Title: Library lantern
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089423/00085
 Material Information
Title: Library lantern
Physical Description: 17 v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of New Hampshire -- Library
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Durham N.H
Publication Date: March 1937
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-17, no. 9; Dec. 1, 1925-June 1942.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 1 consist of 7 numbers (Dec. 1, 1925-June 1926); issued monthly (Oct. to June) Oct. 1926-June 1942.
General Note: Autographed from type-written copy on one side of leaf only.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089423
Volume ID: VID00085
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20901192
lccn - 29020402

Full Text





THE LIBRARY LA R

Published monthly from October to June by
Hamilton Smith Library, of the Universit
of New Hampshire
Entered as second-class matter Octhoer 10, 1927, at the post office at Durham, P'ew e, ta er*
act of August 24, 1912.

Vol. 12 MARCH, 1937 No. 6

CAVALCADE
THE HUNDRED YEARS, by Phillip Guedalla.
The world of today was largely made in the century since Queen Victoria
ascended the throne. The author, looking back over these hundred years, has
attempted "to describe the leading moments of the century as they affected the
leading units of the Western world." He has done this in brilliant, dramatic, and
often poetic fashion, giving a series of vivid pictures of people and events of which
the reader can almost imagine himself an eye-witness: Queen Victoria in her
dressing gown and slippers receiving the news of her accession to the throne; the
Germans occupying Versailles in 1871 ; Kaiser \Vilheln II, 'problem-child,' annoy-
ing everybody in Tangier: the signing of the treaty of Versailles in 1919. The
United States in 1837: "Would the depression never end?" And ironically the
question recurs nearly a hundred years later. The book is not a series of dis-
connected incidents, for the unifying thread of future significance runs through
them all.
SUCH STUFF AS DREAMS ARE MADE OF
TIHE DECLINE AND FALL OF THE ROMANTIC IDEAL, by F. L. Lucas.
A brilliant exposition of romanticism by an author who is an avowed ro-
manticist and who writes from an extensive knowledge of the world's literature.
Romanticism he concludes to be "a liberation of the less conscious levels of the
mind", an escape, if we like, but necessary to the healthy mind because it means
more abundant living. Romanticism is dreaming, yearning for the remote, in-
toxication, while "the world of Classicism is . wide awake and strictly sober."
Romanticism has its diseases: it has engendered sadism, narcissism, and preoccu-
pation with many other morbid ideas. In a chapter on "Criticism in an unromantic
age" Mr. Lucas avers his belief in the connection between ethics and esthetics;
because modern poets and their critics do not observe this connection, they have
lost an audience. The final chapter deals with a trip to Iceland, and comments
on the Icelandic sagas, with the beauty and nobility of their romantic realism.

LITERARY TRIVIA
STREAMLINES, by Christopher Morley.
Authors, food, wine, words, books of all kinds, and people who have anything
to do with them are some of the subjects about which Morley writes in this col-
lection of essays. Most interesting are his observations about authors; Don Mar-
quis, Walt Whitman, Keats, Mark Twain and 0. Henry. Most of the essays are
deeply flavored with the usual amount of sophisticated humor, shrewdness and
common sense which one has come to look for in any of Christopher Morley's
writings. In additions to the essays, there are a few verses called Translations
from the Chinese, some of which are new and others which have appeared before
in the Saturday Review of Literature or elsewhere.
. a*5$o nr '91







MOTHER INDIA TODAY
LANCER AT LARGE, by Francis Yeats-Brown.
The size, fertility and diversity of India are such that it is almost an impossi-
bility to discuss its problems minutely; however, probably few persons are better
fitted to write about India than Yeats-Brown of Bengal Lancers fame. He re-
members India as it was, sees it as it is now, and writes of the changes and the
lack of changes in the social, economic and political conditions. The author traveled
from Dehli, south to Buddha's country, then to the Great Fair, the Ardh-Kumbh
Mela, at Allahabad, to Calcutta, and so clockwise around India. His description
of the fair is particularly vidid-over two million spectators, fakirs, the colorful
ceremonial parade in which priests, ascetics, women yogis, elephants and camels
take part. The author is very much interested in Yoga, and imparts much in-
formation concerning the practice.

