Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00129
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: June 1942
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00129
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text


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Vol. 17 JUNE, 1942 No. 9

A BIT OF NEW ENGLAND
HEAD OF THE LINE, by Gladys Hasty Carroll.
Here is a new book by a very well-known author who lives not far from
here Gladys Ha'st Carroll of South Berwick, Maine. Mrs. Carroll is a very
charming booster for her home state. Her latest book has the same homely at-
mosphere that you remember well in her earlier books, As the earth turns, A few
foolish ones, Neighbors to the sky. Here in Head of the line, she has written
fourteen short stories about New England people, mostly people of New Hamp-
shire and Maine. Mrs. Carroll has a keen appreciation of ordinary folks in rural
communities. She shares this appreciation with the reader.

BENCHLEY AT HIS BEST
INSIDE BENCHLEY, by Robert Be;nchley.
You have probably read Inside Asia, Inside Latin America, Inside Australia
.well, here is Inside Benchley. Benchley, as no doubt you know, is the radio
comedian, writer, and lecturer. He reveals what goes on behind that fixed pleas-
ant expression on many trying occasions. It is quite enlightening. What is he
thinking while on his way to the dentist? What is he scheming while chasing
his son and friend through a museum? You could probably guess, but not in
terms as funny as those he has used to tell us about it.

THE ARTIST AND THE MAN
LOVER OF LIFE, by Zsolt de Harsanyi.
This fictionalized biography of the painter Rubens is aptly titled, for no one
could deny that Rubens loved life to the full and enjoyed every moment of his
existence. Perhaps the reason was that there were two characters in Rubens'
nature, the artist and the man; and in each he lived vigorously. There was also
another side to this amazing man-his talent as a diplomat. Honored by kings
and queens, dukes and duchesses, chosen advisor and friend to'the ruler of
Flanders, he saw the diplomatic workings of almost every court in Europe.
In dealing with the artist side of Rubens' character, the author enters the
mind of the painter with a depth and a sympathy that cannot fail to arouse the
reader's admiration. His knowledge of the mediums and composition of painting
indicate an unusual authority.
Inevitably there were many women who loved him; but the two who count
are his first wife, the gentle, lovable Isabella Brant; and gorgeous, blonde Helena
Fourment, whom he married when she was sixteen and he fifty-three.
Published monthly from October to June by the Hamilton Smith Library, at the University of New Hamp-
shire. Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire, under
the act of August 24. 1912.


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THEY SAW IT HAPPEN
ALL-OUT ON THE ROAD TO SMOLENSK, by Erskine Caldwell.
Here is a first-hand, eye-witness story of the Soviet Union today.
MY NAME IS FRANK, by Frank Laskier.
The radio talks of an ordinary merchant seaman describing his wartime ex-
periences are here set down in book form.
FLIGHT TO ARRAS, by Antoine de Saint Exupery.
This is vivid description of war flying as experienced from moment to mo-
ment by a pilot who is also a great writer. It is also an expression of faith telling
why men fight on in defeat.
FROM THE LAND OF SILENT PEOPLE, by Robert Porter St. John.
This is a personal account of an American war correspondent's experiences
in the Balkans during the time of German occupation.

ON THE PACIFIC FRONT
JAPANESE ENEMY; HIS POWER AND HIS VULNERABILITY, by High
Byas.
The contents of this book includes: War calculations; Japanese mind and
plan; Immensities; Who runs Japan; How strong is Japan; How we can defeat
Japan.

ISLES OF SPICE, by Frank Chine.
Subtitle: An extensive journey through the Dutch East Indies, Indo-China
and North Australia.

OUR HAWAII, by Erna Fergusson.
The writer visited the Hawaiian Islands some time before war broke out
and here gives us an interesting and informative account of her observations.

TROPIC LANDFALL; THE PORT OF HONOLULU, by C(i.i'd, Franklin
Gessler.
Here is the story of the development of Honolulu from its beginning as an
obscure fishing village to the great commercial city that it is today.

INTRODUCING AUSTRALIA, by Clinton Hartley Grattan.
A fine account of the geography, history, economic and social conditions,
cultural life, and foreign relations of Australia.

WESTWARD THE COURSE! by Paul McGuire.
A survey containing historical background material about Australia, Hawaii,
New Zealand, Netherland East Indies, Batavia, Java, and British Malaya just be-
fore the beginning of the war. It also contains material on manners, customs,
and beliefs of these regions.

SETTING SUN OF JAPAN, by Carl Randau and Leanle Zugsmitb.
After visiting Japan, Indo-China, Singapore, the Netherlands East Indies,
and Australia, two New York news correspondents give us an account of how
the people live under the fear of Japanese Fascism.







