Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00099
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: November 1938
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00099
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LAN N,.
Published monthly from October to June by the ,, /
Hamilton Smith Library, of the University i, .
of New Hampshire
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New II tnm,:..ir.- undjr the
act of August 24, 1912.
Vol. 14 NOVEMBER, 1938 No. 2

SWIMMER IN A DARK SEA
LETTERS OF HENRY ADAMS, 1892-1918.
In the year 1900 Henry Adams, historian, "Conservative Christian Anarchist"
S. .and some may wish to add, prophet . wrote of England, "I tell you the
church bells are tolling. The greatest empire the world ever saw is tottering to its
grave." Dying eleven years before the great panic beset our generation, he informed
his friends, with the weird premonition of a banshee and the banshee's gift for
being right, that the man who lived to see 1930 would wish he hadn't. Aside
from the references to our own time, however, these letters are interesting because
of their comments on the political and international affairs of Adams' time, and
because they portray the aging of this man's spirit as the first volume of his let-
ters portrayed his youth and his best years. They dispel that general error of
the masses, that a Boston aristicrat can be neither likable nor human, and confound
the more particular error of one criminal Adams who complained that the family
was short on humor. Henry Adams moved through personal tragedy and a period
of social decadence, like a swimmer in a dark sea, while his contemporaries flapped
complacently about in what they thought was the sunshine; but he moved steadily
ahead, and with strength, on the only course that was possible for him, and he had
the vision to recognize darkness, which is one of the qualities that make a great
man if not a happy one.

A WORLD PROBLEM
REFUGEES, ANARCHY OR ORGANIZATION, by Dorothy Thompson.
Even since the publication of this book the refugee problem has grown more
serious and the necessity for a constructive program more important. Dorothy
Thompson offers such a program in this book, in which she discusses the problem
historically, tells what has been done in the past by such men as Nansen and Al-
bert Thomas, and what can be done in the future. The solution of the problem lies
with the democratic countries, who can acquire great potential assets by the ad-
mission of the skilled outcasts of other lands.
HAPPY LANDINGS
LISTEN! THE WIND, by Anne Morrow Lindbergh.
Ten days of a six months' trip to survey trans-Atlantic flying is shared with
the reader in Mrs. Lindbergh's charming volume. It is a simple narrative of one
lap of their journey . the flight from the African coast to Natal, South America.
Akin in spirit and style to North to the Orient, the same beauty of expression, the
vital interest in all about her, and the remarkable skill in making the reader feel
that he is sharing their experiences is shown throughout. The people they meet
become alive, the places at which they stop are readily seen, the problems they
face . a long ocean hop in a plane designed for land flying, a heavily loaded
machine, and unfavorable weather conditions . become for a time the reader's
own. Though one is sure the ending will be happy, suspense is maintained to the
finish. The delightful personal touch found in her first book is an integral part
of the second.

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CHILDREN'S BOOK WEEK
Is it no comfort when the armies mass,
Good men go hungry, and our prophets mourn,
That Alice still goes through the Looking-Glass,
And Puck makes bold with Oak and Ash and Thorn?
No wizardry of Oz can cure our ills
But we are eased if we can keep secure
The colored books behind the quiet sills,
For younger folk who find this charm is sure.

The following books and possibly other new titles not yet received, will be on display in the Library
during Children's Book Week, November 13-19. Postals may be had at the main desk for reserving any
of these books.
PICTURE-STORY BOOKS
ANDY AND THE LION, by James Daugherty.
What would you do if you met a lion on your way to school? This is the
story of one little boy who did and had an exciting adventure afterwards.
THE BOOK OF INSECT ODDITIES, by Raymond Ditmars.
This beautifully illustrated book tells about unusual insects in our country
and foreign lands.
THE FOREST POOL, by Laura Adams Armer.
Two little Mexican boys hunt for the iguana in the green forest. Striking
illustrations by the author.
THE THREE POLICEMEN, by William DuBois.
A nonsense story about three policemen on an imaginary island and how
they caught the fish-net thieves with Bottsford's help.
STORIES FROM THE OLD TESTAMENT, by Maud and Miska Petersham.
The stories of Joseph, Moses, Ruth and David, retold and illustrated by the
two author-artists who have given us so many lovely books.
BUTTONS, by Tom Robinson.
Buttons is a lovable alley cat who finally becomes a gentleman cat and has
nothing more to do with ash cans and alleys. Pictures by Peggy Bacon.
TALES FROM THE STORYTELLER'S HOUSE, by Thornton W. Burgess.
These are the stories the children heard each week at the Old House while the
story-log blazed merrily on the hearth.
BANANA TREE HOUSE, by Phillis Garrard.
This book is about a little girl in Bermuda and how she amuses herself. The
Haders have illustrated it.
CAP'N BENNY'S BIRDHOUSES, by Ruth Holbrook.
Davy goes to Northeast Harbor and is lonely until he makes friends with
Cap'n Benny and the martins.
MR. POPPER'S PENGUINS, by Richard Atwater.
Why toil for a handful of nickels and copper
When you can be a millionaire?
If you want to know how, just ask Mr. Popper . .
Any child can raise Penguins in Mother's Frigidaire.

FOR OLDER BOYS AND GIRLS
THE WHITE STAG, by Kate Seredy.
This book which won the Newbery Medal this year, is about the early history
of the author's own country-Hungary.
HUCKLEBERRY ISLAND, by Agnes C, Foote.
What a combination! A Maine island and a haunted wreck.







