Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00102
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: February 1939
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00102
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY L7
Published monthly from October to J t ibrar
Hamilton Smith Library, of the W sity
of New Hampshire ,..
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the ost office at D s u the
act of August 24, 1912.
Vol. 14 FEBRUARY, 1939 No. 5

SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYFELLOW
GARLAND OF BAYS, by Gwyn Jones.
This skillful portrayal of Elizabethan England is midway between fiction and
biography. Hero of its pages is Robert Greene, Oxford scholar, dramatist, and
poet, whose lyrics are still studied as excellent examples of the period. But facts
about Greene's life are scarce, and here the author has had to draw on his imagi-
nation in order to round out the picture. Greene was not a particularly admirable
character, for he squandered his own and his friend's resources in reckless living
at home and on the continent, later deserted his wife and child, and finally went
to London to become one of the group who fawned for favor at the royal court.
Its wide range of characters and the finesse with which all levels of society are de-
picted make this book a valuable contribution to our knowledge of the era, but its
scholarly basis does not detract from the pleasure of reading it.

PARABLE OF MODERN SPAIN
AFTER THE DEATH OF DON JUAN, by Sylvia Townsend Warner.
Don Juan de Tenorio, whose riotous living was supported by the ragged
peasants of his father's estate-was he really dragged down to Hell by a host
of devils? It must be so, for Dona Ana arrived at the estate with a retinue, to
inform his father of the sad event. Yet perhaps even she did not wholly believe
the story, else why did she seek the one spot where he would be likely to turn
up should he be alive at all? And when she prayed all night in the chapel, was it
for his soul, or his body? The peasants knew what alone mattered: alive, Don
Juan had lived by the sweat of their toil; dead, he remained the symbol of the
profligate aristocracy that exhausted the men's strength and the soil's fertility.
Don Juan lived in the eighteenth century, but as a parable of modern Spain this
tale is very apt.

MARK SULLIVAN'S TIMES
THE EDUCATION OF AN AMERICAN, by Mark Sullivan.
Many a journalist has given us the story of his life and not infrequently it is
a story packed with excitement and sensational adventures. In his long career
Mr. Sullivan must have had his share of these, but for the most part he leaves us
to read between the lines for such adventures. He describes with great detail his
boyhood on a Pennsylvania farm before the days of automobiles and radios, when
people supplied their own amusements. He had a normal childhood, as he tells
it, and was launched on his writing career before he went to Harvard, in fact
paid most of his expenses with his pen. Fortune smiled on him when Edward Bok
sought his assistance in cleaning up the patent medicine trade, for it led to his
long association with Collier's and his friendship with Norman Hapgood and
Robert L. Collier. This book closes with the Wilson Administration, but Mr. Sulli-
van plans to continue his memoirs.


N6748








THIS IS NEW ENGLAND
NEW ENGLAND HURRICANE, by New England Federal Writers' Project.
On September 19, 1938, we New Englanders read in our newspapers that a
hurricane was headed for Florida. "Poor Florida!" we said. "We may have a
flood now and then, but at least we do not have to worry about hurricanes and
tidal waves." Two days later that furious wind skipped Florida completely and
tore its catastrophic way through our land, leaving in its wake a swath of de-
struction and death. Along the coast the sea became a rapacious monster devour-
ing summer resorts, or leaving them in splintered heaps. Members of the New
England Federal Writers' Project have selected a goodly number of photographs
of the havoc and added a running text. The book makes a graphic record of the
might of a Big Wind, with open admiration for the work of the WPA.
GRANDMA CALLED IT CARNAL, by Bertha Damon.
If you are native to New England Grandma will be almost as familiar to you
as your own grandma. Grandma was a reformer-a conservative reformer if
such there be. But only in the matters of spiritual and mental life did she wish
to introduce changes. Material life must be maintained according to very simple,
very rigid and very antiquated standards. In a time and a place where women
spent their lives in closely curtained houses drudging, Grandma was considered
"odd" because she worked in her flower garden and liked to walk in the woods
watching the changing seasons. But for all her strictness Grandma is accorded
full measure of appreciation by Mrs. Damon, and not a little humor in the telling.
THEY FOUND A WAY, by Iveagh H. Sterry and William H. Garrigus.
It is apparent even after a few minutes of dipping into this volume that the
authors are convinced that whenever Connecticut people wanted to do something,
they found a way to do it, whether it was making women's leghorn hats or wrest-
ling territory from Mexico to found the independent Lone Star Republic. Its
pages filled with anecdotes and legends, the primary purpose of the book is the
glorification of the "Nutmeg state" and its inhabitants. From the time of Thomas
Hooker and its settlement, this little state has produced its share of the nation's
great and interesting. Pioneers and restless adventurers in various fields they have
been, and their accomplishments are set forth here in sprightly, conversational man-
ner. It is the kind of book that has no particular sequence, and its pages may be
enjoyed at random.

DEFENSE OF THE IVORY TOWER
PHILOSOPHER'S HOLIDAY, by Irwin Edman.
Irwin Edman on a holiday is still a philosopher, albeit one who rides his hobby
with a light rein. Here he writes a series of informal chapters on his travels and
encounters in Europe, colleagues at Columbia, music, his cook, his childhood im-
pressions of New York, and much besides. The quiet charm of the book reflects
the man who has learned from philosophy to enjoy life and to see it in true per-
spective. He concludes with a defense of the Ivory Tower. While we cannot
live in it all the time, it is in the long run, the abode of the human mind's highest
aspirations.

