Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00089
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: October 1937
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00089
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text




THE LIBRARY LAW N

Published monthly from October to June by
Hamilton Smith Library, of the Universit
of New Hampshire ; _
Entered as second-class matter October 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, New Hampshire, under the
act of August 24, 1912.

Vol. 13 OCTOBER, 1937 No. 1
POLAR KNIGHTS
40,000 AGAINST THE ARCTIC, by H. P. Smolka.
The northern border of Russia's vast territory has always been considered an
economic desert, a contention which the Soviets have undertaken to disprove. That
they have already been successful is shown in this book by a non-Soviet journalist
who toured the area with the consent and cooperation of the authorities. He found
an army of eager youth opening up the resources of a rich country, conquering
the hardships of polar life, and intent on "culture" at the same time. They talk
of the future in glowing terms; the long cold nights are pleasant when they have
the radio and Shakespeare; getting stuck in the mud is only a slight inconvenience
when paved streets are coming in five years. As for the practical achievements,
they can be seen in the mines, fisheries, vegetables grown under the summer sun,
hospitals, and many more accomplishments which prove that this is no romantic
dream. How much more the Soviets can do in this region remains to be seen,
but the experiment is fascinating to watch and of great import to the rest of
the world.
A NORWEGIAN SAGA
THE WIND FROM THE MOUNTAINS, by Trygve Gulbranssen.
In this story of Norway in the early years of the last century we have a por-
trayal of the deep, mysterious character of the northern people. The novel deals
with the elementary principles of life which motivate men and women and pro-
duce sympathy or estrangement. In the case of Young Dag and his wife Ade-
laide their happiness turns cold, but after years of loneliness they recover it through
the searching of Old Dag for a better way of life. The quality of the northern
landscape is very strongly presented. This is a sequel to Beyond Sing the Woods,
but may be read independently.
THE MASTER SPEAKS
DINE AT HOME WITH RECTOR, by George Rector.
Here is a new kind of cookbook, served up with a spicy sauce of humor,
reminiscence, and folklore, which makes it good reading whether you cook or
not. Though it purports to be "a book on what men like," it has no less in-
terest for women; and although some of the recipes are impractical for the aver-
age cook, others can be tried in any kitchenette. There are many hints on the
fundamentals such as tea, coffee, pastry, eggs, and salads.
IN THE WHITE HILLS
NEW HAMPSHIRE NEIGHBORS, by Cornelius Weygandt.
Some years ago Dr. Weygandt lost his heart to the White Mountains and as
a result we had a delightful book The White Hills. Now he has written a col-
lection of stories about his neighbors and the neighborhood of his New Hampshire
home. Although he is more concerned in this book with the present than with
earlier days and ways, he has the same appreciation of the simple things which
enrich life, and a quiet sense of humour.


,. 34 W be. t V







THE RISE OF SAN FRANCISCO
RALSTON'S RING, by George D. Lyman.
In 1859, with the discovery of the rich Comstock Lode in Western Nevada,
there came a sudden rise in California's fortunes. This book is the story of the
result of this discovery and of the financial life of William Chapman Ralston, the
financial genius of the day. Ralston's life's ambition was to make San Francisco
the capitol city of the West. He succeeded in this to a great degree by pouring
into the city the benefits accrued from the mines on the Comstock Lode. Among
other things, he built harbors, theatres, hotels, and industries of all kinds. He
was the ruler of the Bank of California and, therefore, had access to huge sums.
His unsuccessful battle with Adolph Sutro, the fabulous sums of money won and
lost by speculators on the market, the stories of the parties held at Ralston's villa
at Belmont are all fascinating reading.

POET AND ROGUE
THE BRIEF HOUR OF FRANCOIS VILLON, by John Erskine.
Brief as was Francois Villon's life, he made the most of it in leaving for
posterity his exquisitely polished verse. In the setting of a living medieval Paris,
Professor Erskine tells us of the life and adventures of Villon who, possessed
of keen intellect and a witty tongue, found Fate very unkind to him. After sev-
everal youthful escapades, the worst of which was participating in the robbery of
the College of Navarre, he found his true love in Louise de Grigny, daughter
of a nobleman; because of Louise, he shunned his former companions and wished to
lead an honest life. This he was unable to do-his early mistakes pursued him
relentlessly. Unfortunately Louise died and left Francois feeling very empty,
his spirit worn out by excesses and suffering. At the end of the story, the author
deviates into pure fiction by making Francois live to an old age with his young
daughter in the small town of Saint-Maixent.

