Title: Bulletin - Florida Library Association
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089430/00010
 Material Information
Title: Bulletin - Florida Library Association
Alternate Title: Florida library bulletin
Physical Description: v. : ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Library Association
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Sarasota Florida
Publication Date: May 1935
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-v. 4, no. 1; 1927-1936?
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089430
Volume ID: VID00010
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01410842
alephbibnum - 001588207

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FLORIDA


LIBRARY BULL
Published at intervals by the Florida Library Asso

Vol. 3 MAY, 1935 No. 5

FLORIDA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OFFICERS 1935-1936
President, Carl Bohnenberger, Assistant Librarian, Public Library, Jacksonville
First Vice-President, Mary Bright, Librarian, Public Library, St. Petersburg
Second Vice-President, E. L. Robinson, Library Trustee, Tampa
Secretary, Charlotte A. Thompson, Librarian, University of Tampa
Treasurer, Verna B. Maxson, Reference Librarian, Rollins College, Winter Park
Also Editor this issue of the Bulletin


WHAT A NEW BOOK THINKS ABOUT*
by Arthur Guiterman
A trembling 12mo., on the desk I wait
And dread the doom that I anticipate,-
A Daniel in a den of fierce librarians,
Scared as a slip of speech among grammarians.
What will they do to me when I've been viewed
And branded with their stamp of servitude!
Shall I be indexed under Eschatology,
Mechanics, Fiction, Science, or Mythology?
Shall I be well-displayed, or set far back
In some dark corner of a lonely stack?
Am I for reference or circulation,
For public use or private consultation?
Shall I encounter reverence or scorn,
Shall I be scribbled, broken, foxed and worn,
Caressed by gentle hands, or rent asunder?
Shall I be stolen or misplaced? I wonder!
Yet this is what I chiefly ask myself:
Shall I be read, or left upon the shelf?

Receive this quip or quirk or quiz,
Librarians in evening togs,
From one who knows that nought of his
Will ever grace your catalogues!
*Written for and read at the annual dinner of the Florida Library Association April 11, 1935

43 A,.

FO :4a v











FLORIDA LIBRARY BULLETIN


FLORIDA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
FIFTEENTH ANNUAL
CONFERENCE

April 10-12, 1935

The fifteenth annual conference of the
Florida Library Association brought to-
gether in Orlando 77 representatives,
(67 librarians) from 24 cities and towns.
The program, although conventional in
outline, had a number of distinctive fea-
tures.

The extra session in the Chamber of
Commerce on the evening before the
regular two day program was an innova-
tion in the interest of the local library.
Its purpose was to enhance the publicity
benefit that accrues to a city library
where such a conference is held. Only a
few librarians from other cities had ar-
rived so early and citizens at home ap-
parently had not been deeply impressed
by the excellent newspaper announce-
ments.

The addresses by Attorney J. Thomas
Gurney and Library Trustee John F.
Schumann were timely interpretations
of the mission and the missionaries of
the book. The cordiality dominant at
that meeting and at the reception which
followed in the library rooms was re-en-
forced the next day by the welcome of
the Mayor and representatives of vari-
ous organizations.

Professor Willard A. Wattles' thor-
ough analysis of the reasons "Why we
differ so in what we like to read" was a
fitting preparation for the afternoon dis-
cussion of three groups of books, Flo-


ridiana, recovery literature and poetry.
Miss Marian Youngs, leader of the first
group, distributed a mimeographed list
of "Floridiana 1932-35; books about
Florida and books by Florida authors".
The list contains 89 titles. This large
number is indicative of the richness of
Florida in subject matter and in the
number of its authors. Brief book re-
views (two and one-half minutes long)
were given of 19 books by 11 librarians.

"The literature of recovery" was of
course only a selection of 44 titles, also
mimeographed and distributed. Profes-
sor R. W. France's introduction grouped
the books under various phases of recov-
ery. His treatment was so complete and
illuminating that the special reviews
which had been prepared of certain
books were omitted for want of time.
This decision met with hearty approval
by the audience and by the waiting re-
viewers. In the presentation of Paul
Engle's "American Song" Jessie B. Rit-
tenhouse (Mrs. Clinton Scollard) em-
phasized the fitness of including this
poet's work in a consideration of our
present economic condition. Her ad-
dress lifted the book review session to
inspirational heights.

A liberal allowance of time had been
made for the business meeting, and it
was all used. Results other than rou-
tine were: 1. Report (Miss Clara Abel,
Chairman) on revision of the constitu-
tion approved; 2. Report (Miss Helen
V. Stelle, Chairman) on a library plan
for the state adopted; 3. Proposed
amendments to the state library law











FLORIDA LIBRARY BULLETIN


(drafted by Mr. W. T. Cash) fully dis-
cussed and disapproved. No group
meetings were held but a number of in-
dividual questions were answered. New
officers elected are given elsewhere.

