Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00090
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: November 1937
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00090
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LANTERN
Published monthly from October to June by the
Hamilton Smith Library, of the University
of New Hampshire .
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire, 'dr the
act of August 24, 1912., .

Vol. 13 NOVEMBER, 1937 N.

MOTHER'S TURN /
LIFE WITH MOTHER, by Clarence Day.
In the same charming mood of Life with Father, these sketchesbvy the' late
Clarence Day give an equally lovable picture of his mother; Although :uperfi-
cially both books may seem to ridicule their subjects, the underlying note is rather
one of pride in parents who had enough character to persist in their peculiarities.
Mother was as forceful in her way as Father, who, being a gentleman, often had
to give in. He gave in to Mother's mustard plaster in rather ungentlemanly fash-
ion, which is hardly surprising since Mother didn't know about tempering the mus-
tard with flour, and insisted on Father's wearing it for the length of time the doctor
ordered. Sometimes Father profited by Mother's mistakes, as when she signed
up for a series of German lessons in order to surprise him the next time they went
abroad. The Fraulein was very severe and Mother's verbs wouldn't behave, so
she finally confessed to Father and made him take over the lessons, to his profit and
the Fraulein's pleasure.
ARTS AND CRAFTS IN THE SOUTH
HANDICRAFTS OF THE SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS, by A. H. Eaton.
In New Hampshire, with its own vigorous arts and crafts movement, this book
should attract especial interest. The author's survey of the southern highlands,
and the many fine photographs with which the book is illustrated, show how widely
a love of beauty, coupled with artistic skill, is rooted in the mountain people. Sam-
ples of weaving, carving, baskets, pottery, and other arts are pictured, and while
many of these objects are sold, they are made less from economic need than from
the creative impulse. Consequently they display a quality that is seldom found
in objects made for profit. The author stresses the social and therapeutic values
of handicrafts. This is a most inspiring book to all who appreciate the charm of
hand made things.
A PRIZE NOVEL
KATRINA, by Sally Salminen.
A few months ago the literary world was startled when a Finnish woman who
had been in domestic service in Ne.w York won a prize in a Swedish fiction contest.
Now, translated into English, Katrina appears as a magnificent piece of work. It
presents life in classic simplicity, telling the story of Katrina who married Johann
and followed him to his faraway home. He had promised her riches; she found the
most abject poverty. But without complaint she set about to make the best of
things, to give her children love and sympathy in place of riches, to gain the respect
of the villagers who despised her lazy, false-tongued Johann. With this material,
and with complete absence of dramatic effect, the author has written an absorbing
tale of life at its most elemental. Although the locale is the Aland Islands of Fin-
land it is shaped without any exotic quality, and the scene, like the people, is
fundamental to all time and place.


SI.No. ee< 19 37








CHILDREN'S BOOKS
The following books, and possibly other new titles not yet received, will be on display in the Library
during Children's Book Week, November 14-20. Postals may be had at the main desk for reserving any of
these books.

PICTURE STORY BOOKS
NOODLE, by Munro Leaf.
The story of a lovable dachshund who wishes to change his shape because it
isn't very good for digging. Pictures by Ludwig Bemelmans.
WALTER, THE LAZY MOUSE, by Marjorie Flack.
Walter finds out that it does not pay to be lazy. After his family desert him
he becomes Sir Mouse of Mouse Island.
THE CASTLE NUMBER NINE, by Ludwig Bemelmans.
The strange experiences of Baptiste when he goes to Castle No. 9 to work for
Count Hungerburg-Hungerburg.
WHEN THE WIND BLEW, by Margaret W. Brown.
What happens to the old lady and her seventeen cats and her one blue-grey
kitten when the wind blows? You will want to find out for yourself.
A CHILD'S STORY OF THE WORLD, by Donald Culross Peattie.
The story of civilization from early days to the present. Simply told.
SUMMER COMES TO APPLE MARKET STREET, by Mabel Betsy Hill.
More adventures of Judy-Jo and her friends.
HANS CHRISTIAN OF ELSINORE, by Eva M. Kristoffersen.
Hans the little Danish boy is anxious to share his nice secret with you.
HIGH WATER, by Phil Stong.
We hope the flood cured Mexico the burro from stalling whenever he thought.
HONEY CHILE, by Anna Braune.
One day of Jane's stay with her aunt and uncle on an Alabama plantation.
THE TRADER'S CHILDREN, by Laura Adams Garner.
The children at the Black Mountain Trading Post have a lively time. Real
photographs are used as illustrations.
RICHARD HALLIBURTON'S BOOK OF MARVELS: THE OCCIDENT.
Mr. Halliburton describes many of the wonders of North and South America
and of Europe, and includes many photographs to add to the interest of his book.
CHOO CHOO, by Virginia Lee Burton.
SNIPP, SNAPP, SNURR AND THE BIG SURPRISE, by Maj Lindman.
BABETTE, by Clare Turlay Newberry.


