Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00124
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: November 1941
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00124
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text



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Vol. 17 NOVEMBER, 1941 No.2

"FORWARD WITH BOOKS"
Children's Book IFeek November 2- November 8



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GEORGE WFASHINGTON'S WORLD, written and illustrated by Genevieve
Foster.
A most unusual book, this: a readable and very enjoyable account of the
interesting things which happened in the world at various periods of George
Washington's life. You first meet our beloved hero as a boy, and later as soldier,
farmer, commander, citizen, and president. You learn what was going on not
only in America, but in England and France, in Germany and Russia, and even
in far China. This is the way history should be taught, for it is quite as fascinat-
ing as any story, however imaginative, could possibly be; and it justifies the trite
comment that history lives for you. Best of all, this book can be read and thor-
oughly enjoyed by people of all ages. I The illustrations have been reproduced
with the kilnd permission of ( hai,., ; Scribner's Sons]
BEGINNIN; SAT('II)AY* NOVI,'MBER 8. THE STORY HOUR FOR CHILDREN
FOUR ANI FIX)I,' YEARS OLD WILL BE HELD IN THE
CiHARILO'TmI TIIOMPSON ROOM AT 11 O'CLOCK
Published monthly from October to June by the Hamiltom Smith Library. of the Uiniversity of New Hamp-
shire. Entered a SecCM(1-clZsS m11att," Octobur ]0. 1927. at the post office at Durham. New IHampshire, under
the act of August 24, 1912.



V. 11, No.?,
GEORGE TII'ASHING TON'S 11OR Li), -WIitten and illustrated by Genevieve
Foster.
A most unusual Ibook, this: a readable and very enjoyable account of the
interesting things which happened in the \world at various periods of George
Washington's life. \ ou first meet our lbeloxved hero as a boy, and later as soldier,
farmer, commander, citizen, and president. You learn w hat was going on not
only in America, but in England and France, in Germany and Russia, and even
in far China. This is the way history should be taught, for it is quite as fascinat-
ing as any story, however imaginative, could possibly be; and it justifies the trite
comment that history lives for you. Best of all, this book can be read and thor-
oughly enjoyed b1 people of all ages. I The illustrations have beeni reproduiced
with the kind permission of ( i/'.n'/; Scribner's Sons]
JIE(INNIN( S.\'II RIn)AY OVEM BER S. TrIE STORY HOUR FOR CHILDREN
FOULR ANI) F'I\ YEARS OLI) WILL BE HELD IN THE
CHIARLI) ITTE THOMPSON ROOM AT 11 O'CLOCK
Pul,liihed mintllxl y ftrot Oct,,oi i tot Jutte lit thle Hilmilton, Smith Lilt, aix. of the I'nivtrtitt of New H;-nlam-
shite. Ernte, ired i ; iseend-cl.Iis ntiter Olcetoiet 0lI 1927. ;it tle post office at Dutrhoot. New Hamtpshir e, undler
the cl ttf A\utut 24, 1912.
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PICTURE STORY BOOK
A DAY WITH .1OPSY, hbv .label Betsy Hill.
You'll take Mloips right to your heart, for she is one of the most adorable
little dogs you ever met. The story is about a wonderful day she spent on the
farm.
I KNOW SO.IE LITTLE ANIMALS, by James S. Tippett.
Here are some pretty little poems about all the animals you know and love-
squirrel, cat, chipmiunk, and ever so many more. The pictures are very nice, too.
MAKE WAY FOR DUCKLINGS, by Robert AlcCloskey.
Mr. and Mrs. Mallard and their eight ducklings set up housekeeping in a
large city and brave the traffic.
TLIIOTHY CAME INSTEAD, by Anne Todd.
Linda was counting the days till her birthday. She was sure that the some-
thing which was coming was a little black dog with floppy ears. But Timothy
came instead. He was a little English boy. who didn't say things quite the way
Linda did, but he taught the boys at school a new w av to play ball, and they
became fast friends.
MAJOR AND THE KITTEN, by Helen Hoke.
You'll love Major, the St. Bernard, and Mopsy, the stray kitten whom Grand-
mother's grandchildren adopt.

BOOKS FOR OLDER BOYS AND GIRLS
WINGS AROUND SOUTH AMERICA, by Alice
I)Dalgliesh.
A delightful story of the author's airplane trip
around South America. It is filled with glimpses of
Colorful cities and villages, descriptions of the beautiful
countryside, and charming characterizations of our
South American friends.
THE STORY PARADE GOLD BOOK.
Do you want a story about horses circuses air-
planes adventure magic? You'll find them all in
The Story Parade Gold Book. The stories are written
by all your favorite authors, with grand pictures, too,
by those artists vou love.
THE VILLAGE THAT LEARNED TO READ, by Elizabeth Kent Tarshis.
The little Alexican village of Benito Juarez had a party to celebrate its beau-
tiful new blue school; but there was almost a tragedy-Pedro Lopez wouldn't
learn to read! He just wouldn't. In The Village That Learned to Read, you can
find out what made Pedro change his mind about school, and how there was
another fiesta when the Governor came to give the prizes.
HAPPY TIIES IN FINLAND, by Libushka Bartlnsek.
Imagine going to school for a year in Finland! That is just what Juhani
Malmberg does when he visits his grandmother and grandfather in Finland. I-le
takes part in a Finnish Winter Carnival too, and does many other exciting things.
BROWNIE 01F THE CIRCUS, AND OTHER STORIES OF TOI)AY,
selected by Wilhehlmiina Harper.
Brownie is a dear brown pony who carried children at the circus, but Alice
was the one he loved the best. Some of the other stories are about people from
foreign lands; a family at the seashore; and your old friend Ameliaranne and
how- she took the children to visit the London Zoo.








