Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00115
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: November 1940
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00115
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY 4NTERN
Published monthly from October to Jui.t the
Hamilton Smith Library, of the liversity :', ";'
of New Hampshire "
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire, under the
act of August 24, 1912.

Vol. 16 NOVEMBER, 1940 No 2

"GOOD BOOKS GOOD FRIENDS"
CHILDREN'S BOOK WEEK
NOVEMBER 10-16
| t i PICTURE STORY BOOKS
The following books, and other new titles, will be on
display in the Charlotte Thompson Room during Book
Week. They may be reserved by postals at the Circula-
tion Desk.
f THE DOG CANTBARK, by Marjorie
Fischer.
Cantbark lives with four musicians and
they will not let him bark, but one day he
goes to the country for a visit and then -
but you read what happens in this book with
the bright pictures.
TOPSY TURVY CIRCUS, by George
Duplai.
The animals decide to take charge of the
,,. circus. When they make the owners per-
form -?
RAFFY AND THE HONKEBEEST, by Rita Kissin.
Raffy is a young giraffe and he is the champion runner in his African home.
Then one day he races the mysterious "honkebeest." Can you guess what it is?
BRINGING UP RAFFLES, by Gertrude Robinson.
Rastus, the Newfoundland, has to teach Raffles not to do the silly things
pups like to do.
A BOOK FOR JENNIFER, by Alice Dalgliesh.
Two hundred years ago or more
Jennifer went to John Newberry's store
To buy a book, and there she met
Dr. Sam Johnson and his famous pet.
This is the book from which our picture is reproduced. It is a story the
whole family will enjoy. [The picture is reproduced with the kind permission of
Scribners and The Horn Book.]

BEGINNING SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, THE STORY HOUR FOR CHILDREN
FOUR AND FIVE YEARS OLD WILL BE HELD IN THE
CHARLOTTE THOMPSON ROOM AT 11 O'CLOCK.

02 o
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BOOKS FOR OLDER BOYS AND GIRLS
LITTLE JUNGLE VILLAGE, by JoBesse McElveen Waldeck.
Peh-weh and his sister Mano-o are two little South American Indian child-
dren. They build a village of their own in the jungle. Peh-weh says he is not
afraid of anything, but he may be just a little afraid of the jaguar.
KATY'S QUILT, by Ruth Holbrook.
How could a quilt save a house? Katy's beautiful crazy quilt does just
that. When it happens, a very exciting time for the whole family ensues.
A CONCH SHELL FOR MOLLY, by Lucille Wallower.
Perhaps you think living on a canal boat is all fun. Molly likes her strange
home, but she is lonely for she never stops long enough to make friends. One
day she meets Captain Tucker and his cat Alexander (who eats olives and hard-
boiled eggs!). She hears a conch shell too, so life is much happier for Molly.
THE CUCKOO CALLS, by Nora Burglon.
Imagine finding a buried treasure! That is just what happens to Jukka
and Vendla, two Finnish twins. They start a museum but the jeweled dagger
disappears. The twins start an exciting search aided by their school chums.
LASSIE COME-HOME, by Eric Knight.
Here is an appealing story of a fine, loyal and clever dog. Lassie's long trek
from Scotland back to her Yorkshire master is amazing, but not impossible if
you know anything about dogs.
TALES OF A SWISS GRANDMOTHER, by Frances Carpenter.
Another book in this series as fine as the others. Luc and Josette are two
Swiss children who are fortunate in having a grandmother who delights in telling
folk tales.



BOOKS FOR THE HIGH SCHOOL GROUP
COURAGE OVER THE ANDES, by Frederic Arnold Kummer.
It is a far cry from working in a New York firm under the strict guidance of
an uncle, to helping revolutionists in Chile fight for freedom. But to eighteen
year old Dick Weatherby, land battles, sea battles with whales and privateers come
all in the day's work. A thrilling adventure story of bravery in 1812.
JEWELS AND GEMS, by Lucille S. McDonald.
Combining scientific information and mythology, the author traces the his-
tory of all the well-known jewels and gems from their pre-historic origins to
their present day importance. Love, intrigue, robbery and murder have been
associated with the possession of jewels from earliest times.
THE FAIR ADVENTURE, by Elizabeth Janet Gray.
Page has her heart set on winning the scholarship at Van Welmar College,
but the unexpected happens and it takes courageous adjustments on her part to
write "New System" in her private book. You'll like her large family, from the
Shakespeare-quoting father to her lisping nieces.
FORTY FACES, by Mary Urmston.
Jean Madison is disappointed because she cannot go to the university she
wants so much to attend. She goes instead to the little teachers' college in her
home town and finds that teaching is a very interesting profession.







PUBLIC OPINION DEMOCRACY'S
FOURTH DIMENSION
PULSE OF DEMOCRACY, by George Gallup and S. F. Rae.
All of us are somewhat familiar with the findings of the American Institute of
Public Opinion. Its work is reported in the newspapers we read and we have
followed with varying degrees of interest how the Institute uses measured public
opinion on such important issues as foreign policy, $30.00 every Tuesday, aid to
Britain, and many others, but we are not all familiar with the operation of the
techniques involved. Hence Dr. Gallup, Director of the American Institute of
Public Opinion and one of his associates, Mr. Saul Rae, have written an inter-
esting description of the process by which they are able to estimate with a high
degree of accuracy just how the total populace feels about any important issues.
In their book, Pulse of Democracy, they sketch the background of the polls. After
a brief discussion of the early straw polls and their weaknesses together with an
analysis of the Literary Digest's dramatic failure in the 1936 election, they describe
how the miniature electorate is built up and how the surveys of public opinion are
actually conducted. Chapters are then devoted to success stories showing the
Institute at work. The third part of the book deals with evaluations. Here the
value of continuous cross sections of public opinion is weighed and the advantages
enumerated. Here also the criticisms fired at the opinion polls are answered.