BOOKS FOR OLDER BOYS AND GIRLS
CHINA QUEST, by Elizabeth Forman Lewis.
Reds Stuart and Wang Li-san prove that the East and West can work together.
SILVER CHIEF TO THE RESCUE, by Jack O'Brien.
A new story about Silver Chief and his Mounty owner, Jim Thorne.
LOST COVERS, by Edna Turpin.
Missing: one Confederate Stamp. Result: a corking story.
JANE OF LANTERN HILL, by L. M. Montgomery.
Jane's dreaded visit to her father on Prince Edward Island turns out to be fun.
It leads to a new life for Jane and her mother and incidentally the jealous grand-
mother is defeated in her selfish scheme.
BLAINE OF THE BACKFIELD, by Donald H. Haines.
Huddle! Just the new football story for which you have been longing. You
can always count on Mr. Haines for a touchdown.
,








(Children's books continued)
COLLEGE IN CRINOLINE, by Marjorie Medary.
An interesting story of college days during the Civil War when co-education
was still frowned upon. Imagine having to supply your fuel and mattresses! Just
the same, Bessie Q and her friends had much the same kind of college life as you
and I-except for Rule Twelve.
THE LUCK OF THE SALABARS, by Nina Brown Baker.
Mexico, a sacred jewel and two American Girl Scouts are an ideal combina-
tion for an entertaining story.
FOOTLIGHTS AFLOAT, by Rose B. Knox.
"Here comes the Showboat!" Come aboard the New Wonder and get ac-
quainted with the troupers and learn about show boat days on the Mississippi and
Ohio Rivers.
THE PHANTOM CODE, by Truman Northup.
POLLY TUCKER: MERCHANT, by Sara Pennoyer.


A GODDESS CONQUERED
THE ASCENT OF NANDA DEVI, by H. W. Tilman.
The mountain Nanda Dcvi situated in the Garhwal district of the Himalayas
north of Delhi is according to legend the refuge of a Hindu goddess. From her
lofty hiding place (altitude 25,645 ft.) the goddess looks down into a Sanctuary
surrounded by a fence of peaks none less than 19,000 ft. The author with a
group of four Americans and three other Englishmen climbed to the top in the
summer of 1936. Mr. Tilman tells a thrilling story of their climb through the
dangerous Rishi Gorge into the Sanctuary, then onto the snow covered mountain.
Photographs show the awesome difficulties of the climb as well as some magnifi-
cent vistas of the Himalayas.
FOR THE GOURMET
SERVE IT FORTH, by M. F. K. Fisher.
The pleasures of eating have been greatly appreciated ever since the cave
man cooked his first dinner. Each country has its favorite foods, in Ancient
Egypt it was melon with honey, in Rome it was fish with "garum", and in France
it is snails. As a child the author was present at a very special feast of snails
(prepared at home) about which she tells. Another occasion was dinner for
Cesar who usually preferred to dine with men only. There are other chapters
on the habits of many people. If you live to eat read about the others who have
lived for the same purpose.
ILLUSTRATOR TURNS DIARIST
MY WAR WITH THE UNITED STATES, by Ludwig Bemelsman.
"In December 1914, I was sixteen years old and came to America" is the author's
introductory sentence. What follows is a translation of the German diary which
he kept during his service in the U. S. Army. His first experiences were with
the Field Hospital Unit encamped at Oswego, on Lake Ontario. Later he was
transferred to the Hospital for the Insane at Fort Porter, Buffalo, New York. He
has a fine sense of beauty, keen perception of the worthwhile and an excellent sense
of humor, the Story of the Elephant Cutlet being one of the best examples of the
latter.
ON GILBERT HEAD, by Elizabeth Etnier.
If you are not an island enthusiast and have not yet bought your island off
Maine you will want to dash off to do so after reading On Gilbert Head. It is a
very chatty diary of Stephen and Elizabeth who set out to renovate an old house
on an island off Popham.There is a feel for the beauties of Maine and the love
of the sea neatly blended.