DON'T LET IT WORRY YOU
HOW TO WORRY SUCCESSFULLY, by David Seabury.
"We meet experience in one of these two states of mind: confused brooding,
or calm calculation." The author shows us the morass of panic and indecision
into which the former leads us and suggests sound, common sense methods of
achieving the latter state. "ln dealing with trouble never forget this simple rule:
KEEP IN ACTION. The most dangerous form of worry is to sink into despond-
ency." Mr. Seabury is the founder of the Centralist School of psychology. He is
the author of several books along this line and is a popular lecturer.

YELLOW COMMUNITY
CANARY: THE HISTORY OF A FAMILY, by Gustav Eckstein.
This absorbing book is a modified log of the activities of the canaries living
in Dr. Eckstein's laboratory over a period of eleven years. In order that the
birds might be as natural as possible, they were not encouraged to become pets.
Consequently, their owner watched with increasing amazement and delight the
loves, hates, petty jealousies, parental cares and additional phases of canary life.
Father, Mother, Candy, Hinge, Puck and the other members of the little com-
munity developed as many characteristics as your next door neighbor, some
lovable, some otherwise. We wish a few photographs of the birds had been
included in the book.

SLIGHTLY NOSTALGIC
NOT UNDER FORTY, by Willa Cather.
A collection of six "sketches." which are not supposed to interest readers
under forty. With due respect to Miss Cather, we feel that she should have
lowered the age bar. The first essay recounts a chance meeting between Miss
Cather and Flaubert's niece, the Caroline to whom he wrote so many letters. The
Novel Denieuble is a protest against the too-detailed novels of our day. We enjoy
the intimate glimpses of Sarah Orne Jewett and Mrs. James T. Fields. In Joseph
.And His Brothers Miss Cather gives us an appreciation of Thomas Mann's latest
work. The last sketch is of Katherine Mansfield as she appeared to a chance ac-
quaintance.
THE STORY OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES, by John Kieran.
A much needed book which contains factual material in readable form. There
is a short account of Greek Olympics from legendary days to the first modern
Olympic, 1896, in Athens. From 1896 to 1936, there is a descriptive account
of each meet; a table of winners of all events for each Olympic; a table of winners
for each contest for all Olympics and a discussion of any controversies and diffi-
culties.








THE RISE AND FALL OF A FORTUNE
.SAND CASTLE, by Janet Beith.
In 1889 Lancashire was the home of a growing industry, and wise men fore-
saw in cotton a means to power and fortune. One of thees was Charles Appleby,
who invited into his mill two callow Scottish boys, David and Alan Stewart. The
novel covers a span of forty years and the fortunes of the two boys and their patron.
The author has done a fine piece of character portrayal, both in the chief char-
acters and the minor ones, all of whom are as real as flesh and blood can be. The
industrial history of the period is merely the background against which the drama
of character is played.

THE HOWS AND WHYS OF HOUSES
HOUSES IN AMERICA, by Ethel Fay Robinson and Thomas P. Robinson.
The authors trace the influence of the early Spanish, English, French, Dutch,
Swedish and German Colonists upon the architecture of our country. They tell
of attics, chimneys, "secret chambers," roofs, ells, doorways and bake ovens. We
learn about some of the first men to be called architects and of various building
materials and their combinations. The book was written with young people in
mind, but this does not detract from its interest and the illustrations are unusually
fine.

ART AND ITS APPRECIATION
HISTORY OF ART CRITICISM, by Lionello Venturi.
Is there only one correct appraisal of a work of art as Venturi says? If so,
which is the true one and why? Venturi has traced centuries of art criticism from
before Christ, in Greece, through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque,
to the present. These criticisms are by men contemporary with the various art
periods. Through this means Venturi has attempted to "relive both the historical
facts of art and aesthetic ideas at the same time, as if the historical facts and
aesthetic ideas were one and the same thing". Only thus can a true conception
of art be reached. Good bibliography.
THE PAINTINGS OF REMBRANDT, by A. Bredius.
An immensely satisfactory collection of sepia reproductions of Rebrandt's
paintings; only those of unquestionable authenticity are included. They are ar-
ranged by subject with brief explanatory notes at the end of the book. There
is an index of collections represented and a chronology of Rembrandt's career.
The short, somewhat biographical, introduction is more particularly a simple dis-
cussion of the phases of his art. Although containing no real subject matter, there
is sufficient information for an introductory study of Rembrandt, and the book
book makes an excellent supplementary volume for more learned texts.
THE CHINESE EYE, by Chiang Yee.
A very interesting and entertaining interpretation for the Western world of
Chinese painting and its background by a Chinese artist and scientist. Previous
books have been written on the subject by learned Westerners with less success.
The author emphasizes the necessity for an understanding of the vast differences
in the psychology, customs and taste of Eastern and Western civilizations before
an attempt is made at comparison of the art of the two.

