/Historical Note William Sherman Jennings was born March 24, 1863, in Illinois. His cousin was William Jennings Bryan. He graduated from Southern Illinois Normal University and Union Law School in Chicago. He moved to Brooksville, Florida, in 1885 in order to open his open law practice. His second wife, May Mann Jennings, was a leading member of the women's club movement and was an influential advocate for social reform and civic causes. Jennings had an extensive career in elected and appoin ted positions. He served as County Judge of Hernando County in 1888. He was a member of the Florida legisl ature from 1893-1895, serving as Speaker of the House in 1895. He served one term as Governor from 1901-1905. He was the last Florida Gove rnor nominated at a state party convention; after 1900 Florida implemented primary el ections. By the end of his term as Governor, Jennings was credited with leading the effort to drain and reclai m over 3 million acres of Florida land, primarily in the Everglades. In 1905 he was appointed by Governor Napole on B. Broward as General Counsel for the Internal Improvement Fund, the state agency respon sible for administering public lands. In this position, which he held until 1909, he was able to continue leading drainage activities in the Everglades. Jennings continued to practice law in Brooksville and Jacksonville until hi s death on February 28, 1920. Scope and Content The Jennings Papers (1877-1928) document his years as Governor and his activities after leaving office, particularly his work with the Internal Improvement Fund, his own legal practice, and his personal business affairs. The collection is comprised of correspondence, speeches, le gal documents, legislative material, news clippings, photographs, pamphlets, programs, and other publications. The collection also includes numerous letterbooks dating from 1898 to 1909 that contain both personal and offi cial/business letters. The primary focus of the collection is the drainage and dredging of South Florida, from the earliest discussions at the turn of t he century to the subsequent development and land boom of the 1920s. Of particular interest are the surveys, reports, memoranda and correspondence generated as part of the early planning for the drainage of the Everglades. Some of the major subjects covered in the Jennings Papers include draina ge laws, public lands, the dredging and opening of canals, new road construction, the use of conv ict labor, the development of Dade County, relations with the Seminole Indians, and the activities of his wife, May Mann Jennings. Full finding aid available at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/sp ec/pkyonge/JenningsWilliamS.htm Appendix A 2

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A Guide to the May Mann Jennings Papers University of Florida Smathers Libraries Special and Area Studies Collections March 2005 Descriptive Summary Provenance: Jennings, May Mann, 1872-1963 Title: May Mann Jennings Papers Dates: 1889-1963 Abstract: Correspondence and miscellaneous materials of May Mann Jennings, a political and environmental activist. Extent: 8 linear feet. (23 Boxes) Identification: Ms 57 Biographical/Historical Note May Mann Jennings was a leading member of the women's club movement and an influential advocate for social reform and civic causes in Florida and nationwide. Born in New Jersey in 1872, she moved with her family to Crystal River, Florida, in 1874. She was educated at St. Joseph's Convent in St. Augustine, and lived primarily in Jacksonville throughout her life. No str anger to politics, her father was Flor ida State Senator Austin Shuey Mann and she married future Governor William Sherman Jennings in 1891. During their years in the Governor's mansion, she became known as the "Mother of Forestry" for her advo cacy efforts on behalf of t he state Board of Forestry. Her interests varied widely and she championed numerous causes related to the Seminole Indians, women's rights and suffrage, conservation, beaut ification efforts, child welfare, public health, education, and Democratic politics. A prominent leader in the women's club movement, she serv ed as president of the Flor ida Federation of Women's Clubs from 1914-1917, and as both Florida director and vice president of the General Federation of Women's Clubs (1918-1920). She also held several important leadersh ip positions with social club and civic organizations throughout Florida, including nume rous beautification committees and the state Audubon Society. During her tenure as president of the Florida Federation of Women's Clubs, she spear headed the effort to have the Royal Palm State Park established in 1915, thereby preserving a portion of the Everglades for p ublic use. Throughout the 1920s and 1930s she continued to oversee and advocate fo r the Royal Palm Park on behalf of the Federation. She was appointed to the Everglades National Park Commissi on in the late 1930s and pushed for the creation of a national Everglades Park. She died April 24, 1963. Scope and Content The May Mann Jennings Papers (1889-1963) document her ac tivities related to the Federation of Women's Clubs, the Royal Palm State Park, the Everglades, and her rela tionship with her husband, Governor William Sherman Jennings. Other topics include women's rights and suffrage, the Seminole Indians, beaut ification efforts, child welfare, public health, education, and Democratic politics. The coll ection consists of correspondence photographs, news clippings, speeches, meeting minutes and biographical information. The personal correspondence includes letters to and from her husband and her son, Sherman Bryan Jennings. Full finding aid available at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/sp ec/pkyonge/JenningsMayMann.htm Appendix A 3