GREEN HILLS OF IRELAND
THE NEED WE HAVE, by A. Hamilton Gibbs.
"You, knowing nothing and seeing the big smiling man at the doorstep and
the family about to welcome him, would have nodded to yourself and said, 'Vil-
lage life, eh? The work of the day done and a neighborly visit between friends!
Fine it is to see such faith in the home'. That's what you might have muttered
to yourself all glowing within and you knowing nothing. So there was Tim
Sheahan with a grin on his face . 'Glory be to God . 'tis the pleasant picture
you all make and me standing here' ". How should you be after knowing from this
the great need of Moira and why should she be after driving off to the sea with
Dinny without so much as a word to Jim O'Hara? And sure lucky it was for all
of them the doctor was after letting them in. 'Tis a fine Irish story you'll be
after finding now.

OUT FROM LONDON
VICTORIA FOUR-THIRTY, by Cecil Roberts.
Roberts has done a rather unique piece of writing, putting thirteen novelettes
into one. His device, the 4:30 train for Dover out of Victoria Station is a per-
fectly plausible medium for bringing together a bride and groom, a Catholic nun,
a Turkish gentleman, a Greek restaurant keeper, a German movie star, a child
and several middle class English people. On the train to Vienna these people
meet, later to go their own ways to their ultimate destinies. The characters have
individuality and vitality. There is no central plot but as a section from life
the book is most satisfying.








PEACE AND WAR-A CONTRAST
LIFE AND DEATH IN A SPANISH TOWN, by Elliot Paul.
For many centuries the town of Santa Eulalie went its drowsy and peaceful
way, its quiet communal life undisturbed by outside political upheavals. In July
1936 rumors of war began to drift in to rouse the sleepy population; then came
swift death and destruction in the form of Fascist airplanes sweeping down from
the sky with their devastating bombs. Against the colorful background of this
island town, made up of Spanish, Italians and Moors, the author shows scenes
of death, fear and suspense resulting from the horrors of civil war as contrasted
to the idyllic life the town's population had come to accept as its permanent lot.
More than half of this book, the product of a man who is essentially a poet, is con-
cerned with life as it was before the outbreak of hostilities.
AN AGE GONE BY
THE HORSE AND BUGGY AGE IN NEW ENGLAND, by E. V. Mitchell.
Long before Detroit was the center of motor car manufacturing, Concord,
N. H. was the center for the building of horse drawn vehicles. During the "horse
and buggy age" Concord distributed to New England and the world the latest
thing in carriages. Harness came from Connecticut, and horses-Morgan horses
-from Vermont. New Englanders disregarded the old saying and put the car-
riage before the horse, so that his equipment would be appropriate to his sta-
tion in life. Perhaps this swift-moving generation is not well acquainted with
the cabriolet and all it stood for, but it will appreciate the chapters on sleighing,
horse-racing, rearing fire horses and the horse thief rings.
A DAUGHTER OF AESCULAPIUS
A WOMAN SURGEON, by Rosalie Slaughter Morton.
The approved career for Southern belles in 1893 was that of matrimony. Con-
sequently, young Rosalie Slaughter's decision to become a doctor met with shock-
ed disapproval and opposition, which she refused to heed. Few doctors can re-
cord a fuller, more varied life than Dr. Morton's. Her meetings with Tolstoi
and Ibsen, her summer in Labrador and her experiences on the Salonica Front
are especially interesting. Serbia's heroic part in the World War is a phase about
which we have heard comparatively little. Few can read of the tragic retreat
of the young boys without being intensely moved. After the War, Dr. Morton
was instrumental in having sixty Servian students educated at various univer-
sities throughout the United States and she mothered them all. She now lives in
Florida and devotes much of her time to the study of arthritis.
NIGHT THOUGHTS IN ARIZONA
MIDNIGHT ON THE DESERT, by J. B. Priestley.
"The hut was in a little thicket. The sand between the curled dead leaves
glittered in the light of my torch." What a setting for a crime! The deed is not
alarming, for it is Mr. Priestley burning up papers and some chapters of a book
which he had been writing during his stay on a ranch in Arizona. The hour,
the place and his occupation set up a stream of reflections and observations which
we have in these essays: Hollywood, honorary degrees, political America, Ari-
zona and the Grand Canyon-to name a few.
AMERICAN FAMILY LIFE
THE WOODROW WILSONS, by Eleanor Wilson McAdoo.
The youngest daughter of Woodrow Wilson begins the family chronicle with
her earliest memories and ends it with the death of her mother. Volumes have
been written about Wilson and his political life, so it is refreshing to glimpse him
by his own fireside reading Keats and Browning to his family, or escaping from
affairs of state to spend a week-end with them in Cornish, New Hampshire. The
mutual love and trust shared by the family pervades the atmosphere of the book.