OCTOBER FARM: from the Concord journals and diaries of William Brewster.
There is no doubt but that William Brewster used the English language with
rare mastery and dignity; as an ornithologist he was outstanding. The true bird
lover should appreciate this book.








THE CIVIL WAR IN SPAIN
TIE SPANISH TRADE ( Y, by E. A. Peers.
This book is essentially a narrative of the political situation in Spain during the
six and .one-half years preceding the outbreak of the Civil War, and serves as a
background for better understanding the present bloody situation. Beginning with
the fall of Primo de Rivera and his dictatorship, it traces the rise and fall in
popularity of the Republic. narrates the growing unrest culminating in minor
uprisings and revolutions, the deposition of President Alcala Zamora, and brings
the political front to August 1936.
BEHIND THE SPIANISH BAIRRIC.ADES, by John Langdon-Davies.
One of the first books dealing with actual experiences and facts of the Civil
War to appear, this is, despite the obvious haste with which it was prepared, "an
exciting and extremely valuable document . giving the best picture now available
of what is going on in Spain-especially Catalonia-and fi.:l nf things to make
the newspaper reader weigh the headlines more carefully than liir'tof)i:r." Frankly
biased in favor of the loyalists.

INVASIOAN, by M, -a.re--c vanl dcr Mersch.
ADVENTURES IN ERR(OR, by Viljalnur Stefansson.
THE JOURNALS OF BRAND WHITLOCK, ed. by Allan Nevins.
THE HILL COUNTRY OF NORTHERN NE'W ENGLAND; its social and
economic history 1790-1930, by Harold F. Wilson.
WILLIAM HOLMES McG'UFFEY AND HIS READERS. by HI. C. Mimnich.

FOR THE CHILDREN
LET THE CHILD DRAW, by Van Dearing Perrine.
A plea to every parent with a scribbling child. Mr. I'errine has obtained
amazing results by adhering to his principle of refusing to criticize a child's work
negatively.
THE GOLIEN BASKET, by Ludwzig Bemehnans.
"THE GOLDEN BASKET" is a hotel in Bruges. Mr. Coggeshall and his
two lively daughters stay there on a visit to the old Belgian town.
IN CALICO AND CRINOLINE, by Eleanor Sickels.
Slightly fictionized stories of American women in the changing years from
1608 to 1865. Among them we meet Anne Hutchinson, Lydia Darrach, Ruth
Wyllys and Sister Marie-Madeleine Hachard.
A BOOK OF FAMOUS DOGS, by Albert Payson Tcrhunne.
A treasury of dog stories, real dogs, from Alchibiades' faithful friend to Mr.
Terhune's own dogs.
BORIS, GRANDSON OF BALDY. by Esther Birdsall Darling.
Remember "Baldy of Nome?" Boris proves himself worthy of his illustrious
ancestor with a rescue-dash to Siberia for good measure.
GREEN GROWS THE GARDEN, by Margery Bianco.
Vegetable, herb and dish gardens, even wild flowers are discussed in this
chatty little book about gardens. Just the book for this season.
BACK TO TREASURE ISLAND, by H. A. Calahan.
No matter how loyal you are to R. L. S. and Treasure Island, you will find
that Mr. Calahan has acquitted himself well in writing this sequel.
DRUMS IN THE FOREST, by Allan Dwight.
Quebec in 1686. Denis de Lornay finds the life of a young "voyageur" packed
with adventure and excitement.




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