Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00103
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: March 1939
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00103
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY
Published monthly from October to oe by. h i ti
Hamilton Smith Library, of the rsity
of New Hampshire
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Du N H shir e under the
act of August 24, 1912.
Vol. 14 MARCH, 1939 No. 6

OUR RENAISSANCE COUNTRY
THRICE A STRANGER, by Vera Brittain.
Now an established lecturer in this country, Miss Brittain gives us her im-
pressions of the United States, first as seen through the eyes of a young English
bride accompanying her husband to his university post, then as a lecturer, touring
the country alone on two successive occasions. Her first visit, in the twenties,
took her to a small college town, and, hating provincialism anywhere, she found
it unendurable there with its concomitant smugness of the era of prosperity.
Struggling to do creative work against the burden of domesticity imposed by a
small salary and high prices, she reflected that women everywhere, but particularly
in the United States, will have to overcome that burden before they can equal the
performances of traditionally emancipated men. On her second visit, in 1934,
she found a changed America, a country purged by the depression, with a new
capacity for self-criticism. This time she made real friends and began to appre-
ciate the worth of the country she had so hated before. Finally, on her third trip,
no longer a stranger, she found a country which had achieved a balanced self-
possession and continued gaily on its way, the scene of a renaissance from which
she expects the flowering of a great spirit.

HOW TO BE A DICTATOR
THE SCHOOL FOR DICTATORS, by Ignazio Silone.
The author of Fontamara and Bread and Wine gives us an astute summary of
the technique of dictators. He presents his material in the form of dialogue be-
tween Mr. W., the future dictator of America, Professor Pickup, his secret ad-
viser, and the author's friend, Thomas the Cynic. The two Americans go to
Zurich after an exhausting tour and Thomas the Cynic takes them in hand and
gives them the rich harvest of his observation and study of the ways of dictators
down through the ages. The professor is eager to air his pet theory which he
calls Neo-Sociology, but Thomas is quite capable of keeping the discussions well
in hand and for a cynic he has quite a sense of humor. The author is an exile
from Fascist Italy and has had opportunity to study the workings of the present
dictators at first hand.

A SCOTTISH ANTHONY ADVERSE
COLIN LOWRIE, by Norah Lofts.
Colin Lowrie was a Stuart sympathizer in Scotland during the "45". And in
spite of all the caution of his parents who had suffered in the "15" he found it
necessary to flee the country. Always before him he kept the hope of returning
to rebuild Braidlowrie even through deadening years of slavery. For Colin Low-
rie, white, was sold as slave to a planter in Jamaica. This section of the story
showing the psychology of slavery and especially the reactions of a cultivated per-
son to it is the most interesting part of the book.

020 ./4.

IV I.4-, &o44








FOR THE FIRESIDE TRAVELER
SKY ROAMING ABOVE TWO CONTINENTS, by Harry A. Franck.
Without moving more than your hand to turn the pages you can take off from
Newark airport, fly down across Mexico and the northern part of South America
and home via the West Indies! You will be a bit breathless at the speed with
which territory is covered, but you will undoubtedly enjoy the experience. Mr.
Franck, the commentator and pilot on this arm chair trip, is a good story teller
and, by freely sprinkling the pages with anecdotes and personal reminiscences of
previous trips, he enlivens long descriptions. It is a revelation to discover to
what a great extent the countries to the south of us are served by air transporta-
tion facilities and at the same time to note the primitive habits of the greater part
of the native populations. The numerous photographs are excellent.


STREAMLINED GLIMPSES
PROFILES FROM "THE NEW YORKER."
This is a collection of twenty-three Profiles which have appeared in The New
Yorker Magazine over a period of years. They are of varying lengths, but all
written by competent journalists and because they are not cluttered with the non-
essential details so many full-length biographies carry, the subjects emerge with
refreshing clarity. Father Divine is here, Anna Lonergan, widow of two gun-
men, Harpo Marx, royalty in the person of Queen Mary, Bishop Manning, Eliza-
beth Arden and many others you will enjoy meeting.

AN APOSTLE OF THE OPEN MIND
ART CRITICISM FROM A LABORATORY, by Alan Burroughs.
Mr. Burroughs, keeper of x-rays at the Fogg Museum, has done much for
the development of the scientific and technical study of painting through his work
with shadowgraph, infra-red, microscope photography, and microchemistry. He
believes that the scientific approach can help the art critic, who has the right to
say what he believes, to a more accurate artistic approach. Art history is a means
to understanding rather than an end in itself and learning to appreciate pictures
as physical symbols of emotional meanings is a long step toward art appreciation.
There are tools of criticism, historical, and aesthetic; there are tools of science,
the technical methods. With whichever tools one approaches art and art criticism,
Mr. Burroughs' book will prove both educational and absorbing.

KING OR COUNTRY
THREE HARBOURS, by F. van Wyck Mason.
The familiar story of the American Revolution is given a new slant in this
stirring tale of those troubled times. Rob Ashton, the pivot of the story, was
created to typify the coastal merchants, who as a class constitute the hero of the
novel. He, like many of his associates, hesitated in the early days of the struggle
to choose between King and country, wanting only to maintain peace in order to
build up a prosperous trade. Other predominant groups represented by strong
characters are the Tory business men and the impetous young men who burn to
fight for the cause of freedom. Comparatively little space is given to accounts
of actual fighting, although the Battle of Breed's Hill (commonly known as the
Battle of Bunker Hill) is realistically recounted. Norfolk, Virginia, and the Ber-
mudas share honors with Boston as background.