A MAN OF MANY PARTS
CHATEAUBRIAND, by Andre Maurois.
Maurois wrote Chateaubriand as he himself says, because of his admiration for
the writer and his desire to compare a French romanticist and an English roman-
ticist, also because Chateaubriand was bound up in a whole period of French his-
tory, and finally because of the very few complete biographies which have been
written. Maurois has drawn material from new sources and has done an alto-
gether enjoyable biography as well as a scholarly work.








THREE PERSONS, ONE SOUL
FAREWELL THE BANNER, by Frances Winwar.
Coleridge, Wordsworth and Dorothy interact on one another here in this
book as "three persons and one soul" as Dorothy put it in her journal at the
height of their friendship. Each character is clearly drawn although more time
and space is given to the development of Coleridge. The whole of the first sec-
tion, some eleven chapters, is devoted to Coleridge's early life and influences up
to the time that he met Wordsworth. So that by 'the time Miss Winwar starts
explaining their relationship one realizes that her sympathy is with Coleridge.
With but one half of a chapter does she tell of the childhood of the Wordworths.
In another whole chapter concerning Wordsworth's year in France she paints him
in an unpleasant light of a weak, vacilating character, who squirmed out of a bad
situation to return to a life of smugness and adulation. Coleridge, too, she paints
with all his faults and with all his great poetic ability which Miss Winwar would
have us believe was stifled by Wordsworth's inappreciation. So much does Miss
Winwar draw from her own imagination that one wonders if she has a factual basis
for her conclusions. However, as a character study of the "three persons and
one soul" as well as of others of their families the book makes interesting reading.

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A CORPSE
DEAD NED, by John Masefield.
Here is a book for lovers of high adventure tales. It is a story of a young
English doctor in the eighteenth century when slave trading was rife. Ned was
hanged on circumstantial evidence for the murder of his best friend, cantankerous
Admiral Cringle. Ordinarly that would be the end of a story, but not in Dead
Ned. Just at the most exciting point the author breaks off his narrative with the
promise that a second volume is to follow. Paging Mr. Masefield!

ONE BIG, HAPPY FAMILY
QUEEN VICTORIA'S DAUGHTERS, by E. F. Benson.
The international complications that arose from the marriages of Queen Vic-
toria's nine sons and daughters puzzled even that astute dowager, and certainly
to the modern American reader the number of royal personages connected with
the House of Windsor is bewildering. But although titled names dot the pages,
the story of this mother and her children is an essentially human one, full of many
of the same joys and problems experienced by any family. The Queen dominates
the book even as her personality overshadowed all others about her. Of the
daughters, the most complete picture is given of the Princess Royal who married
the Prussian Crown Prince and became the mother of the last Kaiser. Based on
memoirs and letters, the authenticity of the work is assured.

SANDY SOIL
POWDER RIVER: LET 'ER BUCK, by Struthers Burt.
Powder River is the fourth in the series of "Rivers of America." It is "the
story of grass. The search for it. The fight for it. The slow disappearance of it."
Of course in this "Epic of grass" there is the warwhoop of the North American
Indian and the crack of the settlers' rifles announcing the advance of civilization.
This is an excellent history of Northeastern Wyoming, full of folklore and pic-
turesque, adventurous men. And to this day the words "Powder River" have a
mystic power over those who know and love it.







FOREVER ENGLAND
THE CHAMBERLAIN TRADITION, by Sir Charles Petrie.
Herein Sir Charles acclaims his ancient friend;
Shakes out the family fame like dusty banners.
Sir Neville Chamberlain, you comprehend,
Kept bombing planes away from English manors
And public schools. Sir Neville loves the land
Like any Englishman. Sir Neville's decent.
But Tony Eden kept the upper hand
So long, he hindered things . . hence crises recent.

So says Sir Charles. He glibly tells the story
Of British politics these fifty years;
Caution, not courage, now is England's glory,
And acquiescence to the brandished spears.
Praise we this knight who kept his kin from slaughter,
Regardless of the smoking towns in Spain,
Forgetting that no channel's stormy water,
No ruinous Danegeld kept away the Dane.

ART EXHIBITS
The following is a list of the art exhibits definitely scheduled for showing in
the Library during the second semester:
January 12-February 9-Federal Art Project; water colors by WPA. Reference
room.
January 30-February 13-The Scandinavian countries and Finland; views and
handicrafts.
February 14-28-Miniature palettes of contemporary American painters; French
peasant costumes.
March 8-20-Outstanding work of students in schools of the Association of Col-
legiate Schools of Architecture.
March 20-April 15-American Gelatone Facsimiles; a new reproduction process.
April 1-16-Photographic Exhibit: Russian scenes by Soviet photographers.
April 17-May 1-Athletics and Festivals of Greece; photographs of works of art;
techniques and processes in the Graphic Arts.
Mayl-15-Work by commercial illustrators of this country.
May 16-June 15-Photographs of American Houses, including examples-from the
17th and 18th centuries. Material from Historic American Buildings
Survey.

OTHER NEW BOOKS
QUEER THING PAINTING, by Walter Pach.
CRANBERRY RED, by E. Garside.
LEE IN THE MOUNTAINS, by Donald Davidson.
FANCY THIS, by Jack Frost.
LETTERS OF T. E. LAWRENCE, edited by David Garnett.
SONG OF YEARS, by Bess Streeter Aldrich.
THE SILK ROAD, by Sven Hedin.
AMERICAN QUEST, by Bradford Smith.
BANBURY BOG, by Phoebe Atwood Taylor.
HISTORY OF WOODCUT, by Arthur Hind.
LEONARDI DA VINCI, by Antonia Vallentin.
BEHIND THE BALLOTS, by J. A. Farley.




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