THE RED KEEP, by Allen French.
Gallant knights, a band of ruffians and a lovely maiden in distress.
A BOY RIDES WITH CUSTER, by Zoa Grace Hawley.
A young white boy who fought in the last Indian war became the friend of
a young Sioux.
FELICITY DANCES, by Arnold L. Haskell.
After Felicity Ann and her sister see the Ballet Russe life is never quite the
same and Felicity knows what she wants to do and does it well. Plots of some
of the famous ballets are woven into the story.
SKINNY, by James D. Adams.
Skinny is a real boy when it comes to pranks, but he is truthful and honest
and owns up manfully when caught. The scene is laid in Newburyport, Mass.
THE LITTLE AMERICAN GIRL, by Marjorie Hill Allee.
"Sandy" goes to Paris for six months at the Quaker International Center.
HOLIDAY HANDICRAFT, by Nina R. Jordan.
A very useful book packed with suggestions for special day gifts and favors
and for making costumes and masks.
Richard Halliburton's Second Book of Marvels:THE ORIENT.
This is a companion volume to Mr. Halliburton's book about the Occident.
WAMPUM AND SIXPENCE, by Marjorie Hayes.
A stirring tale of early days along the Connecticut River with plenty of ex-
citing raids.
LINDA AND DICK OF COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG, by Myrtle Trachsel.
The days preceding the American Revolution were troublesome ones and Dick
and Linda's home was often visited by Washington, Jefferson and Patrick Henry.
THE SECRET OF THE GOLD EARRING, by Helen Albee Monsell.
This story is complete in itself, but we find the same characters who appeared
in The Secret of the Chestnut Tree.
THINGS A BOY CAN DO WITH ELECTRICITY, by Alfred Morgan.
Even if you are not interested in experimenting, there is much information here
about electricity.
FIGHTING GUARD, by Ralph H. Barbour.
BOY SCOUTS YEAR BOOK OF FUN IN FICTION, edited by Franklin K.
Mathiews.
MOCASSINS IN THE WILDERNESS, by Elizabeth H. Buck.
THE VANDERLYN SILHOUETTE, by Augusta Huiell Seaman.
BACKFIELD PLAY, by William Heyliger.
THE CHILDREN'S ALMANAC OF BOOKS AND PLAYS, by Helen Dean
Fish.
HEIDI GROWS UP, by Charles Tritten.
THE YOUNG BRONTES, by Mary Louise Jarden.
PENN, by Elizabeth Janet Gray.


NEW DIRECTIONS, edited by Warren Bower.
Filled with ideas of interest to Christian students everywhere is New Direc-
tions; containing essays on such subjects as "Students and World Crisis", and
"Man and the World of Nature." It brings into view the work being done on
numerous campuses to further Christian living.







INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
THE BUCCANEERS, by Edith Wharton.
Mrs. Wharton's posthumous novel is incomplete and unfinished, and therefore
unsatisfactory from some points of view. However those who appreciate her par-
ticular genius will not want to miss this last work, some parts of which are up
to her best, including the creation of characters which have a very real existence
of their own. The story concerns the first assault of American wealth and beauty
on indigent British nobility, with the natural rewards of husbands for the first
and money for the second. The moral problems evoked by the mistakes of these
alliances give the book its plot interest, and although the conclusion is not reached
it is foreshadowed and justified.

"KNOW THYSELF"
ADVENTURES IN SELF-DISCOVERY, by David Scabury.
Because he himself was a failure and misunderstood until he was able to find
himself, the author studied psychology and psycho-analysis. His main emphasis
is on the curing of neuroses especially those which incur morbid tendencies. Dr.
Seabury, as consulting psychologist for New York city and founder of the Cen-
tralist School of psychology is well qualified to write on this subject, and give
the advice which he does in regard to self-analysis.

PATCHES OF SUNLIGHT, by Lord Dunsany.
Lord Dunsany's purpose in this autobiography seems to have been to search
his memory for all the pleasant features of his life and write them down together.
The book starts with his earliest memories and ends with the end of the World
War which in one place he has called the End of the Old World. He does not go
on to tell of his life in the new world. He carefully avoids writing of unpleasant
occurences other than merely mentioning them occasionally. For the most part he
gives the sources and inspirations for his stories written in the period before he
began writing the novels with which we are more familiar. Although this book
has all the restraint and vivid imagination of the novels it has not the gaiety and
humor found in them.
GROWTH OF A MAN, by Mazo De la Roche.
Little Shaw Manifold, during the unhappy years of his childhood spent on
his grandfather's farm, learned much besides the school lessons that he mastered
so avidly. As the result of the beatings and scoldings endured at home, came
patience and tolerance; from the realization that he was considered worthless, de-
termination to prove himself; and from the infrequent visits of his widowed mother
who worked in the city, tenderness and love. All of these characteristics stood
him in good stead as he grew to manhood. His life seemed a continual struggle,
grinding poverty during his college days, and then, just as he was beginning to
make his mark in the Forestry service, the illness that had killed his father struck
him. Through the hard years three persons made life worth while to Shaw-his
mother, his best friend, Ian Blair, and Ian's sister, Elspeth. The final note of
the book is a happier one than the opening, and one can see that from the miserable,
unwanted little boy, there has grown a man of whom to be proud indeed.

OTHER NEW BOOKS
TRIUMPH OVER PAIN, by Rene Fulop-Miller.
FEDERAL THEATRE PLAYS
OLD NEW ENGLAND CHURCHES, by Elise Lathrop.
THE BIG FOUR, by Oscar Lezvws.
MARCH OF THE IRON MEN, by Roger Burlingame.
A NEW BIRTH OF FREEDOM, by Nicholas Roosevelt.




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