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A Guide to the Thomas E. Will Papers University of Florida Smathers Libraries Special and Area Studies Collections January 2008 Descriptive Summary Provenance: Will, Thomas E. (Thomas Elmer) 1861-1937. Title: Thomas E. Will Papers Dates: 1893-1938 Extent: 14 linear feet. (24 boxes) Identification: Ms 112 Biographical/Historical Note Educator, author, and developer of the Florida Everglades Born in Illinois on November 11, 1861. In 1910 Will visited the Everglades for the first time, and he became so excited about the prospects for development there that he quit his Forestry positions to dedicate himself to t he Everglades. Between 1910 and 1914, he spent most of his time working in Washington, D.C., promoting drainage and development of the Everglades, and primarily working as a real estate agent associated with the Evergl ades Land Sales Company and the Florida Everglades Homebuilders Association. He also spent a great deal of time writing articles and making speeches in order to promote further land purchases. Between 1912 and 19 14, Will purchased several tracts of land near Lake Okeechobee. Between 1913 and 1914, Will began the develo pment and settlement of the region's first planned townsite, Okeelanta. As one of the pioneers, he spent cons iderable effort experimenting with agricultural crops and practices suitable for the land. He sold plots to other settlers, and tried to make a living by selling farm products. Will's efforts suffered a serious setback between 1920 and 1930 when the drainage program proved to be insufficient. He was forced to live in Ft. Lauderdale from 1921-1931, focusing his efforts on coastal land sales. Throughout that decade Okeelanta deteriorated rapidly, but Will continue d to promote development of the Everglades through drainage, flood control, and improved navigation and highway trans portation. Throughout the 1930s he refocused his energies on developing Okeelanta, continuing to write and speak on the merits of the Everglades. He died on March 5, 1937. Scope and Content The Will Papers are comprised of business and personal co rrespondence, scrapbooks, articles, speeches, writings, publications, legal documents, and governmental reports and hearings. The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence relating to Will's land development work in the Everglades, particularly in Okeelanta, as well as his writings about the Everglades. Correspondents and topi cs covered in the correspondence include the Everglades Land Sales Company, Laura V. McCullough, Lawrence E. W ill, the town of Fruitcrest, the Everglades Sugar and Land Company, and various local, state, and federal agencies. The articles, pub lications, news clippings, writings and notes (many of which are housed in scrapbooks) doc ument Will's efforts to pr omote development of the Everglades. In addition, there are several legislative reports, hearings, and ot her official documents regarding the Everglades, Lake Okeechobee, and flood control and drainage programs. The collection is an excellent resource for researchers interested in the drainage and land reclamation in the Everglades, early land sales and development, South Florida agriculture, and in particu lar, the settlement and early years of Okeelanta. Full finding aid available at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/will.htm Appendix A 4

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A Guide to the Arthur E. Morgan Papers University of Florida Smathers Libraries Special and Area Studies Collections December 2007 Descriptive Summary Provenance: Morgan, Arthur Ernest, 1878-1975. Title: Arthur E. Morgan Papers Dates: 1912-1954 Abstract: Papers relating to Morgan's work as a civil engineer and to the Dayton Morgan Engineering Companys various water control projects thr oughout Florida, including the Everglades. Extent: 0.8 linear feet. (2 boxes) Identification: MS 237 Biographical/Historical Note Arthur Ernest Morgan (18781975) was the first chairman of the Tennessee Valley Authority engineering projects from 1933938. Morgan also led the Miami (Ohio) Conservancy District in a mammoth pioneer reconstruction program after the disastrous flood of 1913. He went on to become the President of Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, serving from 1920936 while still working actively on engineering projects around the country. Morgan also was a writer well into his nineties and past the point of physical blindness. In 1912 when Morgan was employed in the office of Drainage Investigations in t he U.S. Department of Agricu lture, the U.s. House of Representatives opened hearings to inve stigate the USDA's involvement in pr omoting land sales in the Everglades. In 1909, a preliminary report on the feas ibility of draining and reclaiming land in the Everglades had been prepared by USDA employee, James Wright, who concluded that the Everglades could be drained fairly easily and inexpensively. The facts and conclusions presented in t he Wright report were extremely unsound, but the USDA officially approved the report anyhow. The land companies in Florida were able to use the USDA report as propaganda to spur real estate sales in South Florida. As part of the 1912 investi gation Morgan analyzed the Wright report and testified before a Congressional committ ee that the report was seri ously flawed and that the USDA had acted inappropriately in approving it. Morgan' s expert testimony during t he investigation refuted the claims that draining the Everglades would be easy, thereby causing the boom in land sales to slow down. Scope and Content The Morgan Papers include correspondence, photographs, ne w clippings, magazine articles, pamphlets, reports, and other documents related to drainage of the Everglades and the 1912 Congressional investigation of the Wright report. The collection spans 1912 to 1954 and covers subjects such as flood control, drainage districts, dredging, and land reclamation. Of particular interest is a portion of an unpublished 1954 autobiography, in which Morgan describes the 1912 investigation and provides his analysi s and opinions about proposed drainage operations. In addition, there are engineering materials (including p hoto negatives) related to the Dayton-Morgan Engineering Company's various water control projects throughout the stat e of Florida. Also included is a copy of a Florida State Senate bill that was prepared in collaboration with Morgan. Full finding aid available at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/morganae.htm Appendix A 5