ECONOMIC HEADACHE POWDER
IDLE MONEY, IDLE MEN, by Stuart Chase.
With idle men as his problem and a proposed use of our idle money as his
solution, Stuart Chase embarks on the ever present question of unemployment.
If ever a man braced himself up with facts and figures, this man is the one. Yet
his book remains clear, even to the beginner in world economics. His argument is
a simple but almost revolutionary plan. He says that from the time of man's
first invention, which was, perhaps, cartwheels, we have been trying to keep up
with our mechanical progress. Financially at least, we have not done so. Hence,
the "idle money." He then proves rather convincingly, that the country should
put this money, which lies useless for lack of a way to invest it, into employing
men who are out of work. The Nazis did it, he says, in preparation for war; "what
if such measures were turned to building schools, to housing projects, and to
better hospitals" an extended P.W.A. programme!

COUNTRY SUMMER
JACOBY'S CORNERS, by Jake Falstaff.
This book is a deliberate, but altogether refreshing, record of the life and
culture in the section of Ohio where the Mennonites and the Amish lived. Through
the eyes and senses of Lemuel Hayden, twelve going on thirteen, who is visiting
his grandparents in the country, we see preserved in all its color and charm, a
rural culture inherited from a baker's dozen of Old World lands. Against a back-
ground of vividly described scenes and objects, is loosely woven the tale of the
summer's happenings: chores about the farms, Saturday nights in town, harvest
suppers, fishing, even watching at midnight in the graveyard for the age-old
vampire.
The book evades description, as its qualities must be seen and felt: the quaint
houses, reminiscent of Heidi; the peaceful, fertile landscape; the smell of the barns
after harvest, new-mown hay, cellar shelves bursting with cheeses; the hospitality
of friend and neighbor, with its dark streak of warped personalities and supersti-
tion. From its pages flows a simple philosophy of those who have lived deeply
and contentedly, tasting the essential goodnesses of life. With Grandpa Nadeli,
we agree that at Jacoby's Corners we find "this is peace, it is more than rest. It
is happinesss"






TRIALS OF AN EDITOR
COUNTRY EDITOR, by Henry B. Hough.
Our grandfathers spoke in terms of thousands and sometimes millions; we
think in terms of billions. Now it is difficult to think in terms of smallness, as the
author and his wife, Betty, deliberately try to do when they assume the uncertain
ownership of a small town weekly. They leave the big, restless city only to find
that life can be interesting in a small village where "nothing ever happens."
Country Editor tells the story of Edgartown's delightful "natives" and truly
portrays the trials and the humorous side of publishing a town paper which is an
integral part of the people themselves. It is not impersonal as is a large city
paper. Never a huge financial success, demanding more than it gave, the "Ga-
zette" grew slowly and was loved by all concerned.
Their newspaper friends considered Henry and Betty "crazy" to leave civiliza-
tion and bury themselves in a quiet village where only a mystery, a shipwreck, a
fire at the "Gazette," and a murder break the routine monotony of the life of a
country editor.
PEACEFUL RIVER LAND OF COMBAT
THE DELAWARE, by Harry Emerson Wildes.
Yet another in the "Rivers of America" series; and in many ways a difficult
one to do, for the Delaware as a river is of meager importance. The upper reaches
are picturesque and the most useful portion is sea water. But it is, of course,
closely linked with history, pioneering, wars, and above all, with the story of
Philadelphia. Many famous personages sail past, figuratively speaking, borne on
the current of the Delaware: "Big Belly" Printz, William Penn, Franklin, Mad
Anthony Wayne, Rudolph Blankenburg and many others.

CHARACTER STUDY
GYPSY, GYPSY, by Rumer Godden.
When Madame Barbe de Longuemare, a middle-aged widow, took Henrietta,
her eighteen-year-old niece, to the chateau in Normandy, she was met by a feeling
of hatred on the part of each villager. Henrietta could understand this hatred for
she had been under the influence of her aunt and had also come to fear and hate
her. There was really only one person who loved Aunt Barbe and that was her
old nurse who still treated her as a child. In truth Barbe was still a child-a cruel
and violent one. She spoiled all the lives she touched and here in peaceful Nor-
mandy, she was to bring disaster, which ended in murder, to a gypsy family
camped on the estate.
LIFE IN POLAND
POLISH PROFILE, by Virgilia Sapieha.
Polish Profile is one of the most touching accounts ever published of life in
Poland before the German invasion. Virgilia Sapieha, an American woman, tells
of her six years in Poland as the wife of a Polish prince. It is an intensely per-
sonal story told against the background of a way of life which was ended by the
invasion.
There is a short account of the obstacles in the path of romance between the
writer and the Prince before the marriage finally took place. Imagine a modern,
sophisticated American girl adjusting herself to a semi-feudal society in a country
absolutely foreign to her. Virgilia made this adjustment, but not without blunders
-social and otherwise-which she good-naturedly sets forth in her book. Her
good humor and wise understanding carried her through and aided her in arousing
deep sympathy for Poland and its people.
The Princess entertained, traveled with her husband, and took an active part
in Warsaw society. These six peaceful years in Poland are brought to a close
with the story of her escape into Roumania with her two children.




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