CLIMBING THE SOCIAL LADDER
THE SAGA OF AMERICAN SOCIETY, by Dixon Wecter.
This record of 300 years of social climbing contains many revelations of how
it is done. The struggle to reach the top of the ladder has been going on since
the landing of the Mayflower, whose passengers were almost entirely drawn from
the middle and lower classes, as were practically all the other permanent settlers
of America. This is a gossipy book but an informing one, and although he
gives the "lowdown" on our social leaders the author still appreciates their con-
tribution to the cultural background of the country.

ROYALTY AT ITS WORST
AND SO-VICTORIA, by Vaughan Wilkins.
That this book is now leading the nation's list of best-sellers is doubtless due
to the publisher's vigorous advertising campaign. It purports to be first-class
historical fiction revolving around the- corrupt and- debauched royal family of
England in the period just preceding the reign of Victoria. We should be in-
clined to label it as melodramatic and romantic nonsense under the guise of
history; however, we do admit that it is a highly entertaining story.

RAILS CONQUER
RAILROAD WEST, by Cornelia Meigs.
The author has taken the heart of this novel from an engineer's record; con-
sequently, it reads more like history or biography than fiction. There is ro-
mance, however, in the story of young Philip Fox who goes west to help push
the Northern Pacific Railway through from Minnesota to the Rockies; there is
even more romance in the story of the railway itself. It is pushed through swamp,
quicksand, forest, over prairie, rushing torrents and dry river beds and into the
heart of the Indian country slowly and surely despite financial panic, profiteering,
grave engineering problems, Indian raids and labor troubles.

LOUISA MAY'S FATHER
PEDLAR'S PROGRESS, by Odell Shepard.
This is an authoritative biography of another New Englander, Bronson Al-
cott. Really a biography of intellect, it is based largely on Alcott's journals, of
fifty volumes, in which were recorded not only his doing but his thoughts, includ-
ing many of his educational ideas and philosophies. It is a faithful record of
the "most refined and advanced soul we have had in New England".

CONVERSATION AT MIDNIGHT, by Edna St. Vincent Millay.
Miss Millay definitely departs from her long successful practice of using only
the lyric as a form of expression. She apparently could not resist trying her hand
at the most popular subjects of the day: fascism, communism, war and politics.
Definitely not the poet at her best, but worthy of attention.
MASSACHUSETTS: A GUIDE TO ITS PLACES AND PEOPLE, Federal
Writer's Project.
BULWARK OF THE REPUBLIC: A BIOGRAPHY OF THE CONSTI-
TUTION, by Burton J. Hendrick.
WHIRLPOOL, by David Lamson.
THE THIRD REICH, by Henri Lichtenberger.
JOAQUIN MILLER LITERARY FRONTIERSMAN, by M. S. Peterson.
THE GUGGENHEIMS, by Harvey O'Connor.
CHILDREN OF STRANGERS, by Lyle Saxon.




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