One session was held in the Senior
High School building. It failed com-
pletely in the effort to enlist the interest
of high school authorities or even the
teachers. But the address by James S.
Rickards on cooperation between the
public library and the public school was
an elegant elaboration of Miss Ahern's
slogan, "The public library is an integral
part of public education". How their
pupils are instructed in the use of the
library was told with point and zest by
four school librarians, Nancy K. Brown,
Rose Chiaramonte, Charles T. Gay and
Eulah Mae Snider. There was no lag-
ging of interest even to the last minute.

The peak of the conference was reach-
ed at the annual dinner, served to 140
in the de luxe fashion of the Wyoming
Hotel. "Authors in our Midst" were
guests of the Association. A printed list
of their books, 335 titles, was presented
as a bibliographic souvenir of the occa-
sion with the compliments of the Rollins
Press. Of the 50 authors named 29
were present. Jessie Rittenhouse paid
graceful tribute to one just departed,
Victor Starbuck. Gilbert Maxwell, the
youngest author, read feelingly from his
poems and Edwin Granberry only a
chapter from "The Erl King". Merri-
ment arose at the reading of a poem sent
by Arthur Guiterman "What a new book
thinks about". Professor George M.


Whicher continued the gaiety with his
lilting lines on Horace. Ranking senior
editor among them all was Dr. Albert
Shaw. The souvenir became a delight-
ful "Who's Who" under his sparkling
comments.

A considerable number of librarians
attended the play at the beautiful Annie
Russell Theatre in Winter Park, at
which they were the guests of the Or-
lando Chamber of Commerce, the Orlan-
do Public Library and Rollins College.
The play, given by students of the col-
lege, marked the end of a perfect day
and of a program as rich in realization
as in its published promises.

The newly elected officers will select
the meeting place for next year. Invi-
tations were received from Miami and
Coral Gables, from St. Petersburg and
from Vero Beach.

For this year we are deeply indebted to
city, library, hotel, newspaper and other
officials of Orlando. Through their
generous and hearty co-operation it was
possible to carry prepared plans to a
successful conclusion. And appreciation
was not lacking on the part of our
guests. The committee on resolutions
apparently did not overlook a single act
of courtesy or bit of thoughtfulness cal-
culated to contribute to their comfort
a;,d entertainment. Their gratitude was
as spontaneous as a summer shower.
Equally refreshing was their presence in
our midst. At their departure we even
visioned a rainbow of promise for more
and better libraries in Florida.










FLORIDA LIBRARY BULLETIN


A PLAN FOR STATE-WIDE LIBRARY SERVICE IN FLORIDA


Immediate Objectives

1. Survey of library conditions in the
state, to be conducted and financed by
the Florida Library Association. (Es-
timated time, one year)

2. Program of well planned publicity
for the interpretation of library service,
conducted by the Florida Library Asso-
ciation. (Estimated time, one year, to
follow immediately the survey) This
may be followed by a legislative pro-
gram in 1937 if judged desirable by
the Association.
3. Regional demonstration of library
service, financed by the state and local
unit of government and aided if possible
by one of the Educational Foundations.

General Objectives

1. Expansion of the activities of the
State Library Board to include:
a. State wide service to existing li-
braries.
b. Direct book service to regions not
otherwise served.
c. Organization and supervision of
county and regional libraries.

2. Establishment of well coordinated
system of library service in Florida to
include:
a. Municipal libraries.
b. County and regional libraries.
c. Official libraries: iState, legisla-
tive reference and historical.
d. Libraries in all state schools from
elementary to institutions of


higher learning conforming to
standards set up by Southern
Association of Colleges and Sec-
ondary Schools.
e. Library service in state institu-
tions of correction, first consid-
eration to be given to those deal-
ing with youths.

f. Library service in state institu-
tions for the handicapped.
g. Individual service, as well as in-
stitutional, for the blind.

3. Establishment of minimum state
aid for books for public libraries.

4. This plan to provide equitable li-
brary service for white and negro popu-
lation.


EDITORIAL NOTE
This number of the Bulletin is issued
by retiring officers of the past two years.
They wish to thank all who have given
help and encouragement. They bespeak
for the new officers a larger measure of
cooperation and active support by all
members of the Association and also by
librarians in the state who are not mem-
bers. There has been a gratifying gain
in our numbers but there is room and
need for many more. The enlistment
of new members offers an opportunity in
which every one may join. Such en-
'largement and strengthening of our
forces is going to be necessary in order
to carry out the proposed library plan
for Florida.




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