MOUNT ZION ENDURETH

THE RAPE OF PALESTINE, by William B. Ziff.
Where do green pastures wait you, Chosen Folk,
Denied the shelter of the Nordic pine?
By what still waters shall you loose the yoke
Of Ghetto cares, except in Palestine?
Greeted by British generals, bland, benign,
Whose henchmen slay you at the welcome-feast
For Arab good .. .. or trade routes to the east.
Who takes the prophet's rod to lead you now?
The youth too brash to wait for wisdom's turn,
The scholar on an alien mountain's brow
Watching in vain to see the bushes burn.
The wisest race has still the most to learn;
Loud voices arguing in your synagogues
Can't help, when storm troops slaughter you like hogs.
So writes this man of Zion. His people live
On sufferance only, but he sees for them
The bright, defiant walls of Tel Aviv,
The olive boughs of New Jerusalem
As the one barrier strong enough to stem
The tides of Jewish blood that choke the Jew
To-day, as in the days the patriarchs knew.


"ALPHABET AGENCIES" FROM THE INSIDE

WE TOO ARE THE PEOPLE, by Louise V. Armstrong.
A well-to-do Chicago commercial artist and his wife, losing almost every-
thing they had in the depression, were forced to move to their summer home in
northern Michigan and thereby hangs a tale-that of Mrs. Armstrong and the
federal relief program. Almost before she knew what was happening, Mrs. Arm-
strong found herself installed as Relief Administrator for a large and prosperous
country. Her experiences in that capacity make as fascinating reading as many
a novel, and her clear-headed observations about the various "alphabet" agencies
are a joy. Objective in her judgments, she does not condemn harshly nor praise
sentimentally the relief set-up as she knew it, but fairly evaluates what was at-
tempted and accomplished in caring for those who "too are the people."


WITHIN OUR GATES?

THE GERMAN REICH AND AMERICANS OF GERMAN ORIGIN.
The book consists of selections from German documents relating to applica-
tion of Nazi propaganda outside of Germany. It shows the attitude of the present
German government toward Germans living in other countries, and the attempts
being made to include them in the Nazi program. The note of warning in this
will arouse many to the danger of German propaganda.







WHY NOT THE SONS?
THE FATHERS, by Allen Tate.
Lacy Buchan reviews the train of events which followed his sister Susan's
marriage to George Posey in spite of Major Buchan's opposition. The Buchans
were Southern aristocrats and as such had deep-rooted traditions. George's re-
fusal to recognize or accept these traditions led from one tragedy to another. The
days immediately preceding the Civil War and the first weeks of the strife serve
as a background for the story, but mainly to intensify George's conflict. We can-
not share young Lacy's admiration for his brother-in-law and we are not quite
sure the author expect that of us.

KITTENS IN PERSIA
WE MARRIED AN ENGLISHMAN, by Ruth and Helen Hoffman.
It will not take long to discover why We Married an Englishman could have
been called "Kittens in Persia". And soon after you will discover the book to
be full of atmosphere, or should we say desert heat? It gives a very clear picture
of what life in Iraq is really like for Europeans. Whether you consider that life
pleasant and adventurous or quite the reverse will depend entirely upon whether
you have a sense of humor and a determination to find interest and enjoyment
in every situation. "We" did. You feel that "We" are extremely naive and yet
thoroughly sophisticated and I think herein lies the charm of the book.

MURDER AVERTED
DANGER SIGNAL, by Phyllis Bottome.
Miss Bottome's novels are always interesting for the Adlerian psychology
they contain. In this case we have a dramatic situation in which a young woman
planning a murder is restrained by purely psychological means, and by the same
means cured of the state of mind which prompted the pain-not that its execution
wouldn't have got rid of a very obnoxious person.

IN THE DAYS OF PETER STUYVESANT
KNICKERBOCKER HOLIDAY, by Maxwell Anderson.
Actually on the New York stage with scenes and music this must indeed
be a rollicking comedy. Reading it at home one misses much of the humor and
a great deal of the zest which the music gives it. You will look in vain for such
lyrics as you found in Gilbert and Sullivan but you will appreciate the clever ar-
guments of the council or the sharp commands of the new governor.

A NEW ENGLAND SKETCH BOOK
FANCY THIS, by Jack Frost.
Jack Frost has rescued from oblivion many bizarre reliques of Boston and
New England through his drawings which originally appeared in the Boston Her-
ald. In delving into the past he has preserved fascinating bits of history and legend.
Each page consists of a pencil sketch and a short description.

OTHER NEW BOOKS
CHATEAUBRIAND, by Andre Maurois.
POET AND PAINTER, by Chauncey Tinker.
COLLETED POEMS, by Genevieve Taggard.
DEATH SENDS A CABLE, by Margaret Yates.
THE NAZI PRIMER, by Harwood Childs.




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