THE SPEAR OF ULYSSES, by
Alison Baignie Allessios.
Two boys of modern Greece-
that is, Greece until last spring--
go on a hunt for the spear of the
hero Ulysses, on whose island
home, Ithaca. it was lost. Inter-
\" testing scenes of their everyday
Life heighten the excitement of the
treasure-hunt, and a longed-for
trip to Athens caps the climax.
THE CRIIISON SHAWL, by
Florence Choate and Eliza-
George Washiln,'to'1s lW'orld, vy Genevieve beth Curtis.
Foster. A fascinating story of an Aca-
dian girl, and her family who es-
tablish a home in a Massachusetts seaport town. The story follows the events
of the French and Indian War as they affected the proud New England village.
AUNTIE ROBBO, by Amn Scott-.l1oncrieff.
You'll get plenty of laughs out of Auntie Robbo, whose real name is Miss
Robina Sketheway-and it's somehow appropriate. Anyway, it's a completely
mad, completely delightful book about an old lady over eighty and her great-
nephew, eleven-year-old Hector. They spend a whole summer tearing all over
Scotland, trying to escape from Hector's stepmother, who believes it's her duty to
give her husband's son a normal, dull life.
AVIATION FROM. SHOP TO SKY, by John J. Floherty.
You will like this epic story of flight from blueprint to bomber, fighter, and
clippership. Information, too. on training for pilots and other skilled work in
the aviation industry.

BOOKS FOR THE HIGH SCHOOL GROUP
HAVEN FOR THE BRAVE, by Elizabeth Yates.
This is a splendid, shining book which makes you feel that you too can be
brave and loyal with such an example before you. It concerns an English boy
and girl, who don't want to leave war-time England, although they are anxious
to see America and to continue their studies without interruption. However,
they are fine enough to see that there are other kinds of courage than that of the
firing line, and they take the hard way for the sake of their father and mother
and for the England of the future which they hope for. -low they help in a
dramatic rescue on Mount \Vashington, and how they make themselves at home
in southern New Hampshire rounds out a delightful, heart-warming story.
INTO THE II'IND, by Gertrude E. .lallette.
Sabra Dunning proves that training for the nursing profession can be very
exciting. You'll like the unexpected things that happen in Randolph-Macey Hos-
pital where Sabra is a student nurse.
LAKE OF GOLD, by John 1Huchavn.
No brief description can do justice to these thrilling scenes from Canadian
history, told, with the sensitive, mystic touch which Buchan used so well,
through the eyes of a modern boy w ho hated history.
SPORTS AND GAMES, by Harold Keith.
A brief history and explanation of sixteen major sports, including baseball,
basketball, football, tennis, ice hockey and others. Diagrams of playing fields and
rules are given, too, with illustrations to help you understand the various sports.








THE HUMAN CHAMELEON
LANCE, by EdWLtard F. IHaskell.
Edward F. Haskell is the product of a conglomeration of cultures, and this
unusual novel is a sociological study of such a person. Lance is a multicultural
man who must perforce accept the absolutes of a unicultural society or become
its victim. Into his life is compressed the quintessence of the century's conflicts,
the World Wlar, the cumulation background of this study, and these roots in
turn have led to the present titanic struggle.

AWAY FROM THE CITY
A SMALL TOWN BOY, by Rufus Jones.
This is the story of the author's own beginnings in a small New England town
some three score years ago. The emphasis, however, is placed upon the life which
influenced his development rather than upon himself. . proposing that rural
life is best for a boy's education. He then sets out to prove how ideal it could be,
and in fact was.
Mr. Jones, a college professor of note was born and brought up in a Quaker
community, so his own education and outlook really are not typical of the average
rural community. Self -sufficient communities, as his home one, are rare today.
Still his small book is interesting and very sincere.

ON WINGS OF POETRY
THE POETRY OF FLIGHT, edited by Seldon Rodm/an.
Alan's air-conquering ability has become a prominent theme for modern
poets. Perhaps no better synthesis of this subject celebrating man's victory over
his Icarian humiliation, has been published than a volume of new and old "flight"
poetry, edited by Selden Rodman, bringing the timc-gap between Ovid and An-
toine de Saint Exuperx. The selections have a pleasing dissimilarity avoiding mon-
otony. Ruel Denney, W. B. Yeats, WV. H. Auden, Stephen Spender and Muriel
Rukeyser each have a poem that fixes eloquently the creative- destructive paradox
of contemporary aviation. Nevertheless, measured comparatively with these
poems, prose excerpts by Saint Exupery, Goethe and Jung have the greater merit.
However, they remain prose, hoofprints of an earth-bound Pegasus who runs to
be sure, but cannot fly. WVhat Poetry of Flight there is resides in the best poems
reaching for and gaining something of wings. Re'i.ie'ed by Richard Dent.

THE ALIEN SPIRIT
BIRD OF THE I'ILDERNESS, by Vincent Shleeal.
A sensitive portrait of a sensitive youth has been draw n by Vincent Sheean
in Bird of the WVilderness. Bill Ow en, whose German, Welsh, and American
heritage brings him into frequent and repeated conflict with his German uncle,
is the dominating figure in this slight but fascinating story which revolves around
Bill's senior year in high school in a small Illinois town during the period Wilson
was keeping the country out of World War I. Bill is a sensitive and independent
youth with a knowledge and love of music and literature, a hatred for most
things German, and an aversion to physical activity-a combination of character-
istics that constantly evoke the wrath of his German Uncle Joe. The highlights
of the story center on Bill's paper route; his companionship with Miss Carpenter,
the high school English teacher; and his slight acquaintance with Ursula Vander-
pool and her brother Roger-all of these incidents have dire consequences for
Bill.




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