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A Guide to the James Edmundson Ingraham Papers University of Florida Smathers Libraries Special and Area Studies Collections March 2005 Descriptive Summary Provenance: Ingraham, James Edmundson, 1850-1924 Title: James Edmundson Ingraham Papers Dates: 1854-1920 Abstract: Correspondence, miscellaneous materials, and photographs of businessman, entrepreneur, and railroad company executive. Extent: 1 linear feet. (2 Boxes) Identification: Ms 56 Biographical/Historical Note Businessman, entrepreneur, and railroad company exec utive. James Edmundson Ingraham was born and educated in Racine, Wisconsin. He moved to Florida in 1874 and became associated with Henry Sanford in Sanford, Florida. He spent most of hi s career working in Florida for the railroad tycoons, Henry Flagler and Henry Plant. As part of his work for the Plant railroad along the west coast of Florida, he conducted a survey through the Everglades from Ft. Myers to Miami in 1892. From 1892 until 1897 he was employed by Flagler in various positions, and from 1897 to 1899 he served as land commis sioner for the Florida East Coast Railway (1897-1899). After the turn of the century, he serv ed as president of Flagler's Model Land Company and as an officer of several small land companies organized by Flagler. In this capacity, he promoted land sales and spurred the growth of towns in Florida for several years. Scope and Content The Ingraham Papers (1854-1920) contain his business papers, correspondence, photographs, and miscellaneous materials pertaining to railroads, the Everglades and the sugar industry in Florida. Of particular interest are Ingraham's manuscripts regarding the Flagler and Plant ra ilroads and their role in developing South Florida. Full finding aid available at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/Ingraham.htm Appendix A 6

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Appendix B Selected scholarship based on research in the six Everglades collections Articles Carver, Joan S. First League of Wome n Votes on Florida: It s Troubled History, The Florida Historical Quarterly 63:4 (April 1985): 383-405. Flynt, Wayne. Pensacola Labor Problems and Political Radicalism, 1908, The Florida Historical Quarterly 43:4 (April 1965): 315-332. Johnson, Kenneth R. Florida Women Get the Vote, The Florida Historical Quarterly 48:3 (January 1970): 29-312. Meindl, Christopher. Past Perceptions of the Great American Wetland: Floridas Everglades during the Early Twentieth Century, Environmental History 5:3 (July 2000): 378-395. Purcell, Aaron D. Plumbing Lines, Politics, and Projections: The Florida Everglades and the Wright Report Controversy, The Florida Historical Quarterly 80:2 (Fall 2001): 161-197. Vance, Linda D. May Mann Jennings and Royal Palm State Park, The Florida Historical Quarterly 55:1 (July 1976): 1-17. Books and Book Chapters Davis, Jack E. "The Despoliation of Florida's Living Aesthetic" in Paradise Lost? The Environmental History of Florida Edited by Jack E. Davis and Raymond Arsenault. (Gainesville: University Pre ss of Florida, 2005), 235-259. Grunwald, Michael. The Swamp: The Everglades, Flor ida, and the Politics of Paradise New York: Simon & Schuster, 2006. McCally, David. The Everglades: An Environmental History. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1999. McCally, David. "The Everglades and the Florida Dream" in Paradise Lost? The Environmental History of Florida Edited by Jack E. Davis and Raymond Arsenault. (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2005), 141-159. Proctor, Samuel. Napoleon Bonaparte Broward, Fl oridas Fighting Democrat. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1950. Appendix B 1

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Appendix B 2 Vance, Linda D. May Mann Jennings: Florid as Genteel Activist. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1985. Theses and Dissertations Dovell, J.E. A History of the Everglades of Florida. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 1947. McCally, David Philip. The Everglades: An Environmental Biography Ph.D. Dissertation. University of Florida, 1997. Meindl, Christopher F. Environmental Perception and the Historical Geography of the Great American Wetland: Florida's Everglades, 1895 to 1930 Ph.D. Dissertation. University of Florida, 1996. Strickland, Jeffery Glenn. The Origins of Everglades Drainage in the Progressive Era: Local, State and Federal Cooperation and Conflict. M.A. Thesis. Florida Atlantic University, 1999. Taylor, Leslie. Stakeholders, Advocacy Coalitions and th e Policy Process: Policy Change in Everglades Restoration. Ph.D. Dissertation. Florida Atlantic University, 2007. Vance, Linda Darlene Moore. May Mann Jennings: Floridas Genteel Activist. Ph.D Dissertation. University Press of Florida, 1980. Vickers, Sarah Pauline. The Life of Ruth Bryan Owen: Florida's First Congresswoman and America's First Woman Diplomat. Ph.D. Dissertation. The Flor ida State University, 1994.