THE HOME BATTLE FRONT
WOMEN FOR DEFENSE, by Margaret Culkin Banning.
Mrs. Banning tells how all women in the United States can help in the war
effort. She also gives accounts of what women did to help in the last war and
what women elsewhere in the world are doing to help today.

THIS IS YOUR WAR, by Marquis William( Childs.
Here is a discussion of the implications the war will have for all of us on the
home front. He discusses our obligations and how we should prepare to meet
them.

CIVILIAN DEFENSE OF THE UNITED STATES, by Richard Ernest DupIy.
Some of the subjects treated in this book are: It's a civilian's war; Organiza-
tion for defense; Air raid setup; Shelters; If they use gas; Fire fighting;
Evacuation; Women in defense; Defense health and welfare; Food wins wars;
Propaganda; Morale.

YOUR CAREER IN DEFENSE, by Shelby Cullom Davis.
A factual book on defense jobs, where they are located, types of work, re-
quirements for each, and compensation for each type of job.



HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW?
THE FOOD GARDEN, by Laurence and Edna Blair.
Explanatory text and double-page line drawings show the beginner how to
raise vegetables, greens, herbs, fruits and berries.

WAKE UP AND GARDEN! by Ruth Cross.
A complete month-by-month gardener's manual that will be helpful for the
average gardener in planning attractive year-round gardens.

GROW YOUR OWN VEGETABLES, by Paill IW. Dempsey.
This book contains information on how to grow vegetables successfully for
home use by converting your back yard into a vegetable garden.

I LIKE GARDENING, by Jean Hersey.
Using her own experiences the author has written of every type of garden.

GARDENS FOR VICTORY, by Jean-Marie Putnnam and Lloyd C. Cosper.
A handbook designed for practical and immediate use giving advice and
planting plans for growing vegetables.

25 VEGETABLES ANYONE CAN GROW, by Ain Roe Robbins.
Here is a handbook covering problems of seed, soil, planting, and harvesting
twenty-five basic vegetables for home use.

HOME VEGETABLE GARDENING, by Charles Hebron Nissley.
A timely book giving material on the cultivation of each vegetable, home
storage, preparing the soil, planting, and control of insect pests.




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DRAMATIC HISTORY OF THE
AMERICAN REVOLUTION
PERILOUS NIGHT, by Burke Boyce.
What happens when a well-to-do American sees his family, his fortunes, his
ideals of freedom, threatened by tyranny? The answer is found in Burke Boyce's
Perilous Night. If you are a reader of historical fiction you will like this novel.
The setting is the familiar Hudson River Valley in the year 1776. The historical
facts, of which there are many, are crowded into the pages of this story.
Mr. Boyce is not so interested in telling a story as he is in showing the read-
ers the reality of war and its effects upon the average citizen. The story strikes
home as we realize the national theme of today is expressed through the historical
facts of the year 1776. It is entirely American in spirit and dignified in style.
The reader can not fail to see the similarity of the crisis of today and the crisis
which our forbears faced during the early history of our country.

HAVE YOU READ THIS ONE?
HEADS YOU LOSE, by Christianna Brand.
All you lovers of a fine mystery shouldn't miss this one. It's an absorbing
blend of all the elements guaranteed to hold your interest and set your nerves a-
tingle: romance-a casual-appearing young man, plus a gay, lovable girl, plus
an older man, humorous and friendly and kind; mystery and suspense-two
murders and six potential suspects; humor and pathos-all the characters are
vivid and human.
Christianna Brand gives you ten quite ordinary people and involves them in
two murders that will demand your cleverest detecting. Pick up Heads you lose
with the idea of passing an idle hour-or any idea at all-and you won't put it
down until you've finished it.

A LIVE AND KICKING STREET
FRANKLIN STREET, by Philip Goodman.
Most of us have read about living with Father, Mother, or some member of
a big family. In Franklin Street you can read about all of these plus life with the
neighbors thrown in for good measure-and a very entertaining measure it will
prove to be.
These are the heartwarming recollections of life on Franklin Street a half
century ago. Franklin Street might be in any big American city, but it just
happens to be in Philadelphia. It is here that a cheerful, lusty, and innocent
America is lovingly remembered by a man who at the tender age of twelve
realized that respectable people, be they friend or relative, were apt to be dull
frauds.
There are a hundred things to laugh at here-all the nonsense and capers that
this little corner of the human race committed not so very long ago on Franklin
Street. Simple and unpretentious as the book and its people may be, the whole
is set down in a manner that is pungent, earthy, and tinctured with the slyest of
good humor.
Vol. 17, No. 9 may be our last printed issue for the duration. We
shall endeavor to keep the Lantern alive, however, and will resume pub-
lication whenever it seems feasible to do so. In the meantime we hope
you will continue to enjoy both our weekly newspaper column CREAM
OF THE NEW BOOKS and our weekly book review program over
WHEB Wednesdays at 1:15 p.m.




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