ETHICS VS. CASH
THE CITADEL, by A. J. Cronin.
One learns from this book that the theory of medicine is vastly different from
the practice. Ignorance, opposition, suspicion and few thanks are the obstacles
which Dr. Andrew Manson meets in his career as portrayed by the author of The
Stars Look Down. From country doctor's assistant in Blaenelly in South Wales
to research worker on the Coal & Metalliferous Mines Fatigue Board in London
takes a longer stride than the miles would indicate for most men, but Manson's
paper on inhalation won him both an honors M. D. and a position on the board.
In this coveted position he spent his first six months doing research on the relative
values of a two-and-a-half-inch bandage in comparison to a three-inch bandage.
The craving for money makes Andrew forget his principles for a time but he even-
tually realizes his mistakes and attempts to rectify them.

A MODERN TROLLOPE
CATHEDRAL CLOSE, by Susan Goodyear.
A modern Anthony Trollope in a modern English cathedral town. Mrs. W.
R. Matthews the wife of the Dr. Matthews who succeeded Dr. Inge as dean of St.
Pauls, is the Trollope who writes so distinctly of the life in the close, among
the Close Family and of the surrounding City People, that many a cathedral
town claimed to be that Silbury of the story. But Silbury is no particular town
and perhaps it is just as well for it might be disconcerting to find old Canon
Carmichael in your midst. For it is he who has something on his mind, who is
perturbed when Anna Schmidt arrives to marry Roger Attwater. And how gos-
sip does start, rolling and piling up for the crash which doesn't come, or does
it? It's a good story, well told with characters who live, move, think and act.

OR FOR GRANDPARENTS AND AUNTS
FABLES FOR PARENTS, by Dorothy Canfield Fisher.
These are short stories of family relationships; little everyday perturbing situ-
ations dealing with children and home life. Although written over a period of
time their universality, their sincerity make them preeminently of 1937. They
may be read for fiction or for real help; they may seem a bit sentimental, but
they are built on such sound fundamental thought, love, and tenderness that they
are altogether fine.
CAPE COD PILOT, by Jeremiah Digges.
As successor or guidebook for Elizabeth Reynard's, The Narrow Land, Mr.
Digges with the assistance of the members of the Federal Writers Project has writ-
ten a book about the towns and people of Cape Cod. He gives road directions
to the towns as well as to various historical spots in and about the different towns.
For all its practical suggestions the book contains much native beauty and a great
deal of native humor in its anecdotes of the Cape Yankees and their ways.
EDUCATION OF HYMAN KAPLAN, by Leonard Q. Ross.
CONCORD RIVER: SELECTIONS FROM THE JOURNALS OF WIL-
LIAM BREWSTER.
THE MAKING OF A SCIENTIST, by Raymond L. Ditmars.
ROBERT BROWNING AND JULIA WEDGWOOD, ed. by Richard Cole.
SPY OVERHEAD, by Clinch Calkins.
NAPOLEON AND TALLEYRAND, by Emile Dard.
JAPANESE LADY IN EUROPE, by Haruko Ichikawa.
THE GOOD SOCIETY, by Walter Lippman.
LUCIFER AT LARGE, by